Charter Schools

Catholic Schools Change To Compete With Charter Schools

They were the default alternative for decades

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ALBANY, N.Y. — A recent article in the Albany Government Law Review suggests that the emergence of charter schools — public schools not bound by the same operating procedures as conventional schools — has siphoned many students from Catholic schools, many of whom are minorities in poor, working-class neighborhoods.

This has added an additional dimension to the pressures that Catholic schools have faced in recent decades, as they have been forced to introduce sweeping changes in many U.S. dioceses to cope with the changed realities of sharply declining student populations, greatly reduced numbers of religious sisters and brothers willing and able to work in the schools, and severe financial constraints at the parish and diocese levels.

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  1. How any article can be written about Catholic private schools without mentioning the stewardship model is beyond me.

    http://www.ncregister.com/dail…..in-wichita

    In my opinion, the potential of Catholic schools is the only significant threat to public school indoctrination. In Wichita, the Catholic schools are funded entirely by tithing from local parishioners and operate on budgets that are about 1/3 of the per-student budget of the local public schools. Because of the stewardship model, the Wichita Catholic schools educate children of all socioeconomic backgrounds, just as public schools do, and, not surprisingly, the Catholic schools blow away the public schools on standardized testing results and virtually every other objective or subjective measure of success.

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