NYPD

NYPD Officers Hate Their Jobs, According to Police Union Poll

New York's Finest believe NYC is increasingly unsafe, despite evidence to the contrary.

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New York Police Department (NYPD) officers

NYPD and K9
Zhukovsky/Dreamstime.com

overwhelmingly dislike their jobs, believe that New York City is increasingly unsafe, and feel that suspects are much more likely to resist arrest, according to a new poll conducted at the behest of the NYPD's Patrolmen's Benevolent Association (PBA).

Although previews of the poll were released to reporters over the weekend, the full results will be shared at a press conference tomorrow.

Over 6,000 of the 24,000 PBA members completed the survey, conducted by consulting firm McLaughlin & Associates. The New York Daily News notes, "The poll is difficult to put into context because it's the first of its kind commissioned by the union."

PBA president Patrick Lynch, recently heard from as he raged about filmmaker Quentin Tarantino speaking at an anti-police brutality rally, put his spin on the poll in a press release:

The results of this survey prove what we've been hearing time and time again from members over the past two years—the job is more difficult than ever, the dangers are greater, and morale is extremely low. The understaffing, inadequate training, low pay and lack of support has had a chilling effect on police officers across the city.

According to the poll, 96 percent of PBA members believe police and community relations have worsened, and 70 person indicated that relations had "greatly worsened." Over 86 percent said they would be less likely to recommend the NYPD as a career option to a family member, and when asked to use a scale of 1 to 10 to rate their happiness on the job, the rate of morale averaged about 2.49.  

Opinions about the state of community relations are one thing, but 87 percent of respondents also said that New York has become a "less safe" place over the past two years, with 55 percent calling it "a lot less safe."

The numbers simply don't bear this out. Crime, including violent crime, continues to trend downward in NYC, and the Big Apple remains by far the safest of the US' five major metropolitan areas (including Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, and Philadelphia). 

Mayor Bill de Blasio, widely reviled by many of the rank-and-file for comments he made in late 2014 about how he instructed his biracial son to "be very careful" if faced with an "encounter with a police officer," has yet to comment on the poll, but a spokesman from his office called the results "highly suspect."

Taking a macro view beyond New York City, the narrative that there is an ongoing "War on Cops" is also not backed up by data, with 2015 proving to be one of the safest years for American police officers in history, with violence against cops and violent crime overall down nationwide.  

In December 2014, Reason TV covered a pro-NYPD rally (which inevitably attracted counter-protesters) outside City Hall. Many supporters of the police donned T-shirts reading "I Can Breathe," which was meant to mock the shirts worn by activists protesting the death of Eric Garner, the Staten Island man who died after a being placed in a banned chokehold after police targeted him for allegedly selling loose cigarettes. 

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  1. 96 percent of PBA members believe police and community relations have worsened, and 70 person indicated that relations had “greatly worsened.”

    And the police themselves had nothing to do with this whatsoever…

    1. Oh, heck no. It’s the media’s fault.

      1. You’re actually partially correct. The media hypes up the “war on police” narrative and a lot of people, cops included, buy it hook, line, and sinker.

        1. Maybe if people would stop intentionally getting in the way of cops fists, boots, and bullets, the cops wouldn’t feel so threatened with this war on cops.

        2. I don’t think the cops get it from the media as much as their training. They are trained to treat every non-cop as a potential deadly threat. Children, old people, invalids, doesn’t matter. Everyone is a cop-killer unless they prove otherwise (which is impossible).

          The problem with the media is that they actually report it when cops behave badly. That stuff isn’t supposed to make it into the news because it could endanger the public trust. So any damage to the public trust is the fault of the media for reporting the news, not the cops who behave badly.

          The cops are simply following their training. It’s not their fault.

          1. Children, old people, invalids

            You forgot puppy dogs.

            1. Anyone ever think that if it suddenly became illegal for cops to shoot dogs, that the cat population would be in real jeapardy?

              1. jeopardy, ugh edit fea.. oh never mind.

              2. They’d probably start killing children if they couldn’t kill dogs.

                1. That toddler made a furtive movement, and didn’t obey commands! He could have had a gun in that diaper!

            2. My first thought on seeing the photo accompanying this story was “this cop must need more training on following procedures…he hasn’t shot his own dog yet.”

        3. Oh yes. The NYPost has been running with this non-stop. “Crime out of control!” “Cops don’t get no respect!” It’s nauseating.

          1. SPIDER-MAN: THREAT OR MENACE?

  2. Nothing more OT and less oversight can’t fix.

  3. Welp, i guess they shouldn’t have done all those murders then.

    1. But that’s the one thing they don’t hate about their jobs!

  4. Who doesn’t hate their job?

    1. Eh. It’s more a moderate malaise. But its (hopefully) a transitional job to one I’ll even enjoy or at least derive satisfaction from.

    2. I don’t.

  5. We can’t even shoot a bystander in a stairwell without being persecuted for it anymore!

  6. This persistent belief in the face of contrary evidence is what you get when the police see themselves in an adversarial role vis a vis the public. They perceive it to be so and, therefore, it is damnit.

    1. And the officer’s perception is the only admissible form of reality.

    1. brb, I’m off to kill the memory of that godforsaken thing in race fuel and Mountain Dew.

      1. These masturbation euphemisms are getting kind of abstract.

    2. Ohsonofa –

      There is not enough bleach…

    3. Looks like i’m about to get a visit from IT and/or human resources!

      1. Same here. That’ll learn me to assume SugarFree’s links actually go somewhere, much less click on them.

      2. I saw pbs and figured it was safe. Instead it was blocked so… oh well.

  7. Then quit.

    1. Indeed. If it is so bad, go do something else. It is not like the NYPD conscripts or press gangs its members.

  8. Look, I’ve been to NYC on numerous occasions. And the feeling I always get there is that Newyorkers are generally unhappy about everything all of the time, or at least they go out of their way to make you think that.

    1. Meh, I live here and I don’t get that sense at all. In fact I find people elsewhere to be a little too “happy”.

      1. Well, if you’re used to NYC natives, you would probably find people in hell too happy.

      2. ” I don’t get that sense at all”

        Ah. You are used to it, then?

        1. Perhaps, though I felt the same way even before I moved here. Maybe I’m just not a people person but I when total strangers are “nice” in other cities I have lived in, I find it fake and forced. What you perceive as “unfriendly” in NYC seems to me just people leaving each other alone.

          1. Man. You would hate Houston. I’ve had two different families come by and introduce themselves whne they moved in. People will stop and answer your question on the street. Its total madness.

            1. I’ve had two different families come by and introduce themselves whne they moved in.

              Creepy.

              People will stop and answer your question on the street. Its total madness.

              Same here – that is in fact a different situation. People here are perfectly friendly in that situation.

              1. Oh, I should clarify. If someone overhears you ask, they’ll stop and confirm the answer or take up the slack if the origial party is uncertain. Houston is friendly even for yhe South.

                1. If someone overhears you ask, they’ll stop and confirm the answer or take up the slack if the origial party is uncertain.

                  Yeah, that’s verging on creepy again. I am a firm believer in MYOB.

              2. Oh, and I like New York. My dad is from Long Island and I enjoy both Long Island and The City. I don’t have a problem with New Yorkers. I’m just stating the Houston is as far away from the “mind your own business” as I’ve experienced.

    2. When the light at the end of the tunnel is New Jersey….

      1. You have a point there.

    3. I’ve been to NYC on numerous occasions.

      Out of curiosity, how many is numerous, and how long did you spend each time? and was this 100% in Manhattan?

  9. Breaking news: people hate their jobs

  10. NYPD Officers Hate Their Jobs, According to Police Union Poll

    Good. Please quit.

    1. Yeah right. Where else can they get a job where they can run around bullying everyone with no accountability? They probably don’t have the political connections to be a bureaucrat. And even bureaucrats generally can’t shoot people’s pets and even people for no reason and get away with it.

      1. Prison guards?

        It’s been my experience that those who can’t make it as cops become prison guards.

        1. makes sense

      2. Plus, what other job do all of the employees and management conspire to defraud the pension fund by giving “overtime” to the guys heading for retirement? Oh, you get 100% annualaverage of your last 3 years’ pay? We’ll conspire to get tou 150% of your pay in that time. Plus, get a disability on top of that.

    2. According to a recent article I read about NYC garbage collectors, you can make 6 figures doing that.

  11. From the union’s website about the survey:

    In a result with possible implications for recruiting efforts of police departments in Nassau and Suffolk County, nearly 90 percent of officers said they would leave the NYPD for another nearby law enforcement agency with better pay.

    What?! Most would leave for a similar job in a nearby location with better pay? Hogwash! Next you’ll tell me the survey respondents claimed water was wet.

    1. It’s almost like they’re angling for a pay raise or something. Nah.

    2. You don’t understand.

      Sure, practically everyone would love to switch jobs to an almost identical job in a better location for more money.

      But these are cops. It’s all supposed to be above money. They should be in it for the pure social justice of it all.

      Really, these materialistic concerns will just ruin this country.

      1. They can always vote Bernie and await the coming utopia.

  12. One anecdotal story about the NYPD…

    Some friends of my reported that when it came down that the NYPD was no longer allowed to arrest people for public consumption of marijuana that when they caught someone smoking, they detain them, call a paddy wagon, load the people them aboard (after stealing their weed, of course) and they would drive around all night, collecting more and more people they “couldn’t arrest” until daybreak. Then they would unload them in the middle of nowhere in the morning and tell them “You aren’t under arrest” and drive away.

    I knew a good friend that went on one of these, and he knows a few more.

    And the NYPD wonders why people hate them.

    1. Those fuckers deserve it for taking away part of the cops fun. Cops are people too you know.

    2. You don’t understand. Cops only do those things to bad guys. So if someone doesn’t like the cops then that person must be a bad guy. All this proves is that the cops aren’t allowed to do their job and take the bad guys off the streets. If they did then the people who were left would like them a lot more.

    3. Appalled but not surprised.

    4. Are you sure that’s true? That is literally right out of The Wire. Season 2 or 3 when the new guy swts up the neutral zone in the slums.

      1. Or The Wire was just showing a practice that cops had been doing in different places for a while. Freddie Grey wasn’t the first nickel ride in Baltimore, after all.

        But he had no reason to lie. He was fuming about it for weeks. He said is was all white people with jobs in the vans, so who knows what they were doing to poor black kids.

        1. Yeah. Its probably that. I just figured cops would be too lazy to do that in practice.

          1. It was right after the policy was announced, so I’ve always thought it was a show of force thing they didn’t do for very long.

    5. Was the public not safer while your friend was driving around in a locked van?

    6. Some friends of my reported that when it came down that the NYPD was no longer allowed to arrest people for public consumption of marijuana that when they caught someone smoking, they detain them, call a paddy wagon, load the people them aboard (after stealing their weed, of course) and they would drive around all night, collecting more and more people they “couldn’t arrest” until daybreak.

      Living in NYC since 1996, and having known a half dozen people ‘busted’ for smoking in public, i’ve never heard anything remotely like this.

      I’ve never even heard anecdotes resembling this. I’ve never even heard of a “paddy wagon” or seen its like ever in use. I’ve been arrested in the city twice.

      One guy i know got busted smoking a one-hitter outside a bar, and spent the next 6 hours getting processed at the Tombs. but then was released the following AM with a citation for an appearance, for which he eventually paid a fine.

      FWIW, there was never any “cops never allowed to arrest people” thing. They ‘decriminalized’ MJ many many years ago, but have arrested people for it in increasing numbers ever since the late 1990s

      You will excuse me for thinking your anecdote to be unadulterated bullshit

      1. another anecdote about “how NYPD cops work”, from personal experience and the insight shared by my own lawyer, who was himself a former city prosecutor =

        – 80% of officer arrests happen in the last hour of their shift. Consequently, you’re likely most likely to get arrested at 3 different times of day, and almost never in-between. Even if they ‘catch’ someone, they wont book them until the end. they will drive around with the guy in the back of their patrol car, then eventually bring them in and fudge the numbers on when exactly the ‘stop’ occurred.

        this is so they can rack up as many overtime hours as possible. if i recall correctly, back in the 1980s they negotiated the removal of an overtime-cap in exchange for a lower base-pay rate of increase.

        In my case and my friend’s case, both occasions involved being forced to ride around with cops, then sit in a corner of a building waiting for the officer’s to eventually get around to *beginning* the processing. Which they’d start about 30 mins before the end of their technical shit, and drag it out for about 2 hours while drinking coffee and watching shitty late-night movies.

        1. Now THAT sounds like the police I know.

      2. You’ve never seen a police van? Curious.

        And that’s how long my friend has lived there as well. But, OK. It’s all bullshit. Gilmore has spoken.

              1. You think the NYPD having ‘vans’ is proof of your “Paddy wagons full of weed smokers” claim?

                lol

                1. I’ve never even heard of a “paddy wagon” or seen its like ever in use.

                  1. yes, vans exist. That isn’t some slam-dunk that your wild claim is validated.

                    1. Do you honestly think the NYPD doesn’t have and use trucks to put large numbers of arrestees in at once? Whether or not the story is true, your continued insistence that you’ve never heard of such a thing as a paddy wagon is just bizarre. Look, here’s a picture of a woman in handcuffs being put into a police van: http://www.nydailynews.com/new…..-1.2147200

                    2. your continued insistence that you’ve never heard of such a thing as a paddy wagon is just bizarre

                      That’s not my “continued insistence”. Yes the police have vans. No, i’ve never heard of them rounding lots of people up in them *AND THEN NOT CHARGING/CITING THEM*

                    3. This? = “” call a paddy wagon, load the people them aboard (after stealing their weed, of course) and they would drive around all night, collecting more and more people they “couldn’t arrest” until daybreak. Then they would unload them in the middle of nowhere in the morning and tell them “You aren’t under arrest” and drive away.””

                      …Is what i’d “never heard of being used”

                      yes, police have vans. Does acknowledging police have vans and use them in the course of ‘actual arrests’ mean that this fictional “Drive them around all night and then not charge them” thing is supposed to make sense?

      3. Oh, look an article about that policy that Gilmore says doesn’t exist.

        Many New Yorkers facing low-level marijuana charges will soon be issued summonses instead of being taken to precinct houses in handcuffs, department brass said Monday.

        Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said that the official change to the city’s marijuana policy will be issued Tuesday and will take effect Nov. 19. Under the policy change, people caught with less than 25 grams of marijuana on them “may be eligible” to receive a $100 summons in lieu of being arrested.

        1. An article about the NYPD defying that policy that Gilmore says doesn’t exist.

          (There was also a call to stop low-level offense arrests in 2011 that Gilmore also says doesn’t exist.)

          1. How many times do you need to beat a tard before he stops asking for cake?

          2. Your anecdote claimed they didn’t “arrest anyone” but drove them around in vans.

            When exactly did you hear that story?

          3. here was also a call to stop low-level offense arrests in 2011 that Gilmore also says doesn’t exist.)

            Actually its the opposite = I claimed they DO arrest people for low-level offenses and have done for a long, long time. if they’ve more-recently insisted on stopping that, i think the general effect has been to ‘ignore’ people rather than fuck with them for no reason.

            By contrast, you are claiming that NYC cops regularly pick up weed-smokers in groups, and drive them in circles only to release them later with zero summons or citation. Which makes no sense.

        2. Yep, nothing there about driving people around for hours for no reason.

          And of course i’ve seen police vans. i’ve never seen or heard of police driving people around in them indefinitely over weed charges that they never actually generate any citation for.

          because there’s no incentive to pick people up and fuck with them if they don’t get credit for a bust.

          And this thing you just cited above? from 2014? says they will hand out tickets instead of being taken to precinct house.

          My point to you was that until fairly recently, they didn’t “drive people around in vans and then let you go”

          They put you in cuffs and took you to the nearest station house. Which is exactly the policy i described.

          Did you not read your own cited ‘source’?

          1. Yeah, the police didn’t get caught, so it never happened. Cool argument.

            1. Get ‘caught’? doing what?

              When did you claim this practice occurred? If you’re saying that its a new thing since the november 2014 policy by bratton, then maybe its so novel that it has happened. Though it still makes zero sense *why* they would do it.

              There’s no purpose driving people around in a van if you aren’t getting credit for a citation/summons. What you describe is nonsensical. Of course, nonsensical things happen… but your ancedote made it sound like this was a longstanding policy…whereas now you seem to be claiming its some ‘possible’ rare thing that’s occurred in the last 18 months only.

              1. Well, no, I really don’t know how long they were doing something they didn’t get caught or ever admitted to doing. Nor can I explain why they would do it in a city that arrests people for sitting on milk crates.

                So my friend must just be a dirty liar who makes things up to hurt The Only Real New Yorker.

                1. I really don’t know how long they were doing something they didn’t get caught or ever admitted to doing.

                  IOW, you have no actual evidence or example to fortify your claim. Which i already noted.

                  Nor can I explain why they would do it in a city that arrests people for sitting on milk crates.

                  Which is actually your common sense speaking finally = cops only bust people when they get credit for it.

                  I’ve been with people ‘let go’ for smoking weed on multiple occasions (e.g. most often in central park) because the cops just couldn’t be bothered. wrong time of day, too much effort.

                  So my friend must just be a dirty liar who makes things up to hurt The Only Real New Yorker.

                  No one said that. Your friend’s story *could* be true if it happened in the past year or so. That still wouldn’t validate your claim that this was a general-practice. You just tried asserting something as a “policy” and got butthurt when i explained to you that

                  a) that’s never been the standard practice in the city and
                  b) it doesn’t even make sense from the POV of police incentives.

                  hope that helps.

                  1. Not only did I not say it was a long-standing policy, but I also prefaced it as an anecdote, but I offended The One True and I had to be taken to task.

                    1. i had no intention of hurting your feelings. i wish you the speediest recovery from your trauma.

                    2. Who’s got the hurt feelings here? You just had to rush in a protect your NYC cred.

                      You’ve gotten consistently dumber over the last few years. Have you had your tap water tested for lead?

                    3. You just had to rush in a protect your NYC cred.

                      No, i just thought that your comment about “cops letting people go” sans arrest made zero sense.

                      here’s an actual example of people getting thrown in a ‘paddy wagon’ for smoking weed… and then *brought to a precinct and booked*, which is the only reason cops will bust you in the first place. And exactly why your story rang false.

                      You just had to rush in a protect your NYC cred.

                      Oh of course. Because that wins so may cool-points around here, where its like admitting i’m from a leper colony.

                      You’ve gotten consistently dumber over the last few years

                      Yeah, you keep saying this any time i point out that you might be wrong about something. Thanks for the concern. I think its very mature of you.

  13. feel that suspects are much more likely to resist arrest

    Translation: I don’t get no respect!

  14. The results of this survey prove what we’ve been hearing time and time again from members over the past two years – the job is more difficult than ever

    +1 Serpico.

  15. Stupid fucking pigs have it too damn easy eating donuts and killing innocent people then complaining when the perps don’t roll over for them. Like wtf?

    No but seriously, they are the victims of their own success coupled with decriminalization of drugs. They went on strike for a few weeks 2 years ago and discovered they weren’t even needed. I kinda feel bad for them. Where all the criminals at?

  16. Of course cops think their job is more unsafe than ever! Look at the fucking people they have to work with: other cops.

  17. “We used to be able to beat people without any of this back-talk!! And no one complained for *decades* when we abused street-vendors. WTF”

  18. Why would employees complete a survey saying they think their job is easier, more satisfying, and safer than ever before?

    1. A survey conducted by their union, no less.

  19. I’ve never been a fan of the NYPD. I do have a few family members that are a part of that overreaching organization. The entitlement and sense of special class of citizen is on full display.

    When one of my cousins (NYPD) came to visit me in AZ, he almost shit a brick when I threw a G30 on my hip to go out with him. The biggest problem I see is that everyone in NYC agrees with “The Only Ones” mentality. Some of those people then become The Only Ones. Everyone in that city loves them some big gov’t until it shows up outside their door or hooks up a vacuum to their bank accounts.

    That being said, de Blasio is the statist shit bag they elected, and the statist shit bag they deserve. I just wish they would through a big wall around that place and when the President drops in, Snake refuses to go get him out.

    1. Everyone in that city loves them some big gov’t

      Not everyone, just 99.5% of everyone. There are even some of us libertarians. Actually, one thing that has kind of surprised me in recent years is how many conservatives there are in the outer boroughs – I’ve heard some real Tea Party-type stuff from small business owners and such. But people like that are routinely shut out of decision-making.

  20. Crime, including violent crime, continues to trend downward in NYC, and the Big Apple remains by far the safest of the US’ five major metropolitan areas (including Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, and Philadelphia).

    Crime in NYC is close to early 1960s levels per-capita

    This isn’t just “low” – its ridiculously low. Its low by any reasonable historical standard. Its even more ridiculously low for such a large diverse population.

    I don’t think police in general have an easy job- but by any measure, police in NYC have an easier job now than any of their previous generations, and probably have an easier job than many of their peers elsewhere.

    If anything all the moaning is simply pre-emptive in order to prevent further cuts to their rolls.

  21. It’s all them loose cigarettes…

  22. “The numbers simply don’t bear this out.”

    What happens to those numbers when a cop says “Official Government Victim Group member involved: I didn’t see a crime.”

    It’s been happening for a long time, and is thoroughly documented.

    White Girl Bleed A Lot

  23. This is kinda radical, but if you hate your job, maybe you should just quit? I don’t know, it seemed to work pretty well for me

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