The Save-Spitzer Chorus (Spitzer Resignation Thread)

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I'll cop to schadenfreude at seeing Eliot Spitzer metamorph into Malvolio, even though I basically agree with Kerry Howley on the moral merits of the case. Some of the man's allies are, however, taking it too far. In this MSNBC interview with Norah O'Donnell, Spitzer friend Alan Dershowitz compares him to FDR, LBJ, and Mao Zedong (I made this last one up) "all people who greatly governed during the day and at night behaved like adolescent boys." (It's beside the point, but LBJ's legendary habits of pissing with the door open and whipping out his schlong didn't, uh, occur at night.)

Dershowitz isn't helping Spitzer at all with this, but I'm not surprised by the reasoning. The problem with the presidents who worked hard and played hard was that they abused their power to do so, be it by using and then trashing staffers (i.e. Clinton and Lewinsky) or humiliating employees cowed by the office. The irony of Spitzer's scandal is that, unless we find out something far worse than what we know, this is the rare case of him not abusing power. He took some time off from a hard day of ruining careers with innuendo and novel applications of the law to buy some sex. Fine by me.

Later in the interview, Dershowitz alleges a conspiracy.

I know a lot about banking laws. I've represented a lot of people who have been involved in money laundering and structuring. This case smells. I believe that somebody must have dropped a dime on him and they started looking at his records.

O'Donnell follows up, and Dersh answers:

I do not believe the cover story that appeared in the New York Times. I think that's a story that was put out by federal officials to cover what really went on here. The banks simply don't go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000. What banks look for is $25 million being sent to the Caymans or structured deposits of money laundered money.

In the wake of the Don Siegelman prosecution in Alabama the deep skepticism about this case (more from Glenn Greenwald) is to be expected. Still, sniffing out fraud by elected officials who are moving around money in a shady way is basically the only thing I want the IRS to do, and one of two things I want the FBI to do. (The other, obviously, is to do something about that poor Britney Spears woman.)

UPDATE: From the Times:

In one of the last and desperate rounds of the end game, a top Spitzer administration official reached out to Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's staff on Tuesday to see if the governor could avoid an impeachment vote. But the prospects were grim.

Republicans have pledged to try to have Mr. Spitzer impeached and only 34 of the more than 100 Democrats in the Assembly would be needed for the matter to be referred to the Senate for an impeachment trial. It was clear during the discussions that 34 or more Democrats were almost certain to vote against the governor.

Too bad: If the impeachment had gone through, Silda Walls Spitzer could have run for governor in 2010. That seems to be the voter forgiveness pattern of these things.

NEXT: More From Mississippi

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  1. Except that by using their service he offered the agency official protection from law enforcement, a privilege he did not grant their rivals. That is a serious abuse of power and while I believe prostitution should be legal, I believe a governor who consensually took the job of governor should not give protection to certain people while imprisoning others for the same offense. He didn’t have to be governor.

  2. The other, obviously, is to do something about that poor Britney Spears woman.

    Give her cement overshoes and a swim in the East River.

  3. There are a couple of editorials in the Wall Street Journal today about how “greatly” Spitzer governed.

  4. MSNBC interview [Alan Dershowitz] with Norah O’Donnell

    Whew, talk about beauty and the beast.

  5. The banks simply don’t go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000.

    Sure they do. The War On Terror and the IRS require them to. O’Donnell must have shit for brains.

  6. Typical Dershowitz. Defends the indefensible when something or someone he likes is involved. Banks track ALL transactions to detect CTR “structuring”, and political figures are placed under heightened scrutiny. Period. This has been going on for a long while, enhanced by the USA Patriot Act.

    These stupid eulogies to Spitzer are getting on my nerves. He’s shown a lack of character and principal over and over again. Apparently, that’s okay to some people, so long as he does things they like. I’m glad to hear that most Democrats (and virtually all Republicans, I’m assuming) want him O-U-T.

    Incidentally, the IRS views structuring as a crime. So it’s not just prostitution.

    Whether I agree with or oppose the laws in question, Spitzer defines what it means to be hoist by one’s own petard. He richly deserves all of this. . .and much, much more. If his tarring and feathering and prosecution result in all of these laws being overturned, lovely, but that’s not going to happen. So the next best thing is him pilloried.

  7. Someone tell Alan that Eliot’s not God on the throne; he’s just a cheap political boss with more hair tonic than brains.

  8. LEAVE BRITNEY ALONE!!

  9. This isn’t too suprising considering that Alan was Spitzer’s mentor, and Spitzer got his career started working for him.

  10. Russ 2000,

    That jumped out at me too and it is older than GWOT or WOD. BTW, that was Dershowitz you were quoting, not O’Donnell. He certainly does not have a fecal brain, I suspect he is being intentionally deceptive.

    The Fed required a level of granularity at $10,000 for cash transactions up until a few years ago. Not sure if the threshold has been lowered, and types of transactions expanded, thought they were but not positive.

    Anyway, banks commonly use a much lower level to identify suspicious activity. If they detect it at their level, they report it.

    Not saying I am a fan, but my objections to the practice by the fact that the records being examined belong to somone else (the bank). I guess I could object to the feds coercing them, if that is the case.

  11. You know whats really, really ironic? The software installed on his computer that forwarded his “suspicious activity” to the IRS was installed on state computers at his insistence.

  12. Episiarch

    he’s just a cheap political boss with more hair tonic than brains.

    And how, precisely, does this distinguish him from countless other pols?

  13. I congratulate David Weigel on being able to find two Spitzer supporters.

  14. The banks simply don’t go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000

    There was a story on NPR this morning about how banks now track your $4 puchases, feed them all into software systems, rank them with various lists — including “Politically Exposed Persons”, which would include governors — and brings this all to the attention of the banks “compliance officers”.

    [Pause, for collective shudder to stop…]

    Stunning, how effectively shredding the 4th Amendment has been privatized.

    But, the kicker: much of this is in place because of Spitzer’s going after financial institutions over the last decade for not being aggressive enough in stopping money laundering.

    Me, I’m gonna go re-read seem classic Greek drama — ’cause, man, those guys nailed it when it comes to the human condition.

  15. For some reason, with no evidence at all supporting my suspicion, the possible motovation I mentioned for all of this Spitzer defending is moving up the list for me.

    Behind all of the hysterics, the unstated objection may be that much of the press identified Spitzer as a Democrat when, as of the past several years, they frequently leave Democrats affiliation unidentified, but make sure they identify Republicans as party members. Thus, the feelings of resentment, by some, at the spotlight being on Gov. Spitzer.

    Purly unscientific on my part.

  16. The dude made his career out of stomping on finance guys.

    I could easily imagine some of the higher ups in the bank taking a great deal of interest in any unusual transactions with his name attached.

  17. He took some time off from a hard day of ruining careers with innuendo and novel applications of the law to buy some sex. Fine by me.

    And now he’s been ruined by innuendo and novel applications of the law. Fine by me.

  18. “Hubris, hubris, hubris…”

  19. There was a story on NPR this morning about how banks now track your $4 puchases, feed them all into software systems, rank them with various lists — including “Politically Exposed Persons”, which would include governors — and brings this all to the attention of the banks “compliance officers”.

    See what you get into when you use fiat money?

  20. The banks simply don’t go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000.

    Nonsense. I’ve personally represented clients who were audited by the IRS for WITHDRAWING currency from their own bank accounts a couple of times during a given year. In one case it was merely three withdrawals over a one year period and each was less than five grand.

    15,000.00 is over the limit anyway and is always reported. Any teller who suspects (in the teller’s judgment) that a transaction or series of transactions is unusual or suspicious is required to report it. And they often do, as they are typically self-important little jerks and gives them an immense sense of power. There, criticized bank tellers as if they were the sluts everyone is defending on Kerry’s thread. 🙂

    BTW, this is not a new law and it did not materialize out of thin air after 09/11.

    It is always a good idea to know your bank teller well.

  21. Epi, I couldn’t agree more. I am absolutely jubilant that his life is in ashes. I don’t feel sorry for his wife neither.

    Any libertarian worth his or her salt would not have a problem if this was a simple matter of some married guy caught with his pants down in a whorehouse. The entire issue boils down to:

    He took some time off from a hard day of ruining careers with innuendo and novel applications of the law to buy some sex.

    Not to mention that he put people IN JAIL for buying some sex.

  22. “Hubris, hubris, hubris…”

    Which may be why he chose the Emperor’s Club as his source. Comedy and poetry wrapped in reality.

  23. Too bad: If the impeachment had gone through, Silda Walls Spitzer could have run for governor in 2010. That seems to be the voter forgiveness pattern of these things.

    Shh! Shut up Dave!

  24. I don’t feel sorry for his wife neither.

    Not since this has apparently been going on 6 years and to the tune of $80k. You’re stretching my credulity to make me believe she had no inkling of this.

  25. I am absolutely jubilant that his life is in ashes. I don’t feel sorry for his wife neither.

    Amen, brother. It’s sort of like Elliot Ness (hah!) taking down Capone: bootlegging or tax evasion? Who cares, he’s going down.

    Fuck Spitzer. FUCK HIM. He is the absolute epitome of anti-libertarianism, and I want to SEE HIM BURN.

    Thus ever to tyrants (sic semper tyrannis).

  26. Dershowitz comparing Spitzer to FDR is all I needed to hear to convince me that Spitzer needed to go.

    There’s definitely a sense of schadenfreude watching him go down like this, though… and the people comparing this to Clinton are again, half right, but then they focus on the half that doesn’t really matter. Who cares who they’re pressing the flesh with (ah, yes, political double entendre); with Clinton it was all about perjury, and with Spitzer it’s all about money laundering and exposing himself to potential blackmail.

    Just tells me one thing… I don’t want to be a politician. Managing one’s sex life may require a lawyer from here on out…

  27. Dershowitz defended O.J. Simpson, for Christ’s sake. Of course he’d defend Spitzer.

  28. ChrisH | March 12, 2008, 11:32am | #

    The banks simply don’t go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000
    There was a story on NPR this morning about how banks now track your $4 puchases, feed them all into software systems, rank them with various lists — including “Politically Exposed Persons”, which would include governors — and brings this all to the attention of the banks “compliance officers”.

    [Pause, for collective shudder to stop…]

    Stunning, how effectively shredding the 4th Amendment has been privatized.

    But, the kicker: much of this is in place because of Spitzer’s going after financial institutions over the last decade for not being aggressive enough in stopping money laundering.

    Me, I’m gonna go re-read seem classic Greek drama — ’cause, man, those guys nailed it when it comes to the human condition.

    Chris – You say that as if we at the bank enjoy having to do that shit. It costs us a TON of money. Not a little money, and I work for a relatively small regional bank, but a ton. We’ve whole departments for that: compliance, audit, IT audit, privacy, risk analysis…all just so we can play CYA with petty government wankers who’re really convinced that it’s our job to give a shit what our customers do with their money. Nobody makes Footlocker keep up with how its customers are wearing their shoes, why should we be forced to take stock of how our customers are using our products?

  29. I don’t feel sorry for his wife for the same reason I never felt sorry for Hillary Clinton. They both knew what was going on–they just didn’t want to ruin their future political careers.

  30. with Clinton it was all about perjury

    And, Billy Boy never jailed anyone for creativity with a cigar.

  31. Someone please tell me that people at Feministing are defending him too. Cognitive dissonance is amazing to watch.

  32. Epi-

    The closest they get to “defending” him is when they say something like “oh, its bad what he did, but I bet BUSCHO and the WALL STREET DISASTER CAPITALISTS are really behind it!”

  33. It costs us a TON of money

    I hope to shout………

  34. The banks simply don’t go around accidentally finding transactions of $15,000.

    Maybe not, but if as an AG you spent your time using obscure wrinkles in the law stick your dick in the financial industry’s cornflakes, should you know better than to make transactions that might be considered red flags?

  35. And he’s resigned. Buh-bye, thanks for playing. Maybe he can go teach at Harvard with Dersh.

  36. Sad day for Mainstream Libertarians. A real loss. As I young buck sailor I made use of prostitutes around the world. Didn’t regret a thing. Spitzer proved he was a real Mainstream Libertarian by seeing prostitutes. Makes him a little more like me. But of course the cynics at Reason would be happy about this. You’re really just leftist Marxist-anarchists.

  37. the WALL STREET DISASTER CAPITALISTS are really behind it!

    It really is pretty stupid to stick a shiv in the banking industry and then try to pull the same type of shenanigans that you stuck the shiv in for.

    Even if somebody at a bank went “look, weird activity on that fucker Spitzer’s account”, it’s all still legit. If you fire me maliciously and then I tell the feds about your illegal tax evasions, you’re a moron.

  38. It really is pretty stupid to stick a shiv in the banking industry and then try to pull the same type of shenanigans that you stuck the shiv in for.

    Agreed. But they actually think Karl Rove (who unemployed last time I checked) is behind it, too. *sighs*

  39. Yeah, the prostitution thing gets the headlines, but his real exposure comes from money laundering (a series of transactions designed to disguise the source or use of funds).

    I pray to God that the federal prosecutor in charge of this case has the balls to go after him on an organized crime charge, based on his selective prosecution of the competitors of the brothel he was using.

  40. Maybe not, but if as an AG you spent your time using obscure wrinkles in the law stick your dick in the financial industry’s cornflakes, should you know better than to make transactions that might be considered red flags?

    Point Taken.

  41. I’m really glad we’re getting to talk about prostitution and money laundering, but here’s the bottom line: THE MAN NEEDS TO GO BECAUSE HE APPLIED A LAW TO OTHERS THAT HE REFUSED TO LIVE BY.

    THIS kind of government hypocrisy is what needs to go. It’s the same kind of hypocrisy about the Drug War or about gays or whatever. GOVERNMENT HYPOCRISY IS TYRANNY.

  42. Except that by using their service he offered the agency official protection from law enforcement, a privilege he did not grant their rivals. That is a serious abuse of power and while I believe prostitution should be legal, I believe a governor who consensually took the job of governor should not give protection to certain people while imprisoning others for the same offense. He didn’t have to be governor.

    This is exactly the point. All this moralizing about the nature of prostitution (which should be legal /disclaimer)is a side show. If he had just run to a corner girl a few times, this wouldn’t be nearly as big a deal to me.

    He used his power as Governor to protect the interests of an international prostitution ring for his own benefit, exposing himeself not only as a hypocrite of the highest order but as a man whose arrogance and lack of judgement compromised the entire state. Nothing like having the governor dead to rights if you want to rig the legal system in your favor.

    Again, this isn’t simply about boinking a call girl, it’s about the highest office holder in the state having an ongoing relationship with a criminal enterprise, using his power to protect that enterprise and punish its competitors. More than enough to boot him out, imo, and that doesn’t even factor in whatever financial shenanigans he might have been engaged in.

  43. As J sub D said in a truly awesome post, lets all hope they throw every dirty trick, lets hope every possible punishment comes down on him like a ton of bricks from the state he worshiped for so long. Prison, probation, “rehab”, piss tests, the works. I hope the state is up his ass for the next 30 years.

  44. This whole thing just stinks of Karl Rove.

    I can’t be believe what Bushco has done to Amerikkka.

  45. So Spitzer’s replacement is an empty suit and, I know this sounds harsh, an affirmative action candidate.

    He’s also a blind guy. A blind guy who can’t read braille. Um, doesn’t that make him illiterate?

    Learn more here:

    http://audio.wnyc.org/news/news20080312_paterson_rivera.mp3

  46. I don’t see why he should go if Vitter did not have to…

    I heard Dershowitz on Talk of the Nation yesterday and he indeed seemed fanatically in Spitzer’s camp. Spitzer was an assistant of his during the Claus Von Bulow case. But this level of fanatical support from Dershowitz usually only is exhibited for the IDF these days.

  47. This case smells. I believe that somebody must have dropped a dime on him and they started looking at his records.

    I do not believe the cover story that appeared in the New York Times. I think that’s a story that was put out by federal officials to cover what really went on here.

    He’s on team blue! The game must nave been fixed! I have no evidence to bolster my case, but it must have been. I’m a lawyer, trust me.

  48. MP, its New York. I can’t think of a New York politician I ever had any modicum of respect for aside from William F. Buckley (who never won anything).

    Who has New York given us in recent years? Michael “Smoking Ban” Bloomberg, Rudy “Police Brutality” Giuliaini, Chuck “Camera Whore” Schumber, Hillary…well do I really need to go there?

  49. Once again, I’ll bring out the crazy-assed Team Blue post on a certain left-wing blog to make my point about insane partisanship. To wit

    #
    PinkyLeftBrain
    March 11, 2008 at 2:55 pm

    Is this a warning shot across the bow of the Democratic Party by the republicans?

    Showing how low and deep they are willing to further pervert the laws of this country to get their puppet installed as president. (As if Hillary’s recent performance has made things harder for them)

    This whole thing stinks to high heaven but you just have to wonder, and just like 9/11/2001, there are so many coincidences and ‘strange actions’ for it just to be a spur of the moment incident.

    They have been planning to take Spitzer down for years.

    To watch MSNBC’s Wall Street siren talking to some ‘Wall Street people’ you could see their glee and gloating in this nasty prosecution. Many people, many cruel, nasty, evil, rich and politically connected people are very ecstatically happy over this ‘convenient’ prosecution? And the message seems clear. Since Cheney now has full access to the ‘Justice’ Dept inner workings, I wonder if his fingerprints aren’t all over this thing.

    Once again, Lady Liberty is prostituted for the pleasure of the GOP.

  50. J sub D
    In fairness to Dersh he has done a bit of defense lawyering in his life and he said (on NPR yesterday) that this case smells from his experience therein

  51. Chuck “Camera Whore” Schumber (sic)

    Chuck is almost as bad as Spitzer (the only difference is Chuckles doesn’t pretend to be Sir Lancelot)–maybe he could go down next?

    I’d say I’m dreaming but hey, Spitzer is toast, so why not dream?

  52. MNG anyone who was on O.J.’s defense team can piss off as far as I’m concerned.

  53. I truly hope the rumors of his resignation being part of a bargain to avoid prosecution and disbarment are false.

    Just on the fairness point, if any of us here were accused of the same thing I doubt our promises to quit our current jobs and find a different one would be an acceptable trade to the prosecution.

  54. Guy, either thats true or his successor will pull a Gerald Ford and pardon him. If Richard Nixon didn’t go to jail after all the shit he pulled, I doubt any high level politician can ever be prosecuted.

  55. Oh Cesar, I hate Dersh (have you read his defenses of torture, started in defense of Israel stuff but now happily applied to US shenanigans). I’m just pointing out that when he talks of an unfair prosecution he is in his area of expertise (criminal law)

    Again, I know I lean towards the blue team, but if Vitter could stay so should Spitzer. Hell, more so, Spitzer’s raison d’etre only tangentially touched on being opposed to something like prostitution while Vitter was one of these Moral Majority types…

  56. Cesar-I don’t think his successor can pardon him from federal charges, he’ll have to wait for President Hillary for that

  57. Vitter isn’t the chief law enforcement officer of his state. Vitter didn’t prosecute the competitors of the brothel he visited, either.

    Spitzer is a “moralistic” type to, just in a Democratic rather than Republican way.

  58. Vitter shouldn’t have been able stay, and just because he was able to doesn’t mean Spitzer shouldn’t get chopped off at the knees.

  59. Cesar,

    MNG beat me to the comment. Ignoring your Nixon nonsense too.

  60. That jumped out at me too and it is older than GWOT or WOD. BTW, that was Dershowitz you were quoting, not O’Donnell.

    I know, I fucked up a little but Dersh is a lawyer so you can sort of expect him to lie; O’Donnell should have called him on that immediately.

  61. “Silda Walls Spitzer could have run for governor in 2010. That seems to be the voter forgiveness pattern of these things.”

    David,

    I’ve never been more proud of you than the moment I saw this one-liner. Bravo! Bravo!

  62. Dr. Laura on the today show this morning. Would someone that is more capable than me PLEASE post this on the feministing site???

    “Dr. Laura Schlessinger has never been one to shrink from controversy, and she leaped headlong into one on Monday when she said that if a husband cheats, his wife may share some of the blame.

    “When the wife does not focus in on the needs and the feelings, sexually, personally, to make him feel like a man, to make him feel like a success, to make him feel like her hero, he’s very susceptible to the charm of some other woman making him feel what he needs,” the popular psychologist and radio personality said. “

  63. My bad. This was on monday apparently

  64. MNG,

    I doubt Dersh knows crap about banking laws. His comments sure indicate such ignorance, though it could be willful, I suppose. He’s about as unprincipled as Spitzer. People in power being under greater scrutiny is a surprise and requires a plot?

  65. While watching him give his resignation speech earlier, I was actually thinking “you know, I really wish there was more of this kind of thing.”

  66. Do you consider the Governor to be the chief law enforcement officer of his state, or are you talking when he was AG? Either way I should think the people who make the laws (Vitter) are just as if not more blameworthy for those same laws violations than are those who enforce them (Spitzer). Spitzer never, to my knowledge, railed against sexual immorality, but Vitter did (and does)

  67. I think the GOP’s wink wink towards Vitter combined with their fervor about Larry Craig was bullshit times ten…

    Is Larry Craig still on the job?

  68. I mean, I remember him promising to leave, and then there was some controversy that he might not, and then I stopped paying attention so I honestly don’t know…

    I remember that Dem Governor of New Jersey who admitted to a gay affair and left too. Barney Frank though, got away with something like that.

    So the double standards are plentiful and stinky…

  69. Reinmoose,

    If my life’s work to install the Censor as the fourth branch of government succeeds, you’ll get your wish. At least at the federal level, anyway. Of course, the Censor won’t allow people to resign before he removes them from office. He may occasionally leave a sword in the evildoer’s bathroom, when such evildoer has otherwise led a noble life, but that will be very rare.

  70. So Spitzer’s replacement is an empty suit and, I know this sounds harsh, an affirmative action candidate.

    Actually, he’s more a nepotism candidate. His dad was deputy mayor to Koch, Sec. of State, and a couple other things.

  71. MNG,

    Stop posting now. You are embarassing (sp?) yourself.

    Go team blue bs and you should know better.

    Spitzer may be guilty of felonies. Larry Craig may be guilty of a misdemeanor at most. Big difference.

  72. Nice

    Spitzer also broke up at least two prostitution rings in New York City, including a 2004 case that led to the arrest of 18 people at an escort service.

  73. One of the side effects of this is that there is now one less superdelegate (as there will be no replacement of the lt. governor.) I believe it also means that there is now an even number of delegates.

    How great would a tie be?

  74. MNG,
    I have family in Idaho and stay in touch with the politics there. The folks, (not my folks,) there really really like Craig and if he doesn’t quit or die, the office is his forever. I do not know if his wide stance makes him more difficult to remove.

  75. Vitter may be a hypocrite, but as I said before, getting caught with your pants down in a whorehouse is a whole lot different than getting caught with your pants down in a whorehouse after you’ve put other people in jail for getting caught with your pants down in a whorehouse.

    Follow?

  76. Shit….S/B

    Vitter may be a hypocrite, but as I said before, getting caught with your pants down in a whorehouse is a whole lot different than getting caught with your pants down in a whorehouse after you’ve put other people in jail for getting caught with your THEIR pants down in a whorehouse.

    Follow?

  77. Silda Walls?
    Wasn’t that a Sheena Easton song?

  78. I can’t think of a New York politician I ever had any modicum of respect for aside from William F. Buckley

    Pataki was decent enough for a Republican. Plus, I bet Koch was enormously entertaining at the very least. I can’t think of any others.

  79. Actually, he’s more a nepotism candidate. His dad was deputy mayor to Koch, Sec. of State, and a couple other things.

    And seems to be a nice guy, if not the most charismatic politician around. i saw him speak at a county democratic club before his (and Spitzer’s) election.

  80. Does anyone know where this Patterson character stands on things?

  81. Standard Libertarian Disclaimer #26 (a.k.a. the Spitzer Decree):

    Prostitution should be legal, but…

  82. Spitzer also broke up at least two prostitution rings in New York City, including a 2004 case that led to the arrest of 18 people at an escort service.

    I don’t have any knowledge if this supposition is correct. But dollars to donuts says he held a press conference bragging about it. Any takers?

  83. of course he bragged about it!

    schadenfreude is german for “SO FUCKING DELICOUS”

  84. Any takers?

    I will take a glazed chocolate one please. Sorry, not a betting person, just a donut appreciator.

  85. dhex,

    Schadenfreudelicious is the word you want.

  86. Am I the only one that thinks Silda is super-hot? That just adds to the list of things to be pissed off at Spitzer for. What a douche.

  87. I don’t feel sorry for his wife neither.

    Not since this has apparently been going on 6 years and to the tune of $80k. You’re stretching my credulity to make me believe she had no inkling of this.

    My impression is that he was hiding his money flows precisely because he didn’t want his wife to find out. If he had just written a check to QAT once a quarter, the IRS wouldn’t’ve given a shit, as long as QAT was paying its taxes. But his wife would’ve said “who the fuck is QAT?”

  88. My impression is that he was hiding his money flows precisely because he didn’t want his wife to find out. If he had just written a check to QAT once a quarter, the IRS wouldn’t’ve given a shit, as long as QAT was paying its taxes. But his wife would’ve said “who the fuck is QAT?”

    Yet another reason to never tell the government that you are married and never enter into a joint checking account.

  89. Marc Taylor,

    To be fair, this incident may free up Silda, so perhaps you, and you alone, should be grateful to Mr. Spitzer. Once she gets her check for standing up there with him, I think she’ll be making a low-key, graceful exit in short order.

  90. Once again, Lady Liberty is prostituted for the pleasure of the GOP.

    Cesar, you must know more about wingnuts than me. What does this mean? I really can’t understand it.

  91. Cesar, you must know more about wingnuts than me. What does this mean? I really can’t understand it.

    I guess it means Republicans are rapists?

  92. Cesar, you must know more about wingnuts than me. What does this mean? I really can’t understand it.

    It means that you don’t have to make any sense to make it perfectly clear you’re a fucking idiot.

  93. i just want to say that Episiarch is the only person in the Spitzer threads whose hatred for the man matches my own.

  94. Hey, I’ve taken a “a widely-read libertarian culture site” and turned it into a shrill, long-winded, anti-Spitzer diatribe. That’s surely worth an honorable mention. Or maybe I need to do more. Maybe a Spitzer song?

  95. Where is Joe to defend Eliot?

  96. Not that I feel a bit sorry for the asshole, but as an acquaintance of mine noted, the whole affair (his words) “stinks of dogshit.”

    Oh, and am I hallucinating, or did I actually hear someone invoking the MANN ACT?!?

    The frickin’ Mann Act?!?!?

    Somewhere, Chuck Berry is laughing his ass off…

  97. i just want to say that Episiarch is the only person in the Spitzer threads whose hatred for the man matches my own.

    TDR: Are both of you from NY? I mean, I don’t really have anything good to say about him, other than that his escorts were high end, but it is hard to get very worked up about an elected official who’s from so far away.

    (Unless his name is Forrest Allgood.)

  98. The NYT has posted an article identifying the woman as a 22 year old aspiring musician from New Jersey. She has a MySpace page
    hier

  99. Hard to get worked up? Do you like hypocrisy? Does it float your boat AND toot your horn?

    If this Spitz-bitch doesn’t do jail time, I hope every defendant in court uses him as a defense. “Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, if the law is too good for Eliot Spitzer, then it is too good for me.”

    Why should any of us obey the laws if those charged with upholding them won’t even obey them?

  100. Having finally seen a picture of Miss ‘Kristen’ (thanks, Yahoo!), I have to say… cute, but not worth $4300 and the governorship. Not to mention the possibility of disbarment, lasting political ruin, divorce and time in the clink.

    Of course, no-one is that cute, so perhaps it isn’t a fair standard.

  101. The link between repressive fundamentalists and
    ‘progressive’ liberals is an oddity. I guess it just shows to go you that there’s more than one way to be an officious prude.

    I can accept thatordinary folks in their own private time can be hypocrites. That is forgivable as we’re all fallible,
    foibleable creatures. It’s harder to forgive public acts of hypocrisy, where the perps are attempting to use force to control an act which they themselves are deliberately partaking in, over and over again, in
    many sorts of gymnastic positions (speaking for
    myself, of course, Jim Garman, male prostitute).

  102. The irony of Spitzer’s scandal is that, unless we find out something far worse than what we know, this is the rare case of him not abusing power.

    Wrong.

    He abused power. When you are a governor or attorney general, sworn to uphold the law, and directly in the business of prosecuting people doing the exact same thing that you did, that is, by definition an abuse of power. The only way this wrong is righted is if Eliot Spitzer gets the exact same penalties as these guys. End…of…story.

    A proposed state law that would allow police to impound the cars of people arrested on suspicion of patronizing prostitutes is being greeted favorably by law enforcement in Seattle.

    “The positive thing about forfeiture is it would deter the guys who pick up street prostitutes,” said City Attorney Tom Carr, whose office is studying the legislation.

    State Rep. Al O’Brien, D-Mountlake Terrace, is sponsoring the bill, which would let authorities seize the vehicles of suspected “johns.” Neither the House or Senate has voted on the measure yet.

    The seized property, which could include cars, boats and aircraft, ultimately could be auctioned off, with the proceeds going to help law enforcement.

  103. And fuck Dershowitz.

    “Know-your-customer banking laws” can kiss my ass. Hoisted by their own petard.

    Banks do this shit based on pressure from the Federal Government.

    It started with the idea that someone somewhere had a nickel that might not be taxed. Now we justify it on grounds of the War on Terror(tm).

    Burn them all at the stake.

  104. The link between repressive fundamentalists and ‘progressive’ liberals is an oddity. I guess it just shows to go you that there’s more than one way to be an officious prude.

    It’s not even slightly odd.

    Officious prudery is primary. The rest is fashion and accident for which (the appearance of) ideology is a mess of rationalizations.

    Even the objects of prudery are usually incidental. But who’s to be the subject of officiousness is usually not.

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