Police Abuse

Fleeing from Deputies Lands Southern California Man Vicious Beatdown Caught on Camera

After surrendering, he's punched 37 times and kicked 17 times.

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Ain't that many, many kicks to the head?
NBC LA

Apparently deputies in San Bernardino County don't like having to pursue a man who initiated a car chase, then stole a horse to flee from their identity theft investigation. So after they finally caught the guy, and the guy surrendered, they apparently beat the living crap out of him. It was all caught on film by the Los Angeles NBC affiliate's news helicopter. The station both exposed the behavior and also counted out how much violence was dealt out to the guy, Francis Jared Pusok, 30, of Apple Valley:

In the two minutes after the man was stunned with a Taser, it appeared deputies kicked him 17 times, punched him 37 times and struck him with batons four times. Thirteen blows appeared to be to the head. The horse stood idly nearby.

The man did not appear to move from his position lying on the ground for more than 45 minutes. He did not appear to receive medical attention while deputies stood around him during that time.

"Obviously, it's disturbing," responded San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon. He said he'll be launching an internal investigation.

Watch NBC's report below. On their web page with their report, they also have the raw footage of the arrest and beating posted:

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  1. When interviewed, the horse said, “Wasn’t my circus or my monkeys.”

    1. What has happened to our society, that we should now throw around insults in public, and call skilled law enforcement specialists “moneys”? What’s wrong with a few little punches? Perhaps this should become a regular part of our system of ordered liberty. Until people wake up and realize how much harm is being done by these here dangerous identity thieves, there will be no justice in our great nation. The police should be commended for taking this problem into their hands and really working to solve it, just as they see fit to do. In New York we are making excellent progress, especially with using someone else’s name on the Internet, an academic debating crime which certain members of the leftist defense bar are trying to call “parody.” See the documentation of one leading criminal satire case at:

      http://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

      1. P.s. that would be “monkeys.” Money is an important matter that should always be foremost on our minds; thus, calling a law enforcement specialist “money” would not be an insult.

      2. I’m sorry, but law enforcement officers are paid to apprehend and restrain suspected criminals, not deliver their punishment before they are actually convicted. You ought to look it up sometime.

        1. Se?or Loco almost deceives us, until we realize that his pronouncement must be intended satirically. What, we are to wait for “actual conviction” before we can punish the crooks and scammers? Let’s not be foolish. If we did that, those scoundrels could hold our great nation hostage with virtual impunity! But surely no one is fooled by this “actual conviction” business, at least not our excellent law enforcement personnel, who fortunately understand that the process itself can be the punishment, even if we don’t get that “actual” conviction. And, by the way, are we also supposed to allow them all to appeal their cases after they get convicted before “actually punishing” them, or is it at least okay to go ahead and gas them once we get the conviction?

  2. Maybe someday people will learn not to run. I’m only being partially sarcastic here since besides the wrong doing by the police I can see how certain groups will use this to force police to not chase anyone no matter what they’ve done. certain groups of people will have different rights than others.

    1. Maybe someday people will learn not to run

      Or, maybe someday the cops will learn not to beat the everloving shit out of people who are not posing any threat to anyone.

      1. “cops will learn not to beat the everloving shit out of people ”

        Yes, that’s the long term solution but short term, for goodness sake, learn to put your hands up, say don’t shoot, and say I surrender. Obviously not 100% fool proof, but outcome is likely to be better than running from the cops.

        1. We’ve seen plenty of videos of cops shooting people following their orders. There doesn’t seem to be any way to guarantee they won’t shoot you.

        2. When there’s more than one cop, and often even when there’s only one, the orders conflict with themselves.

          “Hands up!”

          “Show me your id!”

          Bang, bang, bang until empty, then kicks, handcuffs, and call the union rep.

          1. Hands behind your back! Hands up! Get on the Ground! Turn around!

            1. Put your right foot in! Now put your right foot out!

      2. I don’t think anyone here will side with the cops but running from them is not smart. No, it should not result in the type thing that happened but do you really expect to get away?

    2. Or maybe curtail the excessive force and just put the perp in cuffs.

    3. Or maybe convince the general population that all interactions with police aren’t increasingly dangerous. People tend to run from danger

      1. Or maybe convince the general population that all interactions with police aren’t increasingly dangerous.

        First, I think you would have to see to it that all interactions with police aren’t, in fact, increasingly dangerous.

        1. Well, yeah, that’s what I meant–ideally it wouldn’t just be PR or a marketing gimmick, but “convinced” via actual improvements.

    4. Obey.

    5. Ron, some months ago I predicted a ‘police-backlash’ of exactly that sort… where officers refuse or delay pursuit of alleged criminals because THEY are afraid of public backlash and criticism… and lawsuits (frivolous or otherwise.);

      Time will tell if my prediction is right, but if it is, it will also be a sea change for law enforcement, as well as a wonderful example of “Unintended Consequences” of public reactions.

      Everyone.. please also notice that, while one of the officers seems to be pulling another one out of the battle, the first blow landed on the perp WAS a kick in the groin.

      San Bernardino’s Finest? Sure… Right…
      Stay tuned to see what happens in the future and how this turns out… if it ever becomes public info.

  3. You’re supposed to hang horse theives.

  4. I think we’re witnessing a trend here. Cops really don’t like to run.

  5. At least the horse apparently got a few licks in on everyone involved. Good on the horse.

    1. Call PETA in to testify immediately!

  6. Obviously, it’s disturbing,” responded San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon. He said he’ll be launching an internal investigation into why the deputies didn’t just gun him down in cold blood, leave a throw-down weapon, and lie their faces off about it like real New Professionals.

    1. Nice… I had to steal this.

    2. the presence of the news choppers might have had a role in that.

      1. And yet they still savagely beat the shit outta the guy

      2. I’ll bet they thought it was a police helicopter – and believed themselves to be off camera.

  7. News Anchor- “A controversial end to the pursuit”. When a bank robber is caught on tape is it a controversial end to a bank robbery? This is about as clear cut a case of police brutality as you’ll find and we get “controversial” and “emotions were running high” from these copsucking news reporters.

    1. And the cops were dehydrated, so there’s that.

  8. “”Obviously, it’s disturbing,” responded San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon. He said he’ll be launching an internal investigation.”

    Well, maybe mistakes were made, right?

    1. but in general, procedures were followed.

    2. Only in not noticing the news helicopter. I mean, situational awareness training obviously needs some sprucing up.

    3. But it’s over, now… “What difference does it make?”

  9. “Obviously, it’s disturbing,” responded San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon.

    That’s a surprisingly honest admission. Are we sure he didn’t mean it’s disturbing that they were caught on camera? Or disturbing that pissant reporters are questioning the habits of these brave men with badges

  10. In the two minutes after the man was stunned with a Taser, it appeared deputies kicked him 17 times, punched him 37 times and struck him with batons four times. Thirteen blows appeared to be to the head. The horse stood idly nearby.

    The horse has since commented on the incident

  11. I don’t get why they felt the need to continue beat the crap out of him after tasing. There’s no provocation at all, the guy already got off and lied down on his own, then tased. Is there some kind of high people feel beating up a ragdoll?

    1. np, c’mon. You know the answer to that.

    2. Even the tasing is suspect. The man is in a prone position, spread eagle, on the ground. How can you possibly argue that he posed a threat worthy of taser action? Did he have a .22 clenched between his ass cheeks?

      1. He also put his arms behind his back in the position to be cuffed.

    3. Predatory instinct…a kill has to happen after a chase

      1. Predatory instinct…a kill has to happen after a chase

        Or at least a mauling.

      2. It did look like David Attenborough should have been narrating the scene.

    4. payback for running. And yes, there IS a high these people get from pounding a defenseless individual.

      1. All people get a high from beating the shit outta someone. But most people prefer to just smoke a joint.

        1. Except smoking a joint is unnatural, and therefore immoral.

          Beating up a defenseless individual or tossing a grenade into a crib are natural highs, and therefore moral.

  12. What did Chris Rock say about running from the cops?

    1. Keep her off the pole! ..oh, wait..

  13. HORSE PURSUIT

    Now there’s a goddamn band name.

  14. The Aussie response to the video seems more appropriate.

  15. ” a man who initiated a car chase, then stole a horse

    Fuck, there goes my “best story ever”. This man is a god.

  16. My co-worker’s step-sister makes $80 /hour on the laptop . She has been out of work for seven months but last month her paycheck was $21155 just working on the laptop for a few hours. find out here now
    ????????????????? http://www.jobsfish.com

  17. I don’t even see how this is news. He isn’t black.

    1. White Hispanic?

  18. Well, obviously when the first cop ran in and kicked him in the testicles, it knocked his hands free from behind his back into a threatening position.

    Anything after that, if it was a crime, was a crime of passion.

  19. Fire the cops. All of them. Try them. Convict them. Sentence them to long prison stretches. Fine them all the money they’ll ever make for the rest of their lives.

    Send a message to the pigs – no more.

  20. Police officers are vocational sociopaths.

    A sociopath is someone who displays a “disposition to violate social norms of behavior” through “deceitfulness ? impulsivity ? irritability and aggressiveness ? [a] reckless disregard for safety of self or others,” and a “lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.”

    Law enforcers have official permission to employ aggressive violence and escalate it to lethal levels if they meet resistance. They are clothed in “qualified immunity” that protects them from accountability and liability for committing acts that would otherwise result in prosecution.

    Owing to the nature of the job, law enforcement selects for sociopathic personalities.

    Will Grigg, 4/11/2015

  21. He only ” surrendered” after being caught. And when don’t know if there was a series of horrific expletives used to torment our men in blue. That said, when the cops get in deep doodoo over this I sincerely hope this miscreant does not get off. From now on hands at ten and two and say, yes? Officer! And don’t start up with guys that have guns.

    1. “… a series of horrific expletives used to torment our men in blue.”
      You forgot “/sarc,” man….

      Being cursed at is or at least should be part of the job description for police work and many other professions. If you feel ‘hurt or offended’ when someone curses at you in your line of business, you should find another line of business… or become some kind of Politically Correct activist.

      (no sarc)

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