School Choice

In Which I Extract My Kid From the Clutches of Traditional Schooling

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J.D. Tuccille

I can't say it was the stress-induced puking that caused my wife and I to finally pull our son from his brick-and-mortar charter school. We'd been contemplating yanking him from a classroom setting for the past year or so. Over the summer, we ran him through a battery of academic tests and encouraged him to study math and Spanish online. The results were enlightening, but we thought he might be a little young for a full online education. And then the nervous tic developed as the start of school approached. That decided us well before he barfed at the thought of the next day's schedule of classes.

Anthony's (he started insisting on his full name) charter school is a good effort of the type. During a July meet-and-greet, the school principal and his teacher were amenable to a flexible approach—especially one that takes into account the flawed math genes I handed off to him. He grasps some lessons about math, while others on exactly the same concepts might as well be written in Sanskrit. They said they'd work with him. And they tried.

But a classroom is fundamentally a classroom. It has a structured day, and a bunch of kids requiring the divided attention of a teacher. The kids are part of a group, and mostly they're taught as part of that group.

And my kid is now twitching and puking at the thought of school. This does not work for me.

So we took the lead from the online lessons that worked so well for Anthony over the summer, and for his new penchant for googling the shit out of animals, battles, and historical figures who catch his interest. Personally, I had ever heard of slave-making ants, but I walked out of my office one day to find that a mention of them in his encyclopedia of animals started him on an online research foray into the nastier sorts of crawling things. This was after he became fascinated by the shifts in Roman military gear from 100 A.D., to 400 A.D., to 1000 A.D. He has become very familiar with the websites where you can track the evolution.

So now he's enrolled in an online private school. The school promises an individualized approach—we already know from experience that many of the lessons are designed to automatically adjust their pace to the needs of students working through online lessons. He'll still work with a couple of online teachers, and my wife and I take on larger roles in monitoring his work and coaching him through the offline material. It's as much a homeschooling effort with organizational and technological backup as it is a private school.

It's an alternative to what we tried before, which didn't work. And while there's no guarantee that this is the "right" approach for Anthony, I have no doubt that it's an improvement for my kid, whatever may work for others.

It would have been nice to have an option like this back when I was twitching and puking my own way through public schools in New York and Connecticut.

Update: And, for the inevitable accusations that we're now keeping Anthony locked in the closet…He can kick his way through the door with his Tae Kwon Do skills.

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  1. Good luck, Anthony.

    1. Nice try Anthony, but we still suspect you are Tony!

      1. No way. Tuccille’s kid is WAY smarter than Tony.

        On a related note I’ve decided there is no way anyone here socks Tony. No one here can lower their IQ that much to pretend to be someone else that is that mentally handicapped.

        1. I’ve never been a big believer in sock puppet theory.

          In a country of 300 million assholes, is it really that far fetched that a handful would spend their time arguing with people who disagree with them on the internet?

          1. Agreed. I’ve seen plenty of morons who are every bit as dumb as Shriek and Tony in real life. I mean, just look at our government.

        2. “Tuccille’s kid is WAY smarter than Tony.”

          There are things growing on damp bread that are way smarter than Tony.

  2. Anthony Tuccille, huh?. Another garlic huffing, olive oil sweating dago wop. Probably grow up to be either a radio equipment repairman or an enforcer for the mob. Good luck, kid.

    1. Both respectable professions. Certainly more respectable than, say, community organizer?.

    2. Tony Too-chilly just sounds like a name too good to be true. “Tony’s gonna put yous on ice.”

  3. I spent my time staring out the window bored out of my skull instead of puking, but being “allowed” to progress at your own pace, and (within limits, I suppose) choose your subjects is definitely better than being trapped in a school which stamps out “students” like a punch press.

    1. “Punch press” reminds me of this excellent RSA video about education. We organize schools like factories, where “the most important thing about a child is date of manufacture.”

      http://youtu.be/zDZFcDGpL4U

  4. Related, check out this shit.

    It’s funny because parents are supposed to not enjoy the presence of their children and instead enjoy sending them to indoctrination centers where they can have their spirits broken and be stripped of their individuality.

  5. Not to second-guess the Tuccille efforts, but I have to wonders whether your son would be quite so stressed by the thought of attending a traditional school of you hadn’t been filling his head with crazy libertarian ideals about individuality and tailored lesson plans and personal autonomy rather than obedience to the social norm. AND SCHOOL CHOICE. You monsters.

    1. I agree, those radical libertarian ideas of actually learning things and how to think, where to find things that you don’t know. Libertarians need to know that the only real edumakashun is in gov’t indoctrination centers, where we carefully, thoughtfully and lovingly tell you what you should think, how you should think and what to hate. We can’t have a bunch of people thinking for themselves, they my not think like us ant that is bad, we call them divergent.

  6. You should have named him “You picked a fine time to leave me” Tuccille.

    1. Tuccille does not rhyme with Lucille. It sounds like “Too chilly”.

      1. DON’T SPOIL IT FOR ME!!!!!

        You have any idea how long I held that joke back looking for a reasonable time to fire it off.

        1. Except someone made that joke within 2Chilly’s first week on the job. Probably Fist.

        2. Goddammit, me too! And you ruined it!

      2. I agree with Longtorso. It was in bad taste to point out the error when the joke was adequately amusing.

  7. Curious, are you sure about what was stressing him out?

    I went through a short period of that type, but it was peer induced, not academics. In my case I moved to a new school and failed to fit in.

    Do you know for a fact that he isn’t getting bullied or ostracized for some petty ‘childish’ thing? Socializing is still part of the education process, probably the most important part to determining success in life.

    1. Socializing is still part of the education process, probably the most important part to determining success in life.

      You can socialize kids without putting them into school. But I do agree it is important.

      1. Agree completely, I’m asking about this case specifically.

        I think that in general public schooling teaches socialization ala “Lord of the Flies”, and if that’s where Anthony is actually having problems, allowing him to become completely introverted through self-study and internet schooling may not be completely in his best self-interest.

        If that’s where his stress was coming from, adding some specific forms of socialization (play dates, club activities, sports, etc.) might be in order.

        1. I was homeschooled from 4th grade on, and I couldn’t stand other people. I was totally introverted and liked it.

          And yet, now I’m fine with other people. I turned out fine.

          There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with being a loner anymore than there’s anything wrong with needing people around you 24/7.

          Of course, it’s not for everyone…

          1. THIS^

            Being introverted is not a disease or deformity.

            1. Never said it was, I’m an introverted loner too. Or completely extroverted asshole to the other extreme. I have no throttle, and while it’s no disease, it does handicap me in my ability to deal with certain situations.

              Just saying, in Anthony’s situation , I’d make sure that you aren’t allowing him to hide from a problem, rather than teaching him how to cope with it.

              1. I’m guessing you aren’t a parent.

                (Not an insult, by the way. Just my guess.)

          2. ace_m82|9.5.14 @ 11:56AM|#
            …”And yet, now I’m fine with other people. I turned out fine.”

            Not according to your wife!
            (I keed)

        2. Nothing wrong with being an introvert. I spent many many years trying to “fix” myself for not liking to go out with large groups of people and party and all that shite. That’s what caused a great deal of my stress and puking to begin with – I just don’t like being around lots of other people. Once i figured that out and accepted it, I was much happier with much less anxiety.

    2. How do kids properly socialize by only spending time with kids of similar age?

      Of course, they cannot even talk to one another during class without permission. Recess is too short, and if they get too loud during lunch they are forced to eat in silence.

      1. Plus, all the teens I see just sit next to each other tapping away on their phones.

        1. And then, when we all get to college, we have to drink in order to talk to one another.

          1. And then, when we all get to college, we have to want to drink in order to talk to one another.

            1. Well, yes, I wanted social skills, so I drank.

      2. “How do kids properly socialize by only spending time with kids of similar age?”

        Exactly. When was the last time you were at a job and they said “you’ll be going to the 42 year old room today!”

        1. Kids will learn socialization, from other kids who have yet to learn how to socialize.

      3. How do kids properly socialize by only spending time with kids of similar age?

        That’s only part of it. Kids do interact with people of other ages too. But I think that spending time with a bunch of other kids is important. Play and social interaction with your peers is very important in developing as a person.

        1. I do not believe that children should learn from their peers, unless of course you are a big fan of “Lord of the Flies”, in which case, carry on.

          It is also not historically the way children became socialized and were taught. They were socialized and taught by adults.

          1. I do not believe that children should learn from their peers

            Well, that’s just stupid.

            Lord of the Flies is a work of fiction and a load of shit. I don’t know why so many people think it is reality.

            Did you miss the part where I said “Kids do interact with people of other ages too”? Of course kids learn a lot from adults and that is very valuable.

            1. I don’t know why so many people think it is reality.

              Probably because they went to public schools.

      4. Really, how much of your life, after you get out of school do you spend completely around people your own age?

    3. Whenever someone asks me about socialization of my homeschooled kids I say “Sure we socialize them! Once a week we lock them in the bathroom and threaten to beat them up if they don’t give us their lunch money!”

      1. That is a good line. You should also make sure they get handcuffed for chewing a pop-tart into the shape of a gun, and have a drug dog search their room once a week.

      2. Also :

        make them ask permission to go the bathroom.

        drop em off in a park, and make sure they stick to their own race so they don’t get their ass kicked.

        1. and all those Michelle Obama-inspired school lunches…

    4. Being bullied is part of determining success in life?

      1. Dealing with bullying can teach you how to deal with a lot of shit later in life.

        1. This is true too. There are plenty of bullies and assholes in adult life too. Being homeschooled by your parents doesn’t prepare you for that too well.

          1. Some kids learn good things from being bullied, but most don’t. For most kids being bullied just makes life miserable. What percentage of bullied kids who are now adults feel as if they learned how to deal with bullies by being bullied as a kid?

            The kind of bullying you receive as an adult is so vastly different from the kind you receive as a student that it makes childhood bullying mostly useless as a learning tool.

            The way adults are supposed to respond to bullying is also different.

            1. I honestly have no experience of being bullied or bullying as a child, so I can only speak based on observation and what other people tell me. So maybe it is less useful in adult life. Some people seem to think it is.

              1. This definitely explains your upthread comments about “Lord of the Flies”.

            1. Proof? This is a casual discussion, not a math class.

              I got nothing besides some anecdotes. And that’s mostly about overly sheltered Christian homeschoolers.

          2. I have 2 sons and started homeschooling my older boy last year when he was in 2nd grade, now 3rd. I began homeschooling my younger son this year, he is in 1st grade. Based on observing their relationship, I do not fear either of my son’s will have problems later in life dealing with assholes. They each have their moments of assholery and have learned what is acceptable behavior in confronting assholery. The idea that children won’t be properly socialized, because they don’t attend school is ridiculous. From the moment babies are born they begin learning social skills FROM ADULTS.

        2. The only way I learned to deal with bullies was to clean their clocks. This translated into no discernibly-useful skill after high school.

          1. Yeah, I think it probably did, Agile.

            When I’m in a boardroom, a lot of the more unpleasant interactions boil down to highly refined and mediated bullying.

            Learning how to back down a bully is an essential life skill. Sure, you can’t meet them in the parking lot, but the ability to give someone a flat stare while you’re pondering all the ways you can fuck them up does wonders to back them down.

            1. Which only encouraged most bullies I encountered to proceed to pound your face in, or come back later with friends/weapons.

        3. No, not really. I’ve never been assaulted since leaving high school.

        4. Children should not be taught to deal with bullies. Bullies should be taught not to bully.

          1. The way to teach a bully to not bully is for him (her) to get the snot beaten out of him on a regular basis by kids he (she) was sure he could terrify.

            This is accomplished by teaching kids to fight and stand up for themselves.

          2. I see what you did there.

        5. Seriously? I dealt with bullies in the New York public schools. But the techniques I used then (and which I’ve taught my son to use if needed) could now draw an expulsion or a police response.

          1. Hah! I broke 2Chili’s sarcasmometer!

            1. Or not…threading FAIL. 🙁

          2. Spot on. Children are taught not to defend themselves which teaches the bullies that they can continue their behavior because the decent people will have to alter their behavior. It’s tacit permission to engage in anti-social behavior.

          3. This is right on.

            Bullys in school are like muggers in adult life, they are not concerned with following the “rules” and become adept at not getting caught. The result is that our rules bases systems punish the intended victim more often that the perp.

          4. Bullying is not just physical. In fact, physical bullying is assault. For the most part, teachers get involved and kids get expelled.

            A lot of bullying, especially now days, has to do with things like peer shaming and mockery, or facebook attacks. Girls, in my experience, tend to be worse bullies than boys (probably because of the lower likelyhood of physical reprisal).

      2. Are most or even a lot of kids bullied? That was never my experience of school. Maybe I’m just awesome and everyone liked me.

        1. I was bullied once.

          ONCE.

        2. I vaguely remember being bullied in grade school and middle school (though a fair bit of it was outside of school proper), but by high school they had basically weeded out the dead-ends.

        3. Methinks you were a bully.

          Everyone I know was bullied mercilessly, except for those who were bullies themselves.

          I ran into a guy who had made my life miserable for a long time, years after school. He reminisced about all the fun we had had together rough-housing and goofing around. Man, those were the good old days to him.

    5. Socializing is still part of the education process, probably the most important part to determining success in life.

      And how well, exactly, do our public schools do at socializing children? It strikes me that they generally come out with a wildly skewed vision of human interaction.

      1. I never ever meant to imply that public schools are good at teaching this, I’m just saying it’s important for kids to learn how to interact constructively with others.

    6. Socializing children by locking them in a building where they can’t escape from their oppressors is probably one of the most damaging ideas ever presented. You are basically punishing them for interacting with other people. A much better way would be frequent positive interactions so that they look forward to interacting with people while gradually building up their skillset to deal with negative interactions. That is a far cry from dropping them in the Thunderdome and hoping they make it out ok.

      1. SKR: Good post. love the Thunderdome visual. I am writing an article on the pros and cons of public vs private vs homeschool education. May I quote you? The idea that a child will be improperly socialized unless they attend school or hang out with kids their age is silly. Rather than push my children into interaction, I homeschool so that they can develop into themselves. A child who knows himself, appreciates his own strengths and weaknesses, and who spends his days being loved and respected is very well equipped to deal with bullies whether it is a bully adult or boss or peer. And, yes, children in the past were socialized by adults. Those were the days when kids wanted to grow up and be adults ASAP rather than extend their childhoods into their late twenties and thirties. Kids have spent the last 60 years growing up with their own music,their own clothes, their own movies, etc and have been separated from the adults they are supposed to be emulating.

    7. I’ve noticed that kids who do really well socially in school, don’t do so well outside of school. Unless you count becoming a school teacher as doing well. Which I don’t.

      To be clear…many of them end up as good middle class tax payers. But, in terms of accomplishing anything, leading interesting lives, etc….no.

      I think the socialization that takes place pretty much exclusively has to be unlearned in order to become a fully functioning adult.

  8. You might be surprised how valuable the ability to Google well can be to a career, especially in IT.

    Not sure if we’ll homeschool yet, the schools here are all top 1-2% so we’ll probably at least give them a shot. I want my 2-year-old boy to learn calculus by 14 so maybe we’ll try a mixed approach.

  9. As usual the FB comments deliver…

    Dominique Sinclair Right. I’d “twitch and puke” at the thought of school too–it’s called being a kid. another example of a nutjob, more than likely religious, parent being a nutjob.
    Like ? Reply ? 1 min

    1. Shorter derpette: EVERYBODY WHO DOESN’T THINK LIKE ME IS CRAZY.

    2. Kids are not supposed to enjoy school and learning, because it has always been this way.

    3. She has a furry avatar. Yep.

  10. Good for you. Home/private/online schooling is definitely in my kids’ future.

    1. I’m sending mine to public school for the chicks. If I could afford Catholic school, then I’d send him there for the really easy chicks.

      1. As a kid growing up in Catholic schools, I suspected that Catholic girls were only “easy” for non-Catholic school students. It’s like how the young Amish men are allowed/encouraged to stray before committing to their faith and culture for life. Catholic girls don’t put out for the Catholic guys they see every day, because some day one will be their husband and they need to keep their youthful indiscretions, well, discreet.

        1. I also went through 12 years of Catholic schooling and I think you must have been a fat, ugly nerd. The Catholic school girls in our school were crazy.

  11. The ability to function in highly stressful and highly structured environments, whether the stress is coming from the bosses/teachers or from peers, is highly valuable in this day and age. Not essential, but very valuable. I hope he grows into it.

    1. Essential? Only if you work for the man. Being self employed is much higher stress, but of an entirely different type.

      1. For the most part being self-employed means you get to CHOOSE whose cock or cunt you have to suck for money.

      2. Good or bad, most people work for the man and will have need of those skills.

    2. Meh, even Einstein quit school at 15 for better things because of the bullshit typical schools puke out onto young minds.

      His theories didn’t seem to suffer from this decision.

      1. And this one example decisively proves your point, because induction obv.

        1. Nah, just reiterating a bit of history because I get off on punching buttons.

    3. The ability to function in highly stressful and highly structured environments, whether the stress is coming from the PARENTS/bosses/teachers or from peers…

      FIFY

  12. He’s not going to very well trained to work in our country’s mills and factories with that kind of education.

    1. He’d never make it in the Prussian military with that attitude.

      1. He’ll never be a good Protestant professing good Protestant values!

        1. Actually, I was taught very similarly…

          And yet, I am. The Protestants might not know they are good Protestant values, but they mostly went to govt schools so what do they know about Protestantism?

  13. Good for you J.D. I do not know if you checked out Khan Academy but they are great as well for a little extra help.

    My own daughter did the same, on-line school and she turned out great.

    1. Khan!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      — Capt Kirk

    2. We’ve been doing a lot of Khan Academy. It was excellent for convincing him that math does not have to suck, and that he really can learn the concepts.

      1. Our kids are turning out pretty well (homeschooled throughout) with a mix of online stuff, some group stuff, some homeschool co-op stuff. Eldest now taking a couple classes at the local community college (not math and science, but, oddly, psychology and Finnish – I don’t know how he picked those). All 3 are black belts in karate and pursue random diverse interests. The boys are Scouts, leaders in their troop and are killing the appropriate number of brain cells with video games.

        They seem “normal” whatever that means. Certainly they seem happy.

        Good luck to you and spouse Tucille; happy to exchange ideas whenever.

        1. Hamilton: Thanks for a positive comment and the peek into your family. It gives a great vision for those new to homeschooling and, hopefully, some food for thought for the naysayers.

    3. agree, Khan Academy is excellent

  14. Your son sounds like a wrecker already (or is he a Kulak?). Excellent. At what age do you plan to subject him to the H&R comments section?

    1. Never – never – expose him to the commentariat. That is really child abuse.

      I hesitate to mention it, but recall a certain homeschooled young reason writer and what happened to her.

      Let that be a warning.

  15. But a classroom is fundamentally a classroom indoctrination session.

    There. Much more accurate.

    And my kid is now twitching and puking at the thought of school.

    Just like Alex DeLarge after he received his “treatment”. Interesting parallels.

    By the way, my kid hates school, albeit not to the point of puking his guts out. Looking at the kind of things they’re making him practice (like the new math thing) I would hate it, too.

  16. I would recommend the Life of Fred math program. It’s not a complete program (You’re still expected to do flash cards and such), but my kids actually look forward to doing their math.

  17. Nick has completely failed to grasp once again, that the days of the US going it alone are over. We are broke

    We’re not broke. We’ve got plenty of checks left!

  18. Good grief. How did I manage that?

    1. You were public schooled.

    2. I thought it was an extension of your anti-threading commenting. Now you place your comments in unrelated articles.

  19. I have to say, that ant article is fucking fascinating. Your kid studying Roman military and slave ants is shaping up to be quite the military genius.

    1. Or game developer…

    2. See if you still feel that way when Emperor Anthony’s genetically engineered giant ant soldiers enslave you.

      1. I for one look forward to our giant ant soldier overlords.

      2. Thought experiment for libertarians:

        A stranger approaches you with convincing evidence that he is a time traveler from the future. He bears further evidence that your child will grow up to become a monstrous tyrant and that he was sent back in time to negotiate a settlement with you (sort of like a NAP Terminator scenario). Do you work with him to stymie your child’s growth into a monster, even if it might mean harming your child?

        Keep in mind his evidence is convincing, and you have confided in reliable others and they agree the evidence is valid.

        1. Encourage the child to become even more of a monstrous tyrant and rule the world with a iron fist.

          1. Almost by definition, your tyrant child will have had you executed or imprisoned at some point.

            1. This would be the first, and most important question I would ask.

              Answer 1: He has you executed and your corpse defiled – Go home and ‘fix’ child

              Answer 2: He has you declared regent of the realm and lord of the monocle – Stab Reese in throat, bury corpse.

            2. This is why I don’t have children.

        2. I cannot harm my child, but if the evidence is convincing, I will do all short of actually harming my child (I’m fine with spanking, but not mental torture, permanent injury, etc) to prevent the child from becoming evil.

          Interesting thought experiment though.

        3. The only evidence of time travel I would accept is investment advice.

          If all that proves out (which will take a few years), I’ll be a multi-billionaire, and then we can talk about my multi-billionaire kid.

          1. Of course, the first thing you do when confronted by a time traveler is to make him convince you with investment advice. Anyone whose first reaction is not skepticism, and whose second reaction is not “show me the money” has failed Time Travel Skepticism 101. This is why all the Dr. Who companions are morons.

            1. Well, seeing is believing. And perhaps they edit out all the “show me the money” parts and the Doctor says “no” for obvious reasons.

            2. Or, a quicker way would be sports betting advice. Like Hot Tub Tie Machine

        4. I don’t have children, so I would have to assume that the putative time traveler is a fraud, or batshit nuts, or both.

          But, presuming I did have children, I would try to bring my child up to stay the hell away from politics, and then let destiny take its course. after all

          1) The world has survived monstrous tyrant before. Sometimes several in a single century.

          2) The opposition has the resources to travel through time. Seems to me that’s a hopeful sign

          3) My definition of “convincing evidence” from a time traveler would be goddamned stringent. He can travel through time; the idea that he would find it difficult to gin up fake evidence is hardly persuasive.

        5. Lie, agree to help him, gather as much information about the resistance as possible, and then make sure my child knows all about them so they can keep them from being born.

        6. We should ask Tony’s parents to see what they ended up doing.

  20. My dad tried to deprogram me during my public school education, and it just resulted in me being a PITA to my teachers, and getting terrible grades. My dad had the nerve to actually subscribe to Access to Energy, the little newsletter by Dr. Arthur Robinson, and would constantly talk about how Dr. Robinson was brilliant for homeschooling his 6 kids, even though he was a widower, and a busy academic. His kids were completing calculus at age 14, crushing non-recentered SATs, and getting their advanced science-oriented degrees from prestigious universities. And then Dad would tell me my teachers were all idiots, but to do all their busy work anyway. No, I’m not bitter at all.

    Dr. Arthur Robinson and his kids sell The Robinson Curriculum today, and it is quite influential in the homeschooling community.

  21. I puked every day before school, too. Sometimes right after I got off the bus, in the school’s courtyard. Most times I made it to the bathroom.

    1. Yeah, slugging down a pint of rye on the bus often has that effect.

      1. That’s pretty funny if you knew me back then. Let’s just say I was somewhere between square and scolding prude.

  22. I have to say, I really enjoyed my conventional public school education. You get to spend all day with all of your friends, fuck around and generally hang out and socialize. Seems like it is a bit different these days, though.
    But it is certainly true that the traditional classroom is not for everyone. And especially not for every teenager. School does make a lot of kids miserable.

    1. During the summer, when school was not in session, I spent all day with my friends, fuckin’ around, hanging out and socializing. School days kept me from doing those things.

      1. Well, yeah. Summer is better. And I’m sorry your school was no fun.

        I just like to point out that it isn’t entirely horrible for everyone.

  23. Good article Tucille. Glad to see another parent recognize how their child just failed to thrive in public/traditional school. I have yet to see a parent regret the decision, so don’t be too worried about that.

    Since your son seems so self motivated, you might also want to look at “unschooling” as an option.

    Glad others also took down that “socialization” nonsense. Look, if you really want to make sure they spend time with other kids, most places the public schools still have to allow kids to participate in extra-curricular activities and sports, there are numerous homeschool groups, and lots of ways to get that kind of interaction.

    Taking your homeschooled kid out in public with you, so they can deal with everyday people in normal situations with people of all ages is what “socialization” really should be about.

    I had a hard time with my wife on some of these issues, but now that our son just turned 17, got his first job, bought his first car, etc. she concedes that we made the right decisions and everyone who meets him remarks on what a wonderful young man he is.

    1. My son went to college with a few kids who were ‘unschooled’. One girl knew nothing of WWII and did not know a swastika was offensive to most people. I’m sure she was an anomaly but unfortunately she is who I think of whenever someone mentions unschooling.

  24. You were public schooled.

    *hangs head, kicks rock morosely*

  25. Congratulations, Tucille. I homeschooled my son from the time he was 3. He just turned 15 and started his first community college classes. Not because he’s smarter or more academically inclined than average. We just didn’t think high school had anything to offer him, so we skipped it. Homeschooling and meeting other homeschoolers is a great way to learn how to beat the system.

    Best of luck. Hope you all have a great time!

  26. On topic: I believe BC Premier Christy Clark, a center-statist Liberal, may have just found and may have just used The Kill Move on teachers unions and public education. I think this is it.

    Step 1) Brilliantly, compensate parents (of 12-year olds and younger) to the tune of 40$/day during the strike 2) Laugh as teachers flood tutor positions to earn that money, effectively crossing the picket line.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2…..-for-them/

    1. Ha, clever.

    2. Genius.

  27. I can’t say it was the stress-induced puking that caused my wife and I to finally pull our son from his brick-and-mortar charter school.

    First lesson at the Tuccille home school: Ask Anthony to find the grammatical error in this sentence.

  28. Way to go, J.D. Now your kid is going to go to college sooner. I know you admit you are mathematically challenged, but can you afford it?

  29. Maybe I just live in a weird bubble, but is there anything even close to weird about homeschooling any more?

    Can we just move on instant mockery of anybody who even questions it? Fuck those guys.

  30. Regarding the “socializing” aspect, the homeschoolers I know have regular get-togethers with other local homeschooling kids for group projects, field trips, etc.

  31. And, for the inevitable accusations that we’re now keeping Anthony locked in the closet…He can kick his way through the door with his Tae Kwon Do skills.

    So, your real plan is to turn him into some sort of child assassin, right? Maybe a pit fighter?

    1. Anthony Tuccile by day, LIBERTARIO, public ennemy #1 by night.

  32. my co-worker’s aunt makes $68 /hr on the laptop . She has been without a job for eight months but last month her pay check was $13597 just working on the laptop for a few hours. try this site……

    ================ http://www.netjob70.com

    1. my co-worker’s aunt makes $68 /hr on the laptop . She has been without a job for eight months but last month her pay check was $13597 just working on the laptop for a few hours. try this site……

      ================ http://www.blowjob70.com

      A few hours? That is 200 hours = 50 hours a week. I hope she switches up positions or she might get some repetitive motion injuries. I’d worry about how long she can go like that. She must be pretty homely – I hope she is a hearty gal.

  33. We pulled our kids out of “school” 25 years ago, they are grown with professional careers and college degrees now. The argument that the only path for socialization is through public schools is a complete fallacy. I found that in a home school community, kids would interact with adults as well as kids of all ages. Who thinks that forcing your child to hang out with 30 other people all within 6 months of age is a normal situation? We have NO regrets pulling the plug on the public schools. Somewhere along the way that my wife and I realized that we had the ultimate responsibility for our children.

  34. Have you gotten him into counseling? That’s not normal behavior.

  35. as Scott replied I am alarmed that a student can earn $5887 in a few weeks on the computer . learn this here now…. http://www.MoneyKin.Com

  36. After reading the links and other related readings from the author, I do believe that Anthony rules the roost…it would appear that the parents are afraid to parent and are throwing the 8 year old boy under the bus…”Well…it’s what he wanted…”

    Sheesh…..

  37. my co-worker’s half-sister makes $66 every hour on the internet . She has been out of a job for 9 months but last month her check was $18472 just working on the internet for a few hours. read here….

    ???????? http://www.netjob70.com

  38. Mr Tucille, please let your son know it will take 2-3 years until all his friends and relatives call him by his chosen name (relatives will keep calling him by his birth name, long after he has almost forgotten it), and at least five years until he can expect to have strangers call him so. I chose my first name at the age of 12, and it was a difficult process, but very worthwhile. I was lucky to have the example of my grandfather who did the same thing in his teens, and (mostly) the support of my parents, although my father took almost twenty years to fully accept my decision. I believe Anthony will not regret his choice.

  39. I’ll bet Anthony is a very bright kid. Matt shouldn’t be a problem for him. Check out the Kahn Academy.
    https://www.khanacademy.org/

  40. An individualized approach to online academics will not prove as satisfactory as his own personal approach: http://www.quora.com/What-are-…..lter__=all

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