Art

You Can Now Step Inside a Salvador Dalí Painting Thanks to VR

Virtual reality is being used to enhance the art experience.

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Salvador Dalí is known for his surrealist paintings featuring melting clocks and trippy landscapes. But now the Spanish painter's work is going into another dimension with The Dalí's Museum new "Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination" exhibit.

Fast Company reports:

"To help celebrate the opening of its new exhibition 'Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination' on January 23rd, which looks at the relationship between the artist and Walt Disney, the museum enlisted agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners to create 'Dreams of Dalí' to give viewers a new way to experience his work.

Users will be able to move around inside and explore the elements in the painting, and the VR experience also incorporates some of the recurring motifs from his other paintings in the museum's permanent collection, including Weaning of Furniture Nutrition (1934), Lobster Telephone (1936) and First Cylindric Chromo-Hologram Portrait of Alice Cooper's Brain (1973)."

The exhibit is fitting for Dali, who was unapologetic in his love of commerce. In the video below, Reason TV documents their visit to the Dali Museum to explore surrealisms most famous figure. 

Salvador Dali attained international acclaim as a young artist in the 1930s. In 1933, curator Dawn Ames described Dali as "surrealism's most exotic and prominent figure." Surrealist poet Andre Breton wrote that Dali's name was "synonymous with revelation in the resplendent sense of the word." In 1936, Dali made the cover of Time magazine.

Dali didn't simply sit back and enjoy the acclaim. He exploited it. Dali was a shameless self-promoter and admitted to having a "pure, vertical, mystical, gothic love of cash." Ultimately, it was Dali's unapologetic drive for fame and fortune that proved to be too surreal for the Surrealists. Andre Breton, whose opinion of Dali soured over time, created an anagram of Dali's name: Avida Dollars ("greedy for money"). Breton and the other Surrealists, many of whom were closely allied with the French Communist Party, expelled Dali from their group in 1939. Dali responded, "I myself am surrealism."

Over the next several decades, Dali became increasingly flamboyant and controversial. He arrived at a lecture in Paris in a Rolls Royce filled with cauliflower. He did commercials for Alka-Seltzer and chocolate bars. He was thrilled when Sears sold his prints to the masses. He signed sheets of blank lithograph paper and sold them for $10 a sheet. As Dali became increasingly popular with the masses, however, his reputation among art critics suffered.

"There was an era when being a successful artist made you suspect, made your art suspect," says Hank Hine, executive director of The Dali Museum. "When I was going through school, we were not shown Dali. He was not part of the canon. Yes, we would buy posters, we could find his images, but largely he was not part of the serious discussion of values, which is what constitutes serious art. I believe that has changed." Others in the art world agree. The Philadelphia Museum of Art's Michael R. Taylor, for example, believes that "Dali should be ranked with Picasso and Matisse as one of the three greatest painters of the 20th century."

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  1. There was an era when being a successful artist made you suspect, made your art suspect

    Was?

    1. This was interesting. The idea that art must be selective and elite to have any credibility is so pervasive that I don’t think I realized it until now that I have learned that Dali embraced commercialization. Now I think back and realize that I have always sneered at artists who sneer at commercialization. I worked with someone, a self-proclaimed communist (“Not Stalinists!”), who once ranted how governments must support artists. I asked her who defined artists, and the answer was, of course, the artists themselves. I said I would go round painting circles all over and call myself an artists. She snorted, that’s not art. I said why not? I say I am an artist, and that is my art, and who is she, some petty bureaucrat, to tell an artists that he is not an artist? She refused to even acknowledge the argument.

      I came to the conclusion that to her, the point of art was to extort money from rich people to pay for the poor people to insult said rich people, of course as defined by the self-selected elites who knew what the poor people wanted more than the poor people themselves knew.

      1. I came to the conclusion that to her, the point of art was to extort money from rich people to pay for the poor people to insult said rich people, of course as defined by the self-selected elites who knew what the poor people wanted more than the poor people themselves knew.

        How true.

  2. Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail.

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  3. Pr0n is bad, mmkay.

  4. Doctor recommended, and less habit forming that Opium (TM).

  5. Salvador Dali, Fascist

    You’re welcome.

    1. Do you have anything to say about his art?

      Does the term ad hominem not mean anything to you?

      I hear he once lied to his mother, as well.

      But what does that have to do with his art?

      1. Just trying to preempt the feminists, liberals, and other scoundrels.

  6. “He was not part of the canon. Yes, we would buy posters, we could find his images, but largely he was not part of the serious discussion of values, which is what constitutes serious art. I believe that has changed.”

    Thomas Kinkade isn’t taken seriously either.

    The difference is Dali’s influence on the present–especially by way of Pop Surrealism / Lowbrow art.

    If it weren’t for the sensibilities of Pop Surrealism and Lowbrow, what would be happening in the American art world?

  7. The Dali Museum is very cool. One thing that really struck me was a little painting he did when he was a teenager, something like 12-14, I forget. I wasn’t spectacular as a painting, and not in his later style(s), but it was astoundingly good for someone that age.

  8. I thought all virtual reality was inside a Dali painting.

  9. Un Chien Andalou is fantastic and I recommend it. I had the fortune of going to a viewing on the big screen.

  10. Sometimes I get the feeling that this year’s POTUS campaign is akin to living in some surreal, Dali-esque world. Things that matter very little get blown out of proportion and blasted on screen 24/7 while really important things – like felonious acts committed while in office – become flimsy, transient affairs not worthy of note.

  11. Yawn. Presidents and SC justices have had these helmets for decades. They set it on Dali mode every time they review the Constitution.

  12. I dig it. Classical arts meet remix culture.

  13. There is a MMORPG (Atlantica Online) that has a dungeon based on Van Gogh

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