New York Fashion Police Restrained By Bronx Court

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As expected, a court in New York has ruled that there is no constitutional prohibition on dressing like Kris Kross. A Bronx man named Julio Martinez was ticketed by a New York City cop for cinching his pants below the buttocks, as is the style amongst the kids, and "potentially" (but not actually) exposing his "private parts." The New York Post has all the fascinating details:

A Bronx judge has thrown out a summons issued against a Bronx man for wearing saggy pants, finding that "the Constitution still leaves some opportunity for people to be foolish if they so desire."…

"While most of us may consider it distasteful, and indeed foolish, to wear one's pants so low as to expose the underwear . . . people can dress as they please, wear anything, so long as they do not offend public order and decency," the judge wrote.

Martinez was given his summons for disorderly conduct on April 20 of last year.
The summons by the unidentified police officer charged that Martinez had acted in a disorderly manner because he had "his pants down below his buttocks exposing underwear [and] potentially showing private parts."

There was no other reason listed for the ticket besides Martinez's pants, and Franco noted: "The issuance of this summons appears to be an attempt by one police officer to show his displeasure with a particular style of dress."

According to New York State Senator Eric Adams, if we can only "stop the sag" the social problems afflicting his constituents would away. Or something. In the video below (130,000 views and counting!), Adams explains that if we "raise our pants, we raise our image." 

UPDATE: I somehow missed that Damon Root flagged the same story, though with commentary from the august New York Law Journal and not the New York Post. But my post, while also making a Kris Kross reference, includes the "Stop Sagging" video. So I win.

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  1. Sorry to disappoint, Mike. Although it was lame, Damon’s post had alt-text. +1 to him.

    However, if the phrase “fashion police” does not appear in every news outlet running this story, the Fourth Estate has truly lost all credibility.

    1. Can they at least be the suede denim secret police?

  2. Kriss Kross were known for wearing their clothes backwards, which was quite retarded.

  3. This has got to be one of the top ten stupidest and ugliest and tasteless fashion trends in American history. It’s right up there with the ghetto dandies of Detroit (and elsewhere?) circa 1970 who walked around with pink plastic curlers in their hair.

  4. An atavistic part of me would like to see hipsters arrested under this charge for wearing skinny jeans, “ironic” t-shirts, and trucker hats. But then I return to sanity, realizing that looking that way voluntarily is far worse than being arrested, and I don’t have to sacrifice any principles either.

    1. My reaction, exactly. My oldest son wishes to dress like an incarcerated person, and I let him know precisely how stupid he looks. We stop him from going total idiot, but the best part is my secret knowledge that he’s going to spend the rest of his life being embarrassed by pictures from his youth. I know, for I survived the sartorial hell that was the 1970s.

  5. Prison culture?

    bullshit.

    Levi Strauss started manufacturing low riding jeans in the 1920s.

    They were pants to work in complete with metal rivets for durability and cut low on the waist to allow for more comfortable movement.

    The “style” originates from the working class.

    It is called “plumbers butt” not “prison butt”.

    1. Obviously wearing pants below your ass came from early 20th century work clothes. It’s like the big-body Impala with 24’s I saw today painted like a giant Coca-Cola bottle. Obviously a post post-modern take on consumer culture. Really, those are the only possible explanations.

      1. Actually, Normy, sagging had its origins in ancient Babylonia.

      2. soooo…why was Kurt Cobain wearing low riding baggy jeans?

        Cuz he was really into prison culture?

        1. The baggy pants fashion is derivative of rap/hip-hop culture, particularly gangsta rap, who appropriated it from prison culture. Cobain periodically wore baggy pants/jeans because the fashion crossed over very quickly.

          The baggy clothes Cobain wore, as well as much of the initial trend, did not feature the ‘pants-falling-down’ look so popular today. They were big, but they stayed up.

  6. When sag happens, no one wins.

  7. I thought the kids were all about the nut crunching skinny jeans now?

    1. Depends on the kids. The ones who sag actually have nuts. The kids in those skinny jeans traded theirs in for ironic beards and Animal Collective tickets.

  8. fashion police? Most cops I heard from LOVE the idea- wearing belts at knee level makes ’em much easier to catch…

    1. Yup. I’ve had cops tell me that the only thing they liked better than saggy pants were those shoes that light up in the dark when you run.

  9. I’ll get rid of Eric Adams’ sag. Head over tail.

  10. These guys should go to dept stores. They’ve got that lewd underwear stuff right out in the open where kids can see them

  11. “his pants down below his buttocks exposing underwear [and] potentially showing private parts.”
    As I’ve said before, all the more reason to bring back codpieces…with rhinestones.

    1. Codpieces! Codpieces!

  12. Doesn’t everyone pretty much always have the potential to show their private parts? I could whip it out right now in less than 3 seconds if I wanted to.

  13. “As expected, a court in New York has ruled that there is no constitutional prohibition on dressing like Kris Kross.”

    Ugh, this sort of mistake from a libertarian writer is a little frightening. The court found that the constitution doesn’t give government the authority to arrest people for this. Not that there isn’t a constitutional prohibition on dressing this way. They are different.

  14. I’m actually glad to see people dress this way. It’s their “sign”. It’s helpful when stupid people wear the uniform of stupidity.

  15. Worried about the prison culture in this country? So am I! Personally, I blame the culture on the US incarceration rate, the highest in the world. Passing new laws will only serve to increase the incarceration rate.

  16. the Constitution still leaves some opportunity for people to be foolish if they so desire

    Is it just me, or does even this understatement of what should be the freedoms of every citizen sound grudging and conditional?

    1. “”grudging and conditional””

      Pretty much sums up the way our government thinks about our rights.

  17. Just saying it before anyone else does, so we can move on.

  18. Haven’t seen the video, but I’ve liked Eric Adams. He was very outspoken against police misconduct when he led “100 Blacks In Law Enforcement”. How often does a cop speak out against police misconduct?

    Of course, when someone is elected to public office, I expect them to behave as such, so I might think less of him in the future.

  19. Yeah, a ticket was a little overkill. I could see where maybe a wedgie might be in order. I mean someone has to do it.

  20. This is how the police respond to the “No More Stop And Frisk” situation? Ok..I have an idea..how about going to work and arresting hardened criminals for a dayum change! Isn’t that what we pay you morons for anyway? Get a freaking grip!!!!

  21. This is how the police respond to the “No More Stop And Frisk” situation? Ok..I have an idea..how about going to work and arresting hardened criminals for a dayum change! Isn’t that what we pay you morons for anyway? Get a freaking grip!!!!

  22. This article made me a better understanding of New York’s cultural diversity will impact different spark of wisdom

  23. The best and most beautiful things in the world can not be seen or even touched, they must be felt with heart.

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