Marijuana

Arizona Is the Fifth State Where Voters Will Decide Whether to Legalize Pot This Year

If all the measures pass, nearly one in five Americans will live in places where marijuana is legal.

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Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol

Last week a marijuana legalization initiative officially qualified for the ballot in Arizona, joining similar measures that voters will see this year in California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. If all five measures pass, the number of states where marijuana is legal for recreational use will more than double, while the population enjoying such tolerance will more than triple, representing nearly one in five Americans.

The Arizona initiative, Proposition 205, would allow adults 21 or older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana in public, grow up to six plants at home, keep the produce of those plants at home, and give other adults up to an ounce at a time "without remuneration." It would create a Department of Marijuana Licenses and Control to oversee the commercial production and distribution of marijuana products, which would be subject to a 15 percent tax on the retail price. The number of retail licenses would be capped at 10 percent of the number of liquor store licenses, or 180 statewide currently. Consuming marijuana "in a public place" would be a petty offense punishable by a $300 fine, but in 2020 regulators could begin allowing marijuana consumption on the premises of retailers.

Arizonans approved medical marijuana by a razor-thin margin in 2010, and it's not clear they're ready to go further. Last October a survey by the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University found that 49 percent of voters thought marijuana should be legalized for recreational use. According to a June 20 poll by OH Insights, 39 percent of likely voters supported broader legalization, 53 percent were opposed, and 8 percent were undecided. By contrast, recent polls in California, which by itself accounts for 12 percent of the U.S. population, have found majority support for legalization.

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17 responses to “Arizona Is the Fifth State Where Voters Will Decide Whether to Legalize Pot This Year

  1. The number of retail licenses would be capped at 10 percent of the number of liquor store licenses, or 180 statewide currently.

    Arbitrary is the best trary.

    1. Nothing could possibly go wrong. It is known.

  2. It’s even slooooooowly getting some attention here in SC.

  3. If all the measures pass, nearly one in five zero Americans will live in places where marijuana is legal because it remains illegal under federal law.

    FTFY. Still, this would be an improvement over the current state of affairs.

    1. As happy as I am to see the drug war being scaled back, even in this modest amount, these new laws don’t inspire much optimism in me. They are only coming up because politicians have realized that white suburban moms aren’t afraid of pot. This isn’t a newfound respect for personal freedom or bodily integrity.

  4. Stay off pot kids.
    You could end up winning 28 Olympic metals.

    1. Or becoming President of the United States.

    2. Proposed movie remake: Reefer Madness, starring Michael Phelps.

    3. Or becoming the most respected science educator in the cosmos.

    4. or become a noted National Review editorialist, William F. Buckley.

  5. If all the measures pass, nearly one in five Americans will live in places where marijuana is legal.

    Nope. Nearly one in five Americans will live in places were marijuana is legal on the state level. Maybe that nuance was in the alt-text?

  6. Arizona vs. Massachusetts in a head to head battle to see which of them really has the biggest is the most tolerant!

    Let’s get ready to RUMBLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEeeeeeee!

    In this corner, weighing in as the heart of the Confederacy West of the Pecos. The last of the contiguous states to join the union because the country just wasn’t conservative enough, “Raging” Ari-ZONA!

    *mixed cheers and boos*

    And in that corner, a state that’s not entirely unashamed of its patriotic past (what with those goddamn Minute Men and their god awful unregistered guns). A state with people so sensitive, they think being born is both offensive and misogynist, the “Spirit of America”, Mass-a-CHUSETTS!

    BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

    In all seriousness, when it gets to the polls, I think conservatives are more likely to back marijuana legalization.

    Progressives in Massachusetts don’t think you should be free to buy a Big Gulp at 7-11; why would they let you smoke pot?

  7. Progressives in Massachusetts don’t think you should be free to buy a Big Gulp at 7-11; why would they let you smoke pot?

    Because they’re all for letting you make choices they personally make themselves.

    They think empathy is understanding the views of people exactly like themselves.

  8. They should have called it Proposition 420.

  9. …give other adults up to an ounce at a time…

    That’s a dumb rule. “Here, have an ounce. Here, have another, unrelated ounce, totally separately.” Fourteen more repetitions and you have yourself a pound.

  10. The proposition to legalize marijuana in Arizona is proposition 205, not proposition 215.

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