Obamacare

Whole Foods Health Care

Organic-foods magnate John Mackey talks about his controversial health care proposals, why he was investigated by the feds, and "conscious capitalism."

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On August 11, 2009, Whole Foods co-founder and chief executive officer John Mackey published an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal recommending "eight things we can do to improve health care without adding to the deficit." The ideas, many of them familiar to market-oriented health policy wonks, ranged from malpractice reform to eliminating the tax incentives that tie insurance to employment. "The last thing our country needs," Mackey warned, "is a massive new health-care entitlement that will create hundreds of billions of dollars of new unfunded deficits and move us much closer to a government takeover of our health-care system."

It was as if a bomb had gone off in the arugula line. Some of Mackey's customers, who tend to be urban, upscale, and left of the political center, went ballistic. Protests were held outside and occasionally even inside several Whole Foods outlets. A Boycott Whole Foods group on Facebook attracted more than 34,000 members. "Mackey's campaign," warned one boycott leader, "results in the deaths of 60 Americans every day due to lack of health insurance. Mackey is responsible for these deaths as much as anyone."

The "intense" reaction took the soft-spoken 56-year-old by surprise, but the protests quickly faded away. What remained after the hubbub died down was a contentious White House health care plan still very much up in the air and a businessman still eager to have a calm policy conversation with people who now regarded him as a libertarian traitor to his customers' political beliefs.

John Mackey is used to confounding conventional political categories. A cutting-edge entrepreneur who is comfortable quoting both Ludwig von Mises and astrology, who both practices veganism and sells some of the best meat in America, and who both chases profits and is an outspoken advocate of charitable giving, Mackey is an advocate of what he calls "conscious capitalism." He is that rarest of businessmen: an articulate and passionate defender of free enterprise and free individuals.

Mackey—who has contributed in the past to the Reason Foundation, the nonprofit organization that publishes this magazine—sat down with reason Editor in Chief Matt Welch and reason.tv Editor Nick Gillespie in September. For a video version of the interview, go to reason.tv/mackey.

reason: In your Wall Street Journal op-ed, you wrote, "While we clearly need health care reform, we should be trying to achieve reforms by moving in the opposite direction of more government control toward less government control and more individual empowerment." Why do we need health care reform and why should the government not be a part of health care?

John Mackey: We need health care reform because the current system, in the way it's structured and regulated, is becoming more and more expensive. We've gone from spending 4 percent of our gross domestic product on health care in 1960 to almost 17 percent today, and the trend lines aren't really slowing down.

reason: Were you surprised by the vociferous reaction to your op-ed?

Mackey: I was surprised. I mean, CEOs write op-ed pieces all the time. Steven Burd, the CEO of Safeway, had written an op-ed piece in The Wall Street Journal on health care reform just a month or two before I did, and nobody reacted at all to it. So it was rather bizarre.

reason: Do you think employer-based health care is a right, or even a good idea?

Mackey: Well, if you look at the history of it, it came about in World War II when the government put wage and price controls on but exempted insurance. So employers began paying for insurance because that was a way they could compensate people. After World War II, it continued to be a special tax exemption that encouraged employers to be picking up the insurance. It sort of spread through the culture.

I'm not sure that's the best way to do it, primarily because as long as you work for Whole Foods, we've got this great health insurance program, but what if you want to leave? What if you get a better job offer someplace else, or you're ready to do something else? It's not portable. So that restrains people from maybe leaving because they're not sure they can get as good a health care program. I think it'd be better if individuals did it themselves.

reason: Let's say you suffer from Down syndrome. You're going to live to age 50; you probably won't work very well. Where do you get your health insurance under the John Mackey plan?

Mackey: Obviously, there are always the tough cases, the marginal cases, and what we're suggesting for reform wouldn't necessarily be a solution for them. The reforms that I advocated would help tens of millions of people have better health care and health insurance. It may not solve everyone's problem, and so maybe those need to be solutions that are provided elsewhere, either through the not-for-profit sector or through some type of government voucher program.

reason: You started out in 1978 as Safer Way in Austin, Texas. What were your goals in creating that original outlet and then becoming Whole Foods in 1980?

Mackey: That question kind of assumes I knew what the heck I was doing back then. I mean, I had just turned 25 when we opened Safer Way. My girlfriend who co-founded the company with me, Renee, was 21, and we didn't have any grandiose plan. We thought opening our own store would be fun. We could make money to support ourselves and we'd be providing food that would nurture and help people be healthier.

Safer Way was a vegetarian store; we didn't sell any meat. We sold a lot of bulk foods, produce. We had a little vegetarian cafe on the second floor. We had an office on the third floor which also served as where Renee and I lived because the office couch was a futon that we could fold out at night. So we literally lived above the store, and it was fun.

reason: What were the guiding principles or ethics as they evolved in the first couple of years?

Mackey: We were selling food that you couldn't find in conventional supermarkets back then. We were selling lots of organic produce. We did a huge business in bulk foods in the early days. We had tofu. I mean, nobody sold tofu in Austin, Texas, in the 1970s.

We sold bulk honey and maple syrup. You have to remember that in the late '70s the industrialization of the food process was pretty well complete, and most people just ate foods out of frozen dinners, TV dinners, and macaroni and cheese out of boxes or cans. The whole idea of eating a whole food natural diet was kind of a revolutionary act back in the late '70s and early '80s.

Now that's changed as we've become more successful. All our competitors picked up a lot of the foods that we sell, which forces us to innovate and come up with new value propositions for our customers.

reason: How do you decide to site a store?

Mackey: Well, there's no more important decision that you're going to make than where you locate a store. If we're going to invest, depending on the size of the store, anywhere from $8 million to $20-plus million in capital for a new store, and sign a lease of usually 20 years or longer, we're making a long-term commitment and putting up a lot of capital. So we spend a lot of time and energy sorting through that. We do site analysis. We analyze our competition in an area. We look at the demographics of who's living there. We look at education levels, income. There's a whole bunch of variables, but I think by far the most important variable is the number of college graduates within a 16-minute drive time.

reason: Why is that?

Mackey: I don't know exactly why. I can tell you that about 80 percent of our customers have college degrees. I can speculate that our customers, on average, are better educated and better informed. And a college degree, while not a perfect proxy for that, is the best we have in terms of demographic data that we can get. If people are going to change their diets and become more health conscious, they need to be generally better informed. Otherwise, you tend to eat the diets that you ate when you were a child. Most Americans don't eat diets that are particularly healthy, so it takes conscious effort to alter your diet and your eating and shopping patterns. And that correlates with education.

reason: You recently completed a merger with Wild Oats, another national chain of organic stores. You had to go through the Federal Trade Commission, and they blocked it. Why?

Mackey: The FTC argued that Whole Foods Market had a monopoly position in a narrow market, which they called the "premium natural and organic supermarket market," and that if Whole Foods and Wild Oats merged, there really would be hardly anybody left in that category. And of course our position was that we don't compete against just stores in the premium natural and organic supermarket market; we compete against everybody retailing food. We compete against Safeway and Kroger, Trader Joe's, Wegman's—we've got more competition than we've ever had before. So it's all about how you define the market. They chose to define it in a very narrow fashion, and we define it in a much larger fashion, and that was what the argument was about. We've done a lot of mergers in our history, and this is the first time we've ever had one challenged.

reason: Isn't that a sign of success, when you finally get challenged?

Mackey: Is it a sign of success when the government starts hassling you? I don't know. I guess so. I mean, it was a bizarre experience. It's not one I want to go through.

It wasn't a good experience, I'd have to say. We received a lot of negative publicity about it. They downloaded all my emails and a lot of stuff I'd prefer that nobody read, particularly the government lawyers, and they basically treated us as if we were criminals or guilty of some horrible crime for just being successful. So it cost us tens of millions of dollars in legal fees and countless hours of management time. We had to prepare millions of documents. It's not possible that they could have read all those documents.

reason: You also had an SEC probe that ended up looking at whether or not you had tried to manipulate Whole Foods' stock price by posting on Yahoo! message boards.

Mackey: One of the consequences of the FTC getting all my emails is they discovered that I had been posting on Yahoo! bulletin boards under Whole Foods and on other bulletin boards, and then the SEC wanted to launch an investigation to see whether I'd been doing anything illegal in terms of trying to manipulate the stock.

They were asking me questions like, "In this posting, were you trying to signal people in special code?" I was just playing, frankly. Millions of people post on Internet bulletin boards; it's fun. And I didn't at the time see any reason why I was outlawed from doing so. It turned out in retrospect to have been, I think, a mistake in judgment. Somewhere along the line between when I started posting and when I stopped posting, I'd become semi-famous, and this became sort of a scandal.

I am happy to say that it had a happy ending. They did their investigation and decided to take no action. I might have been foolish to make such postings, but I hadn't done anything that they considered to be against the law.

reason: One of the ways that you add value is by tracing your foodstuffs from origin to the market to the shelf. Why are your customers interested in that?

Mackey: We're so intimate with food. We eat food, we consume it, it becomes a part of us. Many people are intensely interested in where the food is grown, how it's grown, what was the farmer's philosophy. Is it a local product? If it's coming from a Third World developing nation, is it fairly traded? Is it ethically traded? Is it organically grown?

If you think about what a retailer is, he's a middleman, a broker between the farmer or the producer and the consumer. So the more information we can provide about how that food is produced, where it comes from, what the philosophy of the farmer or the producer is, the better we're serving our customers. Particularly in an Internet-linked world, where you can provide all that information, I really can see over time that all that information will be available at our stores and online for people so you can get total transparency of the food system.

reason: Some critics argue that you are consciously building or catering to some kind of irrationality, or self-flattering tendencies, among your customers. What's your response to that?

Mackey: I don't completely understand the question. Or if I do understand it, I think it's an odd question. If people want to buy produce that's locally raised, I don't understand what would be wrong with that. If it's grown nearby, that food's going to be incredibly fresh; it's going to be at the peak of nutritional value. There's less transportation mileage, obviously, from where it was produced to getting into our store and into the consumer's stomachs. So I don't think it's irrational. People have preferences, and the great thing about a market system is that there's a diversity of preferences and you compete to satisfy those preferences. Why judge other people's choices? If you don't value that, then you don't. But other people do value it, and I don't see any good reason to judge it.

I think that's what business—every business—should do. You're in business to satisfy the needs, desires, of your customers, and if you don't have that philosophy, you're not going to be successful. It's not very good or smart business to be going around judging why people want what they want and telling them that they're irrational for wanting that.

reason: How you would describe your politics?

Mackey: I'm a conscious capitalist. I have a great passion for capitalism, but the capitalism I see that we need to evolve in the 21st century is a little bit more conscious of what it is and why it exists. I think capitalism has done a very poor job of branding itself to people. In the 20th century, we had a great, titanic struggle, and capitalism won that struggle. Except it didn't capture the minds of the intellectuals or the hearts of the people. I think that's because it's done a poor job of marketing itself and branding itself.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in markets. I believe in individuals—individual empowerment and individual choice. So that's my philosophy of politics.

reason: Where did that come from?

Mackey: These ideas have been evolving for me for many years. There are many sources for the ideas, many classical liberal thinkers, from Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill, from Friedrich Hayek to Ludwig von Mises, Milton Friedman.

The philosophy that I had prior to starting Whole Foods was just kind of "business is evil and government's good." Then I started a business and was trying to meet a payroll and realized that a lot of people thought now I'd become the bad guy because I had become a greedy businessperson. And so I had to throw out my worldview. It might have been Milton Friedman's Free to Choose; that might have been the first book. Or it might have been Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. It's kind of fuzzy, but I started reading a whole bunch of books that are part of the freedom movement, and I read them voraciously. I don't know the order I read them in, but somewhere along the line I started reading Mises, and I thought his book on socialism and his book on human action were just brilliant.

reason: Define "conscious capitalism."

Mackey: There are three key principles. One is that business has the potential to have a deeper purpose. If you ask the ordinary person what the purpose of a business is, they'll say, "Well, it's to make money." Which is kind of a strange answer, because you don't get that answer if you ask what the purpose of a doctor is or what the purpose of a teacher is or an architect or an engineer or any of the other professions, yet they all have to make money. To be a doctor, you can't operate at a loss, at least not for very long.

Most entrepreneurs I've known—and I've known lots of them—none of them started their businesses primarily to make money. Instead, they were pursuing some type of dream, some type of passion. They wanted to make the world a different place, or they had an idea that they wanted to test out. Bill Gates wouldn't tell you that he started Microsoft to become the wealthiest man in the world. He was on fire about software and about personal computers, and he could just see in his mind's eye that this could be a transformative technology. Everybody could have a computer; can you imagine? When he was doing that in the '70s, that was the utopian idea. Now we take it for granted. So he followed that passion, and obviously he changed the world.

It's not why I started Whole Foods Market, to make as much money as possible. It was to sell healthy food and help people earn a living, do something I felt good about. I was on fire about eating healthy food; I had passion about that.

So we become conscious that business has the potential to have a deeper purpose. That is key to this.

We've created this wall in the world. On the one hand, we believe that not-for-profits and government are motivated by a deeper purpose—public service—and then on the other side of this wall, we have corporations and businesses, and they're motivated strictly by selfishness and greed. And frankly, most young, idealistic people are more drawn toward the one that's not motivated strictly by selfishness. I just think that's a false dichotomy. I want to tear that wall down and get people to see that business is motivated by, or has the potential for, a deeper purpose.

The second principle of conscious capitalism is that the best way to think about business is in terms of a complex system with stakeholders who are interdependent: customers, employees, suppliers, investors in the larger community. If the business flourishes, the individual stakeholders that are trading and exchanging with that business are also going to flourish. Too much time is spent focusing on the tradeoffs in business, the conflicts of interest, rather than the synergies and the harmony of interest. Capitalism is creating value for all of these people, creating value for customers, creating value for employees by providing jobs, creating values for our society through taxes, creating value for investors. It's creating prosperity. It's wonderful, and yet how poorly we do articulating that.

The third principle is a different philosophy of leadership. What greatly harms the brand of capitalism is to read about Wall Street executives taking home $100 million or—

reason: Aren't they worth it?

Mackey: I don't think markets are largely deciding that. I think you've got a rigged game here, and I could go into that in some detail if you want to. An organization has to think about not only compensation in terms of the external equity, what other competitors might be paying, but also internal equity, what everybody else in the organization is getting paid, and you have to balance that out. Leadership should be serving the deeper purpose of the business.

I don't think the government should be determining that, by the way.

reason: Do you pay yourself?

Mackey: I have paid myself, but right now I've cut my salary to a dollar a year.

reason: It's useful, especially when you're under fire for being a greedy capitalist who smashes unions with his boot heel, to say, "I pay myself one dollar." It's very disarming.

Mackey: Well, it fits into that third principle of conscious capitalism, that the leader should be serving the purpose of the business. By not taking any money, it's pretty obvious that I'm not trying to get as much money out of the company as I can. I mean, I was a co-founder. I have enough money. I'm not superwealthy the way Bill Gates or Steven Jobs is, but I have plenty of money. On Maslow's "hierarchy of needs," once you get past a certain point, money is less satisfying and other needs—self-esteem, self-actualization, self-transcendence—become more important. So I would say it's good for the morale of our organization that the CEO only makes a dollar a year.

reason: Do you have any political team that you root for?

Mackey: A political team? It's funny that you would say that. I think part of the polarization that exists in America is that people try to size you up for what team you're on. If you're on their team, they love you, and if you're the other team, they hate you.

I'm not on either one of the big teams. I really feel like I'm independent. I think for myself. If there are good ideas that the left or liberals or Democrats have, then I'm going to embrace those ideas. If there are good ideas that Republicans or conservatives have, I'm going to embrace those ideas. If libertarians have good ideas, I'm going to embrace that. I believe people need to think for themselves.

reason: Who did you vote for in the 2008 election?

Mackey: I voted for Bob Barr, Libertarian candidate. Ron Paul didn't get the Republican nomination, regretfully.

reason: How do you think the 21st century is going?

Mackey: Well, entrepreneurs tend to be very optimistic people, and I'm a very optimistic person. I never would have started a business if I wasn't.

If you just watch the news at night or read reports on all the things that are going wrong, you can really become frightened with all the problems that are out there. I do think we have enormous challenges right now. You've got to make a distinction between the short term and the long term, because I think things move in spirals, and if you look at a spiral, sometimes it loops back on itself. It's kind of like it takes three steps forward and one step back. In some ways, I think we're taking a step back right now, but I've got great hope that we'll take three steps forward over the next several years.

I feel like I've been in the jungle with a machete hacking out a path for organic food, conscious capitalism, the freedom movement, animal welfare, all the different causes I'm involved in. And sometimes people come up and they say, gosh, haven't you gotten any further? I mean, they're driving up an air-conditioned SUV to where I'm still in the jungle hacking away.… I like the quote by Michelangelo. He said, "Criticize through creating." It's easy to be a critic. It's much harder to create something. I always want to encourage young people to take their passion for making the world a better place and channel it to help us create new solutions to our challenges.

I've devoted my life to trying to build a business that makes a difference in people's lives and in the not-for-profit world, in ways that I think also serve our society and culture. So I'm optimistic, because I've seen how much progress we've made. If we can just get people to become more conscious about what capitalism is, because I think capitalism is a tremendous force for positive change in the world, and take the collective human intelligence and creativity and begin to channel it in constructive ways, there's really no limit to where humanity will be in the 21st century.

NEXT: All That Jazz

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  1. Reminder to me: Get Whole Foods gift certificates for Christmas presents.

    Step one: See if they even gift certificates.

    1. Should read “See if they even have gift certificates available.”

      1. I thank Gaia for pesticides, cheap fertilizer, genetically modified grain.

    2. ? because SOMEONE had to walk into the bathroom?drop their pants?turn around?maybe spread their butt cheeks apart with their hands?and squeeze out an organic choclate hot dog.

      1. When I’m constipated, mommy gives me a coca cola enema. It’s really fizzy.

        I LOVE YOU MOMMY!

        1. FROM EACH ACCORDING TO HIS HURP
          TO EACH ACCORDING TO HIS DERP

          1. I see Tony and Chad had a special needs love child … please to meet you.

            1. What would you call it if someone contributes to “Reason” Foundation in exchange for an interview and publicity?

              Say, a company like Whole Foods donating to “Reason” Foundation?

              In radio it’s called payola.
              What’s it called at Reason?
              Business as usual?

              1. Oh hai short bus boi!

                He was a libertarian long before Washington decided to try to put the nail in the coffin on health care. Note his health care plan existed already.

              2. Sometimes, crayon, a scandal really isn’t a scandal.

    3. I eat whole food when i go on amsterdam city breaks.

      I bet you think thats awesome don’t you!?

      1. I love eating whole food when readingasics gel kayano review‘s.

        It Really keeps me going till the end.

    4. Suki, that’s really funny
      “Step one: See if they even gift certificates.”
      lol

  2. They do gift cards. My brother gives me every year.

    1. Step the next: Buy gift card for beloved boyfriend and his mom.

      1. You aren’t the one, who had to walk into the boys’ bathroom,
        okay, after having tuh, to wake up early, you know,
        there’s no, no coffee in the teachers’ lounge, and then you,
        you walk into the bathroom just to find a big dook laying there in the urinal!
        Like it’s laughin’ at you!

        1. Mommy says when I get bigger, I can pee without her helping. I don’t ever wat to get bigger.

          I LOVE YOU MOMMY!

          1. DERPS OF THE WORLD, UNITE AND TAKE OVER.
            YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE BUT YOUR HURRS.

            1. Great post i like your site. I have learn lot from your site
              zarabianie przez internet

    2. Hi Ben,please tell me where can I buy for gift cards

  3. Astrology makes you a more “conscious” capitalist? I did not know that.

    1. Well, he’s a cancer on society, so it makes sense that he’s into astrology.

      1. Why, exactly, is he a “cancer on society”?

        Oh, hell, forget it. I forgot who I was typing at.

  4. Question, if I open a mattress retailer – would that make me an unconscious capitalist?

  5. Too bad that smoking’s more or less outlawed, otherwise that pesky Objectivist mental disorder would’ve solved itself.

    Cancer as a cure for cancer.

    1. Who is this asshole-troll?

      1. M’kay?, M’kay? you think it’s funny but nobody else does, there gonna walk in that bathroom and see your rancid duke prob up against to back of the wall like a brown ragdoll!

        1. “like a brown ragdoll!”

          Racist.

          1. Sorry, I meant nigger tarbaby.

            1. You really are a worthless piece of shite, aren’t you

              1. A double-agent troll, playing both sides – idiot liberal and racist right-winger. Gotta love it.

        2. What’s your story, Morning Glory?

          You write as if you are on sick puppy.

          Troll is to good a term for you.

  6. “Organic” food.
    As opposed to what?

    Mineral food?
    Is he implying that only organic food contains carbon?

    Lord, what a scam artist this John “The Knife” Mackey is.

    1. Yes, yes, and your beloved French call it “biologique”, as if only non-conventionally-grown food had anything to do with biology. [I’m assuming you have an irrational, unwavering love of all things French — especially all things burocratic — based on your comments.]

      If you can’t separate the chemical meaning of ‘organic’ from the foodstuff meaning of the same string of characters (or phonemes, if spoken), well, then I guess my suspicions that you are a dipshit have been confirmed.

      1. Oh you think that’s funny, huh?!
        Let me assure you, there is nothing funny…
        about going up to a nice, clean, unsuspectin’ urinal, ‘kay, droppin’ your pants then…
        turnin’ around… squattin’ over that urinal, ‘kay, maybe… maybe pullin’ your buttcheeks apart with your hands, m’kay, and then layin’ out a big organic fudge dragon for all the world to see.
        Oh yeah, that’s real funny!

        1. Is there a procedure for banning morons? This cat fits the description.

  7. Crayon apparently has been in a coma since 1950 and hasn’t kept up with changes in English words and their usages. Someone refer him to a recent dictionary, stat.

    1. when he isnt being completely obnoxious, crayon is good for a laugh every now and then

    2. On second thought, somebody kick him in the balls, stat.

    3. `When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, `it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

      The word “organic” has a very specific meaning and trying to change it so that gullible and uneducated retards like yourself will get warm fuzzies whenever you waste your foodstamps on “Whole Food” shit only works on weak-minded fools.

      Also:

      ENGLISH, MOTHERFUCKER!
      DO-YOU-SPEAK-IT?

      1. im still trying to figure out exactly what crayon is… any guesses out there?

        1. A regular who is playing a clown-troll. Too coherent to be a troll and too clued in on inside jokes to be a passer-by.

          1. I like this organic food:

            h h
            h c-c-oh
            h h

            1. Damn hydrogen stay put!

              1. I’m more worried about your hydroxyl group.

          2. I just wish incif was fixed so I could add him to it.

            1. http://github.com/semiapies/INCIF

              Post-threaded comments version, beta testing complete from what I understand

          3. I think his mocking of himself (Humpty) is a clue.

            1. organic
              or?gan?ic??[awr-gan-ik]
              ?adjective

              Noting or pertaining to a class of chemical compounds that formerly comprised only those existing in or derived from plants or animals, but that now includes all other compounds of carbon.

          4. Mocking labratarians is so easy that even a cave man such as myself can do it.

          5. I thought he was necrotizing tumor that had somehow achieved a sentience of sorts.

            Of sorts.

            1. Excuse me!! Could we get back to the issue, please?!
              You all don’t seem to understand how serious this is!!
              Now who made dookie in the urinal?!
              Oh, you think it’s funny, huh?! M’kay! M’kay!
              You’re gonna think it’s real funny when the police get here!

        2. im still trying to figure out exactly what crayon is… any guesses out there?

          indeed what, not who. it might as well be a bot, since it seems to get upgrades now and then.

  8. Hmm, this guy seems a bit full of himself to me.

    Jess
    http://www.total-privacy.es.tc

  9. Crayon is still under the impression that words have meaning outside of statements. But that’s just not true.

    Lexical semantics is a game of whack-a-mole.

    1. And stunningly inconsistent in his performance art. “Organic” meaning “pesticide/chemical fertilizer/GMO-free farming” is a contextual meaning centered on left-ideology, which he supposedly is siding with in his “criticism” of libertarianism.

      The “High Every Body” performance often ran afoul of the same problem.

      1. Yeah, I really like my food to be costly, covered in shit, and filled with parasites.

        Fuck “organic” food.

        And just because I think libertarians are a bunch of wacky cultists who equate tax dodging with dissidence doesn’t mean that I agree with the filthy hippies who want to live like diseased raccoons.

    2. Fuck you, you worthless English major.

      1. Neu Mejican is not an English major. You take that back!

  10. Mr. Mackey-

    I had never set foot in a Whole Foods store until the moronic lefties protested your health care reform ideas. I decided to shop in WF as a sort of counter protest. I’m now a regular customer.

    1. M’Kay, you all might think that dropping a dook in the urinal is a victimless crime, M’Kay!

  11. ‘The philosophy that I had prior to starting Whole Foods was just kind of “business is evil and government’s good.”‘

    The interviewer should have asked a follow up question about how Mackey came to have such an opinion. Was he subjected to some form of brainwashing i.e. did he go to public school and did his parents listen to NPR and read the NYT.

    1. How would you feel… if somebody came into your home, m’kay, pulled down their pants and laid a big mud monkey right on your mom’s face?

      1. When I’m smeared with poop, I feel like I’ve never been stronger. Everybody runs away. But not Mommy.

        I LOVE YOU MOMMY!

        1. WITHOUT A DEEEERP THEORY
          THERE CANNOT BE A HURRRR MOVEMENT!

      2. “mud monkey”

        Racist.

  12. The troll does make a good case for retroactive abortion.

    1. This is Mr. Venezuela, school janitor, M’Kay.
      He’s the person who has to clean up when some trickster drops a dook in the wrong toilet.
      Mr. Venezuela makes six bucks an hour at best, M’kay.
      He’s got three kids at home, he’s got a car that barely works, he’s gotta clean up puke with saw dust, M’Kay.
      Then he walks into the boys’ room and sees a big meaty chud staring him in the face.
      So when you crapped in that urinal, M’Kay, you might has well have just dropped your pants and laid a turd right on Mr. Venezuela’s head.

    2. I think it’s funny that Mr. Mackey is now the CEO of Whole Food, mkay?

  13. Whole Foods really does right by the people, for example abandoning the anchor store for our neighborhood in favor of a slightly larger store a few blocks down the road… and leaving us with an eyesore empty big box in a formerly charming neighborhood.

    Got to love his page 1 admission: basically he admitted “my ideas won’t help sick people.”

    Have to agree w/ the demagogue congressman Grayson- the conservative plan is “don’t get sick, and if you do get sick, die quickly.”

    Sadly, that is probably a better option than “The most poorly written, spineless, ineffective & lobbied health care bill in world history”

    1. “Organic” food, the most expensive shit-covered shit known to mankind.

    2. Whole Foods really does right by the people, for example abandoning the anchor store for our neighborhood in favor of a slightly larger store a few blocks down the road… and leaving us with an eyesore empty big box in a formerly charming neighborhood.

      Wha? Sounds like blight to me. You know what’s comin’ next…

  14. Steven Burd, the CEO of Safeway, had written an op-ed piece in The Wall Street Journal on health care reform just a month or two before I did, and nobody reacted at all to it. So it was rather bizarre.

    Does Mackey shop at his own store? Has he ever browsed his own magazine isle? I shop at Safeway. It’s other people that shop at Whole Foods. Get it?

  15. I thank Gaia for pesticides, cheap fertilizer, genetically modified grain. Can’t feed the world otherwise. And yet my orchard is completely organic (as understood by all contemporary English-speakers save crayon). It pleases my honey bees.

    1. That’s because you have no science/technology background.

      1. Behold the elitist attitude – “you didn’t go to college! You can’t argue if you have no knowledge!”…

        And yet, he also used the term “hippies” in a derogatory manner.

        Behold, then, the conflicted conservoliberal. Or maybe he’s just fucking insane. Who can say? Who gives half a shit?

  16. “Mackey’s campaign,” warned one boycott leader, “results in the deaths of 60 Americans every day due to lack of health insurance. Mackey is responsible for these deaths as much as anyone.”

    Utter horseshit.

  17. My favorite quote out of this interview:

    “It’s not very good or smart business to be going around judging why people want what they want and telling them that they’re irrational for wanting that.”

    I agree, Mackey. But it IS good governance. Thank you for admiting there is a huge whole that markets will not fill.

    1. Whole? Hole? Holy Cow.

    2. Yes, letting people make independent and free choices would indeed be very bad governance. It is utterly ridiculous to let those irrational plebs make their own decisions.

      Yes, the government is good at filing holes particularly when their screwing all of us up the …

      1. It is, because

        1: People make really dumb choices

        2: People do not bear all the costs and benefits of their choices, and do not weigh these interactions much at all

        3: Some problems are simply beyond the scope of private organizations…they are either too big or too long term.

        1. So:

          1. People are stupid.
          2. People are like children.
          3. We need shitloads of government to coddle all of the stupid, childlike people.

          Did I nail it, or what?

          1. Naah, you just re-iterated one of my three points in three all-too-true ways.

            1. That would be #3, then.

  18. Interesting that this rehash of the previous story left out the most interesting surprise. Mr. Mckay stated “in any one year, 90% of our team members don’t make any health claims” that would mean that 90% have never received any healthcare at all.

    1. Why then McKay is directly responsible for the deaths of 90% of his employees

      1. No, he isn’t. This is the same stupid argument AGWorshippers use – if you speak out against global warming, you’re going to be responsible for X number of deaths.

        Utter nonsense, of course.

        1. Yeah, that’s kinda stupid.
          Trying to predict the future is a futile effort.

    2. Good. people receive “healthcare” when they need it.

      Unless you are trying to kill yourself, if you are a healthy individual of a certain age and fitness level, you rarely get sick.

      1. If you are a 20-something hottie working at Whole Foods, that is true.

        If you are over fifty, it is not.

        Does anyone have any statistics on the age breakdown of Whole Foods employees? From my experience, it skews very young.

        1. The whole point is that his little factoid does not make sense. I love that he is out selling his plan and no one asked questions on words that frankly don’t have any reason.

  19. that would mean that 90% have never received any healthcare at all.

    Why would they receive healthcare they don’t need?

    That’s a primary problem with the current system. Payment systems that promote overuse which increases demand which drives up prices.

    Choice is the mechanism that makes things good and available. It’s why you can afford an iphone or a laptop or some exotic food from the other side of the globe. We’ve systematically removed choice from healthcare.

    Health care didn’t use to be so expensive before we started screwing with the market.

    Health care is still very cheap in portions of the market that are not screwed with like cosmetic surgery.

  20. Mackey: “… we believe that not-for-profits and government are motivated by a deeper purpose?public service?and then ..we have corporations and businesses, and they’re motivated strictly by selfishness and greed. … I just think that’s a false dichotomy. I want to tear that wall down and get people to see that business is motivated by, or has the potential for, a deeper purpose.”

    This is a mighty noble sentiment and plausible if certain corporate-friendly laws are removed/reformed but it faces trouble in contemporary America because businesses are primarily accountable to their investors even at the expense of their employees and customers. This is especially true of publicly traded companies, which law requires that stakeholders are paid dividends so employees and customers suffer to ensure the dividends are paid.

    Will Mackey take up an anti-corporate activist stance, which seems to be a good idea he can surely embrace since it seems to mesh with his worldview.

  21. I agree almost 100% with John. But here’s the funny thing with his Austin hippie capitalists. EVERYTHING in his stores is completely overpriced and it is clear he does not really respect his customers-and that I mean his “real” non-hippie slave customers. What do I mean? Well, I have been to his stories in ABQ. And I only shop at T Joes and the regional place, Sunflower. I am educated, eat well, but refuse to be financially used by Whole Foods. I mean, does he realize his prices are OUTRAGEOUS?! I guess his “disciples” are the idiot types are lambs to the slaughter. I mean, my goal in life is to never spend a penny in his absurd overpriced stores but I “adore” that there are hippie dumbasses who are willing too! F the Dead and Bob Dylan.

    PS: Austin is easily the worst town on the planet. Hot, humid and everyone is so very ugly. But they all seem to love that fact!!! Hilarious. It seems those who love “healthy” food are those who are the most unattractive. I rest my case.

  22. Nice article here, allot of issues here also, our countries health plans suck and needs to addressed. It costs too much for any middle income family to survive. This country is based on the rich.

  23. Considerably, the article is really the sweetest on this noteworthy topic. I harmonise with your conclusions and will thirstily look forward to your approaching updates. Just saying thanks will not just be sufficient, for the wonderful clarity in your writing. I will instantly grab your rss feed to stay informed of any updates. Gratifying work and much success in your business enterprize!

  24. What controversy here…

  25. Scary stuff, you wouldn’t expect federal intervention :\

  26. Whole food is some rich men`s fad.Today world population is more than 7 billions people, can we fad entire population with whole food?What proof we have that whole food is good for health?There are always faddists people they have nuisance value,they have money and time so ideally they do this kind of nonsense .We must not give too much value to them.

    1. I agree that it’s more on fad, however, it’s people’s choice also. And this issue helps use talk about how safe to organic foods are.

  27. Of course there really is a limit to where human beings will be in the 21st century, just as there are sell-by dates on packaged goods. There are no sell-by dates on fresh produce, because most people can readily see when it’s no longer fresh, and can distinguish between wilted and rotten. Why do grown men talk like semi-literate college freshmen? Throughout the 21st century, human beings will be on earth. They will sleep, they will make mistakes, and they will be unable to be in two places at once. And they will die.

  28. Thank you very much. The informaton was very nice and the service was excellent.

    I hope you can take the time to visit the website, http://www.thai-food.in.th.  It is only just beginning but I think you will eventually find it to be a great resource to learn about Thai food basics and beyond.

  29. Thank you very much. The informaton was very nice and the service was excellent.

    I hope you can take the time to visit the website, http://www.thai-food.in.th.  It is only just beginning but I think you will eventually find it to be a great resource to learn about Thai food basics and beyond.

  30. Sometimes organic foods are not so organic.

  31. Talk about starting a firestorm…

  32. I try and eat as much ‘wholefoods’ as possible, but really it’s just commen sense to use your own judgement. Interesting article. Thanks very much.

  33. Well, in 1000 years time we’ll all be eating flavor enhanced algae anyway! Excellent post!

  34. We’ll all be eating flavor enhanced algea in 1000 years time anyway so why worry 🙂 Excellent post by the way!

  35. Everyone has aan opinion. Wholefoods has great organic food.

  36. Seems like the same old story. Business leaders want less government control and are republican….union leaders are ok with more government control and are democrats. What’s the story here? Is it because he runs a grocery store that is environmentally minded? Maybe that just says that the environment isn’t a left/right issue any more.

  37. I was overweight at one time of my life, but then decided to totally change my eating habits. Today I’m at normal weight (hoping to see my abs by the summer, btw ;)). My diet is mostly of whole foods. I’m happier then ever in my life.

    P.S. Nice post!

  38. VRy interesting to read it 😛 😀

  39. I think that Mr. Mackey’s efforts to be a “conscious capitalist” should be applauded. There are far too many businesses that have lost sight of their founder’s intentions- I hope that Whole Foods will continue to be successful, while still holding on to their ideology.

  40. It is strange but nowadays our food became so artificial that the only thing we think about when we buy anything if it is natural.

  41. There is so much artificial food nowadays that now when we buy anything the first thing we think is if it is natural. As for me I’m also for organic food.

  42. Now that’s an eye opener.
    Everyone, nowadays, is so worried about what to consider, both on the internet and in real life.
    Well, I strongly believe that there will never be any bad choices when the options we are choosing from are good.
    What I think the government should do is leave the choice to the people but then again do the sorting themselves when providing the choices to the consumers.
    Everyone has their own choice. Everyone has to make a choice. With limited “good” choices, obviously, good choices will all be picked.
    It’s all about the choices and what is chosen anyway.

  43. “machete hacking out a path for organic food, conscious” funny the word organic food in the article had a live link to a dunkin donuts ad

  44. Very thought provoking article. I think that Mr. Mackey should concentrate on promoting his overpriced products. I eat whole foods, but stay away from his “whole food” store.

  45. I don’t understand why so many people are against some sort of state health care. Right now you are over paying for your health insurance because its a capitalist business with one goal…. MAKE AS MUCH MONEY AS POSSIBLE!

    1. I totally agree with that statement. It seems that we have to consider that the money is intended for our health concern and not for anything else.

  46. They have a whole foods in Madison which was known as one of the best places to work. The employees still wanted mroe and went on strike in hopes of unionizing.

    Whole Foods is just a fad. There are stores which are just as good, if not better.

  47. Whilst I think the employer should pay for health insurance, there is a lot to be said for personal responsibility. Not many people want to take responsibility for their own health. It’s not rocket science to know that whole foods are much better for you than junk food.

  48. I would be interested in hearing Mackey’s verdict on the health care bill that was recently passed. Would he think it addressed his concerns, I wonder?

  49. I hope the new health care reform will encourage small business owners to offer health insurance to those in their employ. I wonder if John would have agreed?

  50. I’m all for state health care and im interested in hearing what Mackeys has to say.

  51. I try and eat as much ‘wholefoods’ as possible, but really it’s just commen sense to use your own judgement. Interesting article. Thanks very much.

  52. I try and eat as much ‘wholefoods’ as possible, but really it’s just commen sense to use your own judgement. Interesting article. Thanks very much.

  53. Whole Foods is just a fad. There are stores which are just as good, if not better.

  54. New approach about health care is still undiscovered lets see when it is implemented.I agree with cody about health insurance

  55. I agree with cody.

  56. I liked what Mackey said. And i totaly agree with one of the commenters that not many want to take personal responsability for their own health. Said but true…

  57. My only point is that if you take the Bible straight, as I’m sure many of Reasons readers do, you will see a lot of the Old Testament stuff as absolutely insane. Even some cursory knowledge of Hebrew and doing some mathematics and logic will tell you that you really won’t get the full deal by just doing regular skill english reading for those books. In other words, there’s more to the books of the Bible than most will ever grasp. I’m not concerned that Mr. Crumb will go to hell or anything crazy like that! It’s just that he, like many types of religionists, seems to take it literally, take it straight.

  58. I can see our Health service here in the UK going the same way as the US and I must admit it does cause me a lot of concern

  59. Health care reform is important because of Medicare. Everyone should have an access to Health care.

    1. Everyone know that Michael but it’s not easy to do.

  60. I agree that everyone should have access, however people that aren’t American citizens should not! We need to teach people the American culture and how it all started.

  61. Well being care improvement is significant because of Medicare. Everybody should have an admission to Health care.

    1. We should have a total awareness when it comes to benefits and other information with regards to Medicare. It is our privileged.

  62. Each investigation is a due process, and whatever the result it may have. There is always a reason. We must have our own responsibility when it comes to health care, being healthy means eating nutritious food that is approved by the government/ association.

    1. Yeah, you are right. Here in our country they will inspect first the foods that will be going out in the market.

  63. Whole Foods for whole money,the prices do surely stink and can only afford to shop elsewhere

    1. Healthcare in the US has become nothing more than an exercise in earning profits. When it should be given a high priority.

  64. Though cases like this should be resolve as soon as possible, it is a serious problem. It involves our health, our life. Government should find solution for that not only to our country, but in any races. Each one of us must have a proper treatment, an authority to live.

  65. fruits and vegetables are the best……

  66. for me fruits and vegetables are the best food ever………

  67. Healthcare in the US has become nothing more than an exercise in earning profits. When it should be given a high priority.

  68. Many workers in the healthcare industry are on part-time schedules. And this is one of the reason why few of the problem are solved. Because the staff, nurses, medtech and physicians has limited time in spending themselves resolving the issues.

  69. The health-promoting effects of whole foods are thought to be partially related to their abundant and complex antioxidant profile. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and other whole foods feature a spectrum of antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, the trace minerals selenium and zinc, and a palette of important phytonutrients such as flavonoids and carotenoids.

  70. Many of Whole Foods’ actions have been controversial, especially where their labor practices are concerned.

  71. I totally agree with Heather Scott.

    There is a problem when the issue of the public health becomes a way to create enormous amounts of profit.

  72. I totally agree with that statement. It seems that we have to consider that the money is intended for our health concern and not for anything else.

  73. The problem is people think that someone else owes them health care, that its the governments responsibility. I wouldn’t want anyone to not have health care, but I don’t expect anyone to give it to me, I have to get off my butt and go get it. People need to get back to the “you don’t work, you don’t eat” mentality and off the “quick fix and instant gratification” reality.

  74. The problem is people think that someone else owes them health care, that its the governments responsibility. I wouldn’t want anyone to not have health care, but I don’t expect anyone to give it to me, I have to get off my butt and go get it. People need to get back to the “you don’t work, you don’t eat” mentality and off the “quick fix and instant gratification” reality.

  75. The problem is people think that someone else owes them health care, that its the governments responsibility. I wouldn’t want anyone to not have health care, but I don’t expect anyone to give it to me, I have to get off my butt and go get it. People need to get back to the “you don’t work, you don’t eat” mentality and off the “quick fix and instant gratification” reality.

  76. This is a real issue, so many people have a sense of entitlement and think the goverment and everyone else owes them things, like health insurance. I agree with him, you don’t work, you don’t eat.

  77. I totally agree with this guy, people need to get off of their sense of entitlement and get to work. Its the lazy ones that expect everyone else to pay for them to live.

  78. I agree with this statement …
    Great article about Food Health Care

  79. I agree with you….Healthcare in the US has become nothing more than an exercise in earning profits. When it should be given a high priority.

  80. The American Health system is a joke. It should called the American Profit System. The only people benefiting from the current system are the doctors, pharmacies and wealthy families.

    Look at countries like England and France. Do you see people getting refused service? No, thats because they have a non-profit health care system at an affordable rate.

  81. I fully agree, American Healthcare is more concerned with producing profits than it is with helping people

  82. Health care in the US, is nothing but a profit generating vehicle.

  83. Healthcare in the US is nothing but a profit making business.

  84. This is great article
    I agree that American Healthcare is the most important thing that we should care about

  85. When FDA approves aspartame and white sugar, etc. Which are 2 very poisonous substances you will just know something is very wrong. Probably also linked to Monsanto and other such companies.

    They make you sick with bad food and medicines.

  86. Heya, Someone mentioned this site over at http://www.trancecommunity.com…..nergy.html a while ago. Anyway, I’m not necessarily into this stuff but whole foods health care – reason magazine just happened to grab my attention while I was browsing through so i thought id check out the Page you have here.

  87. Here in the EU they have these so called food additives(E numbers)… On the label it says that those additives are approved by the EU itself. E621, which is an additive, is well known to be a neuro toxin… now I ask you: why oh why did they approve that??!

  88. Many of Whole Foods’ actions have been controversial, especially where their labor practices are concerned.

  89. Interesting…
    Thanks for the great tips

  90. Different people have different opinions about the America’s health care system reform. One way or the other, there are always both pros and cons of the traditional and proposed health care systems.

  91. So, there is no way she knows about any of the research you site or has any idea how the world outside her own bubble actually works. So cut her some slack.

  92. You can never trust the FDA or CDC or America or any nations health system because they always have an incentive or corporate agenda behind the things they say…..

  93. @mater
    I like many posts here, I wonder if I can have any ways to subscribe?

  94. Looking to subscribe to the rest of the posts on Reason. I have an account already, but it hasn’t been emailing me at all to tell me when something new has been posted.

  95. Yeah, like a few other people, I’m looking to subscribe to the site’s feed, but it’s not working for me. I have an account on here and everything, but it’s not liking my email setup or something. Any idea what’s up with it?

  96. I shop there all the time, actually is good but costs $$$$$$

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  98. Great share. I like your post. i have read it twice
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  99. Its really unfortunate to see the us health care system has lesser priority then others when this particular system should have higher priority.

  100. Its really unfortunate to see the us health care system has lesser priority then others when this particular system should have higher priority.

  101. The US health care industry is truly all about profits and control of the politicians who look out for them.

  102. I fully agree, American Healthcare is more concerned with producing profits than it is with helping people

  103. Employer-based health care ought to be made mandatory! 50% Contribution by the employer and 50% deductions.. That sounds fair enough but then we have to take account of employers who go bust before making their employees payments.. It has to be government run!

  104. Great article, a lot to debate here though.

  105. we’ve had the same health care reform in norway for 50 years. works great, no reason it shouldn’t in the us

  106. I’m glad someone’s leading the way on health care from a nutrition point of view.

  107. The United States, already experiencing a huge loss in the economy, cannot accommodate another expense that controls the health care system more than it already does. Mackay does not propose the complete removal of government hold on healthcare, what he proposes is a more effective health care system where the people rather than just the government create the reforms. His ideas reflect just how drastic and confounding the loss in the economy is. Basically, the country of “free people” must exercise their freedom by doing their individual responsibility in consciously investing and taking care of their own needs.

  108. Its one of my favorite post. Its also helpful topic for newbie. Thanks a lot for informative information.

  109. Thanks, excellent information

  110. We definitely need to make some changes when it comes to nutrition. Obesity is out of control.

  111. Well if you look at it, we really do need healthcare reform. The system we currently have is very outdated,something needs to be done. Whether we all agree or not, it needs to be changed so I’m all for it.

  112. Well if you look at it, we really do need healthcare reform. The system we currently have is very outdated,something needs to be done. Whether we all agree or not, it needs to be changed so I’m all for it.

  113. It is a problem… People are too lazy to take care of themselves.

  114. Though cases like this should be resolve as soon as possible, it is a serious problem. It involves our health, our life. Government should find solution for that not only to our country, but in any races. Each one of us must have a proper treatment, an authority to live. Here in the EU they have these so called food additives(E numbers)… On the label it says that those additives are approved by the EU itself. E621, which is an additive, is well known to be a neuro toxin… now I ask you: why oh why did they approve that??!

    1. I agree with you and I think EU should make new quality control and new restrictions. Whole Foods are leading us to disaster.

  115. Whole food is some rich men`s fad.Today world population is more than 7 billions people, can we fad entire population with whole food?What proof we have that whole food is good for health?There are always faddists people they have nuisance value,they have money and time so ideally they do this kind of nonsense .We must not give too much value to them.

  116. Though cases like this should be resolve as soon as possible, it is a serious problem. It involves our health, our life. Government should find solution for that not only to our country, but in any races. Each one of us must have a proper treatment, an authority to live. Here in the EU they have these so called food additives(E numbers)… On the label it says that those additives are approved by the EU itself. E621, which is an additive, is well known to be a neuro toxin… now I ask you: why oh why did they approve that??!

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  120. I have heard many disadvantages about the whole foods for our health care. I am really wondering what can the world do to change all this? Is there any ways doing it in right way?

  121. If we really think about it, it’s time to to make some changes in health care. There is a danger from Whole Foods. I think it’s a problem which needs to be solved. I have debated about this sphere a lot, I think the mass use of whole foods can lead us to a disaster. Government should make new restrictions about Whole Foods, tougher quality control etc.
    We should move to the organic foods, I always try to buy organic foods but they are too expensive. That is a problem, everything good costs a lot, so everybody can not buy.
    I am expecting for changes. Hope those changes will appear soon.

  122. Great Post, It is really thinkable.

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  125. ‘The philosophy that I had prior to starting Whole Foods was just kind of “business is evil and government’s good.”‘

    The interviewer should have asked a follow up question about how Mackey came to have such an opinion. Was he subjected to some form of brainwashing i.e. did he go to public school and did his parents listen to NPR and read the NYT.

  126. I had never set foot in a Whole Foods store until the moronic lefties protested your health care reform ideas. I decided to shop in WF as a sort of counter protest. I’m now a regular customer.

  127. thx for info,i like your posts

  128. Each one of us must have a proper treatment, an authority to live. Here in the EU they have these so called food additives(E numbers)… On the label it says that those additives are approved by the EU itself. E621, which is an additive, is well known to be a neuro toxin… now I ask you: why oh why did they approve that??!

  129. Whole foods or at least going back to a non processed diet would put alot of doctors out of work and so would colloidal silver. Its what big brother dont want you to know.There was no cancer 100 years ago..think about it.

  130. Health care can never be driven effectively from the top down. All of us need to take more personal responsibility for our health and well being by eating a reasonable diet and exercising regularly.

  131. Spot on with this write-up, I truly think this website needs much more consideration. I’ll probably be again to read much more, thanks for that info.

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  132. Whole Foods really does right by the people, for example abandoning the anchor store for our neighborhood in favor of a slightly larger store a few blocks down the road… and leaving us with an eyesore empty big box in a formerly charming neighborhood. (reparation iphone)

    Wha? Sounds like blight to me. You know what’s comin’ next…

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  134. I love Whole Foods! But it’s still pretty expensive.

  135. I love Whole Foods, unfortunately, it’s a bit steep for my budget.

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  137. great idea for those who want to maintain their fitness,healthy diet with no fat
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  138. We all know that the food we eat is not realy healthy. But most of the people can’t afford good food and with groving of population the good food will be even harder to get.

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  142. I stopped shopping at Whole Foods Markets due to increased costs until the left-wingers protested your health care reform ideas. In protest I started shopping there again and I have not stop since.

    Danika

    1. stumbled across this when reading a asics gel kayano review… very interesting blog post thanks for the input!

  143. I agreed wholeheartedly that the whole system of healthcare needs radical overhauling.
    In most deleveoped countries the health service has been allowed to gather staff far beyond the levels needed to satisfy patient capacity and this has led to a massive amount of inefficiency.
    So good on you Mackey for calling it.

  144. It is interesting reading this, especially after the Obama health care bill has already passed.

    I do actually remember the protests here at the local whole foods store.

    Personally, I am all for less government involvement and more for free enterprise.

    I’ve seen government run health care programs in the VA, and through relatives in other countries…..much less access and options to choose from.

  145. This is something I agree with 100%

    John Mackey is used to confounding conventional political categories. A cutting-edge entrepreneur who is comfortable quoting both Ludwig von Mises and astrology, who both practices veganism and sells some of the best meat in America, and who both chases profits and is an outspoken advocate of charitable giving, Mackey is an advocate of what he calls “conscious capitalism

  146. Thanks for such a nice post.

  147. Why in every country around the world there is always the sam eissue? If governments will really want to do something about it – they would. On end of the day it’s all about votes… Sad but true!

  148. great post and great topic

    good job

  149. I need some time to think about this!

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  163. so what are you waiting for?

  164. There are lots of links on reason

  165. Good article. You guys should check out the paleo diet – it’s not only HEALTHIER but way up your alley in terms of politics.

  166. I love my new repair dentures, I can finally eat in confidence and it has completely changed my life.

  167. For most intelligent people the world of finances presents with numerous difficulties and they find it difficult to manage their personal financing.

  168. nice post, I love reading it. I hope 1 day I will get the same. have a nice day.

  169. I personally just got into whole foods and honestly my health has seemed to improve alot as of late.

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  171. Everyone should keep a flock of organic chickens. Some cute Rabbits wouldn’t hurt either. Problem Solved!

  172. get your own private messenger

  173. Everybody should eat more whole foods, whether you get them from “Whole Foods” or not is another issue.

    Amy,
    How to get rid of a muffin top

  174. This is a great post! If anyone is interest in keeping chickens check out our range of chicken coops

  175. Good advice. Everyone should try and keep their own chickens and grow their own fruit and veg. This will provide whole foods and save money.

  176. This is a good post. Keeping chickens as pets will give you whole foods at low cost. chicken coops

  177. Great post, it was a really controversial story if i recall corectly!

  178. Healthcare in the US is out of control. There needs to be a better way for affordable health insurance for everyone

  179. All point usefull, great post …

  180. I am now not certain the place you’re getting your information, but good topic. I needs to spend a while …

  181. very interesting post i am looking at healthcare insurance now i am over 60
    ann

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