Property Rights

Rule #1: If You're Going to Burn a Flag, Bring Your Own

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flag burning

Today's random flag burning story is courtesy of my alma mater: Three Yale students were arrested and charged with arson and criminal mischief for lighting a flag on fire in the yard of someone's home in New Haven. The flag was not theirs, nor was the house.

Reports the Yale Daily News:

Contrary to a rumor floating around Yale's campus, the building involved is not the home of Sen. Joseph Lieberman.

These three, despite unusual resumes–one student was a Pakistan-born U.S. citizen and sometime translator for the U.S. forces in Afghanistan, the others are Greek and British citizens–are not likely to become martyrs to the free speech cause:

The students said lighting the flag on fire "was a stupid thing to do" to the arresting officers.

Free speech violation, or private property protection? If the mood strikes, will any old flag do or should it be strictly BYOF? You be the judge.

NEXT: The Missiles Are Flying. Hallelujah!

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  1. If this is a free speech violation, let’s continue to violate it.

  2. Tough one. Let’s see. Someone breaks into my home and sprays paint on my wall. Um, free speech?

  3. Er Huh? This is too much a no-brainer to be serious, but I can’t spot the punchline.

  4. sure burn away. However, WTF for doing it on someone else’s property? And with someone else’s property.

    I call the “Juggernaut” principle:

    “I’m gonna beat the shit out of you Charles. I’m gonna beat the shit out of you with Charles, as a matter of fact”

    But definitely – the flag shouldn’t be protected. As a form of expression, burn away, pal, fuck it blue!

    BYOF. go for it. Just please understand how extreme that protest is.

  5. Asbestos I can make out, it’s the owner’s fault.

  6. An arson charge might be a little bit much, but I don’t see this a free speech violation as it wasn’t burning the flag that got them into trouble.

  7. burn your own flag, dag burn hippies/establishment stooges. (yale’s probably a bit closer to the latter)

  8. Non issue. Next!

  9. It’s unclear to me that flag burning is “speech” – it appears to be more of a way to inflame people when your perspective is losing in the marketplace of ideas.

  10. ProL:

    should I fake my orgasm?

  11. BYOF. And, VM, I think we should all just keep burning flags until people don’t care anymore. Like “*yawn* another one? Let’s watch something else.”

  12. Just goes to show you why a flag burning ammendment is the most urgent issue facing America today.

  13. Timothy:

    kewl! I like it. I propose you collect all crying babies and obnoxious teenagers. I’ll wrap them in Styrofoam and plastic. Then we’ll put the stars and stripes around them and set ’em ablaze.

    That way we can make an environmental and abortion statement while burning! Then we could fire our AK47s in the air and cause general consternation among all nanny types!

    (obviously has too much free time this afternoon)

  14. An arson charge might be a little bit much

    Dunno why not. It sounds to me like the flag was still on the building when they lit it on fire, and that the flames actually reached an awning.

    So they didn’t really burn it “in the yard,” Katherine. They lit it on fire where there was a significant chance it would start the whole house on fire.

  15. Lady at information Stand,

    No, make him work for it.

    Next!

  16. BYOF

    If you buy it, you can burn it.

    It’s wrong to destroy someone else’s property.

  17. If you want flag-burning overload, check out The American Flag Burning Archives.

    You’re absolutely right about the overload becoming tedious. Funny.

  18. If you buy it, you can burn it.

    It’s wrong to destroy someone else’s property.

    But even if a U.S. flag belongs to you, it still represents everybody in this country and probably should not be allowed.

    If you have problems with the policies of this country, by all means express your discontent in an adult manner. But sometimes we do need to ban particularly offensive and useless actions such as flag burning.

  19. My flag underwear is feeling itchy today. I guess it is time to wash it.

  20. A flag represents a dyed piece of cloth to everybody who isn’t a mouth-breathing jingoist, but I digress…

  21. There are a lot of comments about this being a no brainer. And it is to anyone who respects property rights. But, we should also not forget that we live in a land where property rights are being degraded all the time.

    If an artist can cry “censorship” when a private gallery won’t host his feces-covered Mona Lisa why CAN’T you express your disdain for America on someone elses land?

  22. Timothy – careful – the “meletary lawyer (sic)” might show up and get all agent orange, navy “seel” (sic) on yer ass!

    he’ll seriously Chow test you, i tells ya!

    *is next. svimvear. very nice.

  23. “If the mood strikes, will any old flag do or should it be strictly BYOF? You be the judge.’

    Are you out of your mind? Do you sanction burning down a flag company warehouse to destroy the flags as being free speech? Good gawd. Where’d they find you?

  24. Burning flags is the expression of an idea. Obviously. The Supreme Court rather loudly agreed with that viewpoint, too. If we start banning everything that offends us–especially in the realm of political expression–we’re going to have to issue 300 million Cones of Silence. Of course, legal flag burning is tricky, because burning anything without a permit or on someone else’s property is usually not allowed.

    I’m planning to go burn a Canadian flag later today. It’s never been done, so I thought I’d be the first.

  25. So Peter, who told you you were smart? That was inaccurate.

    (Actually, I think he’s just juanita-ing.)

  26. A flag represents a dyed piece of cloth to everybody who isn’t a mouth-breathing jingoist, but I digress…

    Then why bother burning it as an expression of an idea?

  27. Dunno why not. It sounds to me like the flag was still on the building when they lit it on fire, and that the flames actually reached an awning.

    So they didn’t really burn it “in the yard,” Katherine. They lit it on fire where there was a significant chance it would start the whole house on fire.

    That’s why I said “might be a little much”. If the flag was attached to the house, or close enough for the house to go up in flames, then of course the arson charge is fair.

  28. We’re all missing the important question here. Was burning that flag carbon-neutral?

    Kevin

  29. ’cause it’s fun to annoy the hell outta jingoists!

  30. We’re all missing the important question here. Was burning that flag carbon-neutral?

    In Belgium they fine you ?20 for burning a flag due to the carbon emissions.

    They’re trying to get the law amended so the charge is only for synthetic material and not for natural fibers.

  31. I’m planning to go burn a Canadian flag later today. It’s never been done, so I thought I’d be the first.

    I recall a Scott Thompson monologue on Kids in the Hall where he said Canadians burned their flags all the time just to keep warm.

    Personally, I only get the urge to burn the American flag when laws (or constitutional amendments) are proposed banning the act.

  32. Free speech, stupid antic, whatever. Do it with your own property and don’t burn the place down.

    It’s ironic, however, that one of them is a Greek citizen. Greece has (or used to have, and I assume still does) a law against ‘defaming the national honor’ or something. Back when I was stationed there in the ’70’s one of our U.S. soldiers got in a bunch of trouble for throwing a pumpkin at a Greek flag.

    So, foreign national in U.S. takes part in exactly the same activity that would get him arrested in his own country. Yeah, ironic.

  33. “So, foreign national in U.S. takes part in exactly the same activity that would get him arrested in his own country. Yeah, ironic.”

    No. That’s one of the most beautiful things about the US. It’s AWESOME! It is why this is the best damned country, EVAR!!!

  34. The fact that you can burn flags at will here, more or less, and not in places like Europe makes me proud to be a ‘Merican. Heck, want to promote Nazism? Sure, no problem. Offend us at will. Even Canada can’t handle such things.

  35. Everyone seems so open minded about burning US flags, I wonder if they would be just as open minded if it was a rainbow flag that was burned on the house of a homosexual.

  36. Everyone seems so open minded about burning US flags, I wonder if they would be just as open minded if it was a rainbow flag that was burned on the house of a homosexual.

    They would be trespassers, so no one would be open minded about this. Try again, gay baiter.

  37. ok, i’ll try again, and these vandals were trespassing.

  38. lurker2,
    I think you missed the point. If someone burns another persons rainbow flag that someone is a vandal. If someone burns a rainbow flag they paid for they are just an asshole.

  39. A Google search of burned a Canadian flag returned a non-zero result, so it does happen from time to time, if sometimes ironically.

    Kevin

  40. lurker2,
    Correct, they were trespassing and burned someone else’s property.

    Now, if it was their rainbow flag and they burned it out in the street in front of a gay person’s house, then I have no problem with the act. They may be homophobic asshats, but it shouldn’t be illegal.

  41. Egad kevrob,
    Tom Green burned a Canadian Flag? That right there makes me want to not do it. I mean, nobody would want to be caught imitating that hack.

  42. kevrob,

    Well, I actually thought that some Mohawks might’ve done it or some Qu?b?cois. I admit it–I exaggerated for effect.

  43. “If you have problems with the policies of this country, by all means express your discontent in an adult manner.”

    In an adult manner? I don’t think so. This is America, buddy.

  44. “But even if a U.S. flag belongs to you, it still represents everybody in this country and probably should not be allowed.

    “If you have problems with the policies of this country, by all means express your discontent in an adult manner. But sometimes we do need to ban particularly offensive and useless actions such as flag burning.”

    This comment makes me think of feces.

  45. If an anti flag-burning amendemnt ever passes, I going to start an internet business selling faux flags. Maybe a flag with tweleve stripes and a single star of david. It will come with a flag etiquette brochure that includs an explanation of the proper method to dispose of a real flag, and a book of matches.

  46. Damn keybord keeps messing up.

  47. Curious; the snarky punchline seems to have disappeared from my post above. It was a good’un, too. The word “feces” featured prominently.

    Did the squirrels install a feces filter?

  48. Now it’s back; eerie.

  49. “If you have problems with the policies of this country, by all means express your discontent in an adult manner.

    Except that I’m protesting because the government treats me like a child.

    But sometimes we do need to ban particularly offensive and useless actions such as flag burning.”

    Make up your mind. If I want to piss off the government and burning the U.S flag is “particularly offensive” then it isn’t “useless.”

    But even if a U.S. flag belongs to you, it still represents everybody in this country and probably should not be allowed.

    “Because the flag still stands for freedom, and they can’t take that away.”

  50. I’m sure other legal beagles have pointed it out above but the right to burn the flag only applies if it’s your flag. Otherwise it is criminal mischef.

  51. I think it is a moral equivalent to burning a cross on someone’s front law. It is one thing to burn your own flag or your own property or on public property, which you absolutly have the right to do, unconditionally – but this was clearly an attempt to intimidate people, and put people in danger.

    I have no sympathy for those guys when they get the book thrown at them. Serves them right.

  52. i find it offensive to burn the us flag, someone else might find it offensive to burn a rainbow flag or a cross. to me it makes little difference if the flag is mine or one that was purchased for the deed. Those who would burn flags or crosses generaly do not do it in private for their own pleasure, they do it publicly by design to offend.

  53. i find it offensive to burn the us flag, someone else might find it offensive to burn a rainbow flag or a cross. to me it makes little difference if the flag is mine or one that was purchased for the deed. Those who would burn flags or crosses generaly do not do it in private for their own pleasure, they do it publicly by design to offend.

    Yes, but somewhere along the line people got the misconception that they have a right not to be offended. Yes, those things are meant to offend. So what?

    The line is crossed when the action destroys someone elses property, or is a public danger (I imagine that even if burning a cross would be very dangerous, unless it was made of matchs or popsicle sticks or something).

  54. The first paragraph in the above was supposed to be quoted.

  55. lurker2,
    The first amendment exists because inoffensive expression doesn’t need protection.

  56. Free speech violation, or private property protection? If the mood strikes, will any old flag do or should it be strictly BYOF? You be the judge.

    That question should never even be asked on a libertarian forum.

  57. My thing was kicking trashcans when I wandered around drunk in college.

    Meatheads. They probably shouldn’t make too much out of it.

  58. Was it a bio-fueled cloth flag or a synthetic polyester flag?

  59. Deport them.

  60. BYOF and do it on your own property (if you believe in property) or with YOUR OWN group on “the commons”.

    At a Support the Troops rally in DC a little over one year ago we had all sorts of wanna-be vandals defacing banners made to show support for the troops.

    Then we had one fellow who had to move into the center of the crowd (not a densely packed crowd, but a crowd anyway), sit on the ground with a back-pack, with his back to a couple of police officers, and begin to ‘stealthily’ prepare to burn a flag with a lighter in each hand, while eating peanut butter (that was odd).

    He was quietly pointed out to the officers, who quietly and slowly surrounded the guy. He finally looked up, put his stuff away and left the area.

    I need to find Chicago cops next time instead of Capitol police.

  61. Send them to France.

    CB

  62. If only people needed a license to own a flag, this sort of thing wouldn’t happen.

  63. I still think it’s a strech to include pyrotechnic displays in freedom of speech.

  64. I’m planning to go burn a Canadian flag later today.

    How about just burning a Canadian, like Alanis.
    Would that be ironic, or mercy?

  65. RYO,

    Love them Kids in the Hall!

    To keep warm… funny shit…

  66. “I’m planning to go burn a Canadian flag later today.”

    Go ahead.

    But would you please get it right side up this time?

  67. I’m not against flag burning. As long as you bought and paid for your own flag and you don’t set my stuff on fire in the process, go ahead and burn the flag.

    But if you light it up on a public street instead of on your own property, be prepared to accept the consequences of your behavior.

    Now, I realize that victims of public indoctrination er, ah, education sometimes have a tough time with the concept of consequences arising from choices (or cause and effect for that matter), but when your act of protest provokes exactly the enraged reaction you were hoping for, the enragee just might decide to slap you upside the head (that person may also be large).

    And if that happens, the burner will likely be screaming that the enragee is just a fascist nazi, which is another concept that eludes most flag burners.

  68. My guess is that burning a rainbow flag in front of a gay person’s house might constitute extortion, similar to cross burning. I couldn’t be sure though since it doesn’t have the same history.

  69. My guess is that burning a rainbow flag in front of a gay person’s house might constitute extortion, similar to cross burning. I couldn’t be sure though since it doesn’t have the same history.

    So, burning cigarettes and little sticks in front of a homosexual’s home would be extortion?

  70. You think the property owner would have been charged if they’d beat the buggers down? The knee-jerk answer is “yes” since it would be assumed that his life or home weren’t really in danger, but, the flag was close enough to the house, that they would have had a decent court argument that in the heat of the moment, the property owner had to crush their skulls in order to protect their home from being burned down.

    Otherwise, it seems Reason is simply trying to drum up a little repeat traffic with such a frivolous post.

  71. Dude, he said crush their skulls 🙂

  72. Slow night. Usually the skull crushing comment would have drawn more fire.

  73. I know some people who are friends with these guys, and joe is right. They weren’t out to make some big statement. They were a bunch of drunk teenagers being stupid. Its just plain simple vandalism, and should be treated just like they’d treat it if it had been a decorative flag. IMO, prosecuting this any differently (either in their favor or not) punishes them based on their beliefs, and makes it a thought crime (much like hate crime legislation makes actual crimes into thought crimes).

  74. My guess is vandalism with fire equals a more serious charge than vandalism. Plus they were trespassing.

  75. Curious as to how a few drunken American teens would be treated after setting fire to someone’s property in Europe or Pakistan.

  76. Ray G

    If they are in mobs of several thousand, they’re called “football* fans.”

    *’soccer’

  77. A mob of people enthused over Association Football aren’t exactly Americans.

    Kevin

  78. Kevin

    Agreed.

    But I was thinking of the commonest form of mob violence in Europe.

    Superbowl post-game celebrations don’t even come close, although we Canucks can put on a pretty mean Stanley Cup riot.

    However, it’s bedtime.

    ‘night all!

  79. fff:

    My guess is that burning a rainbow flag in front of a gay person’s house might constitute extortion

    That would be vile, but it would not be extortion.

  80. I’d say the more significant question is, when someone recklessly endangers your life and your property by starting a fire on your porch, should you only kick their teeth down their throats, or empty a clip into them?

    Let’s just say that if the homeowner had used deadly force in this situation, and I were on his jury, he’d probably beat the rap.

    -jcr

  81. Stop `em, drop `em, then roll `em.

    Kevin

  82. “It’s ironic, however, that one of them is a Greek citizen. Greece has (or used to have, and I assume still does) a law against ‘defaming the national honor’ or something. Back when I was stationed there in the ’70’s one of our U.S. soldiers got in a bunch of trouble for throwing a pumpkin at a Greek flag.”

    So you mean back when Greece was ruled by a military junta endorsed by the USA?

  83. “Greece has (or used to have, and I assume still does) a law against ‘defaming the national honor’ or something.”

    Isn’t this the case in most European nations? I know France has a redonkulous law against “rejecting France or her values” (tell that to the marauding Muslim rioters), and Finland has a constitutional amendment against flag burning.

    Anyway, I concur with the general consensus here. If you have to ask whether or not it’s OK to set fire to someone else’s property while standing in their yard without their permission, your libertarian credentials are up for serious review.

  84. They were a bunch of drunk teenagers being stupid.

    Impossible. You were already informed in the post that they were going to a superior institution.

    They must have superior backgrounds to go to that institution. They are all probably superior liberal arts majors (of course, no business majors). I would almost bet that one of them has great post-modernest grades.

    This must be some statement that us poor State School graduates can’t figure out until they tell us. Same with their police statement. It is all a superior intellect trick.

  85. This must be some statement that us poor State School graduates can’t figure out until they tell us. Same with their police statement. It is all a superior intellect trick.

    No, no. You misunderstand (which is not surprising, because–after all–you didn’t go to Yale).

    There actually ISN’T a “statement” at all–which is, itself, the big statement. The goal was to make those of us of less intellect scratch our heads trying to figure out what the statement was, in a vain attempt to peirce the depth and profundity of their action.

  86. No, no. You misunderstand (which is not surprising, because–after all–you didn’t go to Yale).

    There actually ISN’T a “statement” at all–which is, itself, the big statement. The goal was to make those of us of less intellect scratch our heads trying to figure out what the statement was, in a vain attempt to peirce the depth and profundity of their action.

    Ah, but are you sure that it was not a non-statement with a hidden real statement, bigger than the “BIG STATEMENT”? It has many parallels to the ‘palestinian’ struggle you know.

    If only the home owner had blasted a little buckshot through these little braniacs it would have been a much more profound statement.

    They should have burned a Yale grad’s flag if they wanted someone to be in on the statement and help them make their point!

  87. They were a bunch of drunk teenagers being stupid. Its just plain simple vandalism, and should be treated just like they’d treat it if it had been a decorative flag.

    Is there any reason to believe that isn’t how it is being treated? It seems to me like exactly the same charges would obtain if they had burned a bedsheet that was hanging off the house.

  88. Is there any reason to believe that isn’t how it is being treated? It seems to me like exactly the same charges would obtain if they had burned a bedsheet that was hanging off the house.

    The campus ‘communtiy’ already has the ball rolling for this being a “political statement”.

    In the minds of some, destroying any American flag is a duty.

  89. The campus ‘communtiy’ already has the ball rolling for this being a “political statement”.

    On any campus, the “campus community” is a shrill idiot and should be strictly ignored at all times. Ask any Duke lacrosse player.

  90. Me and the fellers excorcized our free speach rites last nite burnin a cross in the yard down the other side of the tracks. The hood just protects ya from the fire.
    Yes we did BYOC.

  91. To review:

    – making the desecration of a proud symbol of our nation illegal would be a gross violation of these kids’ precious rights

    – if somebody had just shot them, it would have served them right

    Got it.

  92. JB,

    On any campus, the “campus community” is a shrill idiot and should be strictly ignored at all times. Ask any Duke lacrosse player.

    Impossible! This is Yale that we are talking about!

    SGPM,

    Seems like something got past you, but I am not bright enough to explain to you why it is fine to shoot people trying to burn your house down, no matter what portion that they begin with.

  93. making the desecration of a proud symbol of our nation illegal would be a gross violation of these kids’ precious rights

    I disagree – the only thing standing between us and total anarchy is more laws. Flag burning is reaching epidemic proportions, and if we don’t act now soon all the flags will be gone, and our children will have nothing to salute. Dammit, think of the children!

  94. First of all what are these professor’s teaching these kids? Is burning our nations flag o.k.? I will answer that for you….NO!!!
    What these people need to realize is what that flag that they are burning represents. Among other things past color, stars and strips, it is the one thing that every soldier looks at and thinks of all of those before him (or her) who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to see that our great flag will wave bright and tall everyday in our nations capital all the way to the smallest neigborhoods across America, to the the fire bases in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is not some piece of cloth that some ignorant people can use to make a statement. The statement I think they are making when I see young and old CITIZENS of our great nation is this, that they hate this country and they piss on every soul who has fallen to keep that flag true to our nation. Well let me tell you if you came to my neighborhood and decided you were going to burn a flag in public…..I would be arrested for beating your ignorant @$$. Stop being ignorant people. Learn a little history from our great nation. If you don’t like what we have here…….leave. Kids going to college…..question professor’s….they aren’t the all knowing. College is a place to develop your OWN mind….not follow others minds’. To sum it up I think burning our nations flag should be a crime in itself and should be treated as an act of treason. Maybe then people would take the law serious enough to think about what they are doing before they act. Burning our nations flag….how disrespectful! Be ashamed!

  95. “Is burning our nations flag o.k.? I will answer that for you….NO!!!”

    yes it is. it’s okay.

    to sum up your post:

    What these people need to realize is what that flag that they are burning represents. Among other things past color, stars and strips, it is the one thing that every soldier looks at and thinks of all of those before him (or her) who have paid the ultimate sacrifice to see that our great flag will wave bright and tall everyday in our nations capital all the way to the smallest neigborhoods across America, to the the fire bases in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is not some piece of cloth that some ignorant people can use to make a statement. The statement I think they are making when I see young and old CITIZENS of our great nation is this, that they hate this country and they piss on every soul who has fallen to keep that flag true to our nation. Well let me tell you if you came to my neighborhood and decided you were going to burn a flag in public…..I would be arrested for beating your ignorant @$$. Stop being ignorant people. Learn a little history from our great nation. If you don’t like what we have here…….leave. Kids going to college…..question professor’s….they aren’t the all knowing. College is a place to develop your OWN mind….not follow others minds’. To sum it up I think burning our nations flag should be a crime in itself and should be treated as an act of treason. Maybe then people would take the law serious enough to think about what they are doing before they act. Burning our nations flag….how disrespectful! Be ashamed!

  96. A flag represents a dyed piece of cloth to everybody who isn’t a mouth-breathing jingoist, but I digress…

    Then why bother burning it as an expression of an idea?

    To piss off mouth-breathing jingoists, obviously.

  97. Symbols are not the things they represent. How about a law against trampling on liberties and ignoring Constitutional limits?

  98. to sum up your post:

    Elegant way to put it.

  99. thank you, Sir 1/2 B

  100. “”””If you have problems with the policies of this country, by all means express your discontent in an adult manner. But sometimes we do need to ban particularly offensive and useless actions such as flag burning.”””””

    If the action is useless, why are you complaining?

    “””Symbols are not the things they represent. How about a law against trampling on liberties and ignoring Constitutional limits?”””

    Good one Pro. To the anti-flag burning crowd, it’s more important for the flag to represent the values than to live under those values.

  101. I have always thought it problematic to categorize the burning of objects as speech. At the same time, I see no reason why the state has the legitimate power to single out a particular type of property a burner may not ignite on his own property, assuming the igniter owns what is lit on fire. Of course, physical safety my give the state the right to prohibit the burner from, say, burning an object that produces a high level of toxic fumes, but generally speaking, if a municipality allows a property owner to burn leaves from his trees on his property, there doesn’t seem to be any legitimate way to prohibit him from burning an American flag made out of cotton or other vegetable matter.

  102. test

  103. Patriot,

    I’m a veteran of the United States Army. When I joined up, I knew I might someday have to fight and die for your freedoms, and those of every other American. The freedom to speak out against our own country – and our own government – is one of the most important freedoms we have.

    If you want to take away the freedom of my countrymen to speak out by burning a flag, than let me assure you that I consider you neither a patriot nor respectful to the sacrifices of my fellow soldiers.

    If you want to put people to death (you do know what the penalty for treason is, yes?) for burning a symbol, or if you really do ever beat someone’s “ignorant @$$” for exercising one of their own freedoms, well, here is something I said once:

    I, Jacob Boone, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic…

    Quit pretending to speak for “every soldier.” Have a Coke and a smile and STFU.

  104. The great irony of laws prohibiting burning the U.S. flag is that the Stars and Stripes they are designed to protect were first assembled by the light of burning American flags, which at that time were British union jacks.

    Read the Declaration, folks. We were born flag-burners.

  105. Those who claim burning a flag is disrespectful, are wrong. It’s why the flag is burned which they have a problem. They just don’t admit the “protest against America” is what they really hate.

    Here is what the U.S. code says about burning a US flag. Title 4 chapter 1 section 8 says,

    (k) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

    According to US code, buning of the flag is the dignified way to destroy one. So what’s the problem? It’s not that people are burning flags before they are no longer a fitting emblem, they don’t factor that in their argument. They just say is wrong to burn a flag which, in and of its self, is wrong. At least according to US code.

  106. well i think it should not be a crime since it is just a piece of cloth that is mass produced in factories almost everyday there are millions of us flags so why not burn 1 or 2 here and there 🙂

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