Walker vs. the Secret Muslim Vault

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I will break open the vault…with my aerobics!

Via Newsweek, a wonderfully incoherent piece from Chuck Norris, star of Firewalker and Slaughter in San Francisco, who accuses the Obama administration of empowering Interpol with unchecked power to promote his pro-Muslim agenda. To be honest, it's rather difficult to follow, but provides me an opportunity to post this photo of Norris. But Walker Texas Retard has no doubt—none—that Obama is building an Al Capone-like vault for all of the evidence he wants to hide, being that he's an agent of the Kenyan secret police:

I have no doubt that Interpol will become Obama's secret vault for terrorists' criminal records and evidence–and whatever else he and his Cabinet want to place in there. This is just the beginning of what Washington can and will do with this executive order that Obama signed. And it's just one more example of the way your federal government has got the backs of those who are attacking our country, abandoning our Constitution and dissolving America's sovereignty.

Also, this is nuts too: "Is it merely coincidental that Obama signed this executive Interpol order and that he often goes out of his way to sympathize with and advocate pro-Muslim culture, beliefs and issues?"

And for those wondering, and as Michael Isikoff points out, "Interpol officers actually don't have the authority to arrest anybody on U.S. soil." He explains the executive order signed by Obama, which grants certain "exemptions" to Interpol, "merely gave the employees of a small Interpol office in New York the same privileges that Ronald Reagan granted other international organizations in 1983, like exempting them from certain taxes and fees and protecting their files from the Freedom of Information Act."

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  1. We would like to thank Reason for boldly standing up for the rights of oppressed international police agencies to operate above the law.

  2. “Interpol officers actually don’t have the authority to arrest anybody on U.S. soil.”

    Actually, not just yet.

  3. I think Walker Texas Retard is nuts, but I don’t think anybody should have diplomatic immunity, particularly an international police agency.

  4. World Net Daily never fails

  5. And for those wondering, and as Michael Isikoff points out, “Interpol officers actually don’t have the authority to arrest anybody on U.S. soil.” He explains the executive order signed by Obama, which grants certain “exemptions” to Interpol, “merely gave the employees of a small Interpol office in New York the same privileges that Ronald Reagan granted other international organizations in 1983, like exempting them from certain taxes and fees and protecting their files from the Freedom of Information Act.”

    Oh, is that all??

    So because Reagan did it, then Obama giving a foreign organization extraordinary powers and privilages is Ok?

    Chuck may be rambling and I certainly don’t presume to know what’s behind Obama’s executive order. I just find it strange that such a thing is not seen as unconstitutional – what gave the Executive the power to grant extraordinary powers or privileges to an international body of tax consumers?

    1. Chuck is an idiot but aside from that you seem to confuse ‘rights” and executive order.

      Andrew Jackson long ago discovered that the Court had absolutely no authority to enforce law.

      Dick Cheney lived on this dictum.

      1. Re: Shrike,

        Chuck is an idiot but aside from that you seem to confuse ‘rights” and executive order.

        Please elaborate – I did not mention “rights”. I mentioned granting powers.

  6. Next article?

    How the U.N. and it’s members are doing a great job of not abusing its immunities.

    1. Evidence of UN Diplomats abusing immunities hier.

      You’re welcome.

  7. People shouldn’t listen to 99.9% of celebrities.

  8. Chuck Norris. The new Sara Palin?

    1. You have it backwards

  9. “…and protecting their files from the Freedom of Information Act.”

    Crackpot as Norris is, this is a *bad* thing. No law enforcement entity on US soil should be exempt from freedom of information act searches, or legal investigations.

  10. I see. Everyone is comfortable defying and mocking Norris on this obscure blog. Go ahead and say that somewhere where he can hear you. You’ll feel his displeasure like a roundhouse to the head. Just like that.

  11. I’ve actually read the executive order, like most government documents it makes no sense. Without the original to refer to we really have no idea WTF it means.

    ……. and in order to extend the appropriate privileges, exemptions, and immunities to the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), it is hereby ordered that Executive Order 12425 of June 16, 1983, as amended, is further amended by deleting from the first sentence the words “except those provided by Section 2(c), Section 3, Section 4, Section 5, and Section 6 of that Act” and the semicolon that immediately precedes them.

    1. Just like sausages.

    2. The originals aren’t too hard to find.

    3. Indeed, since this order amends the previous one, Obama is emphatically NOT giving them the same privileges Reagan gave.

  12. “Interpol officers actually don’t have the authority to arrest anybody on U.S. soil.”

    Does that mean that they physically can’t arrest and drag someone’s ass out of the country in a “rendition” type of operation, or only that they don’t have the authority bestowed upon them by the Tax-Consumer-in-chief? Because one thing does NOT preclude the other. What would happen if one of them gets shot by a person he was tailing if the other thinks his own life was in danger? Would that carry the same weight as shooting an American police officer, or an FBI agent?

    What if the Interpol cop SHOOTS someone inside US soil? Would HE be prosecuted, or does he enjoy immunity?

    1. Old Mexican, my read is that Interpol enjoys the same diplomatic immunity as a consular official. Which means, he no go to jail for shooting your sorry ass.

      1. TWC, in that case, do I have immunity if I shoot HIS sorry ass? That’s the key.

        1. You could try pleading self-defense, I suppose. I don’t think the extra protections for LEOs would extend to Interpol, particularly if they’re not supposed to be active on US soil. but then again, I always thought it was silly to prosecute the killing of a police dog as the murder of a police officer, so what do I know.

    2. Interpol is NOT some independent international police force. They are basically a clearinghouse for data helping to get information shared between local, state, federal, and international police groups. The actual police work is done by the local law enforcement agencies. They do have some agents but they must obey all local laws and get permission from the local authorities before doing anything. Basically, they help coordinate and share information across all levels of police groups amongst all their member countries. This is a good thing and it is understandable that you might not want every piece of data from every law enforcement agency from across all member countries subject to the freedom of information act.

      In short, its more of a giant database than anything else, although they do have people that can help, advise, or train the local police. That is why its just one small office with just a few people here in the US.

      The commenters here really seem to think its a group analogous to the CIA or FBI or something. It is not.

      1. Hey, jumping to conclusions is the only exercise some these guys get.

  13. Most of the rest of the Obama Interpol executive order relieves them from the obligation of going thru customs and paying income or property taxes. However, there isn’t any question that this exempts Interpol from the FOA and it doesn’t just apply to a small Interpol office in New York.

    (c) Property and assets of international organizations, wherever located and by whomsoever held, shall be immune from search, unless such immunity be expressly waived, and from confiscation. The archives of international organizations shall be inviolable.

    I don’t know if Interpol has authority to arrest people on American soil or not, but I’m pretty sure that if they wanted to, they’d manage it in some fashion or another.

  14. Anyone else have a World of Warcraft character named ChuckNorris?

    1. Just check the armory. It looks like there’s one on every server.

  15. Contrary to popular belief, America is not Democracy, it’s a Chucktatorship.

  16. Chuck Norris is so powerful, when he decided to go crazy, he made the H&R commentariat seem sane and sensible.

    1. Chuck Norris is the H&R commentariat.

  17. Actually, Norrises column makes a lot of sense. And your points and Newsweek’s point doesn’t even discuss his main point, which is an international law enforcement agency has just been exempt (via Obama’s executive order) from search and seizure laws–which not even the FBI or CIA can avoid (though they do the Freedom of Information Act about present pursuants). That is a fact, not a theory. Shouldn’t we all have a problem with that?? As a liberal, I even do. Read Norris’s WOrld Net Daily exclusive (which is longer) to get the full context) at http://www.wnd.com/index.php?f…..eId=121560

    1. Didn’t they revoke your liberal license for reading WND?

  18. “Is it merely coincidental that Obama signed this executive Interpol order and that he often goes out of his way to sympathize with and advocate pro-Muslim culture, beliefs and issues?”

    Ah yes, pro-Muslim beliefs and issues like legalized abortion and gay rights.

    1. Well Obama is against gay marriage and his position on abortion is “next question?”

      1. Not that I think he’s a Muslim plant or something. He’s just a politician like the rest.

  19. Someone on the internets talking about Chuck Norris. That’s weird.

  20. Maybe you R?hmites like Interpol so much and defend it from the mighty Chuck Norris because Iran has asked Interpol to arrest 25 Israelis.

    Yesiree, let us make it easier for Iran to nuke Israel with Interpol’s legal harassment to deal with.

    “There’s no need to fear. Underzog is here.”

    1. There’s no need for schmear! Underzog is here and he’s got whitefish salad!

      1. And here I thought that he was spending all his time on trying to break Mr. Teitel out of prison.

    2. Undermoob is right. The three lawyers the Israelis will have to use to respond to the red corner notices are coincidentally also the only thing protecting Israel from nuclear attack.

    1. I don’t think it would be a great organization to have in the States. The first time they try to arrest some one here all hell will break out. It will not sit right with a great segment of the population. I’ll have a scotch on the Rocks. http://www.suckitupcrybaby.com

  21. So, if Interpol doesn’t have to comply with some laws or with FOIA, why it would be a great organization to use within the U.S., wouldn’t it? Not going paranoid here, but that seems a logical extrapolation of this order.

    1. There’s no such thing as an Interpol police officer. The offices are staffed by host country police units like the FBI and they can’t arrest anyone. They co-ordinate with other national police forces and keep data bases on international criminals that are available to member countries.

      1. If they’re staffed by US citizens, then why do they need diplomatic immunity?

  22. Nice to see TWC back again!

    … Hobbit

    1. Hobbit, you’ve aged…..

      I appreciate the warm welcome, drinks all around. Bartender?

      I still come around now and again, but I don’t run my mouth as much.

  23. Reason FINALLY gets around to covering this bombshell of abuse of executive power, and this is the dismissive treatment it gets? I might have to subscribe just so I can cancel my subscription in disgust.

    I suppose technically, since they don’t have authority to arrest on US soil, you could plead self-defense if you had to blow the blue-helmets’ heads off before they stuffed you into a van. Beyond that, the fact isn’t terribly comforting.

  24. Smith & Wesson doesn’t recognize diplomatic immunity.

  25. Anyone else notice that the Interpol logo bears a striking similarity to the Evil Earth Empire in the Star Trek mirror universe?

  26. At least the secretary general of Interpol doesn’t seem too ambitious about expanding Interpol’s power:

    [Ronald Noble] is a 1979 graduate of the University of New Hampshire with a bachelor’s degree in economics and business administration and a 1982 graduate of Stanford Law School. Mr. Noble also is a tenured professor at the New York University School of Law, on leave of absence while serving at Interpol.

    From 1993 until 1996 he was the Undersecretary for Enforcement of the United States Department of the Treasury, where he was in charge of the United States Secret Service, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, the Office of Foreign Assets Control, and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. He was head of the Department’s “Waco Administrative Review Team” which produced a report [ed:cover-up] on the ATF’s actions against the Branch Davidians leading to the Waco Siege.

    From his induction speech:

    For Interpol, the 11th of September was a moment of reckoning. It was the time for us to decide what kind of international police organization we wanted Interpol to be. Although Interpol had been created over 80 years ago by police chiefs to provide operational police support internationally, something had happened to Interpol over the years. Interpol had become so slow, so unresponsive that in many police circles around the world Interpol was considered irrelevant to their day-to-day needs. But, it was on September 11, 2001 that Interpol went operational and that we committed ourselves to working 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year to support our NCBs and police services. And it was on that day that we first began reaching out to you in times of crisis, rather than waiting for you to ask for help. One can say that Interpol was reborn on the 11th of September 2001.

  27. I’m amazed it took 13 comments before someone worked in a Chuck Norris fact or a roundhouse kick reference. Pro Libertate Wins!!!

    I’m amazed that as of 9:00AM this thread still hasn’t devolved into everyone giving their favorite Chuck Norris fact.

  28. By the way, did you know that Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat because she was saving it for Chuck Norris?

    I read it on the internet so it must be true.

  29. Is that a unitard?

    1. I think so, and it really doesn’t go with that beard very well.

  30. Why does Chuck Norris hate the musical stylings of Interpol so much?

  31. Nobody has mentioned the dream tickets for 2012. Obama/Biden vs. Palin/Norris.

  32. wow…did you need to use the word retard? so offensive and just very 5th grade.

  33. Michael, when Norris round house kicks you to the next century,

    can I haf ur stuff?

  34. Shouldn’t someone point out that INTERPOL does not have any officers or agents with authority to arrest anyone? They manage a criminal database for use by member nations.

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