Venezuela

China Not Getting Dragged Into Venezuela's Problems

China's foreign minister says he hopes the U.S. and Venezuela can deal with their issues with mutual respect and non-interference.

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Xinhua

It shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone that China says it's not going to get involved in the spat between Venezuela and the U.S., which this week declared the country, a socialist shithole in the grip of on-again-off-again anti-government protests for the last year, a "national security" threat. The latest bout of protest and unrest began when intelligence services raided the home of Caracas' mayor, opposition leader Antonio Ledezma, accusing him of plotting a coup.

"China hopes both countries can handle their relations on the basis of equality, mutual respect and non-interference in each other's internal affairs," Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said, according to Chinese state news agency Xinhua. "These international principles apply to all state-to-state relations," Hong said. "Adherence to these norms not only serves the interests of the two countries but also peace and stability in Latin America."

China's foreign minister said he hoped the government and people of Venezuela were able to secure economic development and national stability. Venezuela appears to have neither, only a kleptocratic government whose central planning policies have pulled the country into a recessionary spiral. The Chinese know about the importance of economic growth to stability—first expressed in the ancient idea of the Mandate of Heaven.

China knows about anti-government protests, too. They have at least doubled in the country over the last decade, with 180,000 "mass incidents" reported in 2010. The Chinese government regularly spends more on internal police than on military forces. But it doesn't spend on potential client states' problems. Maduro made a last minute overseas trip in January looking for financial assistance—he visited China, Russia, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Iran, and Portugal. He said he secured $20 billion in investment from China, but the Chinese government didn't confirm it and it likely represented a pre-existing oil-for-loans deal. The U.S. government's latest move, meanwhile, could be handing Maduro a much needed foil to shore up domestic support with appeals to "anti-imperialist" feelings.

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  1. You can’t have a single party state, without elections, where all the important decisions are made by the same people who own the important companies–and not have rampant corruption. And they can’t get corrupt leaders to reform themselves–when corruption is just so damn profitable.

    Meanwhile, the elite are sending their kids to American schools and making all the foreign investments they can to qualify as resident aliens once the shit hits the fan.

    Classic train wreck in slow motion.

    It may not happen this year or next, or even in the next five years, but this system can’t perpetuate itself forever. …unless they look to North Korea as a model. North Korea perpetuates itself by starving off its excess population, periodically, or sending them off to death camps. But at this point, I doubt China could put that genie back in the bottle. It would be bad for business.

  2. basis of equality, mutual respect and non-interference in each other’s internal affairs,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said, according to Chinese state news agency Xinhua. “These international principles apply to all state-to-state relations,” Hong said.

    Ok, great. I’m declaring myself a state.

    1. If you’re a state….then….state’s rights….so…..

      RAAAAAAACIST!!!!

  3. “China hopes both countries can handle their relations on the basis of equality, mutual respect and non-interference in each other’s internal affairs,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said

    Which one would suppose is why they’re ruled as a one-party communist state.

    The Chinese know about the importance of economic growth to stability?first expressed in the ancient idea of the Mandate of Heaven.

    Which one would suppose is why they’re ruled as a one-party communist state.

    1. Stop trying to meddle with their internal affairs, Immaculate! Geez!

  4. Grammar Nazi:
    ” a pre-existing oil-for-loans deal.”
    Is this like an *existing* deal? If not, why not?
    Carry on.

  5. Could? The only reason the U.S. would rattle its saber at Venezuela right now is because it wants to sure up the Regime against its ongoing economic collapse. I guess Obama wants to make sure that mess goes down under someone else’s administration.

  6. Please let’s carpet bomb Venezuela Berlin-Airlift Style with bags full of toilet paper, sundries, and little notes that say “Heard your socialist utopia isn’t working as planned. Best wishes, your friends in the USA”.

    1. I expect that the police or military would be ordered to confiscate them with the explanation that the evil capitalists in the US have poisoned the goods.

    2. I’ve always maintained that the best thing the US could do to defeat the Maduro regime would be to offer humanitarian aid in the form of TP and diapers. Then he would be forced to either accept help from the yanqui imperialists or explain to his people why he turned down free toilet paper while they’re wiping their asses with their shirt sleeves.

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