Republican Convention 2008

Girls, Business Folx, and People of Color

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It's Palin night at the Xcel Center, and so far everybody at the podium has been a woman, a member of a minority group, an entrepreneur, or all three.

And to tell you the truth, I have no problem with this. This in fact is what I've been looking for from the Republicans: an unabashed assertion that the free market is not a plot against the disenfranchised; it's the best friend the disenfranchised have.

Of course the flip side of this truth is that the free market has no more ardent enemy than a successful businessman. And no politician, Repubican or Democrat, will ever admit that.

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  1. the free market has no more ardent enemy than a successful businessman.

    Gee, when did Reason get on the hollywood business-bashing bandwagon?

    I’ve known a lot of successful businessmen and women in my time, and most of them are far more ethical than a typical Reason editor.

    -jcr

  2. I’ve known a lot of successful businessmen and women in my time, and most of them are far more ethical than a typical Reason editor.

    hey, jcr. don’t bash my reason homies! you go to hell! you go to hell and you die!

  3. John C. Randolph,

    The point of the comment was that many successful businessmen often try to curtail competition, etc. via seeking influence in government decision making re: regulation, etc. BTW, if I recall correctly Cavanaugh’s statement echoes somewhat a statement by Adam Smith.

  4. Seward,

    I’m quite aware of the tendency of some businessmen to seek government interference in the market. What I’m objecting to is Cavanaugh’s blanket condemnation of businessmen in general.

    -jcr

  5. Born rich white guy on now
    I really hate Mitt

  6. I’ve known a lot of successful businessmen and women in my time, and most of them are far more ethical than a typical Reason editor.

    Interestingly enough, the particular businesswoman holding a prominent position with the McCain campaign who spoke a few minutes ago at the convention is neither successful nor ethical.

  7. They just showed a guy dressed up as Lincoln on the convention floor.

    Reminded me of a Mr. Show skit set at a Civil War reenactment where two Lincolns showed up.

  8. I am proud to say that the Lincoln guy is a delegate from my home state of Missouri.

  9. Did Guiliani just say to become energy independent McCain will use nuclear bombs instead of nuclear power?

  10. Sorry, on rewind he said power.

  11. the free market has no more ardent enemy than a successful businessman.

    Oh, horseshit. The free market has no more ardent enemies than politicians and bureaucrats who owe their livelihoods, status, and self-respect to bashing and wrecking it.

  12. R C Dean:

    “Naturally, existing businesses generally prefer to keep out competitors in other ways. That is why the business community, despite its rhetoric, has so often been a major enemy of truly free enterprise” – Milton Friedman

    I think it’s overstating it to say that there is “no more ardent” enemy, but Friedman certainly thought that the word “major” was appropriate.

  13. Adam Smith says nothing positive above businessmen. He noted that they are the worst enemies of a free market. Everyone has self interest at heart.

    R C Dean

    Politicians aren’t for or against free markets. Each individual politician acts pragmaticaly and if we the voters wanted free markets, politicians would bash businessmen in a second.

  14. Politicians aren’t for or against free markets.

    Broadly speaking, politicians have a built-in bias against free markets, because such markets reduce the area subject to the control of politicians.

    There are exceptions, of course, but most politicians see free markets, at best, as a necessary evil to be tolerated only for their unmatched ability to generate tax revenue.

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