Nanny State

Decline and Fall of America Starts at the Bus Stop

Going to the bus stop used to be a stoic ordeal, not a festive occasion.

|

The scene on the corner played out thousands of times last week: A gaggle of parents swirled around elementary-school children, taking photos to forever immortalize the First Day of School. When the bus came, the tots dutifully hauled themselves aboard and sorted themselves into the seats. The parents, meanwhile, began to wave wildly. You would have thought they were bidding bon voyage to an ocean liner, not saying sayonara to someone they would be seeing again in seven hours.

The parents wave every day. (Confession: So do I.) This is one of those subtle changes you notice as the years draw on. (Here is another: The music enjoyed by The Youth of Today is pure noise. Also, They Don't Make Things Like They Used To. Just sayin'.) One doesn't point this out censoriously. The parents are all very nice people who live in a very nice neighborhood. It's the sort of neighborhood where the juvenile delinquents still deface property with graffiti—but they do it in chalk, so it washes right off.

Going to the bus stop used to be a stoic ordeal, not a festive occasion. Your folks might march you to the proper spot, if it was your first time, but after that you were on your own. Nobody took pictures. Nobody was waiting at the bus stop when you came back, either. Now parents not only wait – they bring the car in case of inclement weather.

Writing in The Wall Street Journal recently, Lenore Skenazy detailed some of the other ways parents are urged to mollycoddle their children: Practice saying goodbye. Practice eating a sack lunch. Drive the bus route. Tour the school. And to avoid even the slightest measure of novelty or surprise, have a picnic on the playground before the school year starts.

The equipment on today's playground, you might have noticed, is sheathed in rubber (fewer bruises) with few if any moving parts (no pinched fingers). To increase safety further, some schools have banned games such as dodgeball, touch football, soccer, and even tag. The playground itself might be surfaced with shredded tires. Shredded tires are not only environmentally correct, they also guarantee that any child unlucky enough to fall will bounce.

When those of us of a certain age were growing up, playgrounds were surfaced with gravel. Sometimes even scrap metal and broken glass. It hurt like heck, but it made a man out of you.

Not to get all philosophical, but that is the problem with how we treat The Youth of Today. Thirty or forty years ago Mom and Dad did not have time to hang out at the bus stop and take Polaroids. By the time you left the house Dad had already been slaving away in the hellish furnace of the steel mill for several hours, and Mom was too busy doing all the manual labor needed to keep the household together. No Roomba vacuum for her.

Now look. America has gotten soft.

Did anyone see this coming? You bet they did. Years ago, many conservatives lamented what Daniel Bell called the cultural contradictions of capitalism. In this view, market economies develop and thrive thanks to a particular set of values: hard work, thrift, persistence, and so on. But those market economies then produce a level of material comfort that degrades precisely those same values. Capitalism, therefore, contains within it the seeds of its own destruction.

You used to hear this sort of thing a lot. David Frum, for instance, once wrote that "without welfare and food stamps, poor people would cling harder to working-class respectability. . . . Contemporary conservatives still value that old American character." He cites another cultural conservative, William Bennett: "In his lectures [Bennett] reads admiringly from an account of the Donner party written by a survivor that tells the story in spare, stoic style. He puts the letter down and asks incredulously, 'Where did those people go?' "Frum wonders, too: "If you believe that early Americans possessed a fortitudethat present-day Americans lack, and if you think the loss is an important one, then you have to think hard about why that fortitude disappeared."

This sort of thing earned such writers the richly deserved sobriquet "Donner-party Conservatives" for thinking what people really need is a good hard bout of misery and deprivation to toughen them up. (Notice how it's always other people who need toughening up. You never see Frum, Bennett, or other social conservatives striding into the snow-covered woods with nothing but a poncho and a hunting knife to enhance their own fortitude.)

Still, it's not just right-wingers who think this way. Everybody says America has grown too flaccid – even President Obama. As he put it last September, "The way I think about it is, you know, this is a great, great country that had gotten a little soft and, you know, we didn't have that same competitive edge that we needed over the last couple of decades. We need to get back on track."

Right you are, Mr. President. It's time for the U.S. to toughen up. Donner-party starvation and cannibalism might be asking too much at first. But could we maybe strew some broken glass on the playground?

This column originally appeared in the Richmond Times-Dispatch. 

NEXT: Hillary Clinton on Benghazi Assault: No Justification for This, None

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. narcissistic facebook parents raising lil narcissists

    what could possibly go wrong?

    1. That and Fox News and Nancy Grace. Every single one of them is convinced their kid is going to be a victim if they are left out of their sight for even a moment.

    2. From the standpoint of you absolutely nothing is wrong!

      Excellent mental conditioning for the manufacture of more little democrats!

      1. except i quit facebook when they started selling customer info to 3d parties w/o seeking permission a few yrs ago.

        narcissistic facebook parents raising lil narcissists.

  2. The last two years the elementary school in my neighborhood has been being remodeled. So all of the kids have to ride a bus to another school. The stop for my block and a couple of others is literally at my front door. Every morning anywhere from a dozen to two dozen parents and their dogs congregate in my front yard. It is pathetic. These kids are in fourth and fifth grade some of them. And I live on a street with little traffic in one of the safest neighborhoods imaginable. But their parents still walk them to the bus stop. I feel so sorry for these kids. They are never on their own or out of sight of some form of authority. I don’t even want to contemplate what kind of adults that is going to make them.

    1. I live in a similar neighborhood, but see 2nd graders walking to school alone, poor little things struggling with backpacks large than they are. But then, almost no one takes the bus, it seems. You either walk (some of the smallest have a parent with them) or get dropped off n a car. It’s an interesting dichotomy.

      The car drop-off people are the worst, though. They will kill you to get their kid to school on time.

      1. IN the day and age of Kindles there is no reason for them to be lugging a bunch of books back and forth.

        The science is pretty clear that doing things on your own is essential to cognitive development. My God these kids are being deprived.

        1. In the day of photocopiers, there was never any reason to be lugging a bunch of books back and forth.

          1. That doesn’t make any sense you half wit. How would the copies be any liter than the books.

            1. Lack of hardcovers.

        2. If they don’t have a giant hardback that they will only use 1/4, how can they possibly justify charging that much for them?

        3. 1. There’s a bajillion texbooks out there and the authors can’t guarantee their cut on ebooks.

          2. The costs of papertexts is hidden from parents, but the cost of a Kindle is up front. And having the distrcit buy them isn’t a solution – if you don’t pay for it you don’t take care of it. I’ve got plenty of experience with this coming from senior enlisted in the navy when the navy (briefly) issued pda’s. Its amazing how oten these things went missing.

          1. PDA?

            How did I survive with only a little green wheel book in my shirt pocket.

      2. I seen them dumbfucks wait in a car line longer than it takes to walk.

      3. How far is the school? I think where I came up, there was no bus service for kids who lived less than 1 or 2 miles from the school. I had to walk to school in 4th grade (or take a bike) because there was no bus. Granted, it was maybe 1/2 a mile.

        1. My school from K-5 was about .75 miles, and I walked every day that it wasn’t horrible weather. At the time, it seemed like the most normal thing.

        2. It’s in the neighborhood. I doubt any of them are walking more than a mile.

    2. I don’t even want to contemplate what kind of adults that is going to make them.

      Stupid, narcissistic, authority fluffing ass clowns so used to being coddled their whole life and having everything handed to them that they’ll be incapable of doing anything for themselves, or imagining any situation that isn’t all about them? IOW, progressives.

  3. The ideas expressed in this ‘article’ contribute no new or profound ideas to an argument that is, at best, an irrational longing for a past that never existed.

    1. I can only guess that your past is of insufficient duration for accurately making the hopelessly unaware claim in that last clause.

    2. Right. It used to be the heartless parents leaving their kids at the bus stop alone and latch key kids that were evidence of the fall of America. Now it’s the opposite.

    3. A past where kids walked to school by themselves, or waited for the bus by themselves, never existed? Do you just copy and paste that sentence from HuffPo every time you see an article talking about the past? Because it makes no sense in this case. I’m only 29 and every single kid I rode the bus with from Kindergarten on waited by themselves, or walked to school on their own. And this was in two different areas, one suburban and one rural.

    4. The ideas expressed in this ‘comment’ contribute no new or profound ideas to an argument at is, at best, fodder for our perpetual mockery machine.

    5. “He who controls the past controls the future, and he who controls the present controls the past.” George Orwell, 1984.

  4. One time, when I was in 5th grade or so, we didn’t get word that school was delayed by 2 hours, so I walked down to the bus stop and stood there, freezing for over an hour by myself*. I eventually walked home and my Ma said she figured the bus would come eventually, so she didn’t see any reason for her to come and bring me home.

    *it was in the country, so my brother and I were the only kids at our bus stop, and my brother was sick that day.

    1. And it was uphill both ways to the bus stop.

      1. Indeed it was!

      2. When I was a kid… we waited outside for the bus, even if it was 36 degrees below zero. And we had to listen to country music in the morning, because that’s what the bus driver liked. We had a blizzard once, and school was delayed for 2 hours while they cleared the roadz.

      3. When I was in Middle School I did have to walk uphill both ways. That’s what happens when the school is on top of one hill and your house on another.

      4. My grandfather went to school with MC Escher. For him, the walk really was uphill both ways.

    2. Step 1: Put your kid out on a street corner. Step 2: Come back a week later. Step 3: If the kids still there you got yourself a stupid fuckin kid.

      1. Now that is funny.

  5. My kids have walked to the bus stop a block and a half away, since they were in K. Yes I get dirty looks from some other parents, and even offers to drive them home, which I of course refuse. I consider it an essential part of growing up.

    The problem is that some of those people add teeth to their dissaproval by reporting us to child protective services. I’m sure government agents questioning my kids about their parents fitness to be parents did wonders for their development.

    In reality, for my kids, it was an unpleasant minor speed bump, and we went on as before allowing more and more freedom/responibility as they get older and earn it.

    Oh, and according to what I’ve read, and the agent, there is absolutesly nothing I can do to prevent them from harrasing my family, besides not coming across busy bodies who dissaprove of my parenting….

    1. Physical violence?

      1. The actual reporting was because I typically got home at 4:00, and the bus arrived at about 4:05. However, occasionally I would be as much as 15 minutes late, leaving my kids at home, in a locked house, by themselves, for upwards of 10 minutes. A teacher, who had expressed concern over the walking, thought that when my oldest (9 at the time), bragged to one of the other kids that dad trusted her to be on her own at home for a few minutes, occasionally, thought that pushed it way past sanity.

        She actually reported us twice. The second time I think, just to make sure we were good and cowed.

        The first time, the agent was a real bitch. The second was at least nice about it, admitting that my kids seemed intellegent, healthy, and well adjusted. It was just her opinion that 9, 6 and 5, were too young to be home alone for any length of time.

        Of course, I absolutely have to follow direction, based on her opinion…

        1. They pick on people like you who they know will cower. If you were a real abuser, they wouldn’t have fucked with you because that would have been hard. Remember, these are the same people who have allowed parents to starve kids to death or keep them chained in the basement.

        2. Sweet fuck. I was an OG latch-key kid. Starting in 2nd grade I would spend 45 alone in the house after the bus dropped me off. It was a glorious time. Glorious.

          (If it wan’t for the dumb-ass bus route, it would have been 1.5 to 2 hours.)

        3. The summer after 4th grade — I was 10 — I was in charge of getting my sisters — 6 and 5 — from Fort Worth to Pennsylvania, through St. Louis, via Greyhound. With a wad of cash for meals and souvenirs. We stayed with relatives for a month and then made the return trip.

          It was one of the coolest summers ever. I played a ton of baseball with Phillies and Pirates fans I never would have met otherwise. I felt like I had actually accomplished something pretty cool. I have absolutely zero doubt my kids would be taken away from me if I did anything even remotely like that.

        4. Once again, the state is the biggest bully of them all.

        5. except that being at home alone in a locked house is a pretty damn safe place for a kid to be.

    2. They really reported you to CPS for making your kids walk to the bus stop? I weep for America.

      1. Who ever reported aelhues should be outed and shamed. I think that kind of meddling in other peoples lives is disgusting and inexcusable. I blame the “It takes a village” mentality which convinces busy bodies that they’re doing it for your own good.

        1. That and laws that make it a crime not to report child abuse.

          1. Very true. In Florida, any teacher (public or private) can be put in prison for failing to report “suspected” child abuse. I wonder how many false reports that the fear of arrest or job loss generates.

    3. I simply can’t imagine the thought process that would make someone call CPS on you for allowing your children to walk to the bus stop. How is that 1. a problem and 2. any of their fucking business? I’m just baffled.

    4. During my divorce, my practice of allowing my kids to spend afternoons in unstructured play with neighboring kids in the “forest of doom” (a 1 acre wooded area spanning several residential properties) was questioned by the GAL. It was clear that she thought I should be shuttling my kids to ballet and soccer lessons instead of letting them discover the world on their own.

      My kids’ definitely became less whiny, more self-reliant, more self-confident, and more engaged with their peers as a result of the unstructured play. Oh, and my son got into the habit of solving his problems himself, developing a brutally effective strategy for dealing with bullies and a reputation for not being someone to mess with.

    5. Stories like this make me so glad I don’t have kids and my wife can’t have them. I don’t think I could put up with other parents. It would only be a matter of time before I end up in jail for assaulting one of those nosy busy body shit stacks.

  6. I disagree.

    I have always believed that a well-run school should be indistinguishable to a student from a well-run restaurant.

    When I go to a well-run restaurant, I am not expecting as part of my dining experience to create some sort of social community with the other diners. At a well-run restaurant, I come in and get food and then eat and leave, and never have to notice the other diners at all. If a diner gets up from his table to fuck with the other diners, he’s thrown out. That’s what schools should be like.

    The idea that letting the kids create their own social microcosm with little dominance rituals is good because it “teaches kids about the real world” is false. There is nowhere in the “real world” that is anything like riding a school bus in 1982. Nowhere. Except perhaps in the anarchy of international relations, but even in that case the school bus wasn’t lining up with the real world, because if it had been a proper analogue I would have been able to kill people if they fucked with me.

    The schools of our youth, gentlemen, created extraordinary artificial social worlds where a level of violence that allowed tough kids to fuck with smart kids was tolerated and allowed, but any real-world-style smart kid response (like building a tank and running over the so-called tough kids) would have been forbidden. And that doesn’t exist in the real world. The real world has two types of interaction – open violence, and the well-run restaurant.

    1. The most well run restaurants I have ever been to had what I would call butlers, who would appear at your table to brush away the slightest crumbs that had fallen on the table cloth. Drinks will be refilled immediately, proper silverware will be brought and placed for each course, and so forth.

    2. At my kid’s elementary school, the parents either walk the kids to school or pick them up in cars. Only a few kids ride the bus.

      As part of its focus on preventing bullying, even recess play and going to the bathroom are supervised. There’s virtually no unstructured social interaction between the kids at all.

      And if my kid says he doesn’t like the lunch, the ladies who work for the contractor that does the meals get him a different one.

      It’s like a well-run restaurant.

      1. Is putting kids in what amounts to prison a bit worse than the problem of bullying? I am quite familiar with the law of the jungle in schools. But I think the situation you describe would be much worse. It is not like it was all bullying.

        1. I think a little bullying is good for you. How else are you supposed to learn to stand up for yourself if you never have to deal with conflict? Not that I think everyone should get beat up on their way to school or have their lunch money stolen. But schools today consider even normal teasing as bullying and go out of their way to diffuse such situations.

        2. But it’s not like a prison.

          He likes the other kids. He likes his teachers. He has fun. He was counting the days until he could go back to school during the summer, because summer vacation sucked.

          Contemplate that for a moment: a kid who thinks summer vacation sucks.

          I think a little bullying is good for you. How else are you supposed to learn to stand up for yourself if you never have to deal with conflict?

          I’ve been in some pretty competitive situations in adult life.

          I’ve never been in a situation, ever, where somebody else in a meeting threw shit at me to make the other people in the meeting laugh. Or knocked stuff out of my hands so people would laugh.

          If going to schools where the kids just worked it out among themselves was going to produce self-reliant people, where are all the self-reliant people? I don’t see them. Generation X should have been libertarians front to back, if that was the case. But it wasn’t.

          I think that’s because it doesn’t teach self-reliance at all. What is does is teach people that they’ve got to accept their place in the social hierarchy. It teaches them cowardice and backing down, and teaches it to them way, way deep, where they can’t even see it any more once they reach adulthood.

          Alexander the Great never got a wedgie in gym class. Where did he learn his toughness, then?

          If the very first post here is right and this produces a generation of narcissists, I’ll actually be hopeful.

          1. Alexander the Great never got a wedgie in gym class. Where did he learn his toughness, then?

            That’s because in his time, gym class was conducted in the nude. Which made the sodomy part much easier.

          2. I said a little bullying, not a living hell. And being in a competitive situation isn’t going to prepare you for being physically assaulted. While that is an extreme example, I’m a firm believer that everyone should know how to defend himself.

            I’ve never been in a situation, ever, where somebody else in a meeting threw shit at me to make the other people in the meeting laugh. Or knocked stuff out of my hands so people would laugh.

            It’s good that you’ve never been picked on in your entire life. But I wasn’t suggesting that all “conflict” involves physical confrontation. Nor was I suggesting that grown adults do this sort of thing to each other, but it does happen in middle school and high school and a child who learns to handle such situations early can avoid them in the future.

          3. If going to schools where the kids just worked it out among themselves was going to produce self-reliant people, where are all the self-reliant people?

            I know of no such schools existing in this country in the last 40 years. Do you?

            What is does is teach people that they’ve got to accept their place in the social hierarchy. It teaches them cowardice and backing down, and teaches it to them way, way deep, where they can’t even see it any more once they reach adulthood.

            I can see this being true if that child’s parents take absolutely no responsibility for helping them cope with life in general. Let’s face it, Parents do have a role to play.

            Alexander the Great never got a wedgie in gym class. Where did he learn his toughness, then?

            Probably from his drunken and abusive father, Philip, or during the quarrels with his younger brother when he feared that he might be killed over succession to the throne. But those are just guesses since I wasn’t there.

          4. IDK, Gen Xer’s seem to be far more libertarian than Millenials.

    3. I’m with Fluffy on this. My kids school experience is soooooo much better than mine. I grew up in a blue-collar lower income neighborhood, walked to my bus stop, and had to stand there with a bunch of jerks and then get on the bus with those same jerks (my school was K-8…it was fun being in 1st/2nd/3rd grade and having a bunch of 6th, 7th and 8th graders make fun of you, etc. with nothing you could do about it).

      The old way was rotten and any change from it is almost certainly for the better.

      1. I’m 90% sure Fluffy is trolling the thread.

        1. No, I’m not.

          I look at my own adult personality, and pretty much all the parts of it that are harmful or flawed come from negative middle school interactions.

          If I could run through my middle-school experience again Ken Grimwood style, but this time with a bat in my hand the whole time, I’d probably be fucking King by this time.

          1. I look at my own adult personality, and pretty much all the parts of it that are harmful or flawed come from negative middle school interactions.

            Not everyone handles the bad times in his life the same way. Some people are ruined by those experiences. Some are made stronger. There is no perfect template for living that works for everyone. I’m sorry that your middle school experience still haunts you, but at some point in our lives we have to take responsibility for how we feel and how we choose deal with such things.

  7. So are kids just never left to their own devices anymore, or what? If so, that’s really fucking sad.

  8. This doesn’t make sense. If we’re supposed to be all for advancements and improvements that make our lives easier and make the world more productive, how can be piss and moan when it results in people getting soft? What the fuck did we think the result is going to be? John mentioned that there is no reason for kids to be carrying a ton of books thanks to e-readers like the kindle. Won’t that just make kids soft too? More families today are better off than their parents were and can spare the time to take their kids to the bus stop. Should we pray that their situations change in order to force them to work harder in order to stop this for the sake of the children?

    Granted, I think it’s stupid to get rid of all the cool playground equipment that was around when I was growing up, but I blame trial lawyers and schools that are afraid of being sued for that shit. It only takes one pissed off mom to sue a school to bring about that kind of change.

    Face it folks; we no longer live in a primitive world and the kind of sturdiness that was once required for survival is no longer a necessity. Until some cataclysmic event comes along and resets the world and the way we do things, each generation is going to get a little softer than the one before, and standing around like a bunch of old men lamenting about how much better things used to be when they were growing up isn’t going to change that.

    1. It’s not just about physical toughness, it’s mental toughness. You don’t think they’re related, or beneficial in modern society?

      If so, I heartily disagree.

      1. You don’t think they’re related, or beneficial in modern society?

        I believe wholeheartedly that they are beneficial to any society and to every individual.

        I just think that it is inevitable that, as we progress, we will weaken as a species, both physically and mentally. I’m not saying it’s right, but if we recognize that fact then we will be in a better position to adapt, to find different ways to foster the kind of independence and ingenuity needed for success in life.

      2. Exactly! People blame tragedies like Columbine on bullying. But bullying has been around as long as there have been schools. The difference is that kids today aren’t as mentally tough, so when they get bullied, they just can’t cope with it and snap.

  9. Our district requires a parent or “known adult” to accompany elementary kids to the bus stops and to be there to pick them up. Not a big deal for us, but it’s definitely different from when I used to walk a mile to school by myself.

    1. You are kidding.

    2. Or what? They can’t get on or off the bus?

  10. America has gotten soft? Tell that to the Marines.

    1. Compared to the Marines that stormed Normandy or landed on Iwo Jima, modern Marines are pussies.

      1. The only Marines involved in the Normandy invasion were gun crews on naval vessel bombarding coastal fortifications and protecting the ships from air attack.

        An agreement very early in the piece made the Europan theater an Army operation while in the Pacific the islands were assaulted and taken by marines and then cleaned up and held by the Army.

        1. True story. The Army brass was so bitter about the Marines’ media whoring during World War I, there was a general order at Normandy that no Marine was to ever set foot on solid ground. They didn’t want the Marines claiming to have saved Normandy the way they claimed to have saved Paris in World War I.

          1. I heard variations on that when i was active…plus france did have an active resistance

        2. The only Marines involved in the Normandy invasion were gun crews on naval vessel bombarding coastal fortifications and protecting the ships from air attack.

          You are correct. Excuse my ignorance. I was not in WWII, and I am not a Marine (though my grandfather was). I was just being snide.

  11. The decline and fall of America isn’t because the parents are taking pictures of their kids being abducted by the indoctrination camp vehicles, it’s because they let the kids get abducted in the first place.

    http://lewrockwell.com/north/north278.html

  12. My little suburb is literally 1.5 miles from the local elementary at its furthest point. Parents here in this tiny little town (literally 5 miles wide at its widest) not only drive their kids to the bus stop, at least one of them waits there, in the car, until the bus picks the kids up.

  13. I am confused by this article. The tone goes from “kids these days have it so good” to “don’t you hate people who talk about kids these days having it good?”. Which is it?

    I remember walking to my bus stop by myself on the first day of kindergarten, but I lived in the city. My friends who lived in the suburbs had parents that were a lot more overprotective and doting.

  14. More characteristics, novel style,varieties,and good quality low price
    http://l2y.eu/dddqh

    http://l2y.eu/dddqh

  15. “Notice how it’s always other people who need toughening up. You never see Frum, Bennett, or other social conservatives striding into the snow-covered woods with nothing but a poncho and a hunting knife to enhance their own fortitude”

    Does Reason Magazine have a rule that every article must contain at least one poorly-thought-out anti-conservative insult? For one it is nothing but a personal attack that contains no justification. Maybe they are people who enjoy camping and hunting, maybe they aren’t, but it has no relevance to their arguement. It is the logical equivalent of saying, “okay libertarians, you think pulling yourself out of poverty would be easy, why don’t you got to the amazon rainforest and see how easy it really is.” This crap belongs on The Nation, not on a libertarian publication. What’s really ironic is that the author essentially agrees with the oh so evil “social conservatives” until the last few paragraphs, when he launches into a leftist tyrade against republicans, this comes after his discusion about the “cultural contridictions of capitalism,” which is assumed to be heretical, as anyone who doesn’t think that the free market will solve anything is a “statist.”

  16. you should see some of the happy horseshit parents call 911 on.

    my favorite was the parent (who was a teacher herself – montessori), who wanted to make an assault complaint because that day at school, the teacher had lightly slapped her perfect son across the temple with a rolled up test (3 pieces of standard sized paper) HARD ENOUGH TO DISPLACE HIS GLASSES.

    i pointed her to :
    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/def…..=9A.16.100

    she wanted the teacher arrested. i explained to her i wasn’t even going to take a REPORT

    or some mom calls bcause some neighborhood 9 yr old pushed her 8 yr old down at the local playground and she wanted a report. Wtf?

    incredibly candy-ass stuff.

    for a while, we even had parents calling because their kid wouldn’t go to school and they wanted us to “make” the kid go

    speaking of double standards – *I* cannot spank your kid, lady. YOU can

    fortunately, our patrol supvr told the dispatch supvr to kibosh those calls we weren;t going

    there are a lot of parents out ther who think the slightest thing involving their precious angel is a friggin’ criminal matter.

    another was a young girl who got sent a scary text on her phone when she opened it, it had a brief message, then a scary face popped on to the screen and screaming noises were made.

    mom thought that was threats and criminal harassment

    of a 12 yr old

    jesus christ

  17. A website for Libertarians with kids: http://www.freerangekids.com

    It is possible to do, but a lot easier if you live in China out in the country somewhere. Definitely easier if you homeschool, at least during the early years. The results are well worth it.

  18. In Chicago, the only real kids are the Mexican kind. I once saw a Mexican kid eat a pile of glass, and another punched a dog in the face. Mexican parents are also probably the best parents, they just aren’t there. I only speak for about a 4 block radius in Chicago, where most of the Mexicans have crammed in.

  19. I’m not so sure the whole bus stop ordeal is a function of coddling children.

    Rather, I think it’s a function of parents terrified by the news media with every child kidnapping/abuse/murder that happens anywhere in the United States. Parents have a skewed idea of the actual risks posed to their children, and act accordingly. They’d rather over-protect than deal with the fear that they could end up on the news at any moment.

  20. I agree with the author. I take pictures of my kids every year getting on the bus. This year after my son had got on his bus I noticed the bus was stopped in front of my neighbors house for about 5 minutes. The neighbors, who are here in the US on a work visa from the very socialist Netherlands, made the bus wait for them while four cameras snapped picture after picture. The bus almost drove away! That will be us soon.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.