Pot on the Ballot

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NORML has a roundup of the marijuana initiatives that will be on state and local ballots tomorrow. The most far-reaching will be considered by voters in Alaska, where possession of up to four ounces in the home for personal use already is protected under the state constitution. The initiative would dramatically expand upon Alaska's relatively tolerant approach, requiring that "persons 21 years or older shall not be prosecuted, be denied any right or privilege, nor be subject to criminal or civil penalties for the possession, cultivation, distribution, or consumption" of hemp or cannabis, whether for medical, recreational, or industrial purposes. The initiative calls for a system of regulation similar to those for alcohol and tobacco.

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  1. Go Alaska!

  2. Finally, an issue worth taking the time to go vote. Wonder if I can write-in these fine initiatives on my Texas ballot.

  3. Oakland, CA has a city Measure Z to make enforcement of marijuana possession the city police’s “least priority” (whatever that legally means).

  4. Those crazy, free Alaskans. Don’t they know that legalization of certain plants will ultimately lead to rioting in the streets?

  5. Note to Alaska:

    If you can keep 4 o’s (!) and no one hassles you, QUIT WHILE YOU’RE AHEAD!! I would like to live up there someday, and don’t want to find a smoking hole courtesy of the DEA.

  6. The cool part of the Alaska situation is that even if Prop 2 fails to get the needed majority, possession of 4ozs in the home will still be a private affair based on the AK Supreme Court ruling earlier this summer.

    The ruling essentially clarifies that the state cannot make possession of 4ozs a criminal offense due to privacy and the inability of the state to demonstrate a legitimate danger to public health if no criminal law is in place.

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