Anti-Terror Democracy Building—Update

|

Kuwait remains suspicious of the whole political party thing, Reuters reports:

Kuwait's prime minister said on Monday that there were no plans to allow political parties at present, after the parliament speaker said it was time for the country to consider legalizing them.

"I say there is no intention pertaining to the issue of political parties; there's a constitution that explains these issues so let's leave it to the constitution," Prime Minister Shaikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah told reporters.

Meanwhile, Afghanistan has elected to parliament the governor who was in office when the Taliban blew up two 1,500-year-old Buddha statues in Bamiyan province. Mawlawi Mohammed Islam Mohammadi blames the destruction on "Chechens and Arabs" who controlled the Taliban.

We got it, Mo.

NEXT: Me and You and a Dog Named Glue

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Good for Kuwait! Now if only they can avoid entangling foreign alliances…

  2. Sure it starts off innocently enough with political parties, but next thing you know voters are demanding rights and acting like the government has some kind of accountability to their wishes.

  3. Tangential note: This guy wants to “recreate” those buddhist statues as a laser light show. If they legalize opium, stabilize that joint, and give me some kind of feeling that I won’t be dragged off into a cave to get my head chopped off, I might like to see that someday.

  4. I wish we could ban political parties here. Might actually end up with some independent political thought, instead of the “go team, yeah!” and the “you must choose between a douche bag and a shit sandwich” crap that passes for political debate we have now.

  5. Tangential note: This guy wants to “recreate” those buddhist statues as a laser light show.

    Turn back time to 1983, and we’re half way to a Ronnie James Dio concert.

  6. I do believe Dio was in Sabbath at the time, but I could be wrong…

  7. “I do believe Dio was in Sabbath at the time, but I could be wrong…”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Diver

  8. My favorite Dio band was Elf. The first album, anyway.

  9. Well, I’m glad I live in America, where anyone can start a political party. Of course, the two parties in power do their darnedest to make it practically impossible for a third party to actually get on the ballot, but…

  10. The great thing about Dio’s first turn in Sabbath is it gave Iommi a new song writing partner with whom he could update his sound. I mean who does not hear Eddie Van Halen’s influence in Lady Evil, for example?

    /ultimate threadjack

  11. Being the world’s most fanatic Sabbath w/Dio fan, I’ll have to disagree. “Lady Evil” is more clearly a Blackmore influence than an EVH influence. The guitar riff involves the use of what I call ‘running fourths’, much like Blackmore’s typical stuff, rather than the older Iommi power chords based on fifths. EVH’s riffing also used fourths, but I hear more of the Blackmore influence on Lady Evil and other Heaven & Hell tracks.

    By the way, Dio left Sabbath in 1982. They were mixing a live album but couldn’t manage to get in the studio at the same time–Iommi and Butler claimed that Dio was turning up the vocal tracks and Dio claimed they were turning them down. Good drugs all around, I’m sure.

    God I love a good threadjack. 🙂

  12. That’s waaaay too analytical. It’s Black Sabbath for cryin’ out loud.

    Having said that, I’ve never heard any Van Halen influence on any of that branch of heavy metal.

  13. Alright, if not Lady Evil how about Walk Away? Very VH slamming of bright of Gs and Ds with open A chugging. Toss in the “oh-O” backing vocals, and you got VHI or II.*

    *Note, I much prefer Sabbath to VH. I note this only in the service of historical accuracy.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.