Communes

American Communism

A million hippie kids shaped modern America by trying to escape it.

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We Are As Gods: Back to the Land in the 1970s on the Quest for a New America, by Kate Daloz, PublicAffairs, 355 pages, $26.99

Public Affairs

In 1971, a young man named Bernie Sanders visited Myrtle Hill Farm, a rural Vermont commune for disaffected white middle-class kids. Its residents' back-to-the-land lifestyle was meant to free them from a culture that had come, in the midst of war and racial unrest, to seem "an unstoppable torrent of death and destruction, all for no reason."

Myrtle Hill had an all-are-welcome policy—for three days. Then the core owners would decide by consensus whether you were cool to hang around. Sanders' tendency to just sit around talking politics and avoid actual physical labor got him the boot.

That's just one of the stories in Kate Daloz's We Are As Gods, a loving but honest history of hippie communes in Vermont in the 1970s. Daloz has the journalist's gift for getting people to explain themselves, the historian's ability to explain the context in which they made their choices, and the novelist's power for revealing character through action, plot, and the perfectly chosen detail. While she focuses on a small group of communal and quasi-communal rural homesteads within a few miles of each other in Vermont—one of which housed her parents, Judy and Larry—Daloz explains that her characters represented a large and unprecedented cultural and demographic shift.

The decision to build a saner, purer way of life away from urban civilization and private property was "being made almost simultaneously by thousands of other young people all across the country at the same moment for almost the same reason," she writes. No other point in American history, Daloz says, saw so much deurbanization, with as many as a million young Americans going back to the land. Almost all of them, she notes, were from middle-class white backgrounds; most were well-educated, with no fear that they couldn't make their way quite well in normal society. This gave them a safety net "that made such radical choices possible."

Their motive was liberty—the freedom to control their own environment, education, technology, diet, productivity. (To the significant number of draft dodgers and teen runaways involved, their very liberty to live free of violence was at stake.) But though this is not Daloz's central point, her fine-grained narrative shows that being free of the technologies and wealth thrown off by the national and international division of labor carried with it its own tyranny.

Many of these young communalists believed their world was doomed, whether through nuclear war, fascistic repression, or ecological megadeath. Learning how to live off the land, then, was about survival itself, not just ideological self-satisfaction. One of this book's main characters was driven to rural Vermont by the realization that if the industrial civilization that was all he knew broke down, he'd "just fucking die. You'd just stand there and die." He felt it his duty to thrive off only the soil, water, and animals on his property with techniques that didn't require energy or fuel from the outside world.

But as everyone in We Are As Gods soon learned, a small group of human beings pitted against nature were at a far greater disadvantage than they dreamed. Despite the valorization of Stewart Brand's Whole Earth Catalog and its ethos of learning to master the tools and technologies of self-sufficient living, far too many people attracted to the movement knew—as Robert Houriet, one of the original chroniclers of the scene, put it—all about the Tarot but nothing about how to fix a pump.

Myrtle Hill outlasted the vast majority of similar communes that arose at the same time. Its rise and fall, from 1970 to the mid-'80s, is the spine of the book's narrative. (Daloz notes that groups with a unified and specific religious or sociological goal tended to last longer than ones with the pure, groovy "let's hang out and be free together" attitude of Myrtle Hill.)

One of the original Myrtle Hill couples, Fletcher and Nancy, had already lived at what might be the original weird arty hippie commune of the era, Colorado's Drop City, whose open-door policy quickly led it to druggy, decadent decay while helping to popularize the idea of jury-rigged geodesic domes as good hippie living. Fletcher and Nancy hoped that non-rat-race life in rural Vermont would give them plenty of time to pursue their interests in filmmaking and painting. It didn't work out that way.

The lives of the Myrtle Hill gang become intertwined with a smaller communal grouping of two couples in a nearby farmhouse dubbed Entropy Acres. The latter's troubles were many and varied. To start with, since one of the couples held the actual deed to the property, the other couple often felt powerless. The couples also dueled over the propriety of eating meat. Fully committed to a "no modern conveniences" ethic, they tried to farm for money using no machine power. The task was incredibly hard and remarkably unlucrative. Their early attempt to pump organic carrots into the national supermarket system grossed $3,000 for 18,000 pounds of carrots; each individual vegetable had been touched by human hands at least four times and their cultivation worked five adults all day every day for months.

When the Entropy Acres couples tried to re-enter the cash-for-labor economy by seeking jobs as county school bus drivers, they became poster children for the often tense relationship with the townies, who rejected them because it was rumored (correctly) that they grew a little pot on their homestead.

While most of the story takes place in Vermont, a few of her characters understandably didn't want to suffer through Northeast winters without sufficient warm shelter, so they hit the road to survey, and thus help Daloz's readers survey, the burgeoning communal scene across the country.

In one fascinating chapter, we see another example of a commune rubbing against its noncommunal neighbors the wrong way. In a California commune called Morningstar, landowner Lou Gottlieb, formerly a popular folksinger with the Limeliters, declared that "shitting in the garden…is a spiritual act, as well as a constitutional right." He tried to create a legal workaround by signing over legal ownership of the land to "God," but the plan failed. His gang of neighbor-aggravating hippies were condemned as public enemies by Gov. Ronald Reagan and most of the makeshift structures were bulldozed by the authorities.

Daloz's reporting displays the full range of communal experience. There was free love, and sometimes there was jealousy. There was self-sufficiency, and sometimes there was no way to keep warm. There were canvas tents for shelter, and sometimes there were icicles hanging from the inner ceiling that could take your eye out. (And if you were sheltering your cow in such a tent, and the snow settled too heavy, there were a collapsed tent and a dead cow.) There was tobogganing through the snow with your loving comrades, drunk on your homemade dandelion wine; and then there was spreading meningitis and staph to each other. There was the joy of building a self-contained toilet system, and then the relief of putting out a fire in that toilet without burning down your whole dome.

There were children being raised by a village, and there were parents getting tense and angry when another adult tried to discipline their kid. There was talk of total equality, and there was the reality that the women were cooking, cleaning, and minding the children while men got high around the fire and made big plans. There was the glorious freedom of disconnection from the corporate death culture, and there was the endless drudgery required to eat and be anything close to comfortable.

The final blow that shattered the Myrtle Hill experiment came courtesy of the expanded drug war in the Reagan '80s. Jed, one of the early Myrtle Hill residents, took to growing lots of marijuana. He protected that pot with lots of guns and fences on what was supposed to be group land, and became consumed by a raging paranoia that destroyed any sense of communal togetherness, fun, or eventually even safety. (Though Daloz does not seem to have interviewed Jed himself, one of her central characters, Myrtle Hill's mainstay matriarch Lorraine, also briefly dabbled in pot growing on the property. Lorraine said her motive was needing cash to pay taxes.)

When Jed got busted, the Myrtle Hill crew needed a lot of expensive legal help and political pull to avoid having their land seized by the feds. Craig, Myrtle Hill's original source of cash, was proud of the "communal land trust" legal structure in which the full-timers (each of whom had been chosen by consensus) took turns making the monthly mortgage payments. Eventually, a legal entity controlled by all of them owned the land.

But even before Jed's bust, some of the folks who had put tons of sweat equity into improving the land and the houses on it realized they were trapped unless they were willing to abandon the homes they'd built. A normal American landowner could make money by selling her property if she wanted to leave. That wasn't possible under Myrtle Hill's communal structure, which sucked for those who felt terrorized by the erratic Jed.

After the trauma of his arrest, the communards managed to agree to split ownership into a more standard personal model for the 20 acres surrounding each individual home. Three of the group continued to own the remaining unoccupied land communally for a few years. Then their "spouses called a reality check" on paying taxes on land they didn't use, and they sold it.

Daloz cares deeply for her characters—remember, two of them are her parents—and she is ultimately kind in her judgments about their successes and failures, their impact on themselves and America. But she is an honest enough reporter that not every reader will share her perspective. You may be charmed by a hippie romance that begins when the young lady sees that the young man keeps peanut butter smeared on his hat brim in case he gets hungry, or you may not. But Daloz's caring, detailed understanding of who these people are, why they did what they did, and the lessons they learned is skilled enough that it's hard not to become interested in seeing whether everything turns out well for them.

From this reader's perspective, it doesn't. The communalists' physical and emotional experiences seem harder than they needed to be. (Not that most of them didn't have a lot of edenic memories as well.) Lives far less ambitious and adventurous than the ones these colonists chose can also go wrong, so perhaps they ought not be uniquely faulted for their fecklessness. But it can't be denied that this is a story of people who were very mistaken in their assumptions about how their choices would work out for them.

For one thing, they often didn't realize that pre-industrial rural life was never so much self-sufficient as village-sufficient: It was idiotic to try to be your own grower, miller, baker, and blacksmith if it wasn't absolutely necessary. They also grossly underestimated how much richer, healthier, and more comfortable the divisions of labor found in industrial civilization make us.

Yet her characters did not completely eschew the market economy; because these communes were voluntary experiments with room for lots of trial and error, they were able to make some lasting contributions to American culture beyond an extended lesson in things not to do. Craig, one of Myrtle Hill's founders, recognized the need to get their groovy foodstuffs organized, sold, and transported. So he began the Loaves and Fishes trucking company, which helped forge a national network among food co-ops for those who wanted homemade cheeses and granolas and exotic spices such as cumin that had previously been very hard to find in the U.S.

Such hot modern brands as Celestial Seasonings, Burt's Bees, Tom's of Maine, Stonyfield Yogurt, and Cascadian Farms Organic all arose from the setting Daloz chronicles. As she notes in her conclusion, "every last leaf and crumb of today's $39 billion organic food industry owes its existence" to the 1970s hippie commune scene. America's diet would be far less varied and interesting without them.

Meanwhile, as Daloz notes, "every YouTube DIY tutorial, user review, and open-source code owes something to the Whole Earth Catalog," the periodical that energized the movement and spawned the epigram ("We are as gods and might as well get good at it") from which the title of Daloz's book is taken.

In her brief but entertaining survey of earlier waves of voluntary rural communism, Daloz quotes Louisa May Alcott, who grew up on a commune called Fruitlands. Though she lived a century before Myrtle Hill came into being, Alcott could have been summarizing Daloz's own spirit of clear-eyed admiration tinged with admonition when she noted that "to live for one's principles, at all costs, is a dangerous speculation; and the failure of an ideal, no matter how humane and noble, is harder for the world to forgive and forget than bank robbery or the grand swindles of corrupt politicians." Daloz helps us forgive, but not forget.

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249 responses to “American Communism

  1. “Sanders’ tendency to just sit around talking politics and avoid actual physical labor got him the boot.”

    Not surprised in the least.

    1. It really tells you everything you need to know, sanders was so lazy he got kicked out of a hippie commune.

      1. For not working and contributing to society. Hmmm…

        1. Hey man,like,thinking and making rules for my comrades is hard work.

          1. That’s what Stalin said.

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            2. Stalin had a better hair stylist.

            3. So Bernie was stallin’ the whole time?

              1. No, Clinton is Stalin, Bernie is Trotsky.

    2. Perhaps if he’d spent more than 3 days amidst a conglomeration of dirty smelly hippies doing actual physical labor he’d have had his eyes opened, so to speak, as to why it’s desirable for a society to produce 23 kinds of deodorant.

    3. Israeli kibbutzim had similar problems. Free riders are fairly endemic to socialized systems of any kind.

      1. But socialism in America CAN be made to work, ’cause we’re ‘Mericans! We Be Special!!!!

        (Just elect Top Men, Experts, and all will be well… Free shit all around!)

        1. This Pilgrims tried all this shit. It didn’t work. Case closed.

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    2. Well you can’t, because your a penniless hippy!

  2. the expanded drug war in the Reagan ’80s

    Which also ruined millions of lives outside communes. I know Reagan is a demi-god to many of the Peanuts here but he was emblematic of how evil government can be.

    1. Fuck off, turd.

      1. While I usually disagree with the speaker, I don’t disagree with what he’s saying right now.

    2. Reagan created the monstrous government we have today by countering the ‘tax and spend’ Democrats with the ‘borrow and spend’ Republicans.
      He does not deserve all the honors heaped on him.

      1. This, a million times over

      2. True, he started or rode the wave of a trend. Previously the Democrats had always been the ones to hike spending, & then for the Republicans to be “fiscally responsible” by raising taxes. But then the Republicans wondered why they should be the suckers, & became borrow-&-spenders.

        1. In other words, the consensus of the voting public is to spend more. Their only real point of disagreement is how to finance the spending.

          1. And, even more importantly, keebs, is to whom and what that spending goes.

      3. Congress was solidly held by Democrats throughout Reagan’s Presidency. The man probably should have been more prodigious in his use of the veto power but he didn’t set fiscal policy, Congress did. The more important point is not that Reagan is or isn’t deserving of honors. It is that Congress more than the President is responsible for the fiscal situation. Although he does deserve some credit for pushing to have the average American’s income tax burden lessened.

        Now, as to monetary policy, Reagan benefited from Volcker’s sound management of the Fed, but it was Carter who appointed Volcker. In his place, Reagan put Greenspan, a man who on paper knew what he was doing but in practice royally messed things up. Of course, Bush appointed Bernanke to replace Greenspan, and Obama appointed Yellen to replace Bernanke, and each has continued and expanded the ruinous policies their predecessors started.

        Stick to praise where it’s due, criticism where it’s due, and a sense of perspective.

        1. The man probably should have been more prodigious in his use of the veto power but he didn’t set fiscal policy, Congress did.

          I recall the Democrats having a PR show of declaring Reagan’s budgets “dead on arrival”.

        2. Stick to praise where it’s due, criticism where it’s due, and a sense of perspective.

          Exactly. Reagan made the idea of smaller government respectable even if he didn’t implement it as well as he could have. Calling the USSR “the Evil Empire” and forcing them into an arms race that their pathetic economy couldn’t sustain helped bring it down. Had his successor not blown the “Peace Dividend” on social programs the budget would have balanced.

          Reagan’s greatest mistake was in accepting the support of the “Religious Right”. They were the inspiration for the wars on drugs and “perverts”. Goldwater despised Jerry Falwell and said that “all good Christians should kick Falwell in the ass”.

          When evaluating Reagan it’s important to realize just how out of tune he was with “real” Republicans like Nixon and Bush. Nixon implemented price controls by executive order and said that “we are all Keynesians now.” G H W Bush called Reagan’s relatively free market beliefs “voodoo economics”.

          1. Reagan made the idea of smaller government respectable even if he didn’t…

            …do a goddam thing to make it happen. And did the opposite.

            1. Indeed, if only he had had a pen, phone, and malleable congress ceding authority to him….

      4. He gets the credit for bringing down the Berlin Wall, deserved or not, and talking about smaller government. The WOD was actually started by Nixon, right? Reagan just doubled down on it and every president since has just maintained the status quo, including the light bringer who is well known for closing Gitmo.

        1. The “War On Drugs” was started back in the earliest part of the 20th Century. A good deal of it was a side effect of the Hubris that lead to the passage of Prohibition, and several key parts of it have, not totally unreasonably, been described as ‘total employment for out of work Prohibition agents’. I’m not excusing Nixon (a dreadful President) or Reagan, but the idiocy is a lot older than those administrations.

    3. I would rather have had Reagan than the Democrats’ choices, but he was no saint.

      The national debt had been declining since WW II, even during LBJ and Nixon’s terms. He doubled or tripled that. The common rationalization is that he spent the USSR into bankruptcy, but I say if he had actually believed Communism was incompetent and oomed to failure, he would have instead unleashed the American economy and done the job even sooner and with far less pain down the road.

      A remember very clearly a job I had in 1989, where co-workers were ecstatic to get a 21% mortgage. That is down entirely to Reagan after 8 years in office.

      He doubled down on wars on drugs and porn; so much for less government.

      I think Trump is going to be like Reagan. A false “small-government” mantra, sticking its nose into everybody’s private business, expanding the national debt, idiotic economic policies. tax cuts and spending increases. And the Democrats will react similarly with another set of stupid candidates.

      1. The national debt had been declining since WW II, even during LBJ and Nixon’s terms.

        False.

        Unless you believe Regan was the secret president in 1962. Still false even at that.

        1. I don’t know what goes into that chart, but I do know that every other graph I have seen shows a a steady decline. Google for “US national debt” and you will find any number of chrts like these two. Debt rises til after WW II, drops until Reagan, rises again.

          Here is just one example. There are zillions others like it.

          1. I didn’t give you a chart, I gave you a table from the US Treasury, the place everybody else makes their charts. If you can’t tell the difference, then I can’t help you.

          2. The decline was as a percentage of GDP, not in absolute dollars. In absolute dollar amounts the debt continued to increase after World War II.

            Basically, the debt was lowered by inflation, i.e. payments were made in cheaper dollars and holders of War Bonds and Savings Bonds were swindled.

            That doesn’t absolve Reagan of blame for increasing the debt, which was put forth by Congress and not vetoed, but it does show how governments swindle their citizens. Eventually, the US will do what every other major debtor nation has done – debase their currency just as the US did previously under Johnson, Nixon and Ford.

        2. Maybe your chart doesn’t adjust for inflation. The ones I looked at are all as percentage of GDP, not absolute dollar amounts.

          1. Exactly.

            1. Where is the adjustment turning 11% prime into 21% home loans, and the throngs who love them?

      2. co-workers were ecstatic to get a 21% mortgage

        I don’t know how true this statement is, given that I was seven at the time, but 21% sounds mathematically impossible to pay off. At my 3.5%, if I were not agressively paying down principle, a 30-year would cost more than three times the offer price on the house, possibly four times.

        1. There were two half thoughts in that statement.

          For argument lets go with a 50k mortage for simplicity’s sake. Throwing some numbers into a spreadsheet, I do find that it is possible to pay it off within the 30 years. But your interest payments start at $875/mo. I don’t know house prices in 1989, but $875 is still a lot these days (it’s more than my required mortgage payment).

        2. My first car loan, in 1981, was 19% and close to the prime rate at that time.

          1989 opened with prime at 11% and dropped rapidly throughout the year.

          But since this subthread doesn’t like facts, correct dates, or numbers, just skip it.

          1. My first car loan was 11% – because I had shit credit at the time. Now I could probably get a much better rate (but my car is paid off and not broken – so I don’t need to find out)

        3. I bought a house in 1977 and the rate was 9.25% variable tied to the prime with a 12% cap that I reached in 1981. A friend of mine was glad to get a 15% mortgage in 1981 or 1982. I got a 10% raise in 1979 and was furious because it didn’t keep up with inflation.

          As I remember it mortgage rates peaked at about 18% in the early 1980’s and have gone down ever since.

          There’s a limited amount of money available for housing. If interest rates go up then the price comes down, just like bonds. People don’t care how much of their payment goes to interest and how much goes to capital as long as they can afford to live in the house.

          Can the overall cost of housing outrun income? Yes, when the costs are subsidized transferring part of the cost to non home buyers (renters).

          There’s a lobbying war between construction companies and banks over which one will get the lion’s share of home purchasers money. However, they both agree that there should be more and bigger subsidies which is why you’ll never see the end of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

          1. I was pissed when I recieved my notice that my mortgage had been sold to Freddie Mac before my first payment was even due. Shortly thereafter my bank was already sending me adverts for refinancing – on a loan I still hadn’t made the first payment on.

            The system as it stands is just broken.

            1. I’ve had mine sold 2 times already in 6 years. Refinance letters once a week or so, which I disregard because the house is for sale.

      3. “I think Trump is going to be like Reagan. A false “small-government” mantra, sticking its nose into everybody’s private business, expanding the national debt, idiotic economic policies. tax cuts and spending increases.”

        Worst of all, the vast majority of voters still think that Republicans are actually laissez-faire small government types, so the failures of the Trump administration will be blamed on these things, even if his policies are full of economic and social interventionism.

        1. American banks are among the most regulated in the world yet every time there’s a problem it’s because of a lack of regulation.

          How regulated are American banks? There are over 100 nations whose banking systems are less regulated that the US. (part of the Cato Institute’s Economic Freedom rankings).

          Chuck Schumer’s philosophy of “regulation uber alles” is the dominant philosophy of congress. As Reagan put it:

          “Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”

      4. A remember very clearly a job I had in 1989, where co-workers were ecstatic to get a 21% mortgage. That is down entirely to Reagan after 8 years in office.

        UnCivilServant said it the nice way. I will say it this way. This is absolute bullshit. Prime was 11% at the beginning of 1989 and dropping fast. I gave another link to a page full of dates and numbers on this thread.

        Prime was much higher in 1981 than in 1989.

        1. I don’t give a crap what you think about the matter. I know what my co-workers were saying and doing to get mortgages at that time. Maybe it was a lousy time or location or set of co-workers, but that ws what they were talking about at that time.

          1. More importantly you don’t give a crap about facts.

            It is not about what you think are the facts scraped from the bowels of your imagination, it is about the real facts of history.

            Presidents have not gotten to spend less or more that what the Congress appropriated since the Ford administration. Not what I think, it is a fact of fiscal law.

            If your shady coworkers got their mortgages from loan sharks, that would explain every single thing you have said here.

            1. Wow, man, I don’t even have a dog in this fight, and I actually think Scarecrow might be misremembering, but your tone is so unnecessarily dickish that I’m immediately biased against your argument.

          2. No… It’s still bullshit. I bought my first (nice) stereo in 1988, and took out an unsecured buy here/pay here instant loan (no interest for six months) at the stereo store because I barely had a credit history (I only had a Sears card)- yet my interest rate was only 24.99%. (paid in full before the 6 months were over.)

            You are either “misremembering”, or your co-workers were literally the dumbest people on planet Earth.

            1. Fucking squirrels…

          3. Nope- still bullshit.

            I got my first apartment on my own in October 87. Bought a new stereo in June 88, and used an unsecured “in-store” loan from Beneficial Finance (no interest for 6 months!) to pay for it.

            My rate, as a 23 yr old whose only credit history was a Sears card and was working a barely over min wage job, got that (repeat) UNSECURED loan at 24.99%.

            Ain’t no fucking way there is anyone so dumb to pay that much for a loan that was secured by a lien on the property.

  3. “Their motive was liberty?the freedom to control their own environment, education, technology, diet, productivity.”

    And everyone elses

    1. I think the 2nd sentence came later, when the communes were gone and they had all went into politics.

  4. “Sunday’s charges relate to Choi’s alleged extortion, with the help of one of the presidential secretaries, An Chong-bum, of $70 million from 53 companies through a big business lobby group, the Federation of Korea Industries. The companies felt they had to donate the money or they would be at risk of audits or unfair treatment from government authorities, prosecutors said.
    The money was meant for two foundations, but Choi is alleged to have siphoned off much of it for her own personal use.”
    https://www.washingtonpost.com

    Can we get those prosecutors over here? We got a target-rich environment.

  5. ‘YOU DAMN DIRTY HIPPIES!!!’

  6. BTW, I always thought people stayed in congress so long BECAUSE they were to lazy to do any work.All the money,perks,inside information,the junkets. All you have to do is talk,Hell ,they have staffs to write the laws. [ Just sign here Sen. Byrd ].

  7. And,if your lucky enough to be the president you get a big pay check every year for life ,S.S. protection and wonderful speaking fees.

    1. Trumputin has already refused salary. I wonder if he’ll also refuse the pension.

  8. RE: How Hippie Communes Changed America

    Hippie communes, like other communes, did not live long. Eventually, the hippies went back to the establishment for a host of reasons. History has shown, whether it be the Owen Experiment in Indiana to the Israeli kibbutz to the hippie communes, people get tired of “sharing” and being told what to do by “the community.” Eventually, people on communes leave because they prefer privacy as opposed to “openness,” keeping their own wealth instead of “giving for the general good,” and host of other silly ideas that communism demands.

    1. That and it always turns into ‘Animal Farm’ . A book that should be read in all high schools along with ‘1984’.

      1. “Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded ? here and there, now and then ? are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.

        This is known as “bad luck.”

        Accurately describes every hippie farm or camp I’ve ever been to.

        1. Every day I come more and more to the conclusion that humans HAVE to be told what to do by a cadre of Top Men. Your average 100 IQ human is just incapable of getting it.

          1. I think that occasionally throughout history, due to some circumstances perhaps beyond our knowing, there is a period of enlightenment. Followed by a dark and brutal age of ignorance and savagery that is the norm of human existence. I fear that the last enlightenment ended in the 1700s and we’re in full swing towards the new dark age.

        2. Why We Left the Farm is one of the best things I was ever linked to by this commentariate.

          1. Oh, right, the last time this came up, I cleaned up that mess of a PDF and put it in this plaintext pastebin.

      2. My 12th grade English teacher had us watch the cartoon version of 1984, and we also read Anthem by Ayn Rand. I was too much of an angsty, edgy pothead in high school to ever pay much attention, but now that I look back, I think she may have been an undercover non-statist who was working to teach the students the principles of liberty. I should go apologize to her one of these days for being such a shithead in her class.

        1. Haha! When I was in HS Anthem was assigned reading for the 10th grade slow-learner English class.

      3. They’re not? We had both, in olden times.

    2. Not to mention the standard of living that specialization provides.

    3. Don’t forget the Pilgrims’ experiment with communism. All we are taught in public schools is the fake Thanksgiving story; this lesson would be much more useful.

      1. I was 35 years old when I first read that (thank you, internet) but after years of public school educational efforts on the subjects of Pilgrims I could make a construction paper Indian feather band like a champ.

        1. But what about your hand-shaped construction paper turkey?

        2. “…I could make a construction paper Indian feather band like a champ.”

          I don’t think you could get away with that sort of cultural appropriation today.

          1. Ha, the Story Hour program my daughter is in just made Indian feather headbands a few days ago. I was quite surprised.

    4. They were too lazy and unproductive to change society from the communes. Also, no normal people liked their ideas. So they quit the communes and went into politics so they could force other people to like their ideas.

  9. “and there was the reality that the women were cooking, cleaning, and minding the children while men got high around the fire and made big plans.”

    Also known as the good old days. MAGA.

    1. ‘Make me a sandwich.’ [ smacks her butt ]

      1. Blow in her face and she’ll follow you anywhere. Some if these ads are pretty bad.

        http://www.afternoonspecial.co…..ntage-ads/

        1. Pear Shape is not Cool.

          Well, it isn’t.

          1. Also, the whole “marketing household appliances to women is automatically sexist” thing irritates me.

            You always market to who uses the product most. Yes, women tend to cook more than men. So what? All gender roles are fine. Keeping up a household is easier when division of labor is invoked. Is it sexist to market lawnmowers primarily to men?

            1. Blatantly missing the point of some of the ads and turning them into Rorschach Tests is annoying too.

              Ok, I’m done.

            2. Oh come on, you know that sexism is something that only affects women.

              How many times have you seen some stupid op-ed piece that bemoans the lack of women in STEM fields? Now, I bet you’ve never seen an article pushing for more men as pre-school teachers, human relations specialists, or medical assistants.

        2. http://www.afternoonspecial.co…..age-ads/5/

          The good old days, indeed.

      2. Zap! You’re a sandwich.

        1. *chuckles* When I was a wee lad, Mama Maximus would say that to me every time I demanded asked her to make lunch for me.

    2. Metropolitan Amateur Golf Association?

  10. It was idiotic to try to be your own grower, miller, baker, and blacksmith if it wasn’t absolutely necessary. They also grossly underestimated how much richer, healthier, and more comfortable the divisions of labor found in industrial civilization make us.

    One of the criticisms of libertarianism that especially irritates me is the argument that if you’re against coerced association it must be the association part that bothers you and you just don’t appreciate how much you depend on other people. As if, if the government doesn’t do it it’s impossible for it to get done. We don’t depend on the government to supply our bread and yet voluntary cooperation somehow results in the complex coordination necessary to keep bread readily and efficiently and cheaply available – why would you assume the same couldn’t be done for everything else? It seems to me that the idea that if it weren’t for government we’d all be huddled shivering naked and hungry in a cave shows that same basic ignorance of how civilization works.

    Oh yeah, 16 dead, 50 wounded in monkey-related violence. The monkey pulled off one of the girls’ head scarf, leading men from the Awlad Suleiman tribe to retaliate by killing three people from the Gaddadfa tribe as well as the monkey….

    1. Ohh…shiny object.

    2. Remember, only the government can build the roads. You know this because people who’ve never built a single road in their lifes say it’s true.

      1. Well sure,with money from taxes and hiring private companies to do all the work

  11. You may be charmed by a hippie romance that begins when the young lady sees that the young man keeps peanut butter smeared on his hat brim in case he gets hungry, or you may not.

    I’m not.

  12. Sanders’ tendency to just sit around talking politics and avoid actual physical labor got him the boot.

    He didn’t contribute his FAIR SHARE?

    I haz a surprize.

  13. Daloz explains that her characters represented a large and unprecedented cultural and demographic shift.

    She has to explain, because its not obvious to anyone else. And it’s a pretty unconvincing explanation. A handful of screwy hippies is not “an unprecedented cultural and demographic shift.”

    No other point in American history, Daloz says, saw so much deurbanization, with as many as a million young Americans going back to the land.

    This is a thing that simply isn’t happening. Again, a few dirty hippies is not widespread deurbanization. Taking this woman’s claims seriously is ridiculous.

    1. *isn’t happening — and never happened. Even in the ’70s.

      1. Commune denier.

  14. Crazy right-wing preppers!

  15. Two, baby. Just two more months left almost down to the exact minute until Block Insane Yomomma’s sorry ass is finally out the door forever, and he goes back to wherever the fuck it is that he came from.

    Better keep a close eye on that mofo thoujgh while he tries to ram through as many midnight regulations and do as much damage to the country as he possibly can in the little time he has left to do so.

  16. Again, a few dirty hippies is not widespread deurbanization.

    Something tells me none of those kids grew up on a farm.

    1. Probably more farm kids moved to the city that year than dirty hippies moved to communes.

      And I doubt many of those hippies are still out on the farm now, 40 years later. They’re probably establishment sell-outs like Bernie Sanders, commune reject.

  17. “America’s diet would be far less varied and interesting without them.

    Meanwhile, as Daloz notes, “every YouTube DIY tutorial, user review, and open-source code owes something to the Whole Earth Catalog,”

    ?

    I don’t really buy any of that, sorry.

    1. Yeah.

      -YouTube DIY tutorials can make the channel owner money via advertising. Does NBC owe something to the Whole Earth Catalog?
      -User reviews are more just that everyone likes having their opinion heard.
      -While some open source advocates are communist in their thinking, a lot more open source code is academic work that has to be open source or promotional in some way. For example, if you want a job as a programmer, having a GitHub presence is a good leg-up because it demonstrates ability.

      1. It’s hard to write software, open source or otherwise, when you’re without electricity.

        1. Nobody needs 23 punch cards.

    2. I can see a video on how to fix a pump on YouTube, so no, not buying it either.

      1. I found a youtube video that told me what I’d overlooked when trying to reassemble my saiga after cleaning. I was being to gentle. I forgot it was from the Kalashnikov family and applying a little more force wouldn’t break it.

        1. I saw one on replacing a pressure regulator for the household plumbing. They were right on about how much the job costs if you hire a plumber, since the way it was installed necessitated my calling a plumber to do the work.

          The busted unit, that flooded a section of the basement, was made of iron instead of brass. It was plumbed into galvanized pipe, both ends.

          Replaced with brass and copper.

  18. Stat of the day: there are around 300 active terrorist groups today, but 75% of the deaths are caused by just 4 groups: ISIS, Taliban, Al Qaida, and Boko Haram.

    Fun fact of the day: birth control is banned (what isn’t?) in North Korea, but the law is widely ignored.

    1. If only there were some common thread connecting those deadly terror groups that would help us understand the root of the problem….

      1. Well, they are all men with violent rhetoric, right? Sound like Trump supporters to me.

        1. Violent as those Tea Party hooligans I tell ya!

        2. Nonsense, Blessed lap83. Troomp grabbed the pussies of willing wimminz and nubile pageant contestants, making him The Worst Human Being EVAR!

          The other groups merely rape and mutilate the pussies of any nearby wimminz; as far as they are concerned, Troomp is a piker, amateur, and blasphemer infidel extraordinaire.

    2. On the other hand, pot is legal in NK. You’d think they would consider the export market.

  19. Is there anything in the book about shaking down celebrities around 1970? The Diggers did that in San Francisco just before they made their way to what became the Blackbear Commune.

    In London, an Eel Pie Island commune attempted the same thing to Pete Townshend, who was not down with them and shooed them off.

  20. Great moments in ass-hattery:

    Family on way to pick-up remains of son killed in Afghanistan booed by airline passengers

    The father of a California soldier recently killed in Afghanistan says he felt disrespected and hurt by passengers who booed him and his family when they were on a flight to meet his son’s remains.

    Stewart Perry, his wife and daughter were on an American Airlines flight Monday from Sacramento to Philadelphia with a transfer in Phoenix to receive the remains of his son, Sgt. John Perry, of Stockton, when the flight was delayed, the Stockton Record (http://bit.ly/2fFOIRc) reported Saturday.

    Perry, an ex-Marine who lives in Stockton, said the flight to Phoenix was 45 minutes late and the crew, fearing the Gold Star family could miss their connecting flight, made an announcement for passengers to remain seated to let a “special military family” deplane first.

    Perry said several passengers in first class booed, complaining that it was “baloney” and that they paid first-class fares. He said he doesn’t know if the passengers from Sacramento knew there was a Gold Star family on board or whether people sitting in the coach section complained.

    1. Ok, the passengers, if they knew, are asshats. However, I cannot say this enough:

      Gold Star family: STOP.THIS.FUCKING.SHIT.ALREADY.

    2. Two things,the people that booed were rude and should have treated those people with empathy . Two,that young man should have never been in that country in harms way. There’s too many deaths of soldiers being in a place where they should never have been sent.

    3. Why should military families get to pick up their relatives’ remains before other families?

    4. As distasteful as it would be, they probably should have included more about the dead son in their announcement. Probably most of the people on the plane just heard “government privileged people being granted priority over you little people”, which people are getting more and more sick of. Nobody would have objected if they had announced that the needed to deplane a family first who was dealing with a family emergency.

  21. Riddle me this: the oil in the Middle East which made at least some people there fabulously wealthy was discovered by Westerners, extracted by Westerners, and the only reason the oil is valuable in the first place is because of technology invented by the West. Given that, you’d think they’d be a little grateful to the West.

    1. Being lucking enough to be born over a vast pool of oil that they had no way to exploit you mean? They went from a society of wandering tribes and bandits to oil rich sheiks over night. Not through hard work or their talent. Their like a 18 year old with a trust fund.

    2. There’s really two different groups, so to speak. The oil money goes into the pockets of sheikhs and emirs while the imams and muftis denounce the West. There’s lots of interplay between the two, though.

      1. The sheiks need the imams to distract their poor subjects, lest they get the idea of overthrowing the sheiks and stealing their loot.

      2. I sure hope these euphemisms are certified halal. Otherwise. the blowback….

    3. Stop that, you racist bigot monster! And now the Trumputin will have NASA focus on space stuff instead of Muslim outreach and global warming! It’s outrageous!

    4. Grateful for destroying the mind numbing, violent culture of marauding desert sheiks? Progress breeds hope and hope is anathema for a culture whose mind was locked closed in 1100 AD. When your lifestyle depends on the willing subjugation of an entire tribe to your whims, the last thing you want is for them to hope for a better life.

  22. Riddle me this: the oil in the Middle East which made at least some people there fabulously wealthy was discovered by Westerners, extracted by Westerners, and the only reason the oil is valuable in the first place is because of technology invented by the West. Given that, you’d think they’d be a little grateful to the West.

    1. Cultural appropriator!

    2. Not only is there no appreciation there is palpable disdain for the infidel.

    1. They still have Christians that admit it in that hell hole?

      1. Last I heard, they had a reserved seat in Parliament. And they’re not treated nicely at all.

  23. Beautiful: pranksters repaint Soviet star to look like Patrick from Spongebob Squarepants
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/14/…..over-trnd/

    1. “but the townspeople are divided in opinion. Many consider it vandalism, some a manifestation of contemporary art,” local photographer Paul Dolgikh said.

  24. “How Hippie Communes Changed America: New at Reason”

    It ushered in a new era of appreciation for personal hygiene?

  25. Immigrants rush to cross border before wall goes up:

    In the meantime, most of the migrants are released from detention after a few days. Often, they do not appear for their court dates. Of the 20,000 families whose legal proceedings ended with deportation orders between July 2014 and August this year, 85 percent did not show up in court, fueling the perception that migrants are gaming the system and intending to remain in the country illegally.

    Ya think?

    1. I would guess that they never show up for their court dates. All of them have at least 3 aliases that they use and if they run out of those, they just create more. Basically, they live outside the norms of citizens and permanent residents. I’m not speculating on this, I know it to be true. They also receive tax payer benefits, at least some of them in some states. Hell, they could be receiving benefits under several different aliases and no one would know about it.

      1. Here in Texas it is most often the married woman with no ring or US paper records receiving the benefits.

        The men are hard working mofos for the most part and the construction business would be hard hit without them.

  26. France trains eagles to attack drones:
    http://www.reuters.com/article…..SKBN13D1Y9

    1. Eagles versus Drones, coming to a cinema near you.

      1. SyFy already greenlit this a while back; check their website periodically for listing times and dates. And yes, expect exceptionally poor CGI.

    2. *begins sharpening 10.5″ carbon fiber blades that spin at 10k+ RPM*

      1. Even standard drone props would injure or kill eagles.

    3. This from the same folks who’s military wore blue and red uniforms to charge German machine guns in WW1?

  27. A dog-bites-man story from Africa: scores killed in explosion while trying to scavenge gasoline from crashed truck

    This kind of thing happens from time to time over there:
    http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/…..explosion/

  28. Whale spotted in Hudson river

    Sources close to the whale say the whale is now acting all high and mighty because of living in the big city.

    1. Looks like Christ Christie, The Corpulent Jesus, has decided to abandon NJ after all. I’m shocked; I didn’t think he could swim, much less maintain buoyancy.

        1. Yes, Zheodor, but he also has to either tread water or keep moving to maintain getting air, and that bucket of lard gets out of breath cracking open cans of soda; just because he may float with a bit less effort, doesn’t mean he stays above water.

          1. It should be Fyodor, of course. 🙂

            1. I called you Zheodor years ago, if you remember. On purpose, even back then. Think of is as a ball of yarn, and you are a Russian Blue hair.-)

              PS

              Like most of my friends here, Dr. ZG cannot pronounce the ,”th-“, consonant cluster. It sounds much closer to, “Zh-, with a tiny bit of, “f-“, thrown in.

    2. It’s Trump’s fault.

    3. I saw that happen once when i was a kid. People drove from all over Westchester to see the thing.

      I cant remember what the deal was, but my vague memory is that there was a ‘dark side’ to the story – which is that the whale was likely dying, and that its brain was damaged somehow if it were confused enough to be heading upriver. it was being tailed by a tugboat, which i assume was going to drag it back out to sea when it croaked.

      1. “And then we dragged it out to sea…anyway, how’s your steak?”

  29. “How President Trump could use the White House to enrich himself and his family”
    http://www.sfgate.com/opinion/…..626288.php

    Spolier; no mention of hiring that hag as consultant.

    1. Where were these articles about Hillary during the campaign?

      1. She didn’t piss off Paul Horner enough to mention her in his posts.

    2. Does it involve setting up a family foundation?

    3. Two fears about Trump being circulated are =

      a) that he’ll enrich himself via pervasive ‘conflict of interest

      b) that he’ll run a non-transparent, ‘insider’ regime.

      What’s so hilarious about these accusations…. is that these are the two most-common – *because they were accurate*- criticisms of the reign of Hillary & Obama, respectively.

      Its projection, all the way down. Everything they do, they suspect and fear others of doing.

  30. On a lighter note,I’m drinking beer and plotting dinner.

    1. I have this strange desire to start drinking already. We were going grocery shopping, but it’s cold and windy out.

        1. Drinking beer is strange.

          1. I love beer. But I stopped drinking it except on occasion, it just bloats me anymore if I drink more than a couple. Vodka and Gin are now my drinking choices.

            1. I have a glass and a bit of wine each night at dinner. On weekends I’ll also have a vodka-based drink. But that’s about it.

              1. I’ve cut way down because I need to lose more weight. Cutting out the beer has really helped. A couple of glasses of double shot vodka and I’m good and it doesn’t make me fat. Well, last night I think I had 4 or 5 of those, but it was Saturday night. Most nights I have none or 1 or 2 drinks. Some evenings I have a glass or two of wine with the wife. I don’t like it but she enjoys when I drink it with her, so I pretend.

    2. Ha !

      I’m drinking beer, smoking a TurDukHen on the pellet smoker , AND watching football.

      It is a beautiful 60 degree crisp sunny day here in historic San Antonio.

      1. 42 and windy here in Balmer. Tonight will be the first freeze. Yesterday was 72 and mostly sunny.

  31. The experimental-progressive high-school I went to had an annual field trip to Twin Oaks, virginia… (i think) the longest-running self-sufficient commune in America.

    We also read Walden Two and… Utopia, by Thomas Moore? some other similar things. It was like a yearlong theme for sophomore students to read and learn about ‘experimental communities’ and self-organizing, since that was sort of the M.O. of the school itself. Everything was supposed to be cooperative and consensus-driven.

    A lot of the stuff talked about in the article here was stuff we talked about that year; the fact that there are always some people who just don’t do “their share”, or are disruptive…that the “work” always is harder than people think, and that the “play” parts need to be earned… that the “idealists” and ideologues would always conflict with the pragmatic people trying to run the place effectively…. and so on.

    i think we also read “Lord of the Flies”. The ex-hippies who ran our school i think had some awareness that human nature and utopian-leftism often butted heads pretty hard.

    If anyone finds the article interesting… read “Why We Left The Farm“, which is about the largest 1960s commune, and its eventual dissolution. Has lots of funny anecdotes from the survivors.

      1. The school joined Ted Sizer’s Coalition of Essential Schools in the 1980s, but it pre-dated that model… it started in the early 70s, loosely based around ideas of “educational-self-governance” and psychological theories of this guy.

        re: the first part – we voted on *everything*. it was a little stupid and i think they’ve since abandoned a lot of that. but one of the more absurd-legacies of its 1970s roots was “voting whether or not it was ok to be stoned in class”. A few always voted, “why not?”

    1. If you are talking about The Farm in Tennessee, doesn’t look like they dissolved. They even have a weekend experience now.

  32. The exciting lives of Iranian booze smugglers

    One smuggler estimates that 15 men die each month at this very peak, felled by gunfire from an Iranian border patrol tower that looms above, landmines left over from the bloody 1980s war between Iran and Iraq or the harsh elements. The men are traversing one of more than 20 bootleg routes that straddle the border, and they make their deadly jaunt at night.

    1. Prohibition works!

    2. I thought they still made wine in the Shiraz region of Iran. Is it only for export?

      oh, i guess not.

  33. Communes are wonderful. They represent the idea that you can voluntarily join up with like-minded people and submit to whatever authority you choose and leave everyone else the hell alone.

    Hell, with Internet these days, people don’t even have to move to a physical location to form a commune. All these socialists in America could just join a giant fraternal organization whose members submit their paychecks to a central planning board who then distributes to everyone their “fair share”. And from this pool of earnings, they could provide healthcare, retirement funds, stipends for those who need to maternity leave from work, and all the other wonderful benefits that they currently demand from our government. The only caveat is that they can’t force everyone else to go along with it… And that’s what really sticks in their craw.

    The US would be so much more peaceful and productive if it were a political “blank slate” (e.g. mostly libertarian) and everyone with these utopian ideas just started their own villages and voluntarily submitted to the rules that they think should be in place.

    1. I wish I could find the post now, but I cannot even remember the site it was on, but anyway… I was reading a post from an obvious prog, who was explaining that large nation states are just a recent anomaly and how humans had existed in small groups of probably 25 people or more for much of human history. Then he went on about how socialism actually works, but on no larger of a scale than a small community of otherwise autonomous individuals, and that leftists have made a grave mistake by thinking that you can force socialism onto a nation with millions of individuals who mostly do not agree with one another about anything. I actually had to agree with him. Maybe this guy was one of the elusive left libertarians we occasionally hear spoken of? Didn’t get a chance to ask him as he was busy being attacked by his fellow leftists for saying that.

  34. “How President Trump could use the White House to enrich himself and his family”

    Scary. Unprecedented.

    1. Indeed, Brooksie. The obtuseness, it’s not just for triangles.

        1. You lack a sense of humour. You disgust me. You must now commit seppuku. You have brought dishonour and shame to the House of Sevo.

          PS

          Make sure your blade enters your gullet at a greater-than 90 degree angle downward.

      1. It’s terrible to get out of practice on the triangle.

    2. Isn’t that the whole story of the Trump election? People shitting their pants over things that have already been going on for the past decade or so?

      “He’s going to be mean to immigrants and stuff!”
      The current administration holds the record for deporting illegal immigrants. Why do people act like enforcing immigration policy is some kind of evil Republican thing?

      “He’s going to violate the rights of American Muslims!”
      The current administration supports all kinds of 4th Amendment abuses that most likely fall hardest on Muslims. Also, the FBI has been scanning license plates of Mosque visitors for years.

      “He’s reckless and he might start a war!”
      The current president has had us in a constant state of war even after he campaigned on ending those wars and not intervening for “stupid” reasons. It’s just that he doesn’t call them wars; he uses the term “kinetic military action”.

      1. But those are the right Top Men.

    3. Look what HRC managed to do from the mere SoS position; no wonder she was drooling to be president!
      At least I think that was the reason she was drooling.

  35. Communes can sometimes work wonderfully if they have two things:

    1. A means of expelling the unproductive.
    Every socialist country has a long history of enslaving or killing those who are perceived to be “wrecking” the grand experiment. The USSR sure as shit didn’t let able-bodied people sit around collecting government benefits and chanting “tax the one percent!!”

    2. A small population whose members have a modicum of loyalty towards each other.
    Every successful commune-type society (such as the Amish) have a rock-solid sense of community. Much of the community is formed of tight-knit families, and divorce just because you’re “bored” with married life is almost unheard of. By contrast, look at a society as large and diverse as the US. It’s too easy to place the blame for your troubles on “the rich”, because if you’ve never actually met very many rich people, you will just seem them as some faceless villain.

    1. “A small population whose members have a modicum of loyalty towards each other”

      This is the key. Small and loyalty being the key words. I like to think of it as socialism being mostly successful at the smallest unit level, families. Beyond that, very small groups, and after that you are headed for failure.

      1. “I like to think of it as socialism being mostly successful at the smallest unit level, families.”

        Pretty sure O’Rourke wrote an article starting from that premise and then expanding on the proggies’ requirement for a daddy figure to protect them and guide their thinking.
        Tony is an obvious example.

        1. If you want proof that “progressives” look up to the government as a wise father figure, all you have to do is observe how they basically worship Obama and cling to his every word as gospel.

          1. It’s their religion, it’s all faith based.

    2. 2. A small population whose members have a modicum of loyalty towards each other.

      Indeed, to the extent that Sweden “worked”, it worked because it’s population was 1) all Swedish 2) all Lutherans and 3) all committed to the protestant work ethic (which went hand in hand with 1 and 2). After a generation or so of children who grew up without the the Protestant work ethic and the influx of poorly assimilated immigrants who never knew it at all it stopped working.

      You can maintain a Swedish level of benefits as long as you’re willing to sustain a Swedish level of taxation. In the end, even the Swedes couldn’t do that.

      Of course Sweden was never a socialist country in terms of “ownership of the means of production”. It always had a strong private sector and extensive individual rights.

      1. Demographics is not a thing that the left understands, because feelz is all that matters.

        1. For that matter, a great many libertarians have no understanding of demographics how it plays with culture and society. That’s something that needs to change.

          1. a great many libertarians have no understanding of demographics how it plays with culture and society. That’s something that needs to change.

            if this is your subtle attempt at suggesting libertarians need to get on board with ‘identitarianism’, then no.

    3. The Soviets harnessed the labor of the expelled with production from the concentration camps. IIRC, “The Black Book of Communism” (maybe a different book) had a chapter on the Soviet plan of meeting all manner of production needs through gulag labor.

  36. I think it’s about time for Reason to reboot their Dell Pentium 2 laptop they use as a web server, again.

    1. I mean, come on, reliable web hosting is really cheap. I’m all for rolling your own if you know what you’re doing, which is obviously not the case here.

  37. I think I read something about Trump Towers going up all over the world, so can I get a Trump Tower…in my pants?

    1. They’re going to be renamed to Trumputin towers. The Trumputin and Kochtopus overlords will rule from their towers over the peasants below in their cardboard huts. Proggies hardest hit.

      1. Isn’t that the plot for The Hunger Games?

  38. Hippie communes – not an enemy of freedom.

  39. Hillary drones chant “I believe that she can win!”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF1GyLn9Wbg

    1. Heh, that’s cute.

  40. http://laist.com/2016/11/17/cr…..hp#photo-1

    Van Nuys Boulevard in 1972. Everyone was thinner and looked happier. And it apparently paid to own a Mustang GT Fastback. I mean really paid. Hot pants were proof that God loved us in the 1970s and wanted us to be happy.

    1. I lived in Van Nuys in the 60s, when I was a wee lad. Also Simi Valley. The good ol days, I guess I missed most of them. By the time I was old enough to notice the poontang, the statism was already well on it’s way, and we had moved back to the Ohio.

      1. California in the 50s 60s and early 70s was a hell of a nice place. It really is proof socialists can destroy anything.

        1. California was downright magical in that era.Much credit goes to the WWII and after defense industry.

    1. Good. Barron weirds me the fuck out.

      1. I like the scene where his nanny hangs herself.

  41. I was offended that Bernie was in a book with a geodesic dome on the cover. But when I found out he’d been booted out as a freeloader I felt better. Back in those days of smoke-filled rooms, arguments between Ayn Rand & Robert Heinlein fans versus intellectuals of the looter persuasion ran into the wee hours. Both ideologies were displeased with the Johnson and Nixon r?gimes, yet stuck with each other in a single alternative subculture that wasn’t really all that political. Finally the freebooters found an outlet in the LP while the others gravitated toward the Weathermen, Symbionese Liberation, Youth International Party and standard socialist and Dem parties. There was a LOT of variety and debate was fervent.

  42. I was offended that Bernie was in a book with a geodesic dome on the cover. But when I found out he’d been booted out as a freeloader I felt better. Back in those days of smoke-filled rooms, arguments between Ayn Rand & Robert Heinlein fans versus intellectuals of the looter persuasion ran into the wee hours. Both ideologies were displeased with the Johnson and Nixon r?gimes, yet stuck with each other in a single alternative subculture that wasn’t really all that political. Finally the freebooters found an outlet in the LP while the others gravitated toward the Weathermen, Symbionese Liberation, Youth International Party and standard socialist and Dem parties. There was a LOT of variety and debate was fervent.

  43. Transgender Marine speaks out:
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/19/…..ry-policy/

    One hiccup Wixson faced was his decision to seek hormone treatment outside of the military health care system in May without informing his command, a violation of policy. He was slapped with an administrative reprimand that his command is now working to expunge, officials said.

  44. Random thought: the idea of elite warriors is appealing, although I think wars are mostly won through more boring things like logistics, intelligence, training, and equipment.

    There was a Civil War battle near where I grew up that was a disaster for the Union. When they formed up to fire a volley, almost all their rifles misfired. Some of the Union soldiers jumped off a cliff to escape.

    Turns out their were a number of scandals during the Civil War of Union troops getting worthless equipment.

    Also, turns out that a lot of Civil War soldiers never fired their rifles:

    Along with the numerous corpses littered about the battlefield, at least 27,574 rifles (I’ve also seen 37,574 listed) were recovered. Of the recovered weapons, a staggering 24,000 were found to be loaded, either 87% or 63%, depending on which number you accept for the total number of rifles. Of the loaded rifles, 12,000 were loaded more than once and half of these (6,000 total) had been loaded between three and ten times. One poor guy had reloaded his weapon twenty-three times without firing a single shot. At first glance, this doesn’t seem to make any sense whatsoever.

  45. It’s funny how the free market and the tax code fully allow for “from each according to their ability, to each according to their need”. Co-ops and unofficial partnerships are allowed to exist and there’s sufficient code to handle their existence. And, yet, it is rarely used, and if it is, it doesn’t last long. Actual co-ops/communes don’t have sufficiently defused “lines of sight” – you have to work hard. smell the sweat, and watch someone else stuff their face. And so, those inclined to like the theory invaded the corridors of power, the power WE gave to the government to protect us and our property, to ply a new practicality. A function of a double blind system of taking and “sharing” where the smell of your sweat doesn’t have to be a reek in the nose of the “needy” and you don’t have to be subject to watching your production stuffed into a gloating mouth of another. At least most forms of pure communism/syndicalism requires direct participation and involvement. Unfortunately, it is doomed to the predictable failures and Force soon needs to be applied to try and keep a society afloat. But at least they TRY to not have free-riders. “Advanced” forms of socialism don’t require participation in production, which is why it sells so easy to those who desire to live parasitically.

  46. file under: animism
    Trump’s name removed from 3 NYC buildings
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics…..d=43579051

  47. Random thought: I’ve heard the advantage of parliamentary democracy is that it allows small parties to have some influence and that’s good. Isn’t the electoral college similar, in the way that it allows small states to have some influence? Why is it good to for small parties to have influence but bad for small states to have influence?

  48. I never got the geodesic dome fad of the 70’s. I don’t understand how people could make such complicated miter joints while constantly high as a kite. Their saws didn’t even have laser guides! It boggles the mind.

    1. I used to hang out with people in intentional communities back in the 1980s. Ferrocement construction was common. It’s easy to bend wire when you’re high.

  49. We can hope!

    “Trump win could spell the end of FCC net neutrality regulations”
    […]
    “Donald Trump’s victory means that Republicans soon will take control of the Federal Communications Commission. That could spell the end for net neutrality regulations and other initiatives of the agency’s hard-charging Democratic chairman.”
    http://www.sfgate.com/business…..624426.php

    1. Oh no, that means we’re going to go back to those terrible times when big Internet corporations controlled what content you could access and how fast it would load, and the only websites that would give you fast and regular connections were big corporate websites like Wal-Mart and McDonalds!

      Oh, wait… That never happened.

  50. Okay, finally read the article…so these people were so worried about some sort of civilization-destroying event that would wreck their standard of living that they got a jump on things by doing it to themselves?

    1. I think that’s being a bit unfairly narrow-minded.

      Different utopian “intentional-communities/communes” have different reasons for forming, but the basic idea is simply to create something that is ‘self sustaining’ and (theoretically) independent of outside resources as much as possible

      it doesn’t require believing that the current external order is going to implode at all. In fact, many might choose to drop-out of the existing society exactly because they believe the existing order is too-all-encompassing, and too-entrenched.

      The root impulse of commune-seeking types is often very libertarian. They seek to live on their own terms. The problem is that they probably don’t understand their own desires in libertarian terms, and usually end up glomming onto some combination of utopian-religious thinking and socialist-economic ideas.

      Libertarian stuff like sea-steading, or the Free State project, etc. aren’t really much different in concept; they just are couched in different terms.

  51. Name that fallacy =

    “Many people who have racist opinions are big fans of the band “Erasure” = therefore, it must contain ‘coded racism””

    (*this is not true, afaik. but it *could be*; its as white as white gets, and very Euro, and i don’t know why but Racists often seem to enjoy homoerotic stuff)

    I want to say its just a version of ‘ad hominem/guilt by association’, where the fact that there’s any relationship *at all*between the 2 presumes that there must be similar component parts.

    But what i’m thinking is that there’s also some implied ’cause’- that the reason X people have affinity to Y thing must be rooted in something essential to the things that X have in common to one another. Maybe a kind of problem of induction? any help here is appreciated.

    Apparently it IS true that Alt-Righters have a thing for Anime. I really do not understand this.

    (*i don’t like anime and it gives me a headache. Even the tentacle porn; its just too-busy and the tiddies don`t make up for the incipient epilepsy)

  52. I like free enterprise. And hygiene.

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  53. I get Paid over ?80 per hour working from home with 2 kids at house. I Never thought I would be able to do it but my best friend earns over ?9185 a month doing this and she convinced me to try. The potential with this is endless.

    ??..>>>>>> http://www.jobmax6.com

  54. OT: I was sitting in a coffee shop yesterday, and there were two loudmouth yuppie women yammering on about stupid bullshit. One of them said, “his daughter is going to school in the same building that he went to when he was a kid… There’s something fundamentally wrong with that!! Why won’t they build us new schools?”

    … Because apparently, buildings are completely unusable after one generation has passed. Gotta tear ’em down and build new ones! And those kinds of people vote.

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  56. Or, rather, how 60’s kids threw themselves deep into the Establishment by “being against it”.

  57. I find it telling that you can find communes in “capitalist” United States, but you can not find the equivalent in any communist nation in the world.

  58. Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go? to tech tab for work detail
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