Rape

Is Challenging 'Rape Culture' Claims an Idea Too Dangerous for University Students?

Debating assumptions about sexual violence drives Brown University over the brink.

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Colleges across America are in political uproar over new federal policies on how to conduct campus rape hearings. Feminists and the left-leaning demand a halt to the "rape culture" which they claim has caused an "epidemic" of campus assault. Civil libertarians and conservatives see an hysteria that could ruin young lives by stripping away due process from accused students.

On November 18, I entered this melee by speaking at a Janus Forum event at Brown University. My counterpart was the politically correct feminist Jessica Valenti. At Valenti's request and to my surprise, armed security guards were conspicuously present. Apparently, some students also feared an eruption of violence but informed the administration, rather than Janus, of their concern.

Eruptions arrived before the event, which was on a Tuesday. On the preceding Friday, Brown President Christina Paxson circulated a campus-wide email in which she disagreed with me by name. Specifically, Paxton rejected the argument that "sexual assault is the work of small numbers of predatory individuals whose behaviors are impervious to the culture and values of their communities."

This misstates my argument. I acknowledge a person's culture and values influence behavior. What Paxson and I disagree upon is whether North America is a "rape culture." I agree with the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN) which is the largest and most influential anti-sexual violent organization in America; it is hardly a voice of conservatism. On February 28, RAINN sent a 16-page letter to a newly formed White House task force that had the mission of reforming and standardizing campus rape hearings. RAINN stated,

There has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming 'rape culture' for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campus. While it is helpful to point out the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important not to lose sight of the simple fact: rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions of a small percentage of the community to commit a violent crime.

RAINN argued that a focus on the "rape culture" made it more difficult to prevent sexual violence because it "removed the focus from the individual at fault" and seemed to mitigate personal responsibility. 

Paxson's email expressed concern that my views on sexual assault could "trigger" memories in rape survivors or make them feel devalued. Accordingly, a "safe place" was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate. The "BWell Safe Space" offered on-site peer counselors and a staff to provide support. Paxson also outlined an eleventh-hour "direct alternative event" that was schedule for the same time as the Janus one: a lecture entitled "Research on Rape Culture" by Lindsay Orchowski, assistant professor of psychiatry.

Through a Brown Daily Herald (Nov. 17) column, The Janus Forum responded, "We believe the alternative event promoted by the president…is an important event….Unfortunately, it was deliberately planned as an alternative to our own, forcing students to choose between two events, both of which we believe are worthy of their time. By endorsing Orchowski's event, Paxson has denounced ours." The next day, the Editorial Page Board of the Herald called for the Orchowski event to be "moved to a different time or repeated" so students could benefit from both events. Ultimately, both events were made available on line.

Against this backdrop, I arrived at Brown at the arranged time. I do not travel with electronic devices, which invite the TSA to trifle with my privacy. Thus, I did not receive alerting emails and was blissfully ignorant of how dangerous a woman I am.

Saloman 203 was the site of debate and I am told it is largest hall at Brown. It was filled. My presentation was first. The opening was intended to defuse a common attack on women who question the "rape culture."

I am going to open in an unconventional manner with some personal background. I've experienced a great deal of violence in my life. When I was 16 years old, I ran away from home and lived on the streets. I was raped, and brutally so. Then and now, I do not blame the culture. I blame the man who attacked me.

I've had reason in my life to blame several specific men for violence. For example, as a result of domestic violence when I was a young woman, I experienced a hemorrhage in the center of vision of my right eye. I am legally blind in that eye. Every morning I wake up, I am reminded of violence against women because I now see only half the world because of it. Again, I don't blame men or the culture; I blame one specific man. Most men I know would have put themselves at risk to protect me.

I bring up my background because my presentation may upset some people. And I look forward to a productive exchange…But please do not tell me that I do not understand the importance or pain of violence against women or that I trivialize rape. Such accusations are commonplace when a woman disagrees with the feminist orthodoxy and they shut down the one thing that is most needed: a real dialogue. 

I divided what remained of my 20 to 25 minutes between discussing "the rape culture" and the conduct of campus rape hearings.

The Rape Culture

I deny it exists in North America. First, I defined the term and then pointed to a society embodying it. A rape culture is one in which the act of rape is so widely accepted as to be a cultural norm or defining feature. Rape is a core assumption of the society. Certain areas of Afghanistan are examples. Women are married against their will; they are arrested after being raped; they are murdered with impunity for men's honor. North America does not resemble such a culture.

Second, I focused on a key statistic upon which the claims of a rape culture on campus are based; namely, 8 percent of college men have either attempted or successfully raped. I traced its roots to the book Body Wars by the clinical psychologist Margo Maine and did forensics on how Maine derived the data. (Much the same process is described in a National Post article entitled "Is there an epidemic of 'rape culture' at Canadian universities?" I used the Maine statistic as an example of how investigation of "rape culture" claims usually reveals biased studies, badly flawed methodology or simply the absence of any evidence.

Campus Rape Hearings

I opened, "rape is a criminal matter that should be handled by the police not bureaucrats and students." Nevertheless, there is an extreme political push for campus hearings that water down the due process rights of an accused who is almost always male. 

Arguably, the federal push began in April 2011 when the Department of Education told campuses to comply with a new standard for adjudicating sexual assault if they wished to receive federal funds. The new standard deprived an accused of such legal protections as the presence of counsel and the right to cross examine an accuser. The criminal standard of "beyond a reasonable doubt" (99 percent certainty) was replaced by the civil standard of "a preponderance of the evidence" (51 percent certainty). A student could be found guilty of rape by the same standard of evidence used by traffic courts to adjudicate parking tickets.

A common rejoinder is that hearings are not legal proceedings. But the hearings actually operate in a legal gray zone. For example, the last campaign from the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault includes improving cooperation with the police. Increasingly, the testimony an accused gives without due process can be turned over for use by the police and courts.

Moreover, the hearings impose penalties as draconian as a court. A student can be expelled with the word "rapist" permanently in his file. He may be tens of thousands of dollars in debt with no ability to obtain a license to practice his chosen profession. Many unlicensed professions will shun him as well. What university of quality will accept him? His reputation and belief in justice may be damaged beyond repair.

Having academics, university bureaucrats, and students adjudicate a criminal matter makes no sense. The hearings will not benefit genuine rape victims who are better served by reporting crime to the police. But the hearings will ruin the lives of innocent men, and do so in the name of justice.

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133 responses to “Is Challenging 'Rape Culture' Claims an Idea Too Dangerous for University Students?

  1. We do indeed live in a “rape culture.” The Left wing has been raping America of its freedoms and self-respect for decades.

    1. No. The Political Left has been THIEVING our freedo/ms and self-respect. The rape begins when they are sure we can no longer fight back.

    2. “Paxson’s email expressed concern that my views on sexual assault could “trigger” memories in rape survivors or make them feel devalued. Accordingly, a “safe place” was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate.”

      Infantilization Culture.

      1. You say “safe place”, I say “fainting couch”.

        Do you think the fact that feminists are aware that they are playing into the worst stereotypes of female fragility by declaring that women are so fragile, that they cannot even hear words without lapsing into helplessness?

  2. Thank you Wendy for this excellent article.

  3. I’m mildly surprised that the event was allowed to go off, unlike Brendan O’Neill’s. I liked his takedown of the idea of -culture.

    The first rule of the politics of fear is that if you want to make something sound scarier than it actually is, you add the word ‘culture’ at the end of it.
    So if you want people to freak out about knives, you talk about ‘knife culture’. Suddenly, an inanimate object that we all use every day becomes imbued with menace.

    1. “Great” Britain is like a vision sent to Americans by the Ghost of Christmas Future of what we could become if we’re not careful.

      1. No need for the scare quotes. “Great” just refers to the size of an island.

        1. It isnt that “great”, its smaller than Australia even.

          1. But bigger than Ireland.

          2. It’s larger than Brittany (which is what the adjective “great” is comparing it to).

    2. That’s funny. I would’ve thought the word “culture” would give it class. It doesn’t hold anything scary for me.

  4. My son isn’t raping enough. I may have to send him to Summer rape school.

  5. “Ultimately, both events were made available on line.”

    As *all* of Brown’s education should ultimately be.

    1. Well, you know, except for the classes where you dissect cadavers.

      1. Brown has a medical school?

  6. So has the Right wing. They have no more to be proud of than the Left. There are occasional bright lights on the Right and there are occasionally bright lights on the left. Not a single one of them consistently on the side of freedom and self-respect.
    The important thing to remember about “culture blaming” is there are no good guys. [If necessary, substitute “folks” for “guys”.]

    1. folk culture!

      1. Norfolk culture!

        1. Neither folk culture nor folk culture!

        2. We don’t drink and we don’t smoke.
          Norfolk! Norfolk!

          1. Won’t work in Virginia, where it is pronounced NOR-fuck

            1. Close. It’s more like Nah-fuck.

          2. Actually, that’s part of a (possibly apocryphal) cheer from Norfolk HS (in Norfolk, VA). But you’re right about the local pronunciation, thus:

            We are the girls from Norfolk High.
            We don’t drink,
            We don’t smoke.
            Norfolk! Norfolk!

  7. Paxson’s email expressed concern that my views on sexual assault could “trigger” memories in rape survivors or make them feel devalued.

    The normal deflection by the little red Marxians: the truth is [fill in here your favorite sin] sexist | racist | classist.

    Their culture is the same culture that gave us trophies for participating.

    1. Seems like her concerns are easily addressed. If you are a rape victim and you suffer from PTSD that is easily triggered, don’t attend a talk whose subject relates to your traumatic experience. How hard is that?

      1. Cis shitlord!!!

        I should have the right to attend any talk whenever I want!

        /rape monger feminist

        1. What does any of this have to do with complex exponential functions?

          1. A complex exponential function literally raped me once (in a figurative sense).

        2. Whose screaming kid is this? Please remove them. Thank you.

      2. Zeb assumes that Paxton was operating in good faith. Silly Zeb.

        1. Don’t worry, I’m just playing silly.

  8. I wish there was an audience shot after Wendy’s “I blame the man who put his fist in my face” line. I wonder if they were shocked by such an idea or just contemptuous of anyone who could hold it.

    1. I also wish the video showed the Q&A period.

  9. Paxson’s email expressed concern that my views on sexual assault could “trigger” memories in rape survivors or make them feel devalued. Accordingly, a “safe place” was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate. The “BWell Safe Space” offered on-site peer counselors and a staff to provide support. Paxson also outlined an eleventh-hour “direct alternative event” that was schedule for the same time as the Janus one: a lecture entitled “Research on Rape Culture” by Lindsay Orchowski, assistant professor of psychiatry.

    I’m speechless.

    1. but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate.

      Ri-goddamn-diculous.

      1. That’s going to be the basis for all kinds of censorship.

        How is that not advocating the eradication of ideas?

        1. Merchants of Butthurt?

        2. Going to be? It is the basis for all kinds of censorship.

      2. In most jurisdictions, the law allows “victims” to call the police on “aggressors” if they feel unsafe. The idea was that women in danger of domestic violence should not have to wait until they take a frying pan to the temple before they are able to seek protection.

        But here’s the problem. Once one sociopath realizes that she can have the people she hates arrested by parroting the correct script, she teaches it to others. It’s like inmates teaching each other the Folsom Roll, except society doesn’t arrest the pieces of excrement.

    2. Nuke it from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.

    3. You know, if you need a comfortable space because you have suffered trauma and you are upset by things like this, fine. Trauma is weird and can really fuck people up in strange ways.

      But the people who act like that is the best way for victims of rape or other traumatic violence to exist are just evil shits. The reactions of victims of rape may be understandable, but they sure as hell aren’t healthy and shouldn’t be encouraged. If you want to help victims, find a way to help them deal with things that upset them. Don’t tell them that avoiding all unpleasantness is the right way to deal with it. You are just setting them up to be miserable for the rest of their lives if you do that.

      1. This is all just derived correlaries of moral relativism. Rule 1 of prog moral relativism is “If it feels good, it is right”. Rule 2 of prog moral relativism is “If you deny somebody what feels good, you committed wrong”. Combine those and you get all of this thoughtkampf.

        1. I’m pretty sure that prog moral relativists don’t adhere to those rules, at least not consistently. They are frequently trying to deny me things that feel good to me, and get a lot of smug satisfaction out of doing so.

        2. Ah, yes, “moral relativism”, the favorite whipping boy of the Catholic church. So, when we acknowledge that there are moral absolutes, let’s never forget that the Catholic church itself violates those moral absolutes and should be considered intrinsically evil.

      2. I’m no pyschology major, but…

        It’s yet another form of dehumanization. Nazi’s were fond of dehumanizing Jews – literally referring to them as vermin and such. That was dehumanizing with a negative end in mind.

        Victimization seems to be dehumanizing with the idea of being supportive. It slaps a label on a person.

        A traumatic thing happened. Was it right? No. Was it fair? No. Can you go back in time? No. Does being subjected to that event make you less of an individual? No.

        1. Removing human agency comes with a loss of rights AND loss of responsibility. These “victims” are so disconnected from history that they think their loss of agency merely reduces their responsibility, not seeing the loss of rights that is hiding under all this agitprop.

        2. I think that sounds reasonable. In any case, you are doing a real disservice to people who have been victims of violence by encouraging them to be perpetual victims. If you want to help, you need to help them learn to deal with life, not shelter them from it. Once you leave college you are going to have to deal with a lot worse than someone who has a slightly different view of things.

          1. Exactly. I’ve been fortunate enough not to have anything as traumatic as what Wendy or others have been through happen to me.

            But it just makes sense that if you want to put something behind you, constantly having everyone treat you slightly differently would be a perpetual reminder. And that goes for traumatic events as well as race and gender politics.

            1. At this point I am quite convinced that the greatest obstacle to further improving race relations (particularly in the US, there are still more serious problems in some places) is the people who are constantly on the lookout for anything that might be perceived as racist.

            2. They are not interested in putting anything behind them. They are perpetuating and wallowing in their victim status precisely because they are treated different.

              1. Who are “they”?

                A lot of victims of rape or other violence are very much interested in putting it behind them. Which is why the people who encourage them to be perpetual victims are so awful.

      3. Well said, Zeb.

  10. I went to college twenty years ago, and identical stuff happened. Dinesh D’Souza came and the college communist group dropped a big banner saying “smash racism” in the middle of his talk. I suppose there was less of this “eeek give me a safe space so I’m not triggered” silliness, it was more “stick it to the man” type rhetoric. But overall the complete stasis of academic culture is very striking. Nothing much appears to be different at those places from 20 years ago. Rip van winkle could wake up in his dorm room, and would hardly notice.

  11. At Valenti’s request and to my surprise, armed security guards were conspicuously present.

    What, no trigger warning?

  12. My takeaway is that the biggest cultural contribution that millennials have made is the concept of “triggering”.

    Maybe it was all the Baby Mozart.

    1. If I was speaking at a college to criticize the campus left wing, you better believe I’d want security guards there!

    2. It’s more the use of the word that is new, not the concept. And the concept itself is not really wrong. PTSD is a real thing. The new thing seems to be further glorification of victim status and the increased use of “trigger warning”. And the idea that people are somehow entitled not to ever be exposed to anything unpleasant.

      1. The important distinction is that many, almost certainly the vast majority, of people who demand more abundant “trigger warnings” are not in any actual danger of suffering a psychotic break from PTSD. Their “triggering” is just feeling upset or angry about other people’s opinions. That’s what they’re begging for protection from.

        1. I’d agree with that. And that makes it even worse. All these people take what is a legitimate problem for some people and make it into a joke.

  13. I used the Maine statistic as an example of how investigation of “rape culture” claims usually reveals biased studies, badly flawed methodology or simply the absence of any evidence.

    Let’s not beat around the bush and just call them what they are: downright falsehoods.

    Remember the “1 in 5 women are or will be raped during their lifetime in America” statistic so often repeated during the 90’s? Yeah, that was completely made-up and still resurfacing from time to time during these discussions.

    1. Isn’t 1 in 4 the popular number to bandy about these days?

      1. During the Super Bowl it rises to 40%

    2. Hey it’s totally true. You just need to redefine ‘rape’ to mean “anything mildly sexually awkward”, like misreading signals and leaning in for a kiss – RAPE!

    3. I remember in the 80s when I was a kid the establishment kept telling us 1 in 2 children were molested. I remember thinking even as a 10 year old, is that possible? Turns out. Nope.

  14. a “safe place” was set up for … those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate

    , aka “the leaders of tomorrow”. 8-(

  15. All I get out of this is what a bunch of self-obsessed squabbling children “academics” are.

    1. Speaking of academics, this from a now ex-friend on Facebook (he’s a poli sci professor)

      “still nothing organized to say, just an assemblage of quotations, straining toward the thought that the latitude granted cops to kill with impunity has something to do, not only with their supposed role as guarantors of safety, but also with their related role as delegates, bearers, and thus condensers of ambient social fear, collective gratitude for which is expressed in an uncritical indulgence of their acts of “self-defense,” which are cast as heroic even and maybe especially when they are also extraordinarily, childishly fearful.”

      I commented that this sentence alone should win the Bulwer-Lytton prize.

  16. Has anyone here ever had a job application from a Brown graduate?

    1. I once met someone who had graduated Brown with a degree in Art Semiotics

    2. Joe Paterno and Bill O’Brien both graduate from Brown. Neither applied to work for me, though.

  17. Story time:

    I had the misfortune of living in Athens, Ohio for a year. The fucking liberal Mecca of Ohio. 50 shades of bat shit insane. Anyways… After moving back to KY, I kept in touch with friends from the area. I learned that the Ohio U. marching band was going to play “Blurred Lines” during their half time show for a game. There was a “massive student outrage” and a petition submitted to the school’s administrators. I can’t remember the exact numbers, but it came out to less than 0.1% of the student body didn’t want the band to play the song “becuz triggarzzz!”

    The administrators bought it and axed the show.

    That is how much ground the “rape culture” narrative has gained.

    1. It’s not that it has gained ground, it’s that the right people have incentive to buy into it.

    2. Used to be a great party town.

    3. The band should have played “Got To Give It Up”, then it would have been fine because outrage against Marvin Gaye would have been “racist” by not checking your white-privilege without social justice or something …

  18. They should show the most famous anti-rape movie ever: Birth of a Nation.

    1. This would be fun on so many levels.

      1. You’re not American, are you?

  19. still nothing organized to say

    period; the end.

  20. Accordingly, a “safe place” was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate.

    Well, the world needs ditch diggers, too.

    1. We have machines for that now. State highway construction sign-holders, however…

      1. could be effectively automated, too?

        1. Automation costs money. Liberal arts majors are the very reason why minimum wage laws are market distorting.

          1. To be fair, not all Liberal Arts Majors are worthless degrees, but it’s certainly cornered the market.

  21. “a “safe place” was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate

    In my own typical horrible-person fashion =

    this seems to me to provide the ideal opportunity for a small group of students to break into the ‘safe space’, and Streak Naked through the location while wearing a masks of Ronald Reagan (*and socks on your junk if you feel particularly concerned about potential criminal prosecution)

    Why Ronnie? hell, i don’t know. It just seems right.

    An alternative that works extremely well are beer ’12pack’ boxes. They fit the human head perfectly, and you can see out of the handle-holes.

    Naked commando-assault aside; i’m halfway serious. Take people who are so idiotically ‘sensitive’ to potential offense, and *put them all in one place*?

    Christ, its begging for a cross-burning/Maori-Haka of mockery

    1. “Mr. Gorbachev, suck on these balls!”

      1. Sweet Jesus cinammon titties motherfuck, that is hilarious.

    2. Just one moar reazon not to get any identifying tats.

  22. My deep respect to you Wendy McElroy. You are fighting an uphill battle against this generation’s version of witch hunting. You are one of the few in with the experience (and being the right sex) where people might actually listen to what you have to say (instead of plugging their ears and shouting you down in a blind rage of ‘man-hate’).

  23. Paxson’s email expressed concern that my views on sexual assault could “trigger” memories in rape survivors or make them feel devalued. Accordingly, a “safe place” was set up for attending students who were traumatized as well as for those who did not attend but felt endangered by the existence of such a debate. The “BWell Safe Space” offered on-site peer counselors and a staff to provide support. Paxson also outlined an eleventh-hour “direct alternative event” that was schedule for the same time as the Janus one: a lecture entitled “Research on Rape Culture” by Lindsay Orchowski, assistant professor of psychiatry.

    These people truly are beyond parody.

  24. “Grab its motherfucking leg”

    1. What/who is this quoting?

      1. It’s from the Rolling Stone’s UVA frathouse rape article, supposedly said by one member of a group of gangraping frat boys to another in reference to “Jackie”, the purported victim.

        1. Here, found the link if you haven’t read it:

          http://www.rollingstone.com/cu…..s-20141119

          SIV is quoting that line presumably to highlight what many have noted to be an air of implausibility around the words and actions of the people in the story.

          1. The direct quotes really do make it seem unbelievable, which is truly unfortunate if something like what she described actually happened.

            1. “Acid is groovy. Kill the pigs”

      2. One of the Phi Kappa Psi brothers in the UVA gang rape story in Rolling Stone.

  25. It has come to me that they way to deal with “Rape Culture” hysterics i to tell them “Please go check out Iran, and get back to me. If you can.”

    1. Or Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, most places in Africa…

  26. Thank you Wendy. Excellent article.

    This is obligatory-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLqHv0xgOlc

  27. Honest question: I agree that a rape culture doesn’t exist in North American culture at large, but what about certain sub-cultures? I’ve heard stories of certain attitudes in frats, and activities that reinforce them, that do seem to perpetuate a view of women as either overtly wanting to have sex, or being too uptight to say so, but secretly wanting it. Maybe that isn’t a rape culture per se, but it does seem to tread dangerously close to that line. I’ve never been in frat, or a frat party, so I can’t comment from first hand experience. Anyone else care to?

    1. I brought up something similar last week sometime. The conclusion I came to was that rape has a very specific, criminal, violent definition.

      The attitude of some frats, etc can be called chauvinistic, crude, demeaning, unacceptable. But none of those things are criminal and they don’t meet the definition of rape. I think the unfortunate truth is that there women who willingly (being the key word here)associate with the sub-culture you described above.

      1. I think I agree, based on what I have heard, that they don’t meet a strict definition of rape culture, but I can see how those attitudes can lead to thinking that resistance on the part of a woman is not a sign of “no”, but just being uptight, or that it is OK to pressure people to drink with the goal of lowering their inhibition, etc. And even if those things don’t rise to the level of rape culture, I think they are still wrong and not something that people ought to be defending. I worry that too many people react to extreme feminists by siding with people that really are awful.

        1. ” I worry that too many people react to extreme feminists by siding with people that really are awful.”

          Your perspective here requires you to believe that ‘disagreeing’ with radical feminist misconceptions and myths requires ‘siding’ with anyone.

          Pointing out that a “culture in which rape is pervasive and normalized due to societal attitudes about gender and sexuality.” does not exist in the modern western world, much less the United States, does not require apologizing for or defending otherwise chauvinistic social spheres that nevertheless fail to rise to the level of “Pro Rape” by any stretch of the imagination.

          IOW, i do not need to suggest ‘frat culture’ is GOOD. I dont need to point out that it is neither reflective of anything considered ‘normal’, nor passively tolerated in wider society.

          I can simply point out that, no matter how unpleasant feminists may find ‘Frats’, they are not in fact Rape Mills, anecdotes be damned, nor do they adhere to any uniform ‘culture’ comparable to say, rural india, where gang rape is actually “a thing

      2. I think the unfortunate truth is that there women who willingly (being the key word here)associate with the sub-culture you described above.

        Biker chicks – yeah.
        Middle class chicks hanging around the elite frats – yeah.
        Entertainment executives – yeah.

    2. oh darn, I thought you were going to mention the eskimos and blacks which make up overwhelming number of rapists.

  28. “We are so tolerant at Brown that we burn the heretics!”

  29. … and seemed to mitigate personal responsibility.

    It’s #1 in the authortarian playbook. Take that down and leftism goes with it. So they are going to fight to the death on that one principle.

    1. And here I thought the right’s neverending attempts to deny corporate responsibility for, well, anything, was comparable. Or that the higher rates of welfare dependency in red states might be meaningful in penetrating the rhetoric. Thanks for making clear this is just a ‘leftist’ strategy.

  30. Hope to see more of your work posted here Wendy.

  31. “8 percent of college men have either attempted or successfully raped”

    ‘…background research into how this statistic was derived identified a single survey respondent who signed the name “BOOOOSH!” 1000 times.’

    1. Something like that.

      If we simply do the math, where 2/3 of rapists are serials, this means there are 800 male rapists on a campus of 20,000 people. If 533 serial rapists commit 3 rapes each during their time on campus and 267 rapists, the non-serials, rape once, those rapists commit 1867 rapes over four years, of 10,000 college women. It means that the nonsensical ‘1 in 5’ claims are approximately correct.

      In short, the 8% claims is surely false.

  32. Thank you for this Ms. McElroy, please keep on speaking and writing.

    The progs must really hate you, but they are unable to directly attack you without being shown for the hypocrites they are, so they have to resort to BS ways of trying to shut you down like that bogus event timed at the same time as your debate.

    As to the armed guards – perhaps they thought this would intimidate you as it would them.

  33. “Again, I don’t blame men or the culture; I blame one specific man. Most men I know would have put themselves at risk to protect me.”

    This X 1000. Any women out there reading this, please know that most men will run though fire to save you from a rapist or an abuser. A few so-called males create this menace, whereas legions of REAL men will give their lives to protect you from harm. If i die fighting off a rapist, I will die happy, especially if I can take the bastard down with me. If that’s not how things work where you live, you have my sympathy.

    1. If you check out police records, rape is overwhelmingly a serial crime. It’s not unlikely for one male, typically black, to be responsible for as many as 50 rapes in one community. This of course going by the term “rape” meaning actually having sex with a woman while she’s being forced against her will using violence or threats of violence. I’m unsure what today’s feminists mean by rape. Giving a woman flowers?

      1. I’m unsure what today’s feminists mean by rape.

        Anything they want it to mean.

  34. I attended college 20 years ago when a campus feminist group wanted to place posters throughout campus naming every single male enrolled at the U. of Md as a potential rapist. The attempt backfired when a conservative group threatened to retaliate with similar posters, naming every single female as potential child beaters. Their statistics showed that 75% of children abused at home are beaten by their mothers.

  35. The women I’ve fucked always told me their secret fantasy is a man who asks permission for every single damn thing.

  36. Yes there is an epidemic of 18-19 year old chicks going to parties, getting blasted, and thinking they have found the one, only to find out next day that they were a party lay. Obviously, they were raped.

    1. I think rather than living in a “rape culture” we’re in the midst of a “slut culture” that refuses responsibility.

  37. Sounds like the misanthropic moral panic I was expected to kow tow to when I was a freshman. Undergrads ought to stay off campus as much a possible, keep their noses in books, get good grades and a good degree, and get out. They should make it a point to ignore any and all advice to the contrary.

  38. Excellent job. I hope such efforts get a broad hearing. My own university recently started a program to emphasize uses of evidence and logic. Great. They also set up a program to deal with sexual impropriety. That program begins by quoting the dubious one-in-four statistic. I hope the use of evidence program will not accept that standard.

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    1. Wow! I guess bing fisted on cam does lay well.

  40. “The Rape Culture

    I deny it exists in North America.”

    You are completely incorrect and I encourage you to issue a correction.

    Rape culture is alive and well in men’s prisons in the US. Prison Rights Watch estimates 7% of men in prison are raped or sexually assaulted each year. That’s around 300,000 victims. Many of those men are considered sexual property and subject to gang rape or daily rape.

    Rape is well understood to be a coercive aspect of prison culture. Prison rape is the subject of jokes. It is not at all unusual for the prospect of prison rape to be used by police and prosecutors to coerce cooperation, confessions, testimony, and plea deals. Hero cops in the mainstream media threaten prison rape to gain cooperation.

    Rape culture does indeed exist in the United States, but it exists in men’s prisons. Please help us.

  41. I’m not totally clear white these bitches spare on about. I’m guessing they don’t like cock at all. Which is typically the case with this sort. It’s a shame, as I expect a good satisfying dicking would straighten this bulkshit out.

    1. These forums desperately need an edit button.

      1. How about a delete button you can use after you’ve had a chance to reconsider your obnoxious posting.

  42. I agree with Wendy McElroy on most things, but there is something to be said for a culture of immunity for some men on college campuses – most often athletes receiving full scholarships but possibly men whose families are big donors. (Of course, many women on campuses get a similar immunity granted to them, and much of it could be eradicated by separating competitive sports from education.)

    While I don’t believe that cases of rape should ever be decided at any level by a “preponderance of the evidence”, I can certainly see where schools could establish the expectation that students behave as ladies and gentlemen, and act swiftly to punish failures to do so when such behavior is first exhibited – first by verbal and written warnings, then by a probationary period, then later if necessary by a suspension, and if this is not enough by expulsion.

    This is, in fact, the sort of thing that schools used to do, and for good reason. It teaches students (both male and female) that they are expected to behave with civility and dignity – that there are standards of behavior expected of educated persons.

    Incidentally, I expect many of the protesters at Brown would not meet such standards.

  43. Here’s a contradiction. A discussion about rape culture that challenges its existence is triggering. Whereas a discussion that promotes it is not, according to those who don’t like what McElroy had to say.

    What’s triggering it seems are words that do not agree with your world view, rather than the topic.

  44. The word “Safe Space” is a politically correct term for ” I don’t want to hear another opinion because it might actually make me think, and I am a whiny, petulant, little shit head who thinks the world should be handed to me on a platter.” Anybody who says they need a “Safe Space” needs their empty little head kicked in. I hate these fucktards more and more everyday.

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