Are Vitamins a Superstition?

|

Too much of a good thing?

First a confession: I have been taking big doses of various vitamins for a number of years. Of course, finding and fixing vitamin deficiency diseases—ricketts, beriberi, scurvy—was one of the great medical triumphs of the last century. But is too much of a good thing actually bad for us? 

Over the past few years, researchers have launched a number of studies seeking to find out if taking high doses of various vitamins might produce beneficial health effects. The evidence has been slowly piling up that any good that megadoses of vitamins may do is more than offset by harms. For example, a 2004 study of vitamin E supplement showed that megadoses actually increased the risk of death. This was followed by a number of other studies that came to the same conclusion. I stopped taking megadoses of vitamin E. 

The latest blow to the hopes of us that taking vitamins might improve our health comes in the form of two new studies reported this week. As the New York Times notes

A study of vitamin E and selenium use among 35,000 men found that the vitamin users had a slightly higher risk of developing prostate cancer, according to a report published Tuesday in The Journal of the American Medical Association. A separate study of 38,000 women in Iowa found a higher risk of dying during a 19-year period among older women who used multivitamins and other supplements compared with women who did not, according to a new report in The Archives of Internal Medicine.

The findings are the latest in a series of disappointing research results showing that high doses of vitamins are not helpful in warding off disease.

One finding is that men in the prostate cancer study who took vitamin E were slightly more likely to get prostate cancer than those who did not. The second study involved thousands of older women and found that the use of multivitamins, vitamin B6, folic acid, iron, magnesium, zinc and copper were all associated with increased risk of death.

A good definition of a superstition is "a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, trust in magic or chance, or a false conception of causation." As data accumulate, taking megadoses of vitamins looks more and more like a superstition. 

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

158 responses to “Are Vitamins a Superstition?

  1. I take supplements, but only a multivitamin that never exceeds 100% of the daily requirement of any vitamin or mineral.

    1. The minimum daily requirements are set to prevent known deficiencies. They are not set at optimum levels due to testing.

      Something that may be a huge flaw in study with older women: people who take vitamins are people concerned about their health. Many people concerned about their health are, you know, unhealthy.

      1. No, vitamins are not a superstition. The news reports only the sensational. An increasing number of studies are finding utility for vitamins. A few of the many, many applications we have learned in medical school are:

        – B9 (folate) prevents all manner of fetal defects
        – B6, B12, and B9 have recently shown to slow geriatric mental decline and possibly mild alzheimers.
        – Vitamin A is used to successfully treat a specific form of cancer, along with skin pathology

        The above are of course additions to the hundreds of pathologies prevented by multivitamin supplementation that would have otherwise resulted in deficiencies in some populations (B1 in alcoholics, B12 and B9 neuropathy, C scurvy, A blindness, D and Calcium: osteoporosis)

        Like so many modern successes, supplementation is a God-send when used in moderation.

        1. Don’t forget vit D and ricketts in the wee ones.

        2. Folate is indeed good for lowering rates of neural tube defects and other fetal anomalies.

          “B6, B12, and B9 have recently shown to slow geriatric mental decline and possibly mild alzheimers.”

          I’m gonna request a citation for that one.

          A modified form of vit A can treat a very specific form of leukemia. I believe you’re referring to accutane for various skin problems. You’d be a bit nuts to want to take either of these as a diet supplement given the side effects.

          Unless you’re worried about a deficiency due to poor diet or some medical issue, then there’s not much evidence that vitamin overloads do much good other than give you nutrient-rich urine.

      2. I eat pretty well, so I’m not much worried about deficiencies. I’ll take heavier doses if my doctor suggests it, I suppose.

        1. Then you’re perfectly fine. A healthy diet of fruit, vegetables, and fish works best.

          1. Although you still need to watch your vitamin D. If you don’t get regular exposure to noon day sun.

            1. But see below on me and the sun.

              1. I should have probably said moderate as well.

                1. Correct. 15 minutes of sunlight a day is just fine. Unfortunately a computer screen doesn’t qualify as the equivalent.

        2. I’m shocked by how many people are incapable of eating a well-balanced diet in modern America. It’s the best medicine in the world.

    2. I am sure your pee is quite nutritious. That is really all those things do is flush out of your system.

      1. Wrong. Fat soluble vitamins aren’t excreted in urine.

        1. Then I guess his fat cells are really nutritious. When the apocalypse comes, I am sure the cannibal mob that gets him will appreciate that.

          1. I believe the science on supplements in general isn’t so much in question, though any good doctor will tell you to get whatever you can from diet, as is the megadoses of vitamins that many take.

  2. I can think of a potential chicken and egg problem with this. That is, it is possible that people who take massive amounts of vitamins are (in general) poorer health than the general population (and that’s why they do it). You need a true double blind study (IE, get 1,000 people, give them pills to take daily, half of which contain the vitamins and half of which contain nothing) for years for proof.

    However, I tend to think that taking megadoses of anything is a bad idea in general.

    1. Megadose. That should be a band name.

      1. Megamind fronting the band.

        1. You’ll be hearing from my lawyer.

      2. It’s Dave Mustaine’s side project.

      3. Good name but not as good as Steampunk Panzers.

    2. This was my first thought. How many people that take megadoses of vitamins do so because they are, or will be, in poor health in the future, and beleive this is something easy to do that is ‘good’ for them. And also is a rationalization away from the ‘difficult’ things, diet and exercise.

      1. That’s a thought I had…that at least part of the results can be explained by people who take vitamin supplements so they can keep getting their primary nutrition from drive-thrus.

    3. Anecdotally, I think it’s the opposite: health nuts are the ones taking the megadoses.

      But that’s just my personal experience. Although to the extreme right and extreme left, opinion is good science, too, if that opinion is expressed forcefully enough.

      1. That’s what my anecdotes say about health nuts, too.

        1. I can’t count the number of anecdotes about my healthy nuts.

  3. Vitamin pills: pointless. But no more dangerous (in the products’ recommended amounts) than coffee, transfat, wine, fish, or all the other shit that “increases your risk of death”. You’ll pretty much just piss out most of the vitamins your body doesn’t need.

    1. “You’ll pretty much just piss out most of the vitamins your body doesn’t need.”

      So maybe not pointless. If you piss out the Vits you don’t need, you retain/use the Vits you do need.

  4. vitamin E supplement showed that megadoses actually increased the risk of death

    When you use a known carcinogen, coal tar, as a base for synthetic vitamin E, and then people get cancer from it, it’s hardly surprising.

    1. Many synthetics are made from coal tar. Coal tar contains benzoapyrene, “A yellow crystalline carcinogenic” [1].

      Vitamin E is another good example of a nutrient that has fallen victim to the synthetic spell. On a supplement label, natural Vitamin E is listed as d-alpha tocopherol, d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, or d-alpha tocopheryl succinate. ynthetic vitamin E on the other hand are labeled with a dl-prefix.

      Studies have shown that natural Vitamin E absorbs much better then synthetic versions. Protein chaperones produced in the liver select the natural d-alpha form of Vitamin E and largely ignore the rest.

      One study in particular showed that after 23 days of supplementation, natural Vitamin E levels rose higher then synthetic levels[2]. This study also showed that the blood and tissue levels of natural Vitamin E rose twice as high as the synthetic.

      [1] Etiology of Cancer: Carcinogenesis. http://edcenter.med.cornell.edu/CUMC_PathNotes
      /Neoplasia/Neoplasia_04.html
      [2] Burton GW, et al. Human plasma and tissues a-tocopherol concentrations in response to supplementation with deuterated natural and synthetic vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;67:669-84

      http://www.beta-glucan-info.co…..tamins.htm

    2. Many synthetics are made from coal tar. Coal tar contains benzoapyrene, “A yellow crystalline carcinogenic” [1].

      Vitamin E is another good example of a nutrient that has fallen victim to the synthetic spell. On a supplement label, natural Vitamin E is listed as d-alpha tocopherol, d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, or d-alpha tocopheryl succinate. ynthetic vitamin E on the other hand are labeled with a dl-prefix.

      Studies have shown that natural Vitamin E absorbs much better then synthetic versions. Protein chaperones produced in the liver select the natural d-alpha form of Vitamin E and largely ignore the rest.

      One study in particular showed that after 23 days of supplementation, natural Vitamin E levels rose higher then synthetic levels[2]. This study also showed that the blood and tissue levels of natural Vitamin E rose twice as high as the synthetic.

      ____________________
      [1] Etiology of Cancer: Carcinogenesis. edcenter.med.cornell.edu/CUMC_PathNotes/Neoplasia/Neoplasia_04.html

      [2] Burton GW, et al. Human plasma and tissues a-tocopherol concentrations in response to supplementation with deuterated natural and synthetic vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;67:669-84

      http://www.beta-glucan-info.co…..tamins.htm

    3. Many synthetics are made from coal tar. Coal tar contains benzoapyrene, “A yellow crystalline carcinogenic” [1].

      Vitamin E is another good example of a nutrient that has fallen victim to the synthetic spell. On a supplement label, natural Vitamin E is listed as d-alpha tocopherol, d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, or d-alpha tocopheryl succinate. ynthetic vitamin E on the other hand are labeled with a dl-prefix.

      Studies have shown that natural Vitamin E absorbs much better then synthetic versions. Protein chaperones produced in the liver select the natural d-alpha form of Vitamin E and largely ignore the rest.

      One study in particular showed that after 23 days of supplementation, natural Vitamin E levels rose higher then synthetic levels[2]. This study also showed that the blood and tissue levels of natural Vitamin E rose twice as high as the synthetic.

      ____________________
      [1] Etiology of Cancer: Carcinogenesis. edcenter.med.cornell.edu/CUMC_PathNotes/Neoplasia/Neoplasia_04.html

      [2] Burton GW, et al. Human plasma and tissues a-tocopherol concentrations in response to supplementation with deuterated natural and synthetic vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;67:669-84

      1. The dl prefix simply means that the product contains both the dextrorotary and levorotary steroisomers of the compound. Your body can’t process the levorotary type so it just passes through. Assuming a 50/50 blend of course the uptake of the vitamin would be half that in a mixed enantiomer supplement. That doesn’t mean that the synthetic version is worse, only that it contains some product that is inactive in the human body.

    4. Your comment makes no sense. Lots of things have different properties from the raw materials they are derived from. If you eat a few castor beans you might die, but castor oil is quite safe. And who said people got cancer from vitamin E?

      1. Tocopherol is an endocrine disruptor, specifically a xenoestrogen agonist. Since many cancers show proliferative effects when stimulated by estrogen, it’s not terribly surprising that Vitamin E could increase the incidence of cancers.

      2. A Lancet study showed people get cancer from taking a double dose of what the FDA allows to be called “vitamin E,” artificially synthesized from coal tar.

        Coal tar being a known carcinogen. Look up “benzene+cancer.”

        Go ahead, put coal tar in your body if nothing makes sense. The FDA approves it. It’s cheap and profitable, and lets corporations sell benzoapyrene as “healthy.”

      3. This is why I get my megadose of Vitamin E from eating 218 eggs a day.

        Pass the wheat germ.

  5. The difference between medicine and poison is dosage.

    I take the one a day multivitamin for old codgers. Anthing more than that is pointless. You piss out the watersoluable vitamins if you take to much. And the others are just a likely to cause problems if you accumulate too much by over dosing.

      1. My wife buys chewable vitamin C tablets, and I eat those fuckers like candy… The combination of tangy zip and dusty orange taste is, for me at least, strangely delicious.

        And each tab is like 833% of the recommended daily dose. I haven’t been sick in a while, though…

        1. One caveat: water soluble vitamins in high doses can precipitate as kidney stones.

        2. Wasn’t it Linus Pauling who started the whole vit C megadose thing (and megadoses of vitamins in general)?

          Note that this man was not a biochemist or a physician, for that matter.

          1. Wrong, Linus Pauling WAS a Biochemist! However, that does not mean he was right about Vitamin C, and he was also wrong about the triple helix structure he proposed for DNA.

  6. Reminds me of the estrogen theopy study.

    Many people find it odd that when I get a cold, I don’t take decongestants. I have no medicine in my medicine cabinet or anywhere else for that reason.

    Side Effects of Sudafed PE

    Dizziness; headache; nausea; nervousness; restlessness; sleeplessness; stomach irritation.

    Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Sudafed PE:

    Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); fast or irregular heartbeat; hallucinations; seizures; tremor; trouble urinating.

    http://www.drugs.com/sfx/sudafed-side-effects.html

    What’s a little snot compared to that?

    1. “therapy”

      Sheesh!

  7. Ah, for the good old days when mega doses of vitamins only gave you very expensive urine. These days, it is the stuff you cite plus one from a few years ago, that high doses of vitamin C gave you kidney stones.

    This is one area where the granola suckers might be onto something. The best way to get your vitamins is eating a properly balanced diet.

  8. First wife was a biologist who worked on some NASA research involving Astronauts and nutrition (and pilots and aging) that had some cautionary data regarding most vitamin supplements and so I’ve avoided them since. Some supplements simply wash through the body providing doubts about any benefits from megadoses, others can build up to worrisome levels.

    Oh, and don’t shake your orange juice vigorously: Vitamin C can break down under physical abuse.

    1. Okay, but what about Tang?

  9. A separate study of 38,000 women in Iowa found a higher risk of dying during a 19-year period among older women who used multivitamins and other supplements compared with women who did not, according to a new report in The Archives of Internal Medicine.

    The news I heard about this is that the study sloppily did not control for other factors and illnesses, so the vitamin use by the older women could have been a coincidence. The report finished up with “more studies are necessary to show whether other factors contributed to the earlier deaths.”

    That said, I don’t see the need for packing in vast quantities of vitamins/minerals beyond what we’re evolutionarily conditioned to get from balanced meals.

    1. Look at the numbers. They’re as weak as those imputing danger to environmental tobacco smoke.

      1. That’s because this is an intentional vanguard to more government regulation. The FDA wants to go after supplements in a big way.

    2. The news I heard about this is that the study sloppily did not control for other factors and illnesses, so the vitamin use by the older women could have been a coincidence.

      Per the data, women who took supplements were less likely to smoke, have hypertension and diabetes, or be obese. They had more education on average and exercised more. They were still more likely to die.

      1. I’ve been hearing that underweight is nearly as dangerous as obesity. Could be another factor.

        1. It is pretty well-established that being underweight actually puts you at a higher risk of death than being obese. These data are from the latest one of a number of studies that makes that conclusion. It is best to be in the mid-to-high range of normal from a longevity standpoint.

  10. I have persistent ulcers, so I am pretty consistently anemic. Regular blood tests have shown that a daily multivitamin and iron supplement alleviate that problem. So I will continue to take them. Other people may make different choices.

    1. Or you could focus on the cause of your “persistent ulcers”, and not your choice of band-aids

      1. Perhaps the cause is a stress response to people offering unsolicited medical advice in order to cover their insecurity about their intelligence.

        1. Not quite but you inadvertently described the provender of libertarian commenters

          1. Hush little baby don’t say a word. Papa’s gonna buy you a mockingbird.

        2. Pyloric ulcers are now known not to be caused by stress. The most common causes of ulcers are infection by Helicobacter pylori or over-use of Aspirin, ibuprofen or other NASAIDs. The infection form can be treated with antibiotics and the NSAID form may get better if the patient discontinues the use of these pain medicines.

      2. The cause was actually the pounds of painkillers I was advised to take over about a decade. I now use medical marijuana for the headaches that the painkillers were supposed to treat, and for the nausea caused by the ulcers. The ulcers don’t go away, so the “band-aids” are about the best I’m gonna get for awhile. I’m surprised you don’t have a blog post that nobody has read about this, though.

        1. Brandon , was that a little bitch-slap? Poor baby needs to read up on the latest understanding of ulcers

          1. And if that diamond ring turn brass, Papa’s gonna buy you a looking glass.

          2. It might benefit you to do the same. H. pylori is far from the only cause of peptic ulcer disease–NSAID use is the #2 cause.

          3. Yeah, I’ll go with my 5 years of studying them and my gastroenterologist’s recommendations over the “latest understanding” of a whiny cunt with nothing better to do than pitch his blog on a website he claims to vehemently disagree with, but is unable to ever come up with a rational explanation why.

  11. I stopped taking vitamins a long time ago. I eat a variety of foods, including many vegetables. I didn’t feel I needed them.

    Interestingly, though, more and more beverages and foods have vitamins added to them, especially B vitamins. So even if you don’t take vitamins, if you’re eating/drinking any of these products, you’re getting vitamin supplements all the same.

    1. Yeast (as in homebrew beer and wine) is B complex. So, alcoholics that drink yellow piss water have a problem. Me? not so much. Plus the B helps reduce hangovers…i have been ploughed on my own 8% honey hef and woke up cheery.

      1. 8% honey hef
        Now that sounds like something worth trying.

        1. My friend and I polished off a whole Party Pig in one evening. I was so destroyed i slept on the floor…of my own kitchen. And as for good, our recipe has been perfected (7 iterations) and is spectacular. It is technically a Honey Orange Hefeweisen. So good even that this same friend and I made 15 gallons for his wedding…more floor sleeping was involved in that too.

    2. “I eat a variety of foods, including many vegetables.”

      How did you hear of this bizarre diet?

    3. “I eat a variety of foods, including many vegetables.”

      How did you hear of this bizarre diet?

  12. I started taking vitamin D to see if it makes me less murderously angry during the 6 months when I don’t see the sun. I will report my results.

    1. (letter from birmingham jail)

    2. Use D3 (cholecalciferol.)

        1. “I started taking vitamin D to see if it makes me less murderously angry during the 6 months when I don’t see the sun. I will report my results.”

          I believe it can also help reduce the risks for many different types of cancers, and diabetes. Plus of course it’s necessary so you can absorb calcium.

    3. Have you tried an actinic light bulb or SAD lamp? These work wonders for some.

    4. Just use a tanning booth, retard.

      1. Warty has been banned from the tanning booths.

        1. Something about sheep entrails, piles of granny appropriate TED hose, and pictures of Snooki, IIRC.

          1. WARTY WANT SMOOSH SMOOSH

      2. My thick coat of fur makes it hard for the light to reach my skin in the short time they give you in those beds. You, of all people, should know this.

        1. They have industrial strength tanning booths now. They may prove capable of penetrating even your pelt. A normal human spends half the normal time in them; you might have to max it out, but you should give it a shot.

          1. I just read something about people of primarily Northern European descent being unable to get vitamin D from the sun safely. In other words, the amount of sun you need with pale skin is more dangerous than helpful.

            Being pretty much all Northern European, I was less than pleased to hear that. Of course, with entropy, the whole universe is trying to kill me, so why worry?

            1. So what you’re saying is that you’re genetically inferior to, say, Mediterraneans, amongst others. I can buy that.

              1. As I believe has been established, those of us from the north are more Neanderthal and therefore superior to those of you who are primarily hairy and Cro Magnon.

              2. Being able to properly absorb Vitamin D apparently causes one to take afternoon siestas, make unreliable cars and borrow endless amounts of money that you expect the Germans to pay back.

            2. ALL YOUR ATOMS ARE BELONG TO US

              1. What’s odd is that much of the atoms that make us up came from stars in the first place. You’d think sun exposure would be the best thing possible.

                1. to be pedantic (because it is pedantic wednesday) I believe that the ONLY atoms that have even a remote chance of NOT being from a star are the Hydrogen atoms in your body. Everything else was fused…like chicken nuggets fused.

                  1. To think, I am the culmination of billions of years of stars blowing up and recombining to form the perfect me. Wow, I am awesome.

                    1. Suns died to make me!

                      I think H, He, Li, and Be are generally believed to be the Big Bang elements. After that, supernovae.

            3. “I just read something about people of primarily Northern European descent being unable to get vitamin D from the sun safely. In other words, the amount of sun you need with pale skin is more dangerous than helpful.”

              This is not true

              http://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-…..1594630674

              From one of the world’s foremost experts on vitamin D

              1. Hope that’s right, as I live in Florida and get all the danged sun I can eat.

                1. I live in Florida and get all the danged sun I can eat.

                  I felt that way until I had a few square inches od skin removed because of melanoma.

                  Mind you, I have about as Celtic skin as you can get, even though my ancestry is mostly German.

                  1. You know who else’s ancestry was mostly German?

                    1. Austrians don’t count.

                  2. Melonma is often associated with getting inadequte sun, and thus inadequte vitamin D. Moderate sun exposure has not been shown to increase melonam’s levels. Although it may increase regular skin cancer rates slightly. But regular skin cancer is very rarely deadly unlike melanoma.

                    And the reduction in risk to all the other types of cancer more than makes up for it.

                  3. I’m mostly German and Scot, with some English. I’m surprised I can even go out in the daylight here.

        2. If tanning booths don’t work, you should try Mystic tan.

          1. I’m just gonna shave my pelt, put on a purple banana hammock, paint myself brown, and go flex on stage. Want to come watch?

            1. Yes, yes I do.

            2. I’m there.

    5. I use one of these:

      http://www.amazon.com/Philips-…..930&sr=8-1

      It’s a fucking lifesaver. Without it I get depressed in the dark months; using it for just 30 minutes every morning makes a huge difference to my mood.

    6. I started going to Hawaii every winter to see if it makes me less murderously angry during the 6 months when I don’t see the sun. I am happy to report that this totally effin’ works. At least for the two weeks I’m in Hawaii.

  13. New study confirms being born increases risk of death by infinity!

    1. There is a Chippawa saying that goes “We begin to die the moment we are born. If you do not want to experience the deaths of your loved ones, you must die before they do.”

      1. Hence, why “Chippewa Soup for the Soul” sold so poorly.

  14. I’ve always told patients that pretty much the only effect of taking supplementary vitamins is the production of expensive urine.

    1. Bingo! I never bought Linus Pauling’s stalwart belief of ascorbic acid.

      1. Nobel Prize, bitch! Novel Prize!

        1. Crap. Nobel both times, please.

          1. I’d have assumed it was intentional.

            1. My commenting platform was based on transparency. I can’t lie to my constituents, now can I?

        2. You’re just hating because he taught at FSU. Also, with large dose vitamin C tabs, I’d probably have gout. Which means I’d be getting some heavy duty painkillers, and…

          Wait, why am I taking vitamin C again?

          1. Dammit. “…without large dose vitamin C tabs…”

          2. Being at FSU is probably what made him batshit insane on vitamin C.

          3. Incidentally, when did he ever teach there? I think he went there to accept an award once, but I don’t recall hearing that he taught there.

      2. Pauling was an incredible man but he should have stuck to his two long suits – chemical bonds and (chortle) peace.

  15. 1) Vitamin “E”, eh Ron?
    2) That photo is beautiful. I want to take m0ar pillz now.

  16. I still take my large dose of D and smaller doses of a couple others.

    http://xkcd.com/882/

    I am not worried about a few association studies…

  17. I’ve always been partial to megadoses of Vitamin K myself. ; )

      1. This song, and the video are glaring examples of everything that sucked about the 80’s. Truly horrendous. I’m actually embarrassed for the artist.

        1. Are you kidding? That is a classic. What MTV should have been.

    1. I prefer Vitamina N. NSFW.

      1. Argentina has all the good TV.

        1. I thought Daniela Blume was Spanish (well Catalan…)

      2. This video is a glaring example of everything that is right with the internet, and how awesome the 2010’s are!

        1. But are you embarassed for the artist?

  18. Vitamins are a gateway drug. Next thing you know, you’re on daily statins and prozac.

  19. I just eat fruits and vegetables regularly. Seems to be working.

  20. A pall was cast over colloidal silver futures after the news became public.

  21. lef.org has commercially biased but very rigorous analysis of this. Worth reading.

    1. had never heard of them before, but after perusing, yes awesome site !

  22. I take a multivitamin, plus 2000 IU of vitamin D and try to get regular sun exposure.

    Reading this book was pretty eye opening about the need to get moderate sun exposure, and how important vitamin D is

    http://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-…..1594630674

    Note, I think the idea of a megadose is silly. The key if finding the optimum dose.

    Note I also try and eat a mix of fruits and vegetables. Other studies have shown that many vitamins (not D) don’t get absorbed as well in vitamin form as they do when they are part of food.

    1. oh, and of course I take this
      http://anatabloc.com/?ctcampai…..QgodJzlEQw

    2. Does the term “megadose” actually mean what it should mean, i.e., “one million times one dose” or is it just a generic phrase for a large dose? This is one of those confusing things that makes me think vitamin and supplement folks are sort of talking out their asses. But I may be wrong.

  23. I’ll just keep taking my chances of being 17% more likely to get prostate cancer rather than all the other shit that comes with not getting enough Vit E or any other vitamin for that matter

  24. i jst take STEVE SMITH from b-hind 2x daily.

  25. I’ll still drink my malk fortified with vitamin R, thank you.

  26. The common thread of all these studies is that they are designed to address claims no one is making. The latest is the vitamin E/Prostate scare which I wrote about today:

    “For years, those advocating the use of vitamin E for the enhancement and maintenance of good health have urged people to avoid taking large doses of only the alpha form, as it can actually lead to such unintended outcomes as an increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

    That is why a crack team of 21 expert researchers decided to conduct a large study on vitamin E in which participants took large doses of only the alpha form to see what outcome that might have on the risk of developing prostate cancer.”

    I think the participants in the study who came down with prostate cancer might want to seek legal remedy. It’s the equivalent of having a smoking trial to see if it’s really true that cigarettes cure lung cancer.

  27. Vitamins are no good without minerals. Check out Dr. Joel Wallach on his view from the tons of experience he has had with animals and people. Correct supplementing is a must for natural body defence and healing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iib-gLceV-8

  28. These studies are just like the bullshit secondhand smoke studies. It’s not a coincidence that these studies building up tenous links are coming out at the same time that the FDA has been staring at the supplement industry and greedily licking it’s chops. They want to make you get a doctor’s prescription for fucking fiber tablets.

    1. disclaimer: I take glucosomine, chondrition, msm, terrestris trilibus and L-arganine.

      1. An athlete with bad joints? 😉

        1. Bad joints yes, athlete no (or at least not for quite some time). I just work out a lot cause I’m barrel chested. There’s only two torso shapes available to guys like me. Triangle or cylinder. Just dieting without the weight training makes me look like a sparrow at Auschwitz.

          Thank god for the joint supplements, cause the doctor’s only solution was surgery which may or may not have worked.

          1. I work out a lot because I’m otherwise no-chested, lol.

            Joint supplements are one of the things I swear by. A study came out a few years ago with headlines about how glucosamine and chondroitin don’t actually work, but if you read the study, it demonstrates they basically do, and at one-hundredth the cost of drugs. Gotta love science.

  29. I can only speak for myself. I’m iron deficient, and requires daily intake of Iron supplements. It’s something I’d rather not take, but I don’t have much choice.

  30. About one month ago I started taking 2 multivits/day rather than 1.

    Result is a noticeable increase in libido.

    I kid you not.

    1. Your multivitamins probably contain l-arganine. Muscles aren’t the only thing it pumps up in large doses.

  31. The best supplemental advice I ever heard was from a nutritionist researcher years ago on NPR. He only takes specific vitamins he knows he is not getting enough off.

    However, the biggest point he made was multi-vitamins have no scientific bases to them. They were a marketing gimmick created by someone with no medical background in the 1950’s.

    I try to tell women I know who take them ,including my mom, that it is just a marking gimmick. They just choose to ignore me. Anecdotally, I always find it fascinating the ratio of woman who are avid supplemental believers/users over men quite high. Personally it is at least 10 to 1 with people I have know. The men I know mostly took them at their wife’s instances.

  32. While I think that the whole field of whether to take vitamins is a big swamp, I’ll have to admit that Steve Gibson of TWIT’s Security Now podcast has scared me into taking vitamin D.

    http://www.grc.com/health/vitamin-d.htm

  33. More importantly, discern the spirit of someone who resorts to using such flimsy arguments to justify their belief that the passage about the “hare chewing the cud” is in error.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.