Second Amendment

Covered at Reason 24/7: 3D-Printed Guns Activist Sees Opportunity To Empower Individuals

|

Reason 24/7
Reason

Most of the coverage of Defense Distributed and 3D printing of gun compnents and accessories has focused on the scary/gee whiz (take your pick) aspect of generating a firearm at home without any special knowledge. But there's a deeper political agenda behind Cody Wilson, the head of Defense Distributed, and the efforts of he and his colleagues to render gun control laws impotent by giving everybody the ability to be their own armorer. Specifically, the goal is to empower individuals and disempower those who would control individuals. And flip a bird at likely targets in the process. It's heady stuff.

From PJ Tatler:

Over the next hour, we converse about everything from the methods and mechanics of printing a gun, to the why of it, to the philosophy of Democratic politicians like Dianne Feinstein, Andrew Cuomo, Chuck Schumer, and Steve Israel, who believe that there is a legislative solution to everything, and that they have those solutions or are smart enough to come up with them.

Wilson is no fan of any of them. And they may not be smart enough to come up with a legislative solution to Defense Distributed. Distributing printed firearms via download may be a case of politics failing to stop the signal.

He is also no conservative in the typical sense. He's either a libertarian or an anarchist or believes in "socialism from below," but mostly he's just a young man who "wants to remain a human being" by realizing an idea that up to now has only lived in the mind. That idea is printing a gun, not for hunting or for self-defense against criminals, but to defend himself against government. …

"You're printing guns for a set of specific reasons," I say to Wilson. "What are they?"

"The unstated assumption is that you wanted to do 3D printing so you picked guns," he replies. "It's the exact opposite. We imagined a world of liberalized access to firearms. So the question is, 'Why 3D printing?'

"This was a project with a political goal. Yes we know that there are things like C&C milling and there are gun files already online, but the idea was to take a technology, celebrated by these people-power, mostly skewed liberals, 'Oh it's the new revolution in manufacturing!' Take their precious technology, make guns with it, and show them, yes, it is revolutionary, and in fact that has more meaning than you think it means."

Incidentally, I addressed the liberating power of 3D printing and other new technology in an interview with RT that'll be coming to a TV or computer monitor near you! Soon! I'll let you know when I know.

Follow this story and more at Reason 24/7.

If you have a story that would be of interest to Reason's readers please let us know by emailing the 24/7 crew at 24_7@reason.com, or tweet us stories at @reason247.

Advertisement

NEXT: Health Law Pushes Doctors To Retire Early

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Posted this yesterday but everybody was too busy getting advice from out resident hook up artist to notice:

    Vice TV did a short doc on the plastic gun guy.

      1. Can’t call first after you are sure you are first. Gotta lay it out there.

        1. I hedge.

          I’m hedger.

          You are a hedgist.

    1. Already saw it. nany nany ha

  2. But there’s a deeper political agenda behind Cody Wilson, the head of Defense Distributed, and the efforts of he and his colleagues to render gun control laws impotent by giving everybody the ability to be their own armorer. Specifically, the goal is to empower individuals and disempower those who would control individuals. And flip a bird at likely targets in the process.

    Rebel scum. The Empire has all our best interests at heart.

  3. “This was a project with a political goal. Yes we know that there are things like C&C milling and there are gun files already online, but the idea was to take a technology, celebrated by these people-power, mostly skewed liberals, ‘Oh it’s the new revolution in manufacturing!’ Take their precious technology, make guns with it, and show them, yes, it is revolutionary, and in fact that has more meaning than you think it means.”

    That whole mindset in tech that skews (though not dominated by) modern-liberal and progressive is unfortunate. People like Peter Thiel or Patri Friedman are mostly outliers in tech. In fact, Cody Wilson was criminally referred to the ATF by Stratasys, whom he leased his original printer from. Fuck Stratasys and their OMG-he’s-making-a-gun, call-the-cops attitude

  4. The levels of hysteria this dude has already driven the banners and control freaks to has been fantastic. Stir that shit, dude. Troll those assholes.

  5. A German group interviewed Wilson, with more focus on philosophy here:
    http://blink.li/3271/interview…..come-black

    I read somewhere else he did find backers and have others involved, but they want to remain relatively anonymous and have him remain the face defcad/defdist thus far, which is unlike the process of having VCs or your financial backers on your board and/or publicly listed in your company’s bio.

  6. c&c milling

    lol

    1. Jump to the rhythm, jump, jump to the rhythm, jump…

  7. Firearms are cool, but they require bullets and gunpowder. Yes, you can make that from natural materials, but you’re once again outside the reach of your average citizen. If I were him, once I managed to scare the shit out of the blue states, I’d look into 3D printed weapons that work off compressed air, electromagnetic propulsion, or some other tech that doesn’t require an easily regulated commodity. A 3D printed AR-15 is great, but a 3D printed object that doesn’t look remotely like a gun yet fires plastic projectiles or a common object(nails?) would be immune to regulation.

    I mean, who would even want to discharge a firearm when the drone swarm finds you in minutes based on the acoustic fingerprint of the discharge? The legal hassle would effectively disarm folks.

    1. Print casings. Smelt lead. Make gunpowder.

      You can’t stop the signal Mal.

      1. Biggest problem is the primers. There are ways around that, however. Some prison-made improvised firearms use matchstick heads for the primer, for instance, and I’ve heard of people doing this with Berden-style primers.

        1. 3D printed cruise missles don’t need primers.

      2. Yep. You could do all that. You could also use an old mill, or even carve the metal yourself to make a gun. But I thought we were talking about easy-to-make firearms here. Your average person isn’t going to be armed if it requires they smelt lead and grind up rocks and charcoal to make gunpowder.

  8. Sometimes man, you jsut gotta roll with it dude. Wow.

    http://www.MaxAnon.tk

  9. First thing after I get one of those 3-D printers I’m printing myself a new wife.

    1. Didn’t having one teach you not to want another one?

  10. Primers? Charges? Just befriend a libertarian chemist and it’s easy peasy. If push comes to shove, I’ll be happy to write a how-to ebook.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.