Rape

Virginia Wesleyan College Demands Sexual History of Student Rape Victim. Don't Get Outraged Just Yet…

Another convoluted campus-rape case out of Virginia highlights the limits of letting school bureaucrats handle assault investigations.

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There's a lot of outrage going around over a request from Virginia Wesleyan College (VWC) that a former student who claims she was raped now provide a list of past sexual partners and boyfriends. After reading briefly about the case, I was set to write a short post reminding people how campus rape investigations—which Reason frequently criticizes for trampling the rights of the accused—are also absolutely awful for sexual-assault victims (and potential future victims). And at first blush, this case does seem to show that: after VWC found the accused guilty of sexual misconduct and expelled him, it subsequently changed his status to "voluntarily withdrawn" in order to "assist him in seeking further studies." 

blueathena7/Flickr

The victim told The Huffington Post last summer: "I kept thinking, they let him go to another school. What if he rapes someone else? I started feeling guilty, like maybe I should've gone to police, so maybe he would've been arrested."

This paradox is one of many reasons why treating campus rape as an academic infraction rather than a serious criminal matter makes little sense.

But there's much more to this story than what's being reported by The Huffington Post and ran with by other online media. For starters, the victim—identified only as Jane Doe—has filed a civil lawsuit against the college, alleging gross negligence and seeking $10 million in damages. It's in this lawsuit—not the initial rape investigation—in which VWC is seeking to compel Doe to identify "any individuals with whom (she has) had sexual intercourse at any time and… any individuals with whom (she has) had a romantic relationship" since the alleged assault. The school says this is necessary to determine Doe's credibility in regard to the trauma she says she's suffered and whether she was, as claimed in the school hearing, a virgin before the attack. 

Why should Doe's virginity matter to the case? It doesn't per se. But Doe testified (of her own accord) during a school adjudication hearing that she had been a virgin before the rape. The college claims to now have "a good faith basis for believing" that this was not true. While her virginity or lack thereof has no bearing on whether she was raped, lying about her virginity unprovoked might not bode well for her broader credibility. The school states that "if they knew (Doe) had provided false testimony" during the hearing, campus officials may have come to a different conclusion in the original case.

Doe's story

Let's take a look at that original case now. It started in August 2012, when Doe entered her freshman year at Virginia Wesleyan College, a private, Methodist Church-affiliated school located in Norfolk, Virginia. According to Doe's lawsuit against VWC, she and several other freshman women went to a party at an upperclassman's on-campus townhouse following a mandatory orientation seminar on the third day of school. At that party, Doe, then 18, was given (and took) a shot of vodka that turned out to have been drugged, and "several other girls at the … party were also provided with spiked drinks." When she and her friends began to feel "dizzy and lightheaded," they decided to return to their dorm rooms. 

"Her assailant, Zachary Kane, began following them," the suit claims. After depositing her female friends at their dorm, Doe continued walking, with Kane continuing to follow her, until she became nauseous and felt like she was going to pass out. At this point Kane, then 19, "grabbed her and began fondling and kissing her," and Doe "was unable to fight back because she had been drugged," the suit states. Kane then purportedly "grabbed her arm and forced her back to his dorm room" where he "repeatedly and brutally raped, sodomized, and forced (Doe) to orally copulate him until she vomited, for approximately five hours." When she left, Doe was "battered, bruised, and bloodied" and "her shorts, once white, were now crimson with her own blood." 

By the end of the 2013 school year, Doe had dropped out of VWC and entered in-patient treatment for anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and depression. In fall 2014, she filed a lawsuit against the school in Norfolk Circuit Court, claiming VWC was negligent in its duty to prevent students from being sexually assaulted, fraudulent in representing itself as a safe place for female students, and negligent in its response to the assault. As a direct result of this negligence, the lawsuit states, Doe "suffered excruciating physical injury and pain, and has and will suffer extraordinary psychiatric injury." 

In echoes of Rolling Stone's article about the now-infamous University of Virginia (UVA) rape case, Doe's lawsuit suggests that "the college knew that male students were drugging female students, rendering them incapacitated, and raping them, and yet did nothing." Furthermore, campus police should have been able to recognize Doe's "helpless condition" when she entered Kane's dormitory and intervened, it says, and so should have the campus security guard who saw her passing by afterward with bloody shorts. 

"Virginia Wesleyan College has carefully reviewed the facts of this unfortunate incident and the allegations in Jane Doe's Complaint," it said in a statement last fall. "While the College sympathizes with Jane Doe, Virginia Wesleyan denies any allegation of improper conduct and will vigorously defend this lawsuit." It declined to make any further comments as long as the case was ongoing. 

Virginia Wesleyan to blame?

Taking all of this at face value—and as you'll see in a few paragraphs, there may be reason not to—I want to challenge the idea that the school is somehow responsible here. That Doe went to a party and consumed alcohol procured by a stranger in no way makes her to blame for being attacked—that lies squarely with any persons who drugged or attacked her. But how could VWC have possibly pre-intervened here? Short of banning students from socializing without chaperones, that is.

Underage drinking is already prohibited on campus; students do it anyway. Furthermore, the freshman orientation Doe had just attended specifically warned students to be wary about going to parties where alcohol was served for the very reason that assailants may provide "drinks spiked with drugs to facilitate rape and other sexual assaults." 

Again, that Doe went to a party and drank despite this warning does not make it her fault if she was raped. But neither is it the fault of the college for not somehow stopping the party from occurring, stopping Doe from attending, or stopping individual nefarious actors from acting nefariously there. Campus administrators cannot reasonably be expected to keep watch over all student activities at all times. And acknowledging this reality is not, as Jezebel and others have so frustratingly portrayed it, the same as the school saying it has no responsibility to protect students from sexual assault.  

In fact, the school seems to have been well aware of that responsibility, hence the mandatory orientation that discussed these issues and the undisputed presence of school security officers around campus. Doe apparently passed several of these officers on her way to and from Kane's dorm room. Why didn't she try to get their attention on her way in? Or reach out to the officer she saw upon leaving? I don't mean to suggest that not doing so invalidates her assault claims; there are certainly plausible reasons within the realm of Doe's story—incapacitation, shock—why she may not have. But it's absurd to suggest these campus cops, who must see hundreds of drunk kids entering and exiting dorms every week, acted negligently in not simply sensing something was amiss in this case. 

Doe's lawsuit alleges that high levels of sexual violence on the VWC campus mean the security officers should have been more suspicious, and that all intoxicated young women should be regarded as "imminently" likely to be assaulted. VWC had "the highest rate of on-campus sexual assaults" of any school it Virginia, it notes.

For 2010, that meant a total of six reported sexual assaults at VWC, according to Department of Education data. In 2011, zero sexual assaults were reported and in 2012, there were three. Virginia Wesleyan is a small school, with only about 1,300 students at any time, so that works out to a sexual assault rate of about 0.2 percent.* Even making the fair assumption that there are more assaults than get reported, the picture is hardly one of a rape culture so widespread that school officials should treat every freshman female as one party away from being attacked.

Doe's original story

And yet… if the campus cops were right there, how is it that they couldn't tell Doe was being forced into Kane's dormitory? Perhaps because that's not what happened.

In a February 2013 Title IX hearing before the school's Community Arbitration Board, Doe initially shook her head "no" when asked if she wanted to go back to Kane's dorm, according to a transcript. But she followed that with, "I mean, it's not like he dragged me." Later in the hearing she stated that walking back to Kane's room was a mutual decision, but on the walk, Doe got dizzy and stopped. "Then when he walked away I kind of just went with him, not really thinking about where I was going," she told the board (emphasis mine). "I knew I was going back to a room. I ended up just going with him."

Going back to Kane's room willingly certainly doesn't mean Doe consented to sex. But it is one of several discrepancies between her original testimony and her current lawsuit against the school. 

Doe told the board she may have willingly kissing Kane in the dorm hallway. But then "there's like a half hour that I can't remember," she said, and the rest of the night has only come back to her "in pieces." Doe told the board she definitely said no "at least once" before "checking out": "I said, 'This really hurts; can you please stop?'" Doe told school officials. "The main thing I said was, 'This really hurts.'" She said she tried to leave when Kane went to the bathroom but was too dizzy, eventually exiting the room after he fell asleep. 

Kane disputed Doe's version of events at the hearing. Noting that he was not the one who provided her with the allegedly spiked drink (something Doe does not dispute), Kane claims the two participated in consensual sexual activity, including intercourse, for about 45 minutes. He apologized for any pain he might have caused Doe, but insisted that he was neither aware she had been drugged nor that she didn't want to have sex with him. 

Reading a transcript of the hearing is incredibly frustrating. Time and time again, administrators stop cold on lines of questioning that would seem to prompt further probing. They fixate on weird things, like pinning down exactly how much blood may have been on the sheets. They question Kane about how many women he has kissed since starting college, how many women he has had sex with, how often he has sex, and how long it generally takes him to ejaculate. When asking why he'd offer to help with Doe's medical bills if he wasn't guilty, one board member wonders if this is a "you break it, you buy it" situation.  

There is never a concrete determination that Doe's drink was spiked. "I don't have any proof it was drugged; I just heard that it was from other people," she says. Officials ask her if she saw the shot being poured from the bottle (she did) and if she saw anything put in it (she did not). "They were saying it was in the bottle," she adds.

This seems like an area where a little probing could have made a difference. But they don't even so much as ask whom else she saw doing shots—was it solely freshman girls drinking from this bottle?—let alone about other party guests whom they might talk to. If an entire bottle of vodka was drugged and served at a party, it would seem someone else would have felt something.

The school officials also spend a good deal of time trying to reconcile Doe and Kane's diverging timelines: Was she there for 45 minutes or 5 hours? But rather than consult campus security cameras, which must exist somewhere around the dormitories; interviewing Doe's friends (whom she was with right before the incident) and roommate (whom she saw right after); or questioning security officers who may remember something, the school simply tries to talk Doe and Kane through their conflicting accounts. Unsurprisingly, no conclusion is reached. 

Police report filed

Not long after the campus hearing and Kane's dismissal from VWC, Doe filed a police report with the Virginia Beach Police Department (VBPD). In the report, Doe said Kane fisted and sodomized her, in addition to raping her vaginally, and "she tried to tell (him) to stop and push him off of her but she was too physically incapacitated as a result of the drugs." It was only after beginning counseling that Doe "remembered more details of the assault," the police report states.

It also includes info from a medical examination that police requested. By this point, any physical evidence of trauma that may have existed was gone. During the examination, however, "it was found that (Doe) had a consensual sexual encounter 10 days after the reported sexual assault occur ed and therefore it could not be determined whether or not (a urinary tract infection she contracted post-assault) could be a result of the reported sexual assault or the consensual sexual encounter."

No arrests were made. Associate Commonwealth Attorney Kari Kopnicky declined to go forward with the case "based on no reasonable likelihood of successful prosecution." 

"There was enough probable cause to obtain a warrant and make an arrest," Lieutenant John Gandy of the VBPD told me. But there was "not enough evidence to successfully prosecute the case," and so Kopnicky declined to take action. Gandy stressed that it was "not because she didn't want to." 

The $10 million question

Doe's attorney, Jonathan Halperin, said they won't provide the school with information about her sexual history unless the court orders it. "This is a drug facilitated rape of a freshman woman on her third day of orientation by a stranger," Halperin told The Huffington Post. "To ask the victim in discovery to name every sexual partner and romantic interest she has ever had is irrelevant and outrageous and totally inappropriate. It is intended to harass and intimidate the victim."

"VWC acknowledges that Plaintiff's sexual history is a sensitive subject," the school states in its motion to compel the info. "However… Plaintiff has put her sexual history at issue by arguing she is unable to have sex, does not have any interest in sex, and has experienced difficulties in romantic relationships due to her inability to have sex and lack of interest in sex. Given the significance of these claims in a case where $10 million is at issue, VWC feels compelled to explore Plaintiff's sexual history." 

In her lawsuit against the school, Doe claimed she was in "severe pain" for at least a month after the incident. Pointing to the police report finding about Doe having sex soon after the rape, the school states: "If Plaintiff was having sexual intercourse during this period, it calls into question (or provides an alternative explanation for) her claim that she experienced severe pain when using the restroom." As to requesting the names of her post-assault boyfriends, VWC says it gets to Doe's stated inability to now carry on normal relationships. 

No one wants to go back to the bad old days when women's sexual histories were randomly relevant to rape investigations. And we won't, because rape shield laws prevent such info from being used to discredit victims in criminal cases. But this is a civil trial, where the payoff may be bigger but the rules are different too.

Besides, the crux of this case isn't whether Doe was assaulted—which the school does not really dispute—but whether VWC is complicit in the assault and, if so, the extent of the damages Doe is owed for her suffering. Perhaps the info VWC seeks about Doe's romantic life is overly broad, but it's certainly not irrelevant to the questions at hand. "VWC has conferred in good faith in an attempt to resolve this dispute without Court intervention," it claims in the lawsuit. "Unfortunately, these attempts have proven fruitless," and since the matter is now before a civil court the information in question is discoverable "and should be produced."  

Regardless of how this all turns out, the story already embodies everything that's wrong with colleges handling violent assault cases. First, we have a student who feels her rape allegations were diminished by the school, causing her even more distress. Second, we have someone accused of assault whom, if innocent, was wrongly kicked out of school and branded a rapist without ever having the chance to mount a real defense and, if guilty, was merely kicked out of school and not subject to punishment, a criminal record, or any measures that may limit his ability to commit future assaults. And finally, we have a college now forced to spend time and money defending its lack of crime precognition while also dragging a former student's sexual history into the public record. Why do so many people find this preferable to leaving rape cases to the criminal justice system?

Let's let colleges provide student rape victims with encouragement and help in filing police reports and getting forensic exams; post-assault STD testing, etc., at the student health center; counseling and student support groups; and perhaps adjudication in limited, less-serious cases (public health professor Mary Koss has some interesting ideas on the latter here). Let's raise awareness among students about how waiting to file a rape report reduces the chances of future prosecutorial success. And if law enforcement still isn't spectacular at handling sexual assault cases (and it isn't), then let's work on reforming this system for rape victims of all education levels and socioeconomic statuses. 

* Corrected; originally said two percent.  

NEXT: Chris Christie's Fearmongering Argument Against Privacy

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  1. Seems like the story

    [dons Fist’s sunglasses]

    is all TRUMPed up.

    /needless Trump insertion

    1. This whole story is based on needless insertions.

      1. Both of you! Over here!

        *narrows gaze*

        1. You keep making that face and one day your face will be stuck like that.

        2. You keep making that face and one day your face will be stuck like that.

          1. You keep making that comment and the squirrels will get you.

  2. Crime investigations should be left to professionals. Period.

    Title IX seems to create more problems that it’s solved.

    1. I think that is the point.

    2. You don’t professionalize if you don’t federalize!

  3. As a durty furrner, I don’t understand why universities do these investigations. Australian unis would run a thousand miles from this, and make it the cops’ problem. What’s the reason? Has it ever been thus?

    1. It’s because the universities are dependent on federal loan guarantees for students, and the Dept of Edumacation has made it explicitly clear that the universities will involve themselves in this crap or lose their eligibility.

      It’s an endrun on the justice system by progressives in the DOE.

      1. Christ, what an irresponsible policy. Thanks for the explanation.

        1. “Christ, what an irresponsible policy. Thanks for the explanation.”

          Also, to be clear it’s an Obama administration policy issued in 2011.

          “On April 4, 2011, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague Letter on student-on-student sexual harassment and sexual violence (“DCL”). The DCL explains a school’s responsibility to respond promptly and effectively to sexual violence against students in accordance with the requirements of Title IX. Specifically, the DCL:
          Provides guidance on the unique concerns that arise in sexual violence cases, such as a school’s independent responsibility under Title IX to investigate (apart from any separate
          criminal investigation by local police) and address sexual violence.”

          http://www2.ed.gov/about/offic…..tle-ix.pdf

          1. How can anyone doubt the ability of college administrations to investigate rape claims? Why, when Jerry Sandusky was accused of raping young boys in the shower rooms in Penn State, Graham Spanier and company took a look and said nothing more to see, move along now. Who was that grand jury to question that conclusion? Spanier and company are well-educated men with degrees. They all know better than us!

      2. To be more clear, it’s EXACTLY the same as the federal government making endruns on its constitutional limits by tying federal dollars to state compliance with laws the feds cannot legally enforce themselves like speed limits, drinking ages, and the sort.

        1. SD v. Dole was a fucking travesty of a SCOTUS opinion.

        2. It’s a pity the GOP doesn’t have the balls to turn this around on them: declare that states must ban rent controls and other price controls and lower their minimum wages, or lose federal education and highway funding and whatnot.

  4. “I started feeling guilty, like maybe I should’ve gone to police, so maybe he would’ve been arrested.”

    There is a thought.

    1. Except, like everything else she claimed, it was a lie. She did go to the police and the prosecutor refused to bring charges for lack of evidence.

  5. It’s almost as if subverting the concept of actually INVESTIGATING rather than jumping straight to the kangaroo court can BACKFIRE on people! Who’da thunk it?

    1. What’s this Backfire you are talking about? The policy is working exactly as intended.

      1. Yep. One less cis-hetero shitlord male rapist (which is redundant, I know, since all cis-hetero men are rapists /SJW DERP) in college. Exactly as they intended.

      2. !0m dollar suit.

    2. Indeed. It’s remarkable that the university practically can’t defend itself by arguing that there was no rape. Thus there’s considerable economic incentive to sue universities.

  6. In the report, Doe said Kane fisted and sodomized her, in addition to raping her vaginally

    If you are forcibly subjected to a fisting, you’re going to be out of commission for a while and probably in need of immediate medical attention.

    1. Exactly.

      If she was a virgin and was fisted I doubt she would have wanted, much less been able, to have had intercourse 10 days later.

      I agree, she would have gone to the emergency room.

    2. You know who else was forcibly subjected to a fisting? (always wanted to start one of these!)

  7. Well, the good thing is at least this little girl now understands what it’s like to be fucked. Gotta learn sooner or later.

    Always look on the bright side of life, I say….

    *whistles a tune*

    1. “…at least this little girl now understands what it’s like to be fucked. Gotta learn sooner or later.”

      Good God. Or maybe she needs to learn how to use one of these:

      http://www.smith-wesson.com/we…..rrorView_Y

      1. Whoa, whoa, whoa!!!! That’s an offsenive weapon, that is!

      2. If you don’t want women to be victims then you’re part of the problem!

  8. BTW, I think “Needless Trump Insertion” would be an excellent name for a second album from a low-rent band.

    1. Agreed –

      “They totally sold out, man!”

      /one of band’s few fans

  9. It sounds like the therapist she saw gave her a set of false memories. Seriously, have we learned nothing from the sex scandals of the past? We have professionals taking people with minor to no trauma and giving them life long issues. How has it not become part of their training not to do this.

    1. Where is the fun in that?

    2. That was my initial reaction to the whole “I didn’t remember anything until I entered therapy, then I remembered being sodomized and fisted for 5 hours” part of the story.

      Perhaps she should be naming her therapist as a defendant in this lawsuit, if that is the case. The thing about false memories is that they act just like real memories… so if it is these memories that are causing such trauma, and it is the therapist that put them there, then it is the therapist who should be liable.

      Of course one problem with that theory is that in order for her to name the therapist, she would have to accept that some of her memories are false, which is extremely difficult. Perhaps impossible without video evidence showing the memory being created.

      1. Could someone sue the therapist besides her? The security guard, university, or accused boy for example? They can prove she wasn’t fisted and that she didn’t think she was until after the therapy sessions, and the accusations are causing harm to their reputations and in the university’s case wallet. Would any of them have standing to say the therapist caused them harm by convincing the girl this stuff happened?

    3. It sounds like the therapist she saw gave her a set of false memories

      Or maybe she conveniently remembered whatever she needed to ensure the biggest payday

    4. I’d say the obligatory orientation meeting did that. Seriously, you get out that orientation and walk right into one of their example scenarios….really?

    5. /notes that therapist can be pronounced as the rapist

  10. Never ,ever,have sex with a drunk chick,I knew that in 1979,and tuned some down.Bitches be crazy.

    1. Yeah, I had a couple of incidents of needy, drunk and crazy underclassmen show up at my dorm wanting sex. Whether through wisdom or stupidity, I let them sleep it off while I went and crashed elsewhere.

      1. Same here.

        Wise man.

        1. That’s where I come down most of the time.

      2. Whether through wisdom or stupidity, I let them sleep it off while I went and crashed elsewhere.

        I’d go even further and say never let them sleep it off in your room either. All it takes is for some SJW type to see her leaving your room the next day, who then convinces her that you must have raped her while she was passed out, and next thing you know you’re being kicked our of school after the kangaroo court finds you guilty of being a cis-gendered heterosexual male.

        A better option is to call her roommate or another female (or flaming gay) friend who’s sober, and then the two of you walk her back to her room. That way you have a sober non cis-hetero male witness that nothing happened.

        At this point I wouldn’t even want to be seen walking on campus with a drunk chick.

      3. Ah hellz no. Bang away, son. The grave is forever.

    2. Knew this in high school – had two very drunk girls in my bedroom (my parents were away) but just let them sleep it off until they were sober enough to go home.

      Of course one of the girls was pissed that I didn’t take advantage of her – *sigh* just can’t win – and thought that I didn’t like her.

  11. “And yet… if the campus cops were right there, how is it that they couldn’t tell Doe was being forced into Kane’s dormitory? Perhaps because that’s not what happened.”

    Way to be a Rape Denier, ENB.

  12. You know who else made up stories to achieve nefarious ends…

    1. Hillary Clinton?

    2. E.L. James?

    3. Baron Silas Greenback?

    4. Circe Lannister?

    5. Taylor Swift?

    6. Titus Oates?

    7. Columbia U mattress ass- slut/ attention whore

  13. If colleges are the rape dens that so many people are screaming about, why do some politically powerful people want to make college free or super cheap to send more women there?

    1. Federal Rape Camps

    2. They’re hoping to simply overwhelm and wear out the rapists by providing them with an overabundance of targets. It’s quite a clever strategy, really.

  14. “To ask the victim in discovery to name every sexual partner and romantic interest she has ever had is irrelevant and outrageous and totally inappropriate. It is intended to harass and intimidate the victim.”

    But that $10 million dollar initial offer is totally kosher.

    1. She’s punching up, that’s different

  15. All of that blood, and security/cop let her walk by? And as someone said above…fisting and forced sodomization.

    I won’t say she made everything up, but at some point I do think she added in details to make it sound worse.

    1. Well, people who lie about some things tend to lie about other things. And while everyone lies about certain things, most honest people generally don’t lie about getting fisted and sodomized. So I’m gonna go ahead in lean in direction of incredulity.

  16. We’re not any of us focusing on the right thing here. This isn’t about the girl who drank strangers’ alcohol – that’s on her – or drinking spiked alcohol – that’s on neither her nor her sexual partner du jour – or whether the school should have police arresting underage drinkers to protect them from themselves. The important thing here is that the word is nauseated, not nauseous.

    1. Fist focuses like the Eye of Sauron on what truly matters!

  17. I do blame the school for not reporting a brutal rape to police and turning the investigation over to them the second they found out about it. That should be SOP. Not sure how many lawsuits it’s going to take before colleges start to figure that out. BTW ENB, I watched that trafficking discussion last night. Nice job! Very informative.

    1. I do blame the school for not reporting a brutal rape to police

      How exactly is it the school’s responsibility to report an brutal rape individual’s allegation of a crime to police?

      1. They took 1’s and 9’s off all the phones?

      2. Therapists, teachers, and several other categories of persons are required to report any suspicions they have of child abuse. Requiring colleges to report all suspicions of rape wouldn’t be a very large extension of that principle.

        1. persons are required

          Won’t find many libertarian principles starting this way…but

          18 year old students aren’t children.

          1. Seriously? Have you heard of these safe spaces set up for them when someone with words they don’t like come to campus? Floor cushions, puppies, bubbles, coloring books, and screenings of ?ber G-rated films? It seems college students these days are more childish than some children.

            1. ^THIS^

              If we’re going to infantilise 18-22 year old college students, might as well go the full 9 yards.

          2. I thought they were now children until age 26.

      3. From a liability standpoint they fucked up. They were told and thet decided to keep it in house. They made there own bed. fuck them.

        1. If they had told her to call the police because they don’t handle criminal allegations I would not have any blame for them. But they got involved so yes they only have themselves to blame.

    2. I do blame the school for not reporting a brutal rape to police

      The initial report that the girl gave wasn’t a brutal rape though, if you read the article. She either made that up later in order to get a larger payday out of it, or the therapist somehow planted false memories.

      Her initial report to the kangaroo court was the pretty standard “girl goes to party, drinks possibly spiked alcoholic beverage, ends up in guy’s dorm room, has non-consensual sex but probably doesn’t object strongly enough for guy to be sure if she’s into or not” story that seems all too common.

  18. It was only after beginning counseling that Doe “remembered more details of the assault,” the police report states

    How long after the incident did the counseling begin? If she didn’t remember being assaulted, what was she going to counseling for?

    1. …what was she going to counseling for?

      Just in case.

  19. The part I never understand about these things. If you were drugged, assaulted, and raped, why would you go to some university administrator instead of the police? Can someone explain that, because I do not understand it.

    1. Especially if you weren’t just raped, but raped bloody and beaten et cetera. Her story stinks.

    2. Simple answer, college administrators are easier to hoodwink than are the police!

      1. Unfortunately, that is the best explanation I’ve heard. And its probably 100% accurate.

        1. And you can’t so easily sue the police dept for failing to take everything you say as gospel and punish the alleged offender without sufficient evidence.

      2. The stakes are lower in lying to administrators than it would be to lie to the police.

      3. Not true. Look at how Graham Spanier and company handled those scandalous accusations against Jerry Sandusky.

    3. Because you can do that without telling mommy and daddy you’re a drunken whore.

  20. Yet another trumped up rape charge. I wonder if women and feminists in particular get the effect this garbage has on men like me? I used to believe women when they claimed rape, but after so many of these stories being debunked I now initially doubt rape claims when I hear them. Crying wolf and all that.

    1. A proper skeptic doubts all claims made in the absence of supporting evidence, especially when the claim is made months (and in some cases years *cough*Jackie*cough*) after the fact when any evidence of the crime has long since disappeared. If nothing else, she should have been able to wave the bloody shorts to provide some substantiation of her claims.

  21. “Doe’s lawsuit alleges that high levels of sexual violence on the VWC campus mean the security officers should have been more suspicious, and that all intoxicated young women should be regarded as “imminently” likely to be assaulted. ”

    ^^^ This right here…hilarious.

    All my female friends were imminently likely to be assaulted literally every weekend of college, apparently.

    1. All my female friends were imminently likely to be assaulted literally every weekend of college, apparently.

      Yes by you, you EVUL CIS-GENDERED HETEROSEXUAL MALE SHITLORD!!!!!!!1111!!!!!

    2. The fact that the accuser forced in some bullshit about the overall situation on campus (doubtless providing no actual evidence of the claim) really suggests that this was an ideologically motivated allegation, rather than one motivated by an actual crime.

      Scary though, as that basically sums up their view of the world: women are imminently likely to be assaulted (considering they’re statistically less likely to be assaulted than men, we penised persons should be especially ascared), doesn’t this mean men should be regarded as imminently likely to assault; meaning for the security of women, all men seen in public should be arrested.

      Kind of like how if a woman feels threatened by you asking her where 3rd street is, your query for directions thereby magically becomes harassment and intimidation.

  22. I don’t see why school administrators don’t have a policy of “Take all rape allegations to the police and assist the accusor as necessary.” Why doesn’t a school have a whole squadron of men and (let’s be honest, really just) women whose job it is to help navigate the legal system and work with the police? The school cannot get in trouble for not doing enough, and it lets the polife handle the law.

    1. I’d say it’s pretty clear: many of the rape cases colleges get are bullshit or at least decidedly uncertain, and the police would (rightly) drop them due to insufficient evidence, and declare many of them (like Jackie’s) unsubstantiated.

      The university believe there is basically no such thing as an unsubstantiated rape claim, and an accusation is all the evidence required, no matter how preposterous, to warrant conviction. So there is a fundamental disagreement between (feminist) universities and police departments about what evidence is sufficient to warrant conviction (with the feminist position apparently being ‘none’). So the kangaroo courts are just a way the college can punish “rapists” that they “know” the police will just let get away, by expelling them. It’s a form of extra-judicial punishment for men, essentially. Ultimately, the goal, I’m sure, is to graft the universities’ model onto the actual justice system.

    2. Where schools get screwed is thanks to so many rape allegations being nonsense. If a school takes the 20 rape accusations reported to it and only to it to the police, and the police rightly refuse to prosecute 19 of those flimsy accusations, the school gets crucified for helping “create” an atmosphere where women aren’t believed and sexual assault is widely prevalent (sure).

      In short, schools set up kangaroo courts so as to juice the number of guilty verdicts in cases it knows have no merit.

  23. “It’s in this lawsuit?not the initial rape investigation?in which VWC is seeking to compel Doe to identify “any individuals with whom (she has) had sexual intercourse at any time and… any individuals with whom (she has) had a romantic relationship” since the alleged assault. The school says this is necessary to determine Doe’s credibility in regard to the trauma she says she’s suffered and whether she was, as claimed in the school hearing, a virgin before the attack.”

    They think they should be free to confront their accuser and defend themselves against a $10 million lawsuit?!

    That is so racist or misogynist or homophobic or somethin’.

  24. claiming VWC was negligent in its duty to prevent students from being sexually assaulted, fraudulent in representing itself as a safe place for female students, and negligent in its response to the assault.

    In other words, she bears no responsibility whatsoever. Her own inability to judge situations and character had no part in this… She even goes so far as to say that the university led her to believe that she was rape-proof on campus. Ridiculous.

    Jane Doe, you have a vagina, I know it’s not fair but you do. So when you drink or go to parties, acknowledge that there those who want to take advantage of that vagina so you must use better judgement than a man would be expected to use because you have things to worry about that a man rarely ever does. You must take precautions that a man typically doesn’t need to make. Yes, it’s not fair. Boo hoo. The first step to avoid being a victim is acknowledgment of reality.

    1. Maybe she can sue her parents for not explaining the allure of her lady parts to men in their late teens and early 20’s?

    2. It is like going to an ATM in the hood, at midnight, emptying your bank account and yelling at the top of your lungs “I have lots of cash on me and am unarmed. Please don’t steal me money!”

      It in no way excuses the behavior of anyone who would steal his money. But that doesn’t relieve the person of understanding the reality that there are some fucking bad people out there.

    3. What infuriates me the most in this particular case is her inability to take even the slightest responsibility for herself beforehand — getting drunk as a freshman at a stranger’s party during or immediately after orientation which warned of the very activity. Yes, the rapist (if it really was rape) deserves full blame for raping, but her own idiocy removes all blame from the university and everyone else. How can people this irresponsible even live from day to day? Do they blame the university for theft from their dorms which they left unlocked? Do they blame the university for failing classes because they got too drunk to do any homework or attend classes?

      What they fucking hell are they going to do when they hit the real world and have to be at work on time, do specific work activities, rent apartments, buy cars? Are they going to sue the university or their parents for not making sure they have groceries?

      A perfect progressive voter.

      1. Yeah, because believing Obama was born in Kenya or Saddam Hussein was behind 9/11 makes for the “perfect progressive voter.” Oh, fucking wait.

        Do you fucking morons forget absolutely *everything* after every goddamn election?

    4. those chastity belts don’t look quite so ridiculous in light of the last few years. how do we know medieval women weren’t dropping excuses like these?

    5. I feel for her, I am in the process of suing the Detroit Police Department for fraudulently representing its city as a safe place for my unlocked parked Maserati.

  25. “Virginia Wesleyan is a small school, with only about 1,300 students at any time, so that works out to a sexual assault rate of about two percent.”
    From 2010-2012 there 9 reported sexual assaults. That is an average of 3 per year.

    3 cases per year/ 1300 students = 0.23% NOT 2 percent. Assuming half the students are women, that raises it to about 0.46 assaults per year per female student.

    What am I missing here?

    1. Mr Bear,

      Noticed the same thing – journalists should not do math. It’s not in their wheelhouse.

      Also, I seem to recall that the incidence of sexual assault (rape?) in the general population was around 0.7% and was slightly lower in the college population at 0.6%. This puts Virginia Wesleyan’s stats in context – make of it what you will.

      Enough mansplaining – Bendover out.

    2. let’s not talk about this again.

      (thanks)

  26. I used to practice in RVA (both the plaintiff’s and defense attorney are in Richmond) and while both attorneys are very good, neither are what I would call “big hitters”. That the school (or more likely their insurance carrier) choose not to use a big dollar downtown firm to defend this, suggests they aren’t valuing it anywhere near $10M

  27. “There was enough probable cause to obtain a warrant and make an arrest,” Lieutenant John Gandy of the VBPD told me.
    How the fuck would there be probable cause?
    The alleged assault was in August 2012. The Title IX hearing was in Feb of 2013 and she filed a police report a short time after the hearing and Kane’s dismissal. So a good 6-7 months at least. There would be no physical evidence of sexual assault at this point. (I would seriously wonder though if there wouldn’t be some scarring from a forced fisting or forced sodomy, but I really don’t know). There certainly would be no remaining evidence in her blood or urine of the drug that was used on her. As far as we can tell there were no eyewitnesses to point to any struggle or that he was “dragging” her off to his room, and in fact she specifically stated in her Title IX hearing that “its not like he dragged me”.

    This broad should be told “We are sorry that you may have a had a traumatic experience, but would have needed to come here right afterwards so that we have evidende.”

    1. or maybe even “evidence”!

    2. (I would seriously wonder though if there wouldn’t be some scarring from a forced fisting or forced sodomy, but I really don’t know)

      If someone violently fisted you without your consent, there would be evidence from the two days you spent in the hospital with vaginal injuries.

    3. Demanding evidence is just denying rape. You know that. Anytime any woman, anywhere, accusers a man of something, just shoot the man right then and there.
      Oh, and how come she gets to stay “Jane Doe”, but Zachary Kane has his name plastered ask over the internet?

      1. Or “all over the internet”

      2. Feminists assure us that prospective employers, dates, friends (enemies?), and other institutions have yet to figure out how to use google, so no harm no foul.

      3. Because even in the extremely unlikely event that he didn’t commit the rape in this case, he has probably raped other women and will continue to do so in the future, so it’s actually OK to brand him as a rapist.

        /SJW

    4. That made me raise an eyebrow, too. I’d like a comparative article on “probable cause” (for arresting) here.

    5. It’s offensive to arrest a man for sexual assault simply on a woman’s say so. This happens far too often. What the hell happened to starting by questioning someone? In far too many cases that turn out to have no merit a man spends days and even months in jail before being released for lack of evidence. By then, of course, his reputation has been destroyed.

  28. i believe there is a legal doctrine of contributory negligence as in when a minor illegally consumes vodka!

  29. It’s the new inquisition. This is what the SJWs want. When are we going to get back to burning the witches?

  30. “But how could VWC have possibly pre-intervened here? Short of banning students from socializing without chaperones, that is.”

    I considered rising to this bait, but decided not to.

  31. Readable, well-structured, and thoughtful. However, one aspect stands out deficiently:

    “They question Kane about how many women he has kissed since starting college, how many women he has had sex with, how often he has sex, and how long it generally takes him to ejaculate.”

    “No one wants to go back to the bad old days when women’s sexual histories were randomly relevant to rape investigations. And we won’t, because rape shield laws prevent such info from being used to discredit victims in criminal cases.”

    Funny. So we have the (good?) present days of revealing the name of the man accused, of exploring his sexual history (“randomly”), while adding the insult of shielding the accuser from like, and from reasonable questioning (see your analysis). What’s your take on that, Eizabeth?

    1. Simple:
      Women are always innocent unless there is overwhelming evidence of their guilt. In which case, they are victims because patriarchy.
      Men are always guilty unless there is overwhelming evidence of their innocence….Never mind. Men are always guilty.

      1. “Men are always guilty unless there is overwhelming evidence of their innocence…”

        Unless they wear the correct politics on their shirt sleeve, see Bill Clinton, Ted Kennedy, etc.

        1. Fair point, but it only applies when the men in question are POWERFUL lefties. Your average beta male college student majoring in 19th century Marxist poetry is still a man and thus, probably guilty of something.

        2. I guess their policy is a slight adaptation of Einstein’s quip about mathematical models:

          “All men are bad, but some are useful.”

        3. You forgot Scooter Libby, you retarded gimp. Ohhhh, that wouldn’t be the correct politics. Ohhhh.
          Fuck you.

          You chump.

      2. Paul Nungesser had overwhelming evidence of innocence and absolutely no evidence of guilt whatsoever. That still wasn’t enough to exonerate him in the eyes of the social justice warriors.

        1. Well said. No accusation too flimsy, no evidence of innocence sufficient.

      3. I wanted to call that hyperbole, but decide to leave it open.

        Anyway, the thing is, I’m interested in the formal, legal reasoning that’s supposed to “justify” this differential treatment. This looks like an obvious violation of equal protection, and a matter of disparate impact (Title IX) as well. Yet, it passes unremarked upon, generally.

        1. Addendum: Fundamentally, criminal process is supposed to protect the rights of the accused (see “in dubio pro reo”). If examining the accuser’s background is acceptable in civil cases then a fortiori it is acceptable in criminal cases. Conversely, “rape shield” laws would be weaker in criminal than in civil cases. — The exact qualification (public versus civil law) of these college pseudo-trials is questionable, by the way.

  32. That Doe went to a party and consumed alcohol procured by a stranger in no way makes her to blame for being attacked…

    Again, that Doe went to a party and drank despite this warning does not make it her fault if she was raped…

    I don’t mean to suggest that not doing so invalidates her assault claims…

    Even making the fair assumption that there are more assaults than get reported…

    Going back to Kane’s room willingly certainly doesn’t mean Doe consented to sex…

    No one wants to go back to the bad old days when women’s sexual histories were randomly relevant to rape investigations…

    Perhaps the info VWC seeks about Doe’s romantic life is overly broad…

    I get that one must take great pains to set oneself apart as anti-rape lest one be accused by the intellectually dishonest of blaming the victim but how many parentheticals are needed in one rape article? And why do we get his name and not hers?

    1. Brown’s using the perfectly valid rhetorical technique of showing that an argument fails even on its own terms, in this case “construing the facts as favorably as possible to the moving party, she has no case”.

  33. Well, I just read the complete story by ‘Doe’. And I have to say my initial thought is that I don’t believe it.

    So when the guy ‘grabbber it’s leg’ grabbed her arm, she was still able to walk, was she able to scream? If so, why didn’t she?

    Also, the guy is following 3 women and none of the 3 thought to:

    A. Confront the guy and ask, why are you following u?

    B. Contact campus security?

    C. Call someone and report that they are being followed?

    Then, she was raped for 5 hours? Really? This guy is superman. No wonder no one was willing to deal with him, no one had any kryptonite.

    Then, she walks right by a campus security guy, covered in blood and the guy just stands there and she doesn’t ask for help either?

    My guess is that what you have here is a very emotionally disturbed young lady who desperately needed some attention and this was her opening.

    1. And some guy who didn’t know not to stick it in crazy has a reputation as a rapist that will take decades to get over, he’s kicked out of his college and he’ll probably have a hard time ever getting a professional job.

      There’s no independent evidence to indicate any of this actually happened. There’s only her story and it’s wildly inconsistent. This is a travesty of justice.

      1. “This is a travesty of justice.”

        It’s not justice: it’s *social* justice!

    2. And I have to say my initial thought is that I don’t believe it.

      Same here. Stinks a lot like Jackie’s story;

      Unresolved questions about a *conspiracy* to drug drinks prompted by the accuser and virtually no one else (if they were even used)? Check.

      Incapacitated to the point where any opportunist could’ve done anything up to and including murder you but still coherent enough to be otherwise normally functional and credibly identify/engage your attacker? Check.

      Not just suffered, but ably walked away from an assault that would’ve hospitalized a normal person and left a rather literal trail of blood implicating your perpetrator? Check.

      Recall dramatic “facts” about the event well afterwards and upon prompting from a Social Justice Worker? Check.

      I can certainly understand why the University checked it out and then check out on this one.

      1. Yep, pretty much my take as well.

        To me, the telling evidence against the accusation being true is that, in both cases, the attack (which is recounted by the “victim” in some detail) is so horrific that there is absolutely no way you don’t go straight to the ED.

        That didn’t happen. That means the report of the attack is exaggerated at best, inaccurate to a fault, and there is a significant chance it never happened at all.

  34. Oh look the Daily Mail portrays the Oath Keepers as a white supremecist organization.

    More unease in Ferguson as troop of white patriot ‘Oath Keepers’ patrol its streets armed with assault rifles as police chief says their presence is ‘inflammatory’.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new…..guson.html

    Lookout, it’s white patriots!

    1. VOX did the same, without any evidence.

    2. What are they actually, a Game of Thrones fanclub/LARP society?

  35. But they don’t even so much as ask whom else she saw doing shots?was it solely freshman girls drinking from this bottle??let alone about other party guests whom they might talk to. If an entire bottle of vodka was drugged and served at a party, it would seem someone else would have felt something.

    This is a problem I see in the story ? if bottles were spiked, were only girls drinking from the spiked drinks? If Kane was given several drinks and only some of them were spiked, did the hosts tell him which were and weren’t spiked? Or were all drinks, including Kane’s, spiked?

    If dozens of girls consumed spiked drinks, why weren’t there more rapes? You’d think that if a bunch of men were conspiring to spike a bunch of girls’ drinks, then several more conspirators would have attempted to rape girls, too.

    1. Don’t have to spike the bottle or add drugs to the drinks *after* pouring them. Put the drugs in specific glasses prior to pouring in the booze.

  36. Ms. Nolan might be an editor, but sometimes editors need an editor too. Besides the “nauseous” gaffe listed above, she also inappropriately used the word “whom” later in the article. Take out the “if innocent” phrase and it becomes much more obvious:

    . . . whom . . . was wrongly kicked out of school and branded a rapist

    Pro tip: If you could substitute “he” for the relative pronoun, use “who.” If you could substitute “him,” use “he.”

    “He was wrongly kicked out” sounds a lot better than “Him was wrongly kicked out.”

    1. Shit. If you could substitute “him,” use “whom.”

      1. If you can substitute “her” use “whirm “.

    2. I’m afraid the battle over “nauseous” was lost some time ago and its meaning in actual usage has pretty much completely shifted. No great loss in this case, since “nauseating” can cover the original meaning; it’s not as if we’ve completely lost a useful term.

  37. As for this despicable excuse for a human being, all I have to say is that if she was able to seriously contemplate having sexual intercourse a mere ten days after being brutally molested, much less go through with the act, she either has an incredibly cavalier attitude toward being sexually violated, or she’s making the whole thing up. Either possibility means she wasn’t as emotionally traumatized as she claims.

    Only when the penalty for false accusations becomes as severe as the penalty for the alleged crime will we start to see progress in turning back this tide of bogus rape allegations. Now as my attorney friends are quick to point out, there’s a difference between a truly false allegation and a jury returning a “not guilty” verdict. I agree that this would be a sticky area that would have to be addressed with care. There would have to be evidence that the alleged victim had consciously fabricated the story in order to bring a conviction.

    Rape will always be hard to prosecute. The reality that rape isn’t sexy; physical evidence is only found in about 15 percent of rape cases?partly because too many victims wash, partly because it’s comparatively rare for a rapist to ejaculate. It tends to be a hurried, jackrabbit affair. Moreover, the standard of evidence in these cases is extremely high, and as heinous as rape is, that’s exactly as it damn well should be.

    1. if she WERE able.

      1. I’m so glad you caught this.

    2. You nailed it! As long as there is no consequence, either criminal or civil, for false rape allegations any miffed or attention starved snowflake will continue to seek that exalted status of “victim”!

    3. Actually, in accordance with equal protection, the “preponderance of the evidence” standard (Title IX, as opposed to criminal law) would have to be applied not only to the question of whether there was a sexual assault, but also to the question of whether there was a false allegation of sexual assault.
      As a side note, consider defamation law. It’s possible to frame the offense itself in a way that makes it illegal to say disadvantageous things about others unless one can demonstrate that these things are true. Further workarounds include framing offenses in a way that makes creating risks (as opposed to doing harm) illegal. Then it’s only necessary to prove the causation of risk beyond a reasonable doubt, as opposed to proving causation of harm beyond a reasonable doubt. Define res suitably and doubt will not play much of a role.

    4. “…she either has an incredibly cavalier attitude toward being sexually violated, or she’s making the whole thing up.”
      .
      Interesting, isn’t it, how rape crisis feminists seem to place no real value on any given act of intercourse unless it is taken transgressively.

  38. Is spiking drinks really a common thing? Seems redundant. Girls in college are all too eager to drink to the point of passing out or nearly passing out. I find it hard to believe a genuine potential rapist is short on targets every weekend.

    1. This is what confuses me. College girls are easy.

    2. Most studies have found that use of date-rape drugs is quite rare; in most cases where it’s claimed, there’s no toxicological evidence of it, and the reported effects are explainable due to the effects of alcohol alone.

      It’s important to realize that “blacking out” and “passing out” are two different things. If one’s blood alcohol level is rising fast enough (say due to rapid drinking on an empty stomach) one can be reasonably conscious and oriented and appear lucid but be unable to form long-term memories of what’s happening. That’s “blacking out”. “Passing out” is, of course, loss of consciousness. In fact, blackouts can occur at blood alcohol levels that result in only mild drunkenness.

      Thus memory gaps are not in and of themselves evidence of intoxication by anything other than alcohol.

      Also note that if someone is taking anti-anxiety drugs like Xanax, they’re basically roofieing themselves if they get drunk (in fact the combination can be fatal; alcohol poisoning is usually the result of either mixing alcohol with benzos or “stunt drinking” (consuming large amounts of alcohol quickly as part of a contest or dare)).

  39. For the complete story of the now infamous Rolling Stone article on the alleged U-VA gang rape, its fallout, the media firestorm of criticism, the apology, the final police investigation report, and the demagoguery of those radical feminists who refuse to apologize for propagating the myth of “rape culture” and the meme of “victim culture”, see: Yellow Journalism and the Meme of “Rape Culture” – Rolling Stone and U-VA Gang Rape

    For an in-depth expose of the evolution of universities from institutions of higher learning into witch-hunt tribunals for the “rape culture” advocates, see: New Puritanism ? New Paternalism: The “Rape Culture” Narrative Demeans Women, Demonizes Men, and Turns Universities into Witch Hunt Tribunals

  40. For the history of the shift of the Women’s Rights Movement from an egalitarian to a totalitarian one, see: When Progressive Social Change Becomes Regressive Ideology: From Women’s Liberation to Cultural Misandry

    For the backstory on the way the meme of “rape culture” was created by feminist ideologues and eventually insinuated into almost every facet of US society, including nearly every media story on the “epidemic” of campus sexual assault, see: All Sex is Rape ? All Men are Rapists: Patriarchy = Rape Culture

  41. The deprivation of basic constitutional rights for men and their attempts to fight back are addressed in: The Pendulum Reverses ? Again: The Betrayal of Liberty on America’s Campuses & Men Strike Back against Title IX Tribunals

    The Emma “The Mattress” Sulkowicz celebrity story may be the most salacious false campus rape allegation of all time, even surpassing the Duke Lacrosse Team scandal and the Rolling Stone fiasco for the rape fable with the most traction. See A Model of Campus Gender-Based Harassment: The Columbia University “Mattress” Story.

  42. Two legal experts on sex discrimination law and procedure argue that the current Title IX mandates for America’s colleges and universities are legally unsupportable and both practically and ethically indefensible: When the Megaphone becomes the Gavel

    A Senate task force report recommends scaling back the mountain of regulations strangling higher education institutions: HELP for DOE Regulatory Excess & the History of Title IX Over-Reach

  43. Two University insurance industry studies of campus sexual assault contradict the “rape culture” meme: Insurance Industry Revelations and Prescriptions about Campus Sexual Assault

    Two studies ? both by highly-qualified women academics ? have undermined the almost universal stereotype of sexual violence and taken the lid off of the well-hidden problem of male sexual victimization by both women and men: Two Sexual Assault Studies Contradict Stereotypes

  44. To understand how the feminist movement has become its own worst enemy, see: Feminism Has Cannibalized Itself

    The rape culture meme is a largely fabricated story based on the fiction that, in a patriarchy, all heterosexual sex is rape and no woman is really free to consent: The Rape Culture Meme

  45. We have a minimum drinking age that creates a subculture of illegal drinking where if a college-aged female wants to get drunk, she must go to a party (usually held at a private residence or dorm) where alcohol is frequently supplied and served by strangers.

    Is it just me, or is this another one of those odd situations where stupid laws contribute to a problem?

  46. Universities have the requirement of needing to investigate all Title IX issues, which is why they investigate rape accusations. But, that doesn’t mean they can’t create a policy that all sexual assault claims must include a police report. If the police can’t come to any conclusions because of a lack of evidence, so be it, but this would seemingly help a university defend itself from accusations that it didn’t act responsibly.

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  48. So the college expels suspected rapist on no evidence, just the word of accuser which they found credible (even though she changed her story three times)

    Same college now claims the accusers account is not credible as she is suing them

    I kinda hope the guy they expelled files a suit as well. I’d love to see the legal and mental gymnastics of the college claiming the woman’s testimony is truthful enough to necessitate an expulsion, but not credible enough to substantiate her claims against the college

    1. This is on point. The hypocrisy of the college is world class. Incredible that these things continue to go on around the country without a massive uproar from concerned parents over the safety of their sons.

    2. this

  49. Years ago, a small company I worked at had an Xmas party. A fun time was had by all. A couple of women in the office, one in particular, were not used to drinking and went a little crazy and out of control. I chalked it up to their inexperience.

    The next Monday, I came into the office expecting to enjoy commiserating with everybody about the fun party but was surprised to learn that the two I mentioned earlier were mortified by their own behavior and telling everybody that their drinks had been spiked…by me.

    Why me? Apparently because I was a young guy who enjoyed going out to clubs etc. they assumed it must have been me. I guess because, in their imaginations, that’s what guys like me did.

    Anyway, my point is, I get the feeling that sometimes, when people claim their drinks were spiked, the reality is that they simply let their drinking get away from them and don’t want to take responsibility.

    It sounds like this girl let the entire evening get away from her and she’s trying to blame everybody but herself.

    1. I agree, but this sentiment is greatly increased as young women on college campuses are often taught that any misgivings about their sexual conduct is someone else’s fault. Put another way, if they like the sexual encounter, it’s all good. If they didn’t enjoy it, it’s someone else’s fault and likely an assault….

      1. It’s far worse than that. Many cases appear to revolve around a female student giving every evidence of enjoying sex at the time it occurred, then being coached to regret it later.

  50. What utter nonsense. We’re well past the point where we should have returned to a simple, forcible rape standard. “Fight and run” is infinitely more sensible and productive than “read her mind, yes does not necessarily mean yes, regret sex is usually rape, and to hell with due process.”

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