Suicide

Study Challenges Link Between Military Combat and Suicide

Researchers could not find actual relationship

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Combat appears to have little or no influence on suicide rates among U.S. troops and veterans, according to a military study that challenges the conventional thinking about war's effects on the psyche.

Depression and other types of mental illness, alcohol problems and being male—strong risk factors for suicide among civilians—were all linked to self-inflicted deaths among current and former members of the military.

But the researchers found deployment and combat did not raise the risk.

"The findings from this study are not consistent with the assumption that specific deployment-related characteristics, such as length of deployment, number of deployments, or combat experiences, are directly associated" with suicides, the authors wrote.

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  1. My (rather narrow) experience with this would suggest that people who were near combat do worse than people who were actually in combat. I don’t claim that makes sense, just that’s the pattern out of the vets I’ve known.

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