Hate Speech

Telling People to Ignore Insults Isn't Dismissive of Their Plight

Missouri students shouldn't live in fear of bad words.

|

On Tuesday morning, I joined Mashable's Juana Summers, Slate's Jamelle Bouie, and The Atlantic's Krishnadev Calamur on NPR's Diane Rehm show for a discussion about what's happening at the University of Missouri. You can listen here.

I opined that while students were certainly free to publicize genuine instances of racial animus on campus and advocate for administrative change, it was not clear to me that President Tim Wolfe's resignation was wholly justified. I also suggested that refusing to become offended is an underrated anti-harassment strategy. I even referenced the old adage, "sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me."

The other panelists vehemently disagreed. The callers did, too. And so did many of my critics on Twitter:

I was not suggesting that racial slurs are a trivial matter—they are incredibly evil, hateful, and sometimes genuinely traumatizing for persons of color. Nor was I suggesting that black people need to "just get over it." They have every right to publicize their emotional turmoil and demand action. I wish we lived in a world where no one aspired to demean them.

But I suspect the people who shout despicable things at black people on the street have much in common with schoolyard bullies: they are looking for a reaction. And one way to deprive bullies of their power to inflict pain—not just on people of color, but on everyone—is to ignore them.

Another way, I suppose, is to identify the bullies and run them out of town with pitchforks. But when we live in fear of bad words, we give agency to the people who use them.  That's something for everyone to keep in mind, especially now that Mizzou cops have announced their intention to literally police speech on campus.

NEXT: 'Come on!' Judge Leon sticks to his guns, and the government appeals, in Section 215 case [UPDATED]

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. You’re black and discriminated against

    Assumes facts not in evidence.

    typical white male hegemonic attitude

    So now its OK to stereotype people by skin color?

    listen to POC before making claims that racial slurs are no biggie.

    Assumes facts not in evidence, namely, that racial slurs actually happened as described at U of M.

    1. It is okay to stereotype men, specifically whitr and East Asian.

    2. They’re not assuming facts not in evidence, they’re speaking in generalities.

      1. Yeah, that. Racial slurs do in fact happen. That’s really the only fact needed.

      2. Generalities need to leave some mark on the real world before I give them much credence.

        Here, we are invited to believe that there is a problem of some magnitude with racism at U of M, and presumably at colleges generally. That’s your generality, correct?

        So I’m just asking if there is any factual basis for this belief. At U of M in particular, and at colleges generally, I am aware of no such factual basis.

        Sure, there are probably a handful of genuinely racist incidents. But that is a long way from sufficient factual support for the proposed generality.

        1. No, the generality is that sometimes people say nasty things, including racial slurs. The argument is a very basic one over the validity of the “sticks and stones” saying.

          1. I didn’t catch the radio show.

            Was it about the current kerfuffle at U of M, or was it about racial slurs in isolation?

            If the latter, then I’ve probably gone off half-cocked.

            1. The radio show was about U of M but Robby was trying to make a broader point about how to respond to bullying. The people arguing with him on Twitter reject that broader point, just like the people at Yale do.

              1. Fair enough.

                I’d still tap the brakes on any claims that racial slurs are any kind of societal problem, but as for the rest, consider my cranky fit withdrawn.

                Carry on.

                Oh, and I don’t care what anyone says, Nikki. You’re the worst. Don’t ever change.

                1. They are a societal problem, but mostly because so many people still give a shit. Now, you can’t just expect everyone to stop being offended all of a sudden. But that should be the goal. No one is about to reintroduce Jim Crow or other racist institutions of the past. Serious racists at this point, aside from those committing actual violence which are very few, are pretty much trolls. And these whiny college students are feeding the trolls.
                  Racists should be mocked and derided. Taking it all so seriously like this is what gives them any power at this point.

        2. So when was the last time a group of white guys dragged a negro out of the dorm and lynched him on the quad?

          1. HELLO??! INVALIDATING MARGINALIZED PEOPLE’S LIVED EXPERIENCES

  2. I suspect the people who shout despicable things at black people on the street have much in common with schoolyard bullies: they are looking for a reaction

    If we even find such a person, we should ask them.

    1. That man offended me! Let’s get the university president to resign!

      Rather deflates the notion they’re floating that it’s an issue of campus safety and not politicking.

  3. Lol before reading the article I was thinking man Robby must enjoy all the material he has for his college madness beat. I would enjoy writing about their idiocy every day.

    Then once I read that you had to go on NAtiknal Gubmint radio, I quickly decided better you than me.

  4. Robby, you’re going to have to start shaping that hate into a Jacket. Gods, I hope that the generation in college burns out on social signaling and people can hold unpopular opinions without being run out of town.

  5. I’m beginning to think that this poop swastika story that initated all this is shit.

    1. And that strikes me as a complete false flag operation.

      1. When asked if there was any photographic evidence of the alleged incident, one staffer replied, “Not to my knowledge.”

        Nobody among what is uncharitably but not unfairly referred to as “the selfie generation” thought to snap a shot of the poop swastika? Not even someone who I can only hope would recognize what a hilariously oddball gesture it is? You mean to say nobody thought to document it, not even the individual who dutifully cleaned it up?

        Yeah, bollocks.

        1. Even if there isn’t photographic evidence it shouldn’t be terribly hard to find the cleaning staff member that got the joy of washing the wall down. It’s not exactly something you’d forget quickly or deny cleaning up. This should not be that hard for the university to verify.

        2. Good points, both, CS and Illy. Well-done, lads.

      2. I’m not sure what’s worse = that soon there will be people accusing others of being “Poop Truthers”…

        …or that the entire nation seems to have completely *lost their shit* over something someone *(probably didnt even!) scrawled on a toilet wall in a college dorm.

        I’m pretty sure that every single toilet i used in college, if i looked hard enough at the stall-walls, had something probably far *worse* than the Theoretical Poop Swastika…. and yet – shockingly – somehow? National race-relations did not seem to hinge on reactions to said toilet-scrawlings.

        1. I’m seriously consdiering “Poop Truther” as my new handle.

  6. I don’t want to live in the world @robbysoave is describing, where oppressed, threatened ppl just have to let it roll off them.

    It’s the only world there is, lady.

    1. All of this requiring a definition of terms. Terms like “oppressed” and “threatened”.

      1. This exactly. They equate something that upsets them with oppression and violence.

        It’s very understandable that racial slurs upset them. They upset me. But words are not violence.

        1. This.
          Having someone yell a racial slur at you is not oppression, really. Not unless you choose to be oppressed by it.

      2. Note the dip-shit on Twitter calling Robby’s statement “dangerous”. I don’t think she knows what the word dangerous means.

    2. Threatened or “threatened”. A group of people wearing masks and holding a noose outside of a black person’s home in a town where there’s already racial violence is a threat. The root cause of this kerfluffle is not a threat to anyone.

      1. A group of people wearing masks and holding a noose outside of a black person’s home in a town where there’s already racial violence is a threat.

        A proggy student hanging a noose over a tree branch at a liberal university is not a threat.

        See how context matters? See why I want some evidence that we have any kind of non-trivial problem with racism, evidence that goes beyond a smattering of incidents spread across the country?

        No one denies that somewhere, sometime, somebody yelled “nigger” at a black man with malice aforethought. What we are lacking is any reason to believe that we have problem with racism in this country.

        Don’t. Grant. Their. Premises. Without. Proof.

        Why is that so hard?

    3. And I thought we did live in that world, according to many of these people. I thought oppressed minorities were silenced and forced to let these ‘threats’ roll off them.

  7. Telling People to Ignore Insults Isn’t Dismissive of Their Plight

    Depending on the circumstances, the ‘victim’ and the plight, yes… yes it can be.

    The other panelists vehemently disagreed. The callers did, too. And so did many of my critics on Twitter:

    It’s NPR, Rico. My hat’s off to you for NOT preaching to the choir.

    1. To your first point, if I tell my friend who has cerebral palsey to ignore the drunk guys talking a bout “the cripple”, am I automatically unsympathetic? Or am I just advising him to not waste his time trying to correct assholes who don’t want to know better?

      1. Sounds like you missed an opportunity to teach two drunk guys King Fu.

        1. Why? Is fighting with them going to restore the functionality my friend was born without? It’s okay for people to be assholes as long as they aren’t harming or threatening to harm anyone. I don’t have to like everyone.

        2. But apparently Drunken Kung Fu is a thing.

    2. It’s NPR, Rico. My hat’s off to you for NOT preaching to the choir.

      Agreed, well done, Rico.

      Now, go shower off the stench of derp before you come anywhere near us.

      1. I remember when the ACLU guy was on the NPR show, defending the Citizen’s United decision.

        Man he got a reaming from the NPRati.

        1. I can only imagine.

          Progtards don’t like to mention it, but the ACLU supports Citizens United.

  8. These people need to grow the fuck up.

  9. Why are people so stupid about this?

    Laugh, point and mock at the fuckknuckle yelling whatever at you. If you get pissed, they’ve accomplished their mission.

  10. Oh FFS… I grew up in the “inner city” and despite my white privilege, “POC” directed racial slurs at me more times than I can count. I have just about had it up to here with this nonsense.

    1. it’s not the same b/c slavery jim crow racism trayvon.

      1. They were just expressing their frustration with the racist system that Rhywun was upholding.

    2. And spat on and attacked with rocks. Middle of the day in the middle of a big city.

    3. Your white privelege was showing.

    4. I’m so stinkin’ white privileged that I had to google “POC” to find out what it means.

  11. Another way, I suppose, is to identify the bullies and run them out of town with pitchforks.

    Seems like a great idea, if we correctly identify the Obama Youth as the bullies.

  12. You can’t tell marginalized people who’ve been harmed by this type of aggression to just “walk it off” or simply “rub dirt in it”, Soave. They can’t do that, not only because it’s unproven medical practice but also because they haven’t actually been physically harmed in any way.

  13. “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me” is a Noble Lie to keep kids out of trouble by having them rise about insults and not get into fights over them.

    Of course insults can be wounding, it’s just that as a general rule one needs the stones to assess the situation and, if reacting would be worse than not reacting, just move on.

  14. Rico, do you need a safe space after descending into that cesspit of idiocy? I mean, No-wood Holland? ugh.

    1. I was concerned about Robby being traumatized by those viscious hateful-n-hurtful Twitter attacks. Hell, I’m currently typing this from the fetal position just reading them.

  15. I would suggest that racial slurs are not harmful, what is harmful is teaching people to be traumatized by hearing them. Listen to the reactions of some black journalists/activists/bloggers claim to have from hearing the word ‘Nigger’. They describe freaking out, being physically ill, short of breath, seeing red, or suddenly terrified physical violence is imminent. These are PTSD levels of reactions. This is something we expect from people coming back from war zones or survivors of severe assault. Not someone who has grown up in a mostly middle class safe environment and gone on to get a college degree on a safe campus (as most journalists/activists/bloggers have).

    These folks are suffering from the same taught trauma as the recovered memory rape victims. Their feelings are real as are their reactions, but the cause is outsiders convincing them that they should be traumatized. The solution is to get them into therapy were professionals can help them work through the irrational reactions they have to these words, not to further traumatize them by reinforcing the feelings. People who encourage this sort of thing should be shamed for the harm they are causing to innocent people.

    1. Bingo, Illo.

      Best post of the day on this whole sorry mess.

    2. “I would suggest that racial slurs are not harmful, what is harmful is teaching people to be traumatized by hearing them.”
      If this were not true, Jackie Robinson would never had played in the bigs. That man listened to those slurs and proved he was far bigger than any of the red-necks shouting at him.

    3. The left have created a monster that will consume them. I think a lot of them have come to realize it now judging by some recent articles I’ve read. Then you have the Marcotte’s of the world who are going down with the burning ship.

      1. Mind sharing a few? I think it would be fascinating to witness some of the SJW-ilk come to the enlightening epiphany we have been clamoring about since time immemorial.

    4. Spot on. Kudos.

  16. @drshow @robbysoave Soave has that typical white male hegemonic attitude. You’re black and discriminated against so get over it. Accept it.

    Semi-related OT: This reminds me of a story I think I’ve told here before…

    The CEO of the hospital where I used to work (Big Obama Supporter, and constantly reminded people of it) was giving another speech explaining why we were losing so much money… anyhoo, he started talking about how everyone black is always the victim of discrimination. He pointed to a young black woman in the front row (a woman I knew– and I believe she was 2nd generation Ethiopian) and said, “Now, you’ve certainly been discriminated against…” and began to walk away to make his followup statement.

    She said, “No”.

    He stopped, turned around, looked surprised, then indicated he didn’t expect that answer– and it subsequently threw off the rest of his statement.

    1. If that were my CEO, we’d be having a talk in his office about how he just gave away the farm on every unfounded EEOC complaint anyone might care to file against us.

      1. Yeah, not sure how that plays out legally. The context he was using was “in life”, not “here at the hospital”.

        1. Well, of course he would deny what a hegemonic white racist he is.

        2. By the time he got done with his deposition, that nuance would be toes up in the morgue.

          1. It’s ok, we got bought out by a healthcare organization so big, the Pope cowers in fear at its lawyers.

  17. “please listen to POC before making claims that racial slurs are no biggie. This is an incredibly dangerous statement.”

    No, it is not “dangerous” at all. The writer is an idiot.

  18. If you want to see the face of the future Democratic party, you’re looking at it. Just imagine the most infantilized and hysterically irrational snowflake being churned out by Yale and Oberlin, and there you have it. During future Dem debates the typical reaction to all questions will be sticking fingers in ears, shrieking like a mad person and spitting on the moderators and the audience. The person who does that best will be the candidate. This is where we are headed, brave new world.

  19. What’s the problem? It was just the marketplace speaking, and dollars speaking out. We all know that students have complained since the beginning of time about administrators, and nothing ever changed. What was different this time?

    Oh yeah, the football team saying they wouldn’t play, thereby costing the university a cool $1M for one game.

    Dollars equal speech, right?

    1. I’m confused. Are you suggesting that the football team’s actions were an in-kind contribution?

    2. They’re trying to bring the police in to censor speech.

      And the police are offering their assistance.

      1. I saw that. What exactly are the police going to do? There are no laws against hurtful speech. Seriously, what are they going to do? I can tell you what’s going to happen. Some of these morons are going to call the cops and get someone killed and that someone may be the caller, that’s exactly what’s going to happen. These people are so incredibly stupid that the greatest danger they face in this world is their own stupid.

        1. The cops are there to set up the internal campus disciplinary process.

    3. The “marketplace speaking” is all of the people who are going to college to get a degree, i.e. not these students. This President resigning, these students whining, all of this is barely even noise in the context of the marketplace.

      But a little noise can overwhelm the signal if allowed to fester.

    4. Dollars equal speech, right?

      Whose dollars are doing the speaking here? The NCAA’s? The State of Missouri’s? The US Government’s? The Alumni’s?

    5. Again, I would have fired everyone associated with the program except the field maintenance guys and used it to offset the forfeit fees. Next year, there would be plenty of applicants for an SEC coaching job.

  20. Other people’s rights don’t exist for your benefit. Other people don’t exist for your benefit.

    Other people can use their rights to harm you. They may criticize you. They may criticize you in public.

    The idea that everyone else and their rights exist only to the extent that they benefit you is shamelessly infantile and incredibly selfish.

    I am not here for your benefit.

    Assuming that other people and their rights only exist insofar as they are of benefit to you is the very basis of racism, sexism, slavery, Jim Crow, religious discrimination, and many other manifestations of evil. And anyone who assumes that other people’s free speech rights shouldn’t be protected becasue the things they say are hurtful shouldn’t be trusted.

    1. Other people’s rights don’t exist for your benefit. Other people don’t exist for your benefit.

      Well, there went two centuries of progressive thought, right out the window.

    2. I think there’s a lot of confusion surrounding the word “right” in all of this controversy. (I blame progtards, generally, and FDR, specifically.)

      Your natural rights are, essentially, to do anything you please so long as you do not infringe on the life, liberty, or property of others. In a just society, we also have the concept of civil rights, which mostly amount to equal treatment under the law and due process.

      None of that is at issue here. Demanding that others refrain from certain behaviors because you haz a sad is not a “right.” Fuck.

      1. Yeah, a right is the right to make a choice.

        You don’t have a right to violate other people’s rights with a gun. You have the right to choose to own a gun.

        You don’t have a right to violate other people’s rights with your speech (with violent threats, etc.). You have the right to choose what you say.

        Violating other people’s rights means imposing yourself on other people’s right to make choices for themselves (about what they say, for instance).

        Other people have a right to hurt your feelings. They just don’t have a right to violate your rights.

        Do these people realize what society would be like if blacks could be arrested if what they say hurts white people’s feelings?

  21. when we live in fear of bad words, we give agency to the people who use them.

    All this “safe space” sheltering nonsense just empowers your would-be tormenters.*

    *For the purpose of this comment only, I am presuming that the alleged “threatening behavior” and “oppressiveness” actually took place. I do not, however, concede that there was any such behavior at Yale, Missouri, or any of the other colleges experiencing this derptitude.

  22. Words can absolutely be hurtful when they are a part of repeated, sustained harassment. It’s just that there’s little evidence that that was the case at Missouri.

    Plenty of times people absolutely deserve to have their “experiences” dismissed if they are aiming to use it as part of some bizarre modern ritual of self-martyrdom in service to the Cult of the Victim.

    No one should humor me if my personal experience motivates me to try and convince everyone I’m Jesus Christ the Messiah. Similarly I don’t think anyone should be afraid to dismiss claims of racism and hatred as nonsense when they are claimed with such flimsy evidence.

  23. Charles C. W. Cooke ?@charlescwcooke 3h3 hours ago
    New hotness: The police, who are institutionally racist, are being asked to police speech in college, which is institutionally racist.

    1. Lest we forget:
      Campus administrators are perfectly capable of handling rape allegations and calling the police is too burdensome. If, however, you have a problem with the First Amendment, call 911 immediately.

    2. It’s ok when they’re only abusing the wrong thinking people. They won’t harm the right thinking people.

      /derp

  24. God those people are ridiculous.

    Don’t forget to bring pacifiers and rattles as props, Robby.

    1. This cannot end well. These imbeciles, I mean really that is what they are, they are not capable of sentient thought, are now smelling blood and they are going to go full on apeshit. We’re going to see this shit all over the country until they force every single sane person out and the inmates are running the asylums. Seriously, the universities had better stop this shit now because there’s not going to come a point where these animals are satisfied. They’re just a thoughtless mob who only know attack, attack, attack. The real worry is that the spineless administrators at the universities helped instill this mentality and now they don’t have the spine to confront it.

      1. Maybe I’m being naively optimistic, but I seriously think it would only take a few schools taking a hard line approach to put this nonsense to bed. Treat it the same way a parent treats a temper tantrum from a three-year-old. Let the children whine, let ’em protest all they want. But no one gets fired. Are the football players threatening to boycott? Invite them to do so. In the next sentence, inform them that, should they exercise that option, their scholarships will be revoked immediately and they will lose a year of eligibility. Let the masses fester for a while until they dissipate. And they will dissipate. This is not the most tenacious sort.

        Heck, as the anger subsides, one could even throw the movement an olive branch, inviting them to voice their concerns at a school-wide community gathering with school administrators or something. But this is only for the truly gracious.

        In any event, it will work. With nothing to show for their whining, students will lose interest. Other administrations will immediately catch on. And students nationwide will learn that they will have to pick another method to their madness.

        But until that happens? Yeah, it’s going to be a tornado of misinformation and illiberal (in the historic use of the word) chaos until someone confronts this nonsense.

        One just has to approach this like one would a child mid-tantrum. Giving into it is the worst thing possible. Demonstrating its futility is a learning moment.

    2. And cake. Lots and lots of cake.

  25. I was thinking this morning, after hearing a story on the radio about this that featured someone in tears just from thinking about the incidents at UM, how this shit must look to the people who faced down actual violent racists during the proper civil rights movement. Those people would often stand stoically while people threatened them and screamed seriously offensive things in their faces and really meant it. Those people got it. You take the power away from racists and others who would try to dehumanize you by not letting what they say get to you. Some assholes riding around yelling “nigger” at people only have power because people allow that shit to bother them.

    These pathetic student activists are giving bigoted assholes just what they want. Sure, maybe you can’t help how you feel. But if you want to be an effective activist against racism and bigotry, you need to toughen the fuck up and have a little dignity, or you are just giving ammunition to your enemies.

    1. John Lewis must be spinning in his grave.

    2. Look at the white privileged guy telling people to toughen up! YOU DON’T KNOW HOW IT FEELZZZSSSSZZZZ!

      1. I’m not even saying it’s easy. Feels are a real thing too and one can’t always just decide to feel differently about something. But people seem to be moving deliberately in the wrong direction. And with some thought and some time you can generally change how you feel about things.

      2. And yes, I know you were being sarcastic. But this shit really annoys me.

        1. It annoys us all. You and me bro.

    3. Some assholes riding around yelling “nigger” at people only have power because people allow that shit to bother them.

      If this happened at the U of M (which I have no reason to believe it did); its a shame the guy they yelled it at didn’t just yell back “That’s right, boys. Big bad nigger, right here. Run away now.” as they drove away.

      1. Exactly. That would be the right response. Not feeding trolls is much more important in real life than online.

    4. Some assholes riding around yelling “nigger” at people only have power because people allow that shit to bother them.

      If someone did that I’d be inclined to give the guy the finger with both hands while jumping up and down and shouting “You’re awesome dude! You’re fucking awesome!”

  26. Thank you Robby for daring to wade into that seething pool of madness.

  27. Here’s the thing =

    The campus activists don’t care about preventing ACTUAL Racists/Racism.

    Just as Gun-Control people don’t care so much about preventing Actual Criminals or Crime

    They care about imposing controls on EVERYONE, using “Racists/Racism” as their excuse.

    So this thing about = “Buck up little camper! there’s only a tiny fraction of actual racists in the world! so learn to deny them influence over you and you shall live happily and in control of your own destiny!“… isn’t even speaking to their concerns at all. They *need* the Racism to help justify their desire to control Everyone’s speech.

    They want to live in a culture of self-censorship, where people are constantly editing their thoughts to prevent offending. Comment’s like Greg Lukianoff’s, mocking the Yale-Student over-reactions = “They’re acting like someone massacred an indian village….….

    ….they know the point of that comment was to *mock them*, but of course they react only to the “indian massacre” part, and screech that he’s violating their identities and calling for the deaths of indigenous people.

    The only way to undermine these people is to refuse to play ball on their terms at all. Refuse to accept that Words are Violence. Intent means more than content. “Safe” spaces are a euphemism for censorship. Their pathetic appeals and strawmanning should me mocked.

    1. I’m sure you are right. But I think that there are a lot of well-meaning people out there who take people like this at their word and don’t give it a lot more critical thought. Many of those people are honest but overly credulous and I think it is worth trying to convince those people that maybe these activists are full of it.

      1. But I think that there are a lot of well-meaning people out there who take people like this at their word

        That’s probably the first stage of being a Useful Idiot.

        1. I like to do what I can to combat useful idiocy.

      2. “t there are a lot of well-meaning people out there who take people like this at their word and don’t give it a lot more critical thought’

        Indeed!

        There are also millions of people – black, white, yellow, red and mauve – who get along with others every day and don’t think these psychopathic college kids are in any way describing Real Race Relations in America at all.

        i.e. the “middle” on this issue is far larger than the media would have you believe.

        If you read the WaPo article on the Poop Swastika, you’d think the National Consensus was that we should ALL be joining in a collective Hunger Strike

        The media *loves* this shit and obviously gains enormously from the “national freakout” over nothing.

  28. The only way to undermine these people is to refuse to play ball on their terms at all.

    Indeed. Challenge their premises and assumptions relentlessly.

    These people are, at best, severe arrested development cases. Their handle on reality is very shaky. Treat them accordingly.

  29. the only possible proper response to this is “im calling my next band poop swastika”

  30. I was not suggesting that racial slurs are a trivial matter?they are incredibly evil, hateful, and sometimes genuinely traumatizing for persons of color.

    Uh, no. Sometimes they can be evidence that the person using them is genuinely hateful and evil. Other times, they indicate nothing of the sort. The words themselves are just sounds or a series of shapes that humans attach semantic meaning to as they see fit, though based in large part of social conventions.

    1. There’s no need to empathize or apologize. These assholes are, at best, like toddlers who make a giant production out of every teeny boo boo, not because of real pain (though they might eventually train themselves to feel it), but out of a desire for attention and affection. Or, in the case of social justiciars, a desire to get paid and see people grovel. In the worst case, they are people who want to hurt someone, know deep down that it’s wrong, and have to trick their conscience (and the judgment of others) by inventing a false or exaggerated narrative of persecution or perfidy. It’s the same stupid psychology of pogroms, witch hunts, and lynch mobs.

      Actually, considering how rife the SJW movement is with anti-Semites masquerading as Palestinian sympathizers, women hurling bullshit rape accusations to protect their reputation or hurt men that offended their pride, or crowds of zealots alleging that they face genuine, material damage from other people wielding powerful words or thoughts, they’re actually basically just psychologically gearing up for pogroms, lynchings, and witch burnings.

  31. When I was in elementary school a small amount of bullies (including Mexicans and blacks) used to make fun of me in broken English and taunted me to go home.

    OK, what non white person hasn’t been subjected to racial taunts a few times in their lives? And not just by white people either. The black kids who frequent Asian owned grocery stores and liquor stores can be incredibly racists. “When did the Chinese people take over our neighborhood” (I’ve toned down the language here) is something they don’t say under their breath.

    Some black kids got yelled at by unidentified vagrants. Someone saw a poop hate graffiti that no one is able to verify. At least two people lost their jobs. And yet, the libs are having laughing at people who supposedly hate red Starbucks cups. Makes sense.

  32. You know, I was just thinking this morning that if I were more conspiracy minded….

    /tinfoil hat

    If I didn’t know better, I would say that this is the perfect setup for letting “Our Betters” regulate speech.
    African Americans whine and complain that somehow they are being hurt by someone yelling something mean at them, this pisses white people off. Police decide to intervene and start investigating incidents where mean things
    were said. The media will conveniently only cover if a white person is caught saying something racist. Once
    enough of these incidents occur, some white person will stand up and say “Hey! What about all the mean things
    black people said to me????” Eventually, enough white people will be outraged and this will cause the police
    to investigate. A lot of white folks will be thinking to themselves “The shoe is on the other foot now!” all
    while not realizing they just gave away their power of free speech away to our Top. Men.

  33. Personally I’m reveling in the hypocrisy and irony of these hypersensitive and deeply offended folks, both at Mizzou and on social media. For once I found myself agreeing with Josh Earnest (POTUS spokesman, i think that’s his name, which is funny by itself) when he explained in response to the Mizzou protesters that tried to shut up and shut down the folks reporting on their protest, that the basic goal of holding a protest in public is to make sure your point of view is expressed, heard, and reported as widely as possible.

    Every day it seems we get a new version of a, “if this happened in a movie you wouldn’t believe it” moment.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.