Peace, Love, and Hosers

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In New York state's alt-weekly Metroland, David King journeys into the unknown world of American war resisters in Canada.

Zaslofsky notes that being granted sanctuary in Canada as a war resister is much more difficult now than it was during the Vietnam War era. Despite that, he says, life as a war resister in Canada these days is not as grueling and difficult as one might expect. "When they make refugee claims, they apply for a work permit. After the red tape, they get access to health care."

And thank goodness for that!

Zaslofsky notes that a number of resisters have been in Canada for two years now and have become pretty well integrated into society. It is simply a matter of applying for amnesty and appealing court decisions. "When they get a negative decision, we will appeal it to the courts," he says, "and that will take years. Some have been here two and a half years now, living and working. They are not rich or anything…"

The number of AWOL soldiers and military families in Canada is pretty negligible, but as King finds, they're pretty safe from extradition.

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  1. “War resister”? Is this the new way of saying “military deserter”? It is one thing to evade being unwillingly drafted into the Army. It’s quite another to willingly join, accept all of the benefits, and then suddenly decide you’re an objector when you find out you might actually have go to war.
    These aren’t courageous people of counscience. They are cowards and oathbreakers. Canada should be ashamed to have them in their presence.

  2. Agree with Eryk in slightly less harsh terms. Desertion from a duty you have signed up for is not the same as avoiding a draft.

  3. Jason Ligon,

    There may be some circumstances – like unilateral extension of enlistenment – which while technically legal we might find immoral. I’d have to look at the specific situation though.

  4. Agree with Eryk in slightly harsher terms.

  5. Dunno about you folks, but when I joined the military, my oath was to the Constitution of the United States. To protect it from enemies foreign AND domestic. Obviously the issue is problematic, but I think to paint it in such black and white terms is wrong.

  6. “It is Army procedure to shut down the medical coverage of deserters.”

    Imagine that?

    See this is what I don’t get: the “free will” part you guys covered. Still, I can see where he’s coming from and even have some sympathy for him. I doubt he came to the decision easily. But to attend rallies and such and set yourself up as some sort of spokesperson or role model to me is absurd. I can understand doing it, I can’t understand being proud of it.

  7. PL,

    Good point, but as far as I know, when you join the military, it’s an eight year commitment (no matter how many years of active duty you think you are signing up for). I don’t know of anyone who has ever been had their enlistment involuntarily extended past 8 years, which I believe would be illegal.

  8. Phil L: Those things are in the contract, as far as I know. “Mission First” and all that. Now, often recruiters lie and may therefore be guilty of fraud, but reading and understanding all of the enlistment paperwork before signing up is the responsiblity of those entering service. It’s not like people in the US military were press-ganged.

  9. For reference:

    “I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservations or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God.”

  10. I am simply arguing that while as a general rule we agree (less harshly perhaps) with Mr. Boston’s statement, at the same time there may be some exceptions to that rule.

  11. Had I received an induction notice in 1973, there is about a 95% probability that I would be tapping away on these keys somewhere in western Canada right now. In modern times, I thought invading Iraq was a fantastically stupid idea as soon as the plan was unveiled.

    Having said that, I have zero respect for somebody who voluntarily walked in to a recruiter’s office, signed the papers and swore the oath, but has now decided to lam off to Canada. If he went to his commanding officer and said, “Sir, I believe this war is illegal and I cannot in good conscience obey your orders” and then accepted whatever punishment the army decided to impose, I could respect him (or her).

  12. After the red tape, they get access to health care.

    Lets just be perfectly clear: they get access to health care paid for with wealth confiscated from others by the state.

    Heroic, no?

  13. If someone truly objects to the war, they can apply to be a conscientious objector. The standard is that you have to have a geniune religious conversion and object to all wars not this one. My experience, however, has been that the Army at least interprets that standard pretty broadly. I have seen Muslims get out by claiming they couldn’t go to war against other Muslims, which doesn’t technically meet the standard since you much object to all wars. If you are catagorized as a conscientious objector you still go but are given non-violent jobs that don’t conflict with your views. Of course, helping wounded or digging ditches in Iraq is not quite as nice as going to Canada and whining.

    There is of course the option of refusing to go and taking your punishment. Sigfried Sassoon wrote his famous statement condeming World War I and refused to fight in the trenches anymore. Sassoon risked court-martial and was sent to a mental hospital over his statement. If someone is willing to refuse and accept a public trial for breaking their oath, even if you disagree with them, you have to respect it at some level. They are willing to sacrifice for their beliefs. People who won’t get on the plane and just run away to Canada are not sacrificing anything. They are just cowards and the worst sorts of opportunists. Someone has to take their spot and go who wouldn’t have otherwise had to go thanks to their cowardice. We don’t have a draft. They chose to join the military knowing that someday they might have to go to war and it might not be the war of their choosing. They are not draft reisters or war resisters they are deserters and cowards and the worst form of scum imaginable.

  14. “Zaslofsky notes that being granted sanctuary in Canada as a war resister is much more difficult now than it was during the Vietnam War era.”

    Back in the days of the draft, leaving your country to avoid compulsory military service (involuntary servitude) would have been a perfectly legitimate course of action.

    With today’s completely voluntary armed service, this Canadian has no respect whatsoever for anyone who wears a uniform and cashes their paychecks, but runs away when called upon for duty. The morally legitimate thing to do is to put in writing your intent to disobey your deployment orders, and then enter a guilty plea at your court martial.

    But, this Canadian also believes that if you choose to legitimately migrate here (not as a refugee), whatever unresolved issues or consequences you’ve left behind are strictly your responsibility. It’s not our business to get involved. So while we won’t be concerning ourselves with hunting you down and sending you home, don’t expect us to actively interfere on your behalf either. Basically, deal with your own shit.

  15. Take off! To the Great White North.
    Take off! It’s a beauty way to go.
    Take off! To the Great White North.

  16. These people need to be extradited and jailed, they are violating the rights of others. Even if you think the war is illegal, your absence requires someone else to take your place. Someone whose number is not up will sacrifice. Also you are stealing public resources by receiving the benefits, training and pay. The same thing should have happened with the Vietnam cowards. I know that is not the libertarian view, but so be it.

  17. “They chose to join the military knowing that someday they might have to go to war and it might not be the war of their choosing. They are not draft reisters or war resisters they are deserters and cowards and the worst form of scum imaginable.”

    I can think of a guy that one might put in this category, except, in his case, he was allowed to “desert” through his paternal connections. More generally, it was a classic example of the dispensation that the wealthy tend to get in these sorts of cases.

    Can you guess who this guy is?

    How about the guy that had other things to do when his number came up…five times?

    Can the “deserters are the worst scum” crowd get a little ramped up about these sorts of “desertions”? Or is their ire only reserved for pissants who go to Canada?

  18. It’s like it was typed by angels.

  19. Budgie,

    Did he abandon post to avoid conflict? Is he prosecutable for his actions under UCMJ? If so, he is a deserter and if not he isn’t. There is your distinction.

  20. Just on the narrow point, “Someone has to take their spot and go who wouldn’t have otherwise had to go thanks to their cowardice.”

    also written as, “Even if you think the war is illegal, your absence requires someone else to take your place. Someone whose number is not up will sacrifice.”

    That “someone” also volunteered for the military of his own free will. If I’m not supposed to have any sympathy for Solider A having to face combat because he’s a volunteer, than why should I have sympathy for Soldier B having to face combat?

    Or, phrased another way, if it’s a terrible disservice that Soldier B is to be sent to Iraq, then shouldn’t that same concern translate to some sympathy for Soldier A?

    Without commenting on the broader point, I’ll just say that I don’t think this is your strongest argument.

  21. To clarify, no one here is objecting to avoiding a draft, which I’d suspect somewhere near 100% of us feel is immoral in the first place.

  22. The number of AWOL soldiers and military families in Canada is pretty negligible, but as King finds, they’re pretty safe from extradition.

    The former is the only reason for the latter. With the Conservatives in power, Canada is unlikely to brave serious US enmity. Lines in the sand stands, on both sides of the border, are being saved for established industries like fish and lumber. As Americas little brother, even those dust-ups consist mostly of noogies and shoulder punches.

  23. I’ve never thought that this was a cut-and-dried issue. Is it consistent with a free society to have a system where people can voluntarily sign away many of their civil liberties? The draft is clearly wrong, in my book, but the volunteer army has some problems, too. And, it’s more volunteer for those who can resign than for those who can’t, right?

    On the other hand, far be it for me to suggest that we can have a military where people can just walk over the hill during combat. I’m not sure what the solution is, but I’m also not so comfortable with enforced service that I’m going to launch into heavy condemnations of those who change their minds about fighting. I’ve never served, so throwing that rock would be a mite hypocritical, anyway. Maybe if you leave early you have a nondischargeable $200,000 debt to pay back or something. Or maybe you have to move to Canada. Or maybe we just shoot your ass. Obviously, I’m not the one to come to for resolution of this matter 🙂

  24. “Did he abandon post to avoid conflict? Is he prosecutable for his actions under UCMJ? If so, he is a deserter and if not he isn’t. There is your distinction.”

    Ahh! The UCMJ, this timeless piece of objective moral clarity. If you’re debating the morality of deserting/shirking duty, shouldn’t your views be based upon moral beliefs rather than arbitrary administrative regulations?

    If the UCMJ is seen as part and parcel of what you’re signing up to do, then I can understand from a contractual point of view, but still…

  25. Is it consistent with a free society to have a system where people can voluntarily sign away many of their civil liberties?

    If indeed “you own yourself”, which I think is the basis for libertarianism, then forbidding such signing-away is inconsistent with a free society. Of course, you’d have to have protections in place to make absolutely sure that someone who signs away their rights is doing so with full knowledge and complete consent, but ultimately a person must be free to do what they will with their assets.

  26. Pro Liberate,

    If people cannot sign away their civil liberties than you can’t have a society. What is a contract if not “signing away your civil liberties”. Further, you can’t have a society without an army to defend that society. You can’t have an army that only goes to war when everyone in it agrees to. Clearly, at some level there reaches a point where the Army has moral duty to disobey its masters and refuse orders. For example, if the President unlaterally ordered an insurection, that would clearly be an illegal order and the military should refuse down to the lowliest private. I am not sure exactly where that point is but it certainly exists.

    Wherever that point is, the war in both Afghanistan and Iraq are not even close. Both conflicts were authorized by Congress and supported by a sizable portion of the American people. The war in Afghanistan was explicitly authorized by the U.N. and international law and the war in Iraq was argueably authorized by U.N. Security Council 1442 and supported by a several other nations. It is certainly reasonable to argue that the war in Iraq was a mistake, wrongheaded or even illegal under a strict reading of international law. I don’t agree with those positions but reasonable minds differ. It is not reasonable, however, to claim that either war is so immoral as to rise to the level of imposing a moral obligation on those serving in the military to refuse to go. To say so is to enter the land of tinfoil hats.

    Really the refusniks, even if you give them the benifit of the doubt and assume they are not just opportunists, are at best saying “I disagree with the war therefore I shouldn’t have to go”. That argument might fly in the case of a draft, but it can’t work in the case of a volunteer military. By joining the military they agreed to go to obey whatever order given to them up until the point that the order is so blantly wrong and immoral that they have a unquestionable moral duty to disobey.

  27. JOE-

    You should have sympathy on soldier “B” because he is now doing more then his share.
    From a contractual point of view joining the reserves is a lot like issuing an insurance policy. The service member gets “premiums” (pay, benefits) for which under most circumstances he only has to perform 38 days of training a year. When the Army has a “claim” he is forced to leave his family and job and actually go earn the benefits, both past and future. Of course many soldiers want to go to war, but lets assume that we are talking about an average Joe who already did a rotation and decided war didn’t suit him. He is just waiting for his enlistment to end so he can get on with life. When he gets sent to replace the deserter, this guy is paying for someone else’s “claim” even though the other guy enjoyed the premiums.

    JASON-

    “To clarify, no one here is objecting to avoiding a draft, which I’d suspect somewhere near 100% of us feel is immoral in the first place. ”

    I have to disagree with that. I do think the draft is immoral, but I think being a draft dodger is also immoral. When you say that the draft is immoral, I assume you mean that DRAFTING people is immoral, not being drafted yourself. If you dodge the draft you are not helping anyone but yourself. Someone who would otherwise not have to serve will be compelled to take your place. You have done nothing to help end the draft. It’s like if you got arrested and sentenced to jail for smoking pot. It is wrong that you are in jail, and you have a natural right to be free. However, would it be moral to escape if you knew someone else would be randomly pick to be jailed in your place?

  28. crimethink,

    I’m not trying to go all soft and fuzzy here or pretend that getting people to fight (a likely necessity for the U.S. in today’s world, though that’s a debatable point–plenty of isolationists think differently) is easy without some sort of compulsion; I’m just expressing some discomfort for the idea.

    Fundamental rights are supposed to be unalienable (or inalienable–pick your poison). That means that while we can perhaps weaken them a l? John and John Locke to have a functional civil society, trading them away wholesale is presumably objectionable. There’s certainly a long tradition–even for volunteers–of giving up a lot to serve in the military, and I don’t doubt that reality requires that we run the military that way to some extent. My question is more where we should draw the line. For instance, I think it is immoral and probably unconstitutional to change the terms of service unilaterally and after the fact. If a war’s worth fighting, getting recruits shouldn’t be that hard.

    Of course, this will all be moot when we have robot death machines.

  29. “Of course, you’d have to have protections in place to make absolutely sure that someone who signs away their rights is doing so with full knowledge and complete consent”

    Just an aside- I enlisted the day after I turned 17 for an 8 year term. I went to boot camp the summer before my sr. year of highschool. If a 17 year old can throw grenades, deploy claymores, and sign away many of his rights, why can’t he smoke, drink, and get laid by an older women?

  30. Jason: “To clarify, no one here is objecting to avoiding a draft, which I’d suspect somewhere near 100% of us feel is immoral in the first place.”

    Sam: “I have to disagree with that. I do think the draft is immoral, but I think being a draft dodger is also immoral.”

    If you are avoiding a draft, the moral course of action is to leave your country (and relinquish your citizenship if necessary) when conscription is signed into law… not after your number is drawn in the lottery.

  31. Here’s a pile of video from the CBC archives on the subject of draft dodgers and deserters from the Vietnam era. (Warning: includes Sammy Davis Junior.)

    And a bonus clip: William Gibson (yes, that William Gibson) showing a CBC reporter around Yorkville, the original hippie/dodger destination in Toronto.

    I once found a cache of microfilmed dodger/deserter “underground newspapers,” and one thing that became obvious was how many people went into exile with completely unrealistic ideas of what it would be like. After a short period of elation at having escaped the war, most of them started feeling seriously lonely, depressed, and guilty — guilty that they had gone into exile while others had gone to jail, or had taken their place in Vietnam. Dodgers were pretty unpopular with the anti-war crowd back in the US, because the feeling was that those fleeing to Canada not only escaped the war in Vietnam, but had also escaped the struggle against the draft. There was a definite class divide (and antagonism) between the more educated and middle-class dodgers and the deserters; deserters tended to get in trouble more often, had trouble getting jobs, and were blamed for crime in the “American ghetto” on Baldwin street. And the deserters thought the dodgers were a bunch of poncey assholes who had sacrificed nothing and had no idea how tough it really was in Vietnam.

    One interesting sidelight: the left-wing Canadian nationalist attitude toward the new American arrivals was, basically, deytukerjurbs!!

  32. They are not draft reisters or war resisters they are deserters and cowards and the worst form of scum imaginable.

    Your imagination must be somewhat limited.

    My granfather cheated on his hearing examination to get into the army in the second world war following Pearl Harbor. If there’s a problem with deserters and draft dodgers, it’s because the people don’t believe in the war – maybe that’s a clue that we shouldn’t be fighting it.

  33. she knew her husband was loyal to the Army

    He’s so loyal, why, he’s moved to Canada to help recruit the Canucks.

    Last I checked there is no draft. When you voluntarily sign on the dotted line there is a presumtion that you might have to use an M-16 before you get your tax-paid college education or your nice retirement bennies (turns and spits).

    Here’s a hot tip. If your against war, don’t join the Army.

    Side note, Amnesty International considers any jailed deserter to be a political prisoner regardless of the fact that he/she volunteered. I have that in writing on their letterhead by the way.

  34. AML, While your overall point is correct, there were plenty of deserters during WWII. There were also plenty CO’s who didn’t believe in war at any cost. Some were prosecuted some became medics and some were granted deferrments.

  35. I find it curious that if you asked the average American what they thought of indentured servitude they would likely answer, “We’re a civilized country. We don’t allow that type of thing.” And, yet, that’s exactly what we still have in the military. And, to a degree, in professional sports.

    (Admittedly, you’d have to explain to the average American what the multi-syllable phrase “indentured servitude” means, before asking them what they thought of it.)

  36. My roommate (the same one that admires Castro and Chavez) believes that we essentially have a “draft without a draft” today, in that small town kids (like her boyfriend) are forced to join the military in order to get ahead in life, and should desert if forced to go to a war they disagree with, because they’re essentially there by economic compulsion. I tried to remind her of the existence of the PeaceCorps, AmeriCorps, and Stafford Loans, and that some of my friends from poor small-town backgrounds skipped the military and government route and just ran up $100k in debt to finance their educations, but then she reminded me that, as a child of an executive, I couldn’t possibly understand the “plight of the proletariat” (and somehow she, the child of two Emmy-winning Hollywood screenwriters, can).

    Now, on members of the National Guard, she might have a point; it strikes me that homeland defense and true emergencies (not elective wars on the other side of the globe) are the real purposes for having a reserve, and a Guardsman could be morally justified in refusing to serve in an elective conflict abroad (but not in, say, border security or disaster relief, which would be within the purview of the job description of “National Guard”). On the other hand, I don’t think an active duty soldier is justified at all; you’ve signed up to be a field mercenary for Uncle Sam, and you take what that entails.

  37. Postmodern,

    As I am sure you know your roommate is an idiot. This “only poor people who have no other choice joining the military” was horse shit when people were saying in the 1960s and it is horse shit now. The statistics just don’t bear out what she is saying. The military predominately comes from the middle class. Rich people don’t join, but that has always been the case with a few exceptions. Neither do the poorest parts of society either. If anything, there is a regional problem. The military tends to come disproportionately from the South and the Midwest and not from the coast. No doubt your roommate thinks anyone who is not from a blue state is a barefoot poor bucktoothed hillbilly, which probably explains her belief.

  38. Man, oh man. . .memories. I had a two roomies like that at UC Santa Cruz – which is why I’m now HM2(DV)Jen Brown. John: I agree with you that we have a whole lot of representation from Texas in this here military, but I think you’re underestimating the number of poor(er) people who join. I’ve seen and worked with some of those bucktoothed hillbillies, myself.

  39. You might also sweetly inquire of your beknighted roommate what policies obtain in Castro’s Cuba regarding military service. (Hint: it ain’t just “economic compulsion.”)

    Your roommate is a willfully ignorant drooling moron.

  40. Postmodern,

    God only deals out so much intelligence. Sometimes people who are the best at more esoteric things like Attic Greek and Classical Latin, have the hardest time understanding reality and more practical endeavors. That and I think people with extreme political beliefs of any kind usually hold them for emotional reasons. Something tells me that if you could untwist your roommate’s psyche you would find a deep alienation from society as the root of her holding onto such extreme and illogical beliefs.

  41. JenD,

    There are bucktoothed hillbillies everywhere, even from the blue states. Ever been to upstate New York or anywhere in Vermont outside of Burlington? Being a lower enlisted in the military is a low paying high risk job. I am all with the God and Country crowd but people are rational. If I were some trustfund baby hanging out in Berkley raging against the man and the capitalist system, I wouldn’t work for a living letalone take a hard job. Some enlisted come from dreadfully poor backgrounds but just as many or more come from typical middle and lower middle class backgrounds, as you would expect considering the pay and sacrifice demanded.

  42. PS:

    So what if she’s an idiot. Chicks tend to be. Is she hot?

  43. The Other Mark,

    I have been there. I dated an attorney for PETA one time. She was unbelievably hot, and I went along for the ride as long as good. Ultimately though, a real wingnut will drive you nuts no matter how hot she is. You can’t pretend to believe that crap for more than a month or so.

  44. “If the UCMJ is seen as part and parcel of what you’re signing up to do, then I can understand from a contractual point of view, but still…”

    Yes. That is the point. UCMJ spells out explicitly what constitutes deserting and/or shirking duty for military personnel. So, if you are Budgie and you are trying to determine why different standards might apply, that would be a good place to start.

    Getting a cushy assignment is not the same as abandoning post, neither legally nor morally.

  45. ” If a 17 year old can throw grenades, deploy claymores, and sign away many of his rights, why can’t he smoke, drink, and get laid by an older women?”

    Back in the bad old days, he could. When I was a lad, in upstate New York (I am obligated at this juncture to deny that I am a bucktoothed hillbilly), the legal drinking age was eighteen. I and many of my friends were regulars in three or four different bars when we were seventeen. Luckily for you, the Powers What Be have learned from my execrable misbehavior, and saved you from having to live through such horrors. Take their word for it- it wasn’t that much fun, anyway.

    Hahahahaaaaa!

  46. re: “If a 17 year old can throw grenades, deploy claymores, and sign away many of his rights, why can’t he smoke, drink, and get laid by an older women?”

    Nowadays, it wouldn’t be unusual at all to go from an extremely sheltered high school environment where you can be put on probation for bringing a squirt gun to school straight into being taught to be a lean, mean killing machine in boot camp.

  47. If a 17 year old can throw grenades, deploy claymores, and sign away many of his rights, why can’t he smoke, drink, and get laid by an older women?”

    I totally agree. I hate the way we infalize adolescents. How about this idea, if you join and serve in the reserves or active duty military, you can drink before 21. Something tells me that would increase recruiting.

  48. “Getting a cushy assignment is not the same as abandoning post, neither legally nor morally.”

    This guy I heard about did just that–abandoned post–during the Tet Offensive. It just seems funny to me how selectively people choose to dole out their barbs. Have they been asleep for the last five years or so?

    I’ll have a look at the UCMJ Jason, but my hunch is that what it says wasn’t applied to this guy I heard about. It was and will continue to be applied to other schmucks who aren’t as well connected. If any of the several members of my family who served during Vietnam had gone AWOL during Tet or just conveniently stopped showing up and checking in with their units here in the U.S., they would have certainly been courtmartialed.

    So, the distinction seems more to be this: anyone who is unlucky enough to not have key connections when their number comes up is “the worst scum imaginable” while the others get to stand in front of flags and strut around like John Wayne. It really makes me lose respect for the whole institution.

    This guy in Canada should have stayed and made his case here in the U.S., but people who get excited about this negligible community of deserters should demonstrate a bit more curiosity and skepticism when looking at the big picture.

    If that’s not possible, why have this dicussion at all?

  49. “If a 17 year old can throw grenades, deploy claymores, and sign away many of his rights, why can’t he smoke, drink, and get laid by an older women?”

    Agreed. I used to tend bar near a barracks, and I never forced a marine to undergo the indignity of being carded, though I’m sure many of them were underaged. I would have been happy to go down for doing so and it would have made a great judicial theater.

  50. “Agreed. I used to tend bar near a barracks, and I never forced a marine to undergo the indignity of being carded, though I’m sure many of them were underage. I would have been happy to go down for doing so and it would have made a great judicial theater.”

    Old school (95′) reserve military ID’s made great fakes. You had a clerk with a typewriter who typed the info on a cardboard card, took a Polaroid, and put the whole thing in a laminator. So you delaminate it, change 1978 to 1973, and laminate it at the library. The ID’s now have computer chips and are tamper proof.

  51. So what if she’s an idiot. Chicks tend to be.

    The kind who would talk to you, maybe.

  52. Pro Liberate,

    I’m with you in having some level of sympathy for the guy who joins up and comes to the conclusion he’s made a grave mistake for any number of reasons. You could see where his mind is at when he deserts.

    What gets me is to do so and then lead a bunch of rallies up in Canada and do newspaer interviews as if this is something to be _proud_ of. I can see being ashamed of it be feeling you had to do it anyway. I just can’t see rejoicing in your decision and holding it up as some sort of example.

  53. There are bucktoothed hillbillies everywhere, even from the blue states. Ever been to upstate New York or anywhere in Vermont outside of Burlington?

    Not sure about Vermont, but upstate NY is more magenta than blue. I won’t comment on the teeth. ;=(3)

  54. Again:

    That’s because the type of person you describe is known in the original latin as an asshole.

  55. yeah it should be pretty hard to sell your self into slavory…one way and perhaps it should be the only way is the military…i really have no simpathy for diserters….draft dodgers on the other hand are Heros.

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