Police

The Strange Police Killing of Corey Jones

What should have been a peaceful encounter with an officer ended in man's death.

|

Corey Jones
FSU National Black Alumni

Here's how the Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, Police Department described what happened when a police officer encountered Corey Jones next to Jones' broken-down SUV over the weekend:

On Sunday, October 18th, 2015, at approximately 3:15 a.m., a Palm Springs Garden Police Officer, Nouman Raja, on duty in a plain clothes capacity, in an unmarked police vehicle, stopped to investigate what he believed to be an abandoned vehicle on the southbound exit ramp of Interstate 95 and PGA Blvd. As the officer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject. As a result of the confrontation, the officer discharged his firearm resulting in the death of the subject, Corey Jones. Per Department policy the officer is currently on paid administrative leave and an independent investigation is being conducted by the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office.

Well, at least the statement actually acknowledges that the officer actually discharged his gun rather than passively indicating that a shooting somehow occurred. But beyond that, there's so little information coming out that even a local police union rep is calling for authorities to be more transparent. Raja was apparently investigating a series of burglaries, the police say. Jones, a musician who worked with a local housing authority, does not appear to have been a suspect. Jones had bought a gun three days before the shooting. Police say the gun was found on the ground outside the car, and a box inside the car had a matching serial number. Police haven't said whether Jones actually fired his gun, and there's no dash or body camera footage. Raja's personnel record also appears to be fairly clean and free of accusations of reckless or inappropriate behavior.

So should we apply Occam's Razor at this point and consider the likelihood that both men incorrectly identified the other as a potentially dangerous threat? Raja was not in a police uniform and was not in a marked police vehicle. If the police description is accurate, Raja didn't see or even realize Jones was there when he stopped his car and must have been startled. But what actually happened next is what we don't know.

Beyond what is obviously going to end up being a tragic and unnecessary death, here's what's worrisome: Let's assume everybody is being honest (I know it's difficult with the current level of police distrust), and let's assume Raja opened fire after seeing the gun for fear of his own safety. And let's assume the best of Jones, and the reason he had his gun out was for fear of his own safety being stranded on the side of the road. There has been presented so far no evidence that either of these men had any malicious intentions.

If Jones panicked and shot first, few would argue that Raja's response was inappropriate or poorly considered. But if Raja panicked and shot first, what then? It matters because earlier in the month two experts investigated the abrupt police killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was shot to death in a Cleveland park while carrying an air gun, and determined that the officer was justified. All that mattered in that case, according to these experts, was that the police officer feared a threat. That the threat did not actually exist did not matter. It is apparently reasonable for police to shoot to kill (according to these reports) on the basis of what they fear might happen.

But let's consider a hypothetical scenario. If Jones had panicked, shot first and killed Raja, would he have been entitled to the same defense? Remember, Raja was not in uniform and not in a marked police car. Is Jones entitled to the same authority to react from the fear of what Raja might have done? I suspect that very few people would defend Jones shooting first, and I particularly suspect that those who would defend Raja shooting first would be less likely to defend Jones shooting. This hypocritical transformation of fear into the justification for an acceptable response by police officers is contributing to the distrust of law enforcement officials.

We don't know yet that the police will attempt to declare the shooting justified, we don't know the full story yet, and we don't know that they'll defend Raja if he shot first. But if history is an indication, it should not come as a surprise.

WPTV, the NBC affiliate in West Palm Beach, has a page devoted to aggregating stories about the Jones shooting here.

Advertisement

NEXT: Joe Biden Not Running for President

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. But if Raja panicked and shot first, what then?

    Good shoot. The requirement that self-defense requires that you reasonably fear for your life doesn’t apply to cops, as we have learned in reading numerous exonerations which do not include that word.

    If Jones had panicked, shot first and killed Raja, would he have been entitled to the same defense?

    Nope. Not a cop, would have to show that he reasonably feared for his life, which would mean a panic shooting doesn’t qualify as good self-defense.

    1. Which makes sense because police are much better qualified to carry guns because superior training. Otherwise they wouldn’t carry a government badge. Right?

    2. Look, police are heroes, heroes are brave, and a brave person wouldn’t be afraid without reason. Ergo, any fear a brave and heroic cop feels is reasonable.

      /copderp

      1. Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

    3. Theoretically, a defense could be made for either man if they genuinely feared for their lives.
      Fear means there’s no mens rea (guilty mind/criminal intent).
      Poorly trained cops or easily spooked citizens shouldn’t carry, IMO. Same with hotheads, crazies, or the stupid. With or without a badge and a union card.

  2. We don’t know yet that the police will attempt to declare the shooting justified,

    I know which way to bet, though.

  3. Takin’ all bets! 5 to 1 the cop shit his pants, freaked, and killed the guy because he saw a gun and because of “war on cops”! Takin’ all bets!

    1. Throw in your mom and I’ll take that bet!

      1. Done. But I’m throwing in your mom as well. She’s *so* fucking clingy.

    2. We’ll never know what actually happened. There’s no video evidence. The only story will be the cop’s. And the investigators will make sure that only physical evidence that supports that story is made public.

    3. “war on cops”!

      Am I the only one who worries that the foot soldiers might actually believe this nonsense? At least if your rank and file clock-punchers know deep down that it’s all hyperbole they might restrain themselves from killing some people, if only to avoid the paperwork. However, if they honestly believe they’re in the middle of a honest-to-god war they won’t have any issue slaughtering innocents.

      1. Of course they believe it. The cop tribe marinates in this stuff, plus its self-serving as hell.

        1. Thin Blue Line!

      2. They absolutely believe it. They have an entire culture of framing non-cops as a hostile enemy; it’s classic gang/tribe behavior. And then combine that with the fact that the very job attracts pants-shitting coward bullies who derive their power from being in the gang, and you have yourself a nice recipe for shooting children who have airguns and people stopped on the side of the road.

      3. The higher the pedestal, the more it hurts to have to step down.

        The father removed from reality, the more a sudden does of reality stings.

      4. Am I the only one who worries that the foot soldiers might actually believe this nonsense?

        I’m starting to realize this as well. I’ve only had a gun pulled on me once. It was while working for DoD; I was at work after hours, and a sensor for a door leading to a confidential safe malfunctioned and notified the facility police that the door was ajar. I was sitting at a computer as a cop walked into the room, gun drawn. When he saw me he spun into the tripod position, startled, and pointed his gun at me, not saying a word. The look on his face was genuine, gritty, Special Ops Hero. I’m sure that’s the closest I’ve been to death; a cowardly cop ignoring all context to play make believe as a break from pulling over work vehicles for going 18 in a 15 mph zone. And it would have been such an easy sell to the public. They could just claim that they were protecting confidential information vital to national security (which anyone who’s worked with federal confidential material knows is bogus), and the selfless hero had a reasonable fear. Maybe I would have been spun as a terror suspect, who knows?

        1. Maybe I would have been spun as a terror suspect, who knows?

          Maybe if you were a contractor. If you were a federal employee they’d just spin this as a terrible accident/misunderstanding. If it’s any consolation your case would probably get 60 seconds mention in some mandatory training video.”Mr. McMonocle died because he forgot to securely close the door. Don’t be like Mr. McMonocle.”

  4. As the officer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject. As a result of the confrontation, the officer discharged his firearm resulting in the death of the subject, Corey Jones.

    Seems like they both encountered an armed subject, only one subject killed the other.

    1. NEEDZ MOAR PASSIVE VOICE

      1. As the vehicle was exited, an armed subject suddenly appeared. The officer’s firearm was discharged. The armed subject later passed away.

        Better?

        1. NEEDZ MOAR BATH SALTZ

          1. Fine.

            As the vehicle was exited, an armed subject, smelling of bath saltz, suddenly appeared. The officer’s firearm was discharged. The armed subject later became passed away.

            1. Forward movement was made by time before the armed subject became passed away.

            2. As the vehicle was exited, an armed subject particular individual, smelling of bath saltz, suddenly appeared. The officer’s firearm was discharged. The armed subject particular individual later became passed away.

            3. The armed subject failed to regain his wellness potential.

    2. No video, no other witnesses.

      I expect a colorful tale from the traumatized policeman, about how the corpse-to-be was screaming threats, etc.

      1. The man was, was wearing a blue leisure suit. Plates were from Kansas. He was a huge, beastly, bulging man.

        1. He put his head down and ran at the cop!!!!!

          1. Really? Does no one get the Cousin Eddie reference?

            1. I just got into the comments. I was gonna riff on the Cousin Eddie reference. But you ruined it. So i’ll just stick to:

              +1 white belt

  5. Jones, a musician

    Ah-HA!

    /law enforcement

    1. He’s black, a musician – probably one of them jazzers, all hopped up on goofballs all the time.

      1. On his way to some reefer-fueled orgy of violence and rape, no doubt.

        1. Or he was a hard-core rapper looking to earn some street cred. We’re looking into both possibilities.

          1. Either way, those devil-weed marihuana cigarettes were almost certainly involved!

    2. +1 pair of complicated shoes.

  6. More than one recent story here about a police killing in Palm Beach County.

    Anyways, we do know how the investigation will turn out. No sense pretending otherwise.

  7. Why was he not in uniform and why was his car unmarked?

    1. Seriously. If this cop is doing some specific undercover BS, he has no business doing traffic duty too. Couldn’t he have just called this in and let a marked car check things out? How long would it have taken a state trooper to make it to this location from the nearest speed trap? 5 minutes?

      1. But then some other trooper would get to ransack the car for valuables.

      2. Now that he’s being paid to not work, he’s also not doing all of his important undercover work! Silver linings…

      3. The area where this car likely was is on a somewhat blind corner on a relatively fast exit of I95. If it’s where I believe it was, I could not fault an officer for investigating.

    2. His car was unmarked because its daaaaaaamn! important to catch speeders and the craft bastards slow down if they see a cop. We’ve got 25% of the force’s payroll dependent on this.

      In plainclothes because FYTW.

      Seriously though – I though only detectives routinely drove unmarked and in plainclothes.

      1. According to the article Raja was investigating local burglaries. I guess that explains it? No idea why he’d bother to check an abandoned car on the freeway. Around here that’s state trooper duty. Maybe Florida is different.

        1. I assume he *is* a detective – but the article doesn’t make that clear.

          And its certainly trooper duty, but it wouldn’t be unusual for a detective to stop to check this out – but mainly on the assumption that someone was there and might need assistance.

          I don’t know why, after *assuming* it was abandoned, he wouldn’t simply drive by and call it in (or just ignore it and expect the trooper assigned to patrol that are would come along and find it).

        2. This was right off PGA Blvd. (a busy road) in the middle of one of the largest local cities. I rarely see State Troopers patrolling the area. The Florida Turnpike is a few miles west and is patrolled regularly by Troopers but even then they’re spread quite thin.

      2. As long as their wearing a ridiculously exaggerated bulletproof vest and have their badge dangling from a gold chain, aren’t they permitted to wear really awkwardly fitting jeans?

    3. It seems like many of these instances have a connection to plainclothes officers in unmarked cars driving around doing whatever they want.

      1. Assumptions were made. Little bits of metal were accelerated. Mammals were rendered less-than-living.

  8. So this may be a dumb question, but why the fuck are cops ever in plainclothes and unmarked vehicles when they’re on duty?

    1. The better to catch you doing things the law says you ought not be doing.

    2. You think those un-taxed smokes are going to confiscate themselves?

    3. Gives the ‘civilians’ less heads-up time to start running.

  9. More proof that guns are racist.

  10. Nouman Raja, on duty in a plain clothes capacity, in an unmarked police vehicle, stopped to investigate what he believed to be an abandoned vehicle on the southbound exit ramp of Interstate 95 and PGA Blvd.

    I don’t know about you, but if I’m minding my own business in my car and someone suddenly pulls up behind me and exits their vehicle, you can be damn sure I’m not going to think it’s a good Samaritan. Especially if said person is armed.

    1. Why? You’re pulled over the side of the road at night. *I* would assume you need assistance. If you’re screwing or arranging a drug deal – go find someplace a little more private to park.

      1. Maybe I dropped something important in between the seats? Maybe I pulled over to make an important phone call? It was an exit ramp, not the highway shoulder. There are a myriad of things I could have been doing, and, frankly, if I wasn’t outside trying to flag someone down, I wouldn’t expect to be pulled up on by some rando in plain clothes in an unmarked car.

        1. I don’t know where you’re at, but around here if you pull over on a busy road it is not at all uncommon for some random stranger to pull up behind you and ask if everything is OK. People are just helpful like that. I know it sounds strange, but it’s true.

          1. Where do you live – 1950?

            1. Close. Maine.

                1. Youbecha!

                  1. Sometimes they come back wrong.

                2. +1 Biddeford to Jackman

          2. This is in Palm Beach County. Sadly, we just aren’t that considerate here any more.

          3. Same here Sarcasmic. It is very common for strangers to help stranded motorists here. I have been on both ends of that situation a few times. I carry tools, battery jumpers, fire extinguisher, air pump, fuses, plug kit, oil, tools…etc etc not only for myself but for others too.

            I had a Coworker once who moved here from somewhere on the eastern seaboard and he was always going on about the culture shock he was experiencing. One of the things he talked about was strangers stopping to help him with a flat tire. He thought he was about to get robbed. He just couldn’t understand why anyone would do that. He remained suspicious of the guy even after the tire was fixed and the guy had driven away.

            He eventually moved back. I was glad to see him go.

            1. Helping strangers? What kind of a libertarian are you, anyway? Turn in your monocle on your way out.

              1. Ha ha. The kind of libertarian that keeps his monocle and puts a bullet in anyone who tries to put their hands on it.

                I don’t turn it in.

        2. No kidding. Middle of the night, some random car pulls in behind me, some random guy gets out, most likely with a gun in his hand, I think I know who has more reason to fear for their life.

          1. *If* I saw him get out with a gun in his hand – that would be a cause for concern.

            But someone stopping because I’m stopped – that’s not unexpected behavior from people.

            Keep in mind that while there’s no ‘war on cops’ – there’s also no ‘war on everybody else by everybody else either’.

            1. Hobbes begs to differ.

          2. +1 Ennis Cosby

        3. Heck, I can think of two times off the top of my head where someone pulled over near my house (I live on a busy road) and after I noticed I walked over to ask if everything was OK. Turns out both had a flat. One of them I changed the tire for them, and the other had called a wrecker so I invited him to come in out of the cold and have a cup of coffee while he waited. No one got shot.

          1. Of course in both those situations I didn’t approach with a gun in my hand, like the cop most likely did. So they didn’t have any reason to freak out.

            1. Well if you had a gun, they wouldn’t trust you enough to drink the coffee with the ruffie.

              Duh!

              1. Turns out that guy had a gun. While we rummaged through the back looking for the kit that wasn’t there, we uncovered a shotgun. Nothing else happened.

                1. I’ll bet you at least talked about guns/ammunition for a bit over that coffee.

                  1. Cell phones, actually. The guy was an AT&T rep and was interested in the group discount I got through my work.

          2. I must just be a wary city slicker, then.

            1. I must just be a wary city slicker, then.

              I live in a town with three thousand people in a state that has less than two million. It’s different.

              1. I knew you were nice, but I didn’t know you were so nice.

                Yesterday or the day before, I told Tony, after he describe a post of yours as unnecessary and racist, that you would be one of the few people here who would actually cross the street to help him if he was in distress.

                1. Only if I didn’t know who he was.

                  1. I will not help people I know to be assholes, and I won’t help cops. But then I repeat myself.

        4. In the pre-cell phone world, that’s how you got help when you broke down at the side of the world. Has it really come to this?

          I guess that’s why I live where I do. I am perfectly comfortable around pretty much any stranger and I never lock my house or car. How can you people live like you do?

          1. How can you people live like you do?

            We’re heavily armed?

  11. Raja was simply wrong.

    1. He came across a vehicle on the side of the road – this is an indication of *distress*, not a trap.

    2. He ‘assumed’ it was abandoned, but shouldn’t have been too surprised when it wasn’t. Empty cars don’t just show up on the side of the road, someone puts them there. Prudent practice would have been to announce yourself if you didn’t see anyone. Knock on the side of the vehicle.

    3. If you’re so wound up that the appearance of a man is enough for you to draw and fire – you’re too wound up to be a cop. Find a more relaxing line of work.

    The thing is, Raja likely did this with no malice – but because he’s not playing by the same ruleset as the rest of us he killed this man. If a random civilian had stopped, likely no one would have been hurt. But that’s because *we* know that we’ll have to face an inquisitor who will be looking for reasons to fry us, not one looking for reasons to let this go.

    1. Empty cars don’t just show up on the side of the road, someone puts them there.

      Maybe it just evolved there by chance?

  12. Raja was apparently investigating a series of burglaries, the police say. Jones, a musician who worked with a local housing authority, does not appear to have been a suspect.

    So, failed to stop the burglar/burglaries, right?

    1. Jones should be charged with obstruction. If he hadn’t been doing what he was told not to do, then he’d still be alive – and that cop could have caught those burglars.

      1. If the detective was looking for burglars who have some connection to drugs, can they seize Jones’ car, since it was used in a crime (obstruction) related to drugs?

        1. They can do whatever they want. That’s what it means to be a cop. You can do anything you want because you can get way with killing anyone who tries to stop you. So yeah, they could steal the car. Then it is up to the owner to fight it.

  13. Had Jones “panicked” and, in reasonable fear for his life, shot an armed stranger, exactly how many people would shrug their shoulders and say, “It was a tragic accident. Let’s all just try to move on with our lives.”?

    1. Had Jones “panicked” and, in reasonable fear for his life,

      You’re probably going to have to pick one. Not necessarily, but its hard to say “I panicked AND I was acting reasonably”.

      1. They’re not contradictory.

        You can be in a ‘reasonable fear’ and the panic. That has no bearing on whether or not your *actions* were reasonable.

        1. Yeah, panic is a common, if not ideal, reaction to fear, whether the fear is legitimate or not.

          1. I realize that. I’m just saying that its a hard sell, to convince someone that you were simultaneously panicking and acting reasonably.

            1. This is what one pays good lawyers for.

              Gotta agree with RC here. Panicking likely means you aren’t reasoning.

  14. [insert] “who upon further investigation was revealed to be a cop”

  15. “As the officer exited his vehicle, he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject.”

    And managed to squeeze off a few rounds, killing said armed subject. Sounds to me as if the officer is a really quick draw. Did he announce that he was a cop? Sounds like no to me. How did the officer come to believe the car was abandoned rather than occupied? If he truly thought it abandoned then his gun must have been in the holster. As I said, super quick draw.

    By even the simplest of tests this is a wrongful death, but I can confidently predict it will be ruled as appropriate use of force. Who was there that can argue the victims version of the story? Oh, yeah, the officer…

  16. But let’s consider a hypothetical scenario. If Jones had panicked, shot first and killed Raja, would he have been entitled to the same defense?

    Hell no. Police officers always identify themselves as such. That’s what they are trained to do. That means Raja would have identified himself before being shot. After all, that’s the procedure, and officers always follow procedure. You’ve got to prove the officer didn’t follow procedure. Since you can’t prove he didn’t (he’s dead, and if he had lived he would have claimed he identified himself, even if he didn’t), you must assume he did.

    1. Cops don’t even need to identify themselves, since they all obviously broadcast some signal that indicates their occupation to everybody in the area. Why else are cops in plainclothes always being confronted by armed individuals while that rarely happens to us normies?

      1. Well it couldn’t be because they approach while armed and acting in an aggressive manner (ever met a cop that wasn’t aggressive?). That couldn’t have anything to do with it.

        1. I have actually met many cops that were not aggressive. They all looked bored. I assume they can switch between the two states in an instant.

          1. When they want something then they are aggressive. In this case the cop wanted to know what was going on with the car, so he was no doubt in aggressive mode.

  17. “Well there was a box of donuts unsecured and in plain view on the hood of the car.I knew I should investigate.”

  18. Stercus sanctum, there is a nice Embassy Suites right off that exit at which my wife and I have stayed on a couple of occasions.

    1. Bah… Embassy Suites. Decent prices for what you get but generally miles away from anywhere you actually want to be on your vacation. “Hey, we’re going to San Francisco! I got a great price on a suite in South San Francisco! It’s right next to the US-101 so we can easily drive into SF!”

  19. “The Strange Police Killing of Corey Jones”

    Fixed the hed for you.

  20. “even a local police union rep is calling for authorities to be more transparent.”

    You know it fishy when the police union is calling for more transparency.

    1. Reading other articles, it’s more of the “Why won’t you say that everything he did was alright and exonerate him before an investigation” type of transparency. They’re pointing to the Palm Beach County Sheriff as an example, and he’s been known to do that in the past.

      1. Reading other articles, it’s more of the “Why won’t you say that everything he did was alright and exonerate him before an investigation” type of transparency.

        Like they did with the guy who murdered that twelve year old kid.

  21. I’d just like to point out that having a gun is not in itself a crime, it’s not a threat. Cops aren’t operating in a war zone. Most are never shot at period. One, I fail to see why the cop here had his gun drawn in the first place if he thought it was an abandoned car on an off ramp. Two, even if he saw a gun, that shouldn’t be a reasonable reason to shoot. If the gun was aimed at him, then and only then should these cops be able to fire.

    I’ll say it again. Soldiers had to walk around with armed Iraqis with AK’s in Iraq. The orders were very simple. They are allowed to carry, and you need positive identification of a threat such as it being aimed at someone and even then you are supposed to use escalation of force with skipping of steps only permissible if it is required.

    That’s a real war zone where you don’t know who the fuck you’re dealing with. Cops see a hand gun, which is entirely legal here, and they just open fire.

    1. Cops aren’t operating in a war zone.

      They are trained to believe that they are. Everyone is a threat until proven otherwise. So if you’ve got a gun, and you have not yet proven that you are not a threat, then you are considered to be a deadly threat. Bang, bang, now you’re dead. And nothing else happens.

  22. Waiting for retiredfire (aka the new Dunphy) to show up and both about how we are all assholes for second-guessing law enforcement)….

    1. Hello.
      Just hate to see so many, who have never had to face the prospect of facing the wrong end of a fun, as I have, making such sure pronouncements of what goes through a LEO’s mind and, especially statements like “the very job attracts pants-shitting coward bullies who derive their power from being in the gang”, when the ones I worked with were far from that.
      If I see what is a “bad shoot”, based on the forensics, which is very determinative of confirming or disproving the cop’s story, I will admit it and be happy to see the one involved face justice but most stories, especially by the “reporters” here, are too short on facts to be able to say, so I default to what I know and that is undeniably that cops DO NOT feel good, even after a “good shoot”.
      Ending a life is a profoundly disturbing event and police, who have to think about it being a possibility from day one, may be even more affected than your average person, who probably will only do so through some kind of accident, instead of having to make a split-second decision to do so, intentionally. Think about it.

      1. “wrong end of a gun
        I hate that REASON doesn’t have an “edit” feature.

  23. We don’t know yet that the police will attempt to declare the shooting justified

    Uhhh, yeah, we do.

    1. Yes, it is a foregone conclusion. Cops are free to murder at will, and they do. They also commit every other crime in the book with great frequency – assault, rape, extortion, slander, fraud, drug dealing, protection rackets, slavery – you name the crime, cops do it, and the prosecutors and judges help them do it and benefit from it.

  24. I don’t need to know the story. All it matters is if the cops is a damn coward or trigger hapy, he should not be approaching cars without backup. Or at least, park your damn car far enough away, announce yourself, have a fucking flashlight, and you won’t be startling any civilians who may have a right to bear arms. This is outrageous how a cop could possibly get away with this. I travel to that area many times a year. One of my friends does gigs in the same music circle asa the victim. The cops are playing this shady.

    it’s the same with Tamir Rice. What if he really were an adult as they believed? What if the adult had a license to carry in OH? Shouldn’t the cops at least be careful enough to approach a potential incident with caution so such hasty shootings wouldn’t be necessary evne if you buy their account of what happened?

  25. in my state it is against the law for any law enforcement officer or agent to use an unmarked car whilst on duty to deal with anything suspect, relating to law enforcement. They can do investigations and observe, but have NO law enforcement powers such as an uniformed officer in a marked cruiser might do.

    Were I parked at the side of the road, perhaps with a mechanical issue forcing me to stop, and a strange car, no markings, pulled in behind me, I’d instantly be on High Alert. I’d not likely have my weapon drawn at the ready…. but would certainly have it ready to hand “in case”. But is presnting a firearm in such a situation a capital offense? I rather think not. WHY did not the officer use any of his words? Nothing is mentioned about any dialogue. Did he even identify himself as a police officer? We don’t know, as the officer who fired does not mention these things in his reports.

  26. he was suddenly confronted by an armed subject.

    Other than the use of the word “subject – implying the person is the king’s property – I am no longer accepting the word “armed” as used by police to mean “a person with a gun on his person.” I assume the police like to use the word “armed” whenever someone is within 50 feet of a gun or knife or blunt object.

  27. I bought brand new BMW by working ONline work. Six month ago i hear from my friend that she is working some online job and making more then 98$/hr i can’t beleive. But when i start this job i have to beleived her

    ??????? —— http://www.HomeJobs90.Com

  28. There is too much that we do not know about this encounter.

    As someone who has had an encounter similar to this, the MOMENT I was aware that the person approaching me was an off-duty police officer, my immediate reaction was, “He is not a threat. He perceives ME as a threat. DO NOT REACH FOR YOUR PISTOL!”

    Every situation has it’s own circumstances that cannot be piled into a mentality that NO ONE has a right to defend themselves nor that NO POLICE OFFICER has the right to do what his/her duty requires of them.

  29. Cops cannot be trusted. Cops lie all the time and everywhere. They lie for no reason other than that they can get away with it. They lie, lie, lie, and lie again. They lie on their arrest reports, they lie in court, they lie to get a brother cop out of a jam. They lie with abandon. They lie with aplomb. They lie with sincerity. It’s the first lesson in police academy: “How to lie sincerely.” This is the reason you never, never trust a cop. Every word out of their mouths is a lie.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.