Culture

Selling Free Food

Entrepreneurial foraging is the next phase of greener-than-thou eating

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Among fast food outlets, giving away a free meal is an increasingly popular marketing gambit. But not even Col. Sanders can keep pace with the offerings of Mother Nature. Every day, in city parks and urban median strips, in backyards, on public beaches, and in your nearest stretch of federal wilderness, the earth serves up her bounty: snails, wild radish, miner's lettuce, stinging nettles, nasturtium, acorns, blackberries, loquats, lemons, sea asparagus, Dover sole, New Zealand spinach, chanterelles, morels, matsutake.

In an age when we've come to expect music, movies, news, used sofas, and so much other stuff to be free, this abundance has not passed unnoticed. Foraging isn't always legal. But just think of those huckleberries in your favorite state park as nature's MP3s: They are there for the taking if you are willing to risk the occasional stiff penalty.

It's not just the price that resonates so keenly with our current sensibilities. When Walmart carries organic frozen dinners and even your neighbor with the Hummer is touting the environmental efficacy and bonus deliciousness of peaches grown within a 50-mile radius of the neighborhood co-op, foraging represents the next link on the food chain of greener-than-thou eating. One consumes only what the earth yields naturally, without human coaxing of any kind. If Gaia gives you blackberries, wild mushrooms, and fennel, you feast! If you're stuck with a briny mound of sea asparagus, well, at least it's free.

Though not always. All across America, enterprising eco-aggregators are engaged in the somewhat paradoxical pursuit of commercialized foraging, leading mushroom-hunting safaris in forests and selling wild-harvested dandelion roots in bulk on the Internet. Iso Rabins, a 28-year-old resident of San Francisco, joined their ranks two years ago, when he started organizing "wild kitchens," paid events where diners enjoy "rambling dinner[s] of wild foraged foods" in private locales around the Bay Area. A few months later, Rabins added home delivery of food boxes to his menu of services. For $40 to $80 per box, subscribers get a steady supply of nettles, berries, and other wild foods without having to root around any further than their doorstep.

More recently, Rabins has been the driving force behind an increasingly popular Underground Farmer's Market. "To sell at a [typical] farmers market, you need to produce your wares in a commercial kitchen," he explained on his blog last December. "This is an impossible expense for many of us, so the underground farmers market is about helping to get some exposure for all of our fellow producers without the cash for a commercial kitchen." The most recent gathering, held in March, drew 1,262 attendees and more than 40 vendors.

Rabins' ventures have attracted plenty of press, both local and national. While the coverage has helped generate interest among potential customers, not all the attention has been appreciated. (He did not reply to my requests for an interview.) In the wake of one story, U.S. park rangers in the Presidio alerted him to the fact that picking miner's lettuce there carries a $125 fine. At his first Underground Farmer's Market, city food inspectors showed up—tipped off, he complained on his blog, by someone from a certified local farmers' market. Luckily, the inspectors were cordial, advising him how he could better comply with regulations that bar vendors from selling goods that haven't been prepared in a commercial kitchen. The trick, they explained, was to create a private club and require people who want to attend his events to join beforehand.

While Rabins was grateful for the advice, he expressed frustration with the regulations. "Bureaucrats are bureaucrats, whether they work for the IRS or the State Park Service, they all think the same," he wrote on his blog last summer. "We have been [taught] all our lives that the only way to know if something is safe is to ask the government," he mused on another occasion. "Is this toy safe, this seat belt, this apple, these jeans? Should I eat more meat? More veggies? More pasta? We don't know the answer to these questions anymore."

Explore San Francisco's 61 community gardens, and you're unlikely to find many Tea Partiers planting kale in the name of food justice and environmental sustainability. Nor are some of the ideas often associated with the alternative food movement—taxing soda, limiting the number of fast food restaurants in a neighborhood, various other means of regulating tastiness—characteristic of a small-government mindset. At the same time, there is a growing sentiment amongst local food advocates for less government oversight. In February, Wyoming state legislators introduced a bill designed to exempt "cottage foods"—or foods prepared in home kitchens and sold at roadside stands, farmer's markets, ranches, etc. —from safety inspections and licensing requirements. (It didn't pass.) Florida legislators are currently considering a similar bill.

In both cases, the goal was to encourage entrepreneurship among local food producers. That is essentially the goal of Rabins' market too. "To make the jump from being really good at making something at home to selling in public is at least a $4,000–$5,000 investment," he told The New York Times in December. "You need to get several licenses." Such barriers to entry exist for a reason—those free-range snails you've found in Golden Gate Park may be stuffed with snail bait—but they also make it difficult for budding food purveyors to bootstrap their way into a new career. For a generation that has grown up routing around middlemen, it must seem more than a little weird that you practically need a business plan to sell an acorn flour brownie to a stranger. Especially in San Francisco, where medical marijuana dispensaries deliver faster than Domino's.

Naturally, not everyone appreciates the foragers' entrepreneurial instincts. "We have the parks as an inviolate place for plants and animals," exclaimed state parks spokesman Roy Stearns in an SF Weekly profile of Rabins. After the piece appeared, one reader responded: "Collect your own damn wild food or shop at Ralphs. These people seeking to profit on dwindling natural resources are disgusting."

Our snail and nettle populations are probably safe, at least for the time being. Of all Rabins' endeavors, the one that has really struck a chord is the Underground Farmer's Market, which goes beyond miner's lettuce and sea asparagus to homemade local foods, including such quirky but relatively mainstream fare as cucumber marmalade, raw chocolate mousse, pickled vegetables, and quince butter. It's a gastronomic Etsy.com, offering people seeking an alternative to mindless corporate consumption a place where they can engage in mindful, community-oriented consumption of handmade foods. The most effective cure for shopping in this case is shopping.

When you purchase one of Rabins' foraged food boxes you may feel as if you're taking control of your food choices in a way that grazing at the supermarket doesn't permit. You can say no to pesticides, no to factory chicken. But that route also involves forsaking choice and autonomy. The range of available foods narrows. You have to make sure you're home at a specific time to receive your order. The producer, not the consumer, drives these relationships.

But like Burger King, the Underground Farmer's Market does a better job of letting you have it your way. Foraging evolves into metaphor, with Rabins canvassing the city for untapped sources of deliciousness: the backyard meat curer, the self-taught canner, the rooftop beekeeper, all aggregated into a lively and convenient emporium of choice and abundance. The sense of adventure and discovery that comes with trying to make weeds palatable spreads even to those working with more traditional ingredients. Why stick with orange marmalade when cucumber marmalade might be tasty too? Producers feel empowered to innovate. Consumers offer direct financial support for even their most radical R&D efforts. 

The average fast-food joint looks static and undercommercialized compared to this smorgasbord of creativity and trade. Until Ronald McDonald starts selling McAcorn Burgers, his appetite for capitalism remains suspect at best. 

Contributing Editor Greg Beato (gbeato@soundbitten.com) writes from San Francisco.

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  1. STEVE SMITH FORAGE, FORAGE FOR HIKER. RAPE AND FORAGE.

    1. Been hanging around Virginia, Steve?

      1. People of Spotsylvania, even the hilarious name of your county cannot help you now. Just as STEVE SMITH does not distinguish “forage” from “pillage,” he also confuses “hiking” with “consent.”

        1. WHAT ‘CONSENT’ MEAN? ALSO, STEVE WONDER WHY IRON CHEF NEVER HAVE HIKER MEAT AS SECRET INGREDIENT? NOT FAIR! EVEN ON FUTURAMA SECRET INGREDIENT SOYLENT GREEN!

          1. You have to wait for “Iron Chef: North Korea” to see that, Steve.

          2. Hmmm, I thought Futurama’s secret ingredient was plain old water. With LSD in it.

            1. That was Bender’s secret ingredient. Soylent Green was the Iron Chef “secret ingredient”.

              1. Too right, thx Epi!

                1. DAT SOWRD COST FI THOUSAN DOLLA-ROO!!

        2. I have been to Spotsylvania, to keel moose and squirrel!

          1. Not Rocky and Bullwinkel I hope.

  2. There are a bunch of fairly interesting youtube videos about edible wild (mostly) eastern US plants at eattheweeds.com.

    1. When I was a kid in summer camp in North Carolina, we did an “edible plants” course and ended up making a salad out of just stuff from the lawn. Pretty tasty, actually.

      1. And how would you say this early exposure to lawn munching affected you? Besides a total disregard for the “if there’s grass on the field” rule, of course.

        1. I took a liking to it.

          And some girls laser. It’s like a turtle shell down there.

          1. At least it’s nothing as deviant as actually liking wheatgrass shots, for example. You got off easy.

  3. Every day, in city parks and urban median strips, in backyards, on public beaches, and in your nearest stretch of federal wilderness, the earth serves up her bounty:

    And if more than a minuscule fringe of faddists starting feeding on this stiff, it’d be wiped out in no time.

    1. And if more than a minuscule fringe of faddists starting feeding on this stiff

      That would save on funeral costs. And feed the hungry at the same time! Who says libertarians aren’t multitaskers?

    2. When you purchase one of Rabins’ foraged food boxes you may feel as if you’re taking control of your food choices in a way that grazing at the supermarket doesn’t permit. You can say no to pesticides, no to factory chicken.

      Are you? On a factory farm, I’d bet you that pesticides are much more selective and targeted. Whereas that back section of the public park where no one sees it as a source of food? Do you really have any idea what chemicals may be collecting in the weeds?

      I mean, I’m not even that concerned about the pesticides from so-called factory farming. But you never know if the neighbor sprayed ant poison or threw rat poison all over the back lot on the common green space where all the blackberries grow.

    3. I thought Beato’s piece was a bit wandering and sidestepped the issue of that happens if this shit ever became popular. Frankly, good old fashioned row agriculture is exponentially more efficient… and you don’t have assholes wandering through your property.

  4. “These people seeking to profit on dwindling natural resources are disgusting.”

    Hey, SF Weekly reader? You and me should have a little chat sometime about the last 2,000 years or so of human history.

    1. about the last 2,000 years or so of human history.

      More like last 10,000 years or so

      The Neolithic Revolution was the first agricultural revolution?the transition from hunting and gathering communities and bands, to agriculture and settlement. Archaeological data indicate that various forms of domestication of plants and animals arose independently in at least seven or eight separate locales worldwide, with the earliest known developments taking place in the Middle East around 10,000 BC or earlier.

    2. “These people seeking to profit on dwindling natural resources are disgusting.”

      Might as well say what they really mean.

  5. People in Appalachia having been making good money harvesting wild ginger for years. It’s so good that it gets shipped to Asia.

    1. isn’t it wild ginseng?

      1. That too. LOL.

      2. Wild Ginger and Slutty Mary Ann, Gilligan had the best wild foraging of anyone.

        1. Hilarious! Good job!

  6. Juneberries! It’s almost time for juneberries, which are all over and NEVER picked, except by birds.

    A year ago I did a video about foraging in Chicago with a forager named Nance Klehm who knows a LOT about what’s growing wild out there. Check it out: http://www.vimeo.com/2666963

    1. I used to forage elderberries with my Grandmother as a child in Ohio. mmmm, elderberry pie.

      1. I still harvest elderberries from along country roads. They make fantastic jelly.

      2. I hope she didn’t serve anybody elderberry wine.

    2. I have two of these serviceberry trees. Boy, they’re tasty; seedy, but tasty. I can rarely get a ripe one, though, as the birds beat me to them.

      My Grandpap, an old hillbilly, called them “Sarvis” berries. I came across a reference text about trees that said “Sarvis” was correct, but old-time grammar Nazis corrupted the word to “Service”.

  7. I love these ironic entrepreneurs. And the poetic justice that impedes them every step of the way.

  8. Big Foot rumors grow in Spotsylvania County

    SPOTSYLVANIA, Va. – Conspiracy theorists and rare animal lovers unite — Big Foot just may be strutting through the woods of Spotsylvania County.
    Billy Willard, operator of the Sasquatch Watch of Virginia, claims a Big Foot-like creature has been seen 14 times in a five-mile area near Lake Anna.

    But Willard says some of the people who’ve witnessed the creature are afraid to say so in public for fear of being ridiculed.

    Willard says he’s seen a footprint that he thinks belongs to the mythical beast.

    He’s set up high-tech night-vision cameras that are activated by motion and heat.

    http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=600&sid=1966149

    1. Damn! Ragin Cajun beat me to this. Sorry.

  9. The way your dad looked at it, this watch was your birthright. He’d be damned if any slopes gonna put their greasy yellow hands on his boy’s birthright, so he hid it, in the one place he knew he could hide something: his ass. Five long years, he wore this watch up his ass. Then when he died of dysentery, he gave me the watch. I hid this uncomfortable piece of metal up my ass for two years. Then, after seven years, I was sent home to my family. And now, little man, I give the watch to you.

    1. Bring out the gimp!

  10. I’ve foraged in the couch for change to buy Top Ramen. Does that count?

    I’ve also eaten so many Canadian blue berries, in a Canadian wilderness area that I couldn’t stand up. I’ve never been so full in my life. That’s what a two weeks of freeze dried food followed by the discovery of a blueberry patch will do to you.

    1. It’ll give you the shits, but this you already know I should think.

  11. It’s nice that Rabin is seeing the light in some respects, although there does seem to be ‘regulation for thee, not for me’ in some of his compatriots.

    Taking stuff off of public land does seem like the usual left-wing version of ‘anarchy’ to me, though.

    1. although I’ve had some get into a huff about me taking stuff from National Forests. It’s not a National Park people. I’m allowed to take stake a f’n mining claim if I feel like it.

      1. For a rather more libertarian view on similar issues, I suggest Salatin’s Everything I want to do is Illegal.

        http://www.polyfacefarms.com/books.aspx

        The government is getting in the way of food technology and entrepreneurship — who’d have thought?!?

        But anyway, some of these weirdo foodies are potential libertarians, if only they were to learn something about voluntary exchange and violent coercion.

  12. Too bad the barriers to entry for selling home-brewed beer are even worse. If Joe Blow homebrewer could sell his product to his neighbors, everyone would enjoy much higher quality beer that costs way less than a sixer at the liquor store, and the big breweries would be SOL. A homebrewer who buys in bulk can make most styles for less than $0.40/bottle, and a decent homebrewer’s beers are better than most beers at the liquor store.

    I am not optimistic about deregulation, though. Free markets are just too scary. Kind of messed up that crap like this is OK, and selling homebrew is not.

    1. Beer is just the beginning. The home-distillers can make some pretty good hooch for next to nothing.

    2. ph|5.27.10 @ 5:51PM|#
      “Too bad the barriers to entry for selling home-brewed beer are even worse. If Joe Blow homebrewer could sell his product to his neighbors, everyone would enjoy much higher quality beer that costs way less than a sixer at the liquor store, and the big breweries would be SOL. A homebrewer who buys in bulk can make most styles for less than $0.40/bottle, and a decent homebrewer’s beers are better than most beers at the liquor store.”

      Uh, if taxes and health regs weren’t what they are, I’ll be ‘Big Beer’ could beat that $0.40/b all hollow.
      It ain’t ‘Big Beer’ that drives up the cost.

  13. Wow! foraging for food sounds like a way to get in medical trouble, the chances of getting food contamination is quite high.

    1. It’s alo greatly lowered if you wash/cook ’em (and, of couse, have done the requisite research).

  14. Look at the big brain on Greg!

  15. This seems like too happy positive and idealistic to be an article in Reason – may we see more of it please

  16. Bugs are edible, too. I don’t see anyone mentioning that. Indian tribes in eastern Oregon survived on them.

    Hell, if you become skilled at trapping rats, you’ve got a virtually inexhaustible food source in DC and NYC.

    1. You’re encouraging genocide of my people. I suggest you cease and desist.

  17. Nor are some of the ideas often associated with the alternative food movement?taxing soda, limiting the number of fast food restaurants in a neighborhood, various other means of regulating tastiness?characteristic of a small-government mindset. At the same time, there is a growing sentiment amongst local food advocates for less government oversight.

    Less government for me, but not for thee.

  18. Especially in San Francisco, where medical marijuana dispensaries deliver faster than Domino’s.

    We’re working on that.

  19. BTW, it’s a San Francisco news article as predictable as the mid-west ‘Tot dies from lightening strike’.
    Every year after the rains start, some bozo wanders into Golden Gate Park or the Presidio, picks what they swear to be ‘harmless’ mushrooms, and we voters are on the hook for several liver transplants after they cook ’em up and feed the family.
    Even Whole Foods doesn’t charge that amount for shrooms you can eat.

  20. Nasturtiums are edible?
    Fuck me. I’ve been growing those for years, and they are hardy too.

    1. you can eat the flowers, peppery. You can also pickle the pods like capers.

      1. I’ve eaten the leaves, but haven’t tried the flowers, and they are also peppery and quite good.

    2. I think they are slightly hot (spicy) if I remember correctly which flower I ate at an event one time.

  21. 2 Words: Euell Gibbons

    When I was a kid my parents were big on the hippie Foxfire stuff and would bring my sister and I out for all sorts of crazy crap in Stalking the Wild Asparagus.

    For every great thing like morel mushrooms, we did something stupid like flour from cattail roots.

    The plus side of it is that I have several friends who have told me that they are heading to my house if there is a major disaster because I know how to do “all that outdoorsy stuff” like butchering game, smoking meat and canning vegetables.

    1. I was thinking I might be senile for wondering why nobody had brought up Euell Gibbons on a thread with this subject. Thanks jimbo now I don’t have to turn myself into the home.

      Ever eat a pinecone?

      1. Doug,

        Missed that one somehow. I remember milkweed tea, the cattail flour, and various nettles.

      2. “Some parts of a pine tree ARE edible.”

  22. These “foragers” are not paying money for their food, thereby not paying TAXES on it… and that means they’re unpatriotic leeches! Something has got to be done!

    1. Yeah, and it has that haze of right-wing militia survivalist mentality to it. Homeland Security should start cracking down on this.

      1. Would you two like a room so you can get primal and feral?

        1. Room for one more?

          Oh, wait, I’ll have to run it past my shop steward first…

  23. I see no sense in paying more for the supposed “authenticity” gained by eating like a savage. Neither do starving third world peasants.

    Nor do I see how it makes you “enlightened” to suggest we should power the entire US with the archaic technology of the medieval windmill. I’m pretty sure the poor in Africa who forced by developed countries to utilize solar power agree with me.

    I see nothing noble in banning the use of DDT worldwide after we’ve already eliminated malaria in the Developed world, but not for poor African peasants.

    The sanctimonious ignorance of the environmentalist whackos sickens me every time I encounter it. Nothing wrong with engaging in their endless desire to be “authentic” by denying yourself useful technologies, but their kooky religion compels them to “convert” everyone else by forcing them to be equally idiotic.

  24. For $40 to $80 per box, subscribers get a steady supply of nettles, berries, and other wild foods without having to root around any further than their doorstep

    See, this is the wonderful thing about a free market economy. People with more money than brains are rapidly deprived of the former by some clever entrepreneur, and thereby rendered harmless.

    Better that they buy $40 to $80 boxes of roots and twigs and weeds than that they send their money to Babs Boxer’s re-election campaign or compete with me for stock in Amazon.

    1. Very little difference between Babs and a grass sammidge anyway.

    2. I had a back-to-nature type friend who once picked day lily buds for a salad. Not exactly good eating but I didn’t get sick, at least.

  25. Oh wow, that makes a lot of sense dude I like it.

    Lou
    http://www.online-privacy.de.tc

  26. Finally something I can get behind.

    We forage for mushrooms every time we visit the pacific northwest, and we’re VERY entrepreneurial about it too!

    1. Good luck on the liability insurance.

  27. “Commercial kitchen”?! AFAIK most wares at farmer’s markets are produce, and aren’t prepared in any kitchen at all. Some of them do sell some prepared foods, but is there really a reg that says the unprepared foods have to be blessed by a commercial kitchen in some way? As in washed, maybe?

    Here in the Bronx I pick mulberries — some from parks, some from other gov’t property, some from private property, where they’re otherwise treated as a stain-producing nuisance. Come to think of it, mulberry-picking season starts for me in about 2 weeks.

  28. You can get those huckleberries without hassle as long as you’re willing to be sneaky, go well armed, and politely claim ignorance of the regulations. Government screws, whether they be armed or unarmed, outside urban areas, are only tough on soft targets. If they comment on your weapons, just tell them you never know what kind of threats you may encounter out in the middle of nowhere so you like being prepared.

    It’s always well worth the risk, the only thing better than fresh huckleberries is fresh forbidden huckleberries.

  29. If cheap is the operative word, gather away. I raise beef, and get a lot of calls for “grass fed” beef, which is (I guess) beef that is not finished on corn. WTF, if people want venison, who am I to argue. The stuff tastes like shit, much like the European beef.

    I have commenced to offer said “grass fed” beef to customers, nearly all liberal pantloads, at much higher prices than corn fed, quality beef. I figure this is my way of taxing stupidity.

    1. I believe we are morally obligated to take advantage of the willfully and militantly ignorant at ever single opportunity. Well done, Sir.

  30. “If cheap is the operative word, gather away. I raise beef, and get a lot of calls for “grass fed” beef, which is (I guess) beef that is not finished on corn. WTF, if people want venison, who am I to argue. The stuff tastes like shit, much like the European beef.”

    Grass fed beef tastes great if it’s grown on good pasture. Grain fed beef is bland.

    “I have commenced to offer said “grass fed” beef to customers, nearly all liberal pantloads, at much higher prices than corn fed, quality beef. I figure this is my way of taxing stupidity.”

    So do you take your profits and buy some nice subsidized corn fed beef?

    1. liberals are idiots, given, but there are advantages to grass fed beef.

      i do think it tastes better, but then i am WAY into food.

      but it is also much more nutritious. not surprising since cows evolved to eat GRASS, not corn

      GRASS fed beef has a much better EFA profile, lower arachidonoic (sp?) acid, etc.

      similar to the issue with much farm raised salmon, that actually has to be DIED pink. due to the lack of krill, etc. in the unnatural farm raised diet, the EFA profile is not nearly as good, and it doesn’t taste as good, either.

      i;’m a big fan of game meat
      (i have hunter friends) and it has great taste and great nutrition profile.

      as a competitive athlete, this stuff matters to me

  31. Pine needle and dandelion tea both taste pretty good. And if you make the latter, you can eat the leaves afterward; they have a consistency and taste of boiled spinach.

  32. You had me until “gastronomic Etsy.” Makes me wonder what sorts of things we’ll see on the gastronomic Regretsy.

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  43. I was a kid in summer camp in North Carolina, we did an “edible plants” course and ended up making a salad out of just stuff from the lawn.

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  46. The average fast-food joint looks static and undercommercialized compared to this smorgasbord of creativity and trade.

  47. other stuff to be free, this abundance has not passed unnoticed. Foraging isn’t always legal. But just think of those

  48. 50-mile radius of the neighborhood co-op, foraging represents

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