The Feds vs. the Chinatown Bus: The Glorious Rebirth of American Bus Travel and Why the Government May Ruin it Again

The long-distance busing industry was originally dominated by small scrappy companies competing fiercely to win over customers, only to become a government-protected cartel with declining ridership and all the competitive spirit of Ma Bell. A half-century later, busing returned to its glorious origins, but today it’s in danger becoming a ward of the state once more.

In the 1910s, the very first American bus companies started picking up passengers on main streets all across America. There were few barriers to entry; entrepreneurs without much capital could buy or lease a motorcoach and then start doing regular pick-ups in front of a hotel or on a street corner.

Within a few years, local governments intervened to protect established companies from new competition. By 1925, most states required that bus companies apply for permission to service particular routes. The Motor Carrier Act of 1935 put the federal Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) in charge of regulating bus travel. The ICC did everything from set ticket prices to grant established companies the exclusive right to operate between certain cities.The long-distance busing industry was originally dominated by small scrappy companies competing fiercely to win over customers. ||| Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

Protected from competition, bus companies grew indifferent to the changing tastes of their customers. Americans relocated to the suburbs, while car and air travel exploded in popularity. As inner-city depots became dangerous and decrepit, bus companies failed to alter their business models. After World War II, U.S. bus travel fell by half in just a decade and then it kept declining.

The industry languished for the next half century. In 1982, President Reagan deregulated intercity bus travel, which cleared the way for new companies to get into the business and start fighting to win back passengers, but for the next decade and a half not much changed. Then in the late 1990s, a group of immigrants from Fujian Province, China reinvented the bus industry in New York City's Chinatown. These entrepreneurs brought busing back to its roots of picking up passengers right off the street instead of from a traditional station. (The Chinatown bus companies became known as curbside carriers.) Once again, pretty much all you needed to start a bus company was a bus.

The Chinatown operators also figured out a way to win over customers that had eluded the established carriers for decades: charge really low prices. In short order, companies like Greyhound, Peter Pan, and Coach USA started opening their own curbside services, and today intercity busing is the fastest growing form of intercity transit in the U.S.

Today, history is repeating itself. An onslaught of new safety rules are forcing many small bus operations out of business, allowing the corporate carriers to grab more market share. On May 31, 2012, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration shutdown 26 bus companies in a single day, and since then it has forced an additional 15 closures.

Chinatown bus service |||For a case study of the government's incompetence at regulating motorcoach travel, read “Why the Government Was Wrong to Shutdown Fung Wah Bus Company.”

Over-regulating bus lines actually makes passengers quite a bit less safe. Since all the shutdowns, ticket prices have spiked considerably. This means fewer people will be enticed to take the bus and leave their cars at home. Because buses are orders of magnitude safer than cars, travelers are far more likely to die on the highway.

Hosted by Naomi Brockwell. Written, shot, and edited by Jim Epstein.

About 9 minutes.

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  • ||

    Naomi, I want to bear all your children!

  • UnCivilServant||

    ...?

    As an Old Man, wouldn't you need a uterine implant first?

  • ||

  • Libertymike||

    Redheads are hot!

    Thankfully, my wife thinks so.

  • Steve G||

    lol. i only opened the comments to see who else drooled...

  • Live Free or Diet||

    The people who do the hiring at Reason TV are a bunch of pigs... Thankyou!Thankyou!Thankyou!Thankyou!Thankyou!

  • anon||

    Not gonna lie, I didn't even read the headline, just saw hot redhead.

  • ||

    That's always been my weakness. I married one and am still paying for that mistake.

  • ||

    Same here. My god she is a hottie. Yum. What was the article about?

  • grey||

    Why aren't there more Libertarian women?

  • SQRLSY One||

    You have to marry them and brainwash them, and THEN there will be Libertarian women!!! Or raise a daughter or two and do ditto... It's almost the only way...

  • Rights-Minimalist Autocrat||

    The love interest of the main character in the first short story I ever wrote was named Naomi. It's a sign!

  • ||

    Has the government EVER gotten involved in ANYTHING that has turned out well?

    Can anyone name ONE government success story? There's gotta be something. Oh yeah, NASA invented Velcro.

    Why can't the sheep see that EVERYTHING government touches becomes an unmitigated disaster?

  • kinnath||

    The Global Positioning System satellite network perhaps.

  • John||

    That is a good one. RADAR. But that is all just inventions perfected by the military. Not exactly an endorsement of the rest of the government.

  • some guy||

    Inventions likely perfected by the military before they were commercially viable. I have no doubt that the private sector would have eventually developed RADAR and GPS. They would have just spent less money on it by waiting until the tech was more mature and more people actually had the ability to use it.

  • kinnath||

    GPS would not exist without the deep pockets of Uncle Sam. The European Union is trying to put up a competitive system so they aren't dependent on us. But they struggling to find the money as austerity causes cutbacks.

    Private enterprise would never have been able to launch a navigation constellation based upon speculation that there might be a market for consumer goods.

  • some guy||

    The private sector is all about speculation. I'm not saying we'd have the same constellation we have now and it certainly wouldn't be paid for the same way, but it would exist. The reason there is no commercial alternative now is the same reason there is no commercial alternative to I-95.

  • kinnath||

    A new aircraft costs 5 billion to design and certify. Development doesn't start until the airlines have committed to buy 500 or so of the new aircraft.

    The GPS constellation is a 100 billion dollar problem. The operational costs are multiple billions per year.

    The market value of GPS applications approaches zero (Google Maps is free to me).

    There is no fucking business case for consumer GPS that is not fundamentally supported by the national defense industry.

    Alternate technologies may have sprung up, but not a direct replacement for the defense system known as GPS.

  • General Butt Naked||

    I could imagine a system, or the coordination of a few systems, that could work like GPS and be much cheaper on the infrastructure front.

    Besides, google maps isn't free, it just doesn't cost you anything.

  • some guy||

    There is no fucking business case for consumer GPS that is not fundamentally supported by the national defense industry.

    Again. Shipping and airlines were early adopters of GPS for a good reason. With GPS accuracy navigation ships don't go missing and planes don't get shot down for flying over Soviet airspace. What other solution would you have at sea? Are you going to go build fancy cell towers on buoys?

  • Brendan||

    The current GPS system is basically designed for navigation all over the world.

    A private sector built navigation constellation would have probably limited coverage to North America similar to Japan's system, and would have cost less than $100 billion.

  • kinnath||

    Japan's system is an add-on to GPS.

    Japan is focused on fixing the problems that GPS has with high-latitude locations, like Japan. The Japanese is is also focused on fixing the "urban canyon".

  • John||

    Probably so. RADAR was being worked on before the war. The war just speeded it up. GPS would have taken longer. The problem with GPS is that it is very hard for me to keep you from using my signal. Lets say I invent GPS and put up all of the satellites. How do I make my money back when anyone and everyone can pick up my signal? Every device that used GPS would have to have a license from me and pay me a fee.

    The one good thing government can do is create a commons and avoid the costs associated with intellectual property. Since the government put up the satellites, everyone is free to build a device that picks up the signal without having to pay royalties. And that is a good thing.

  • kinnath||

    License keys using encryption can keep snoops from using signals that can be easily seen.

  • Brendan||

    That would be easily doable. The military does this now with the (P(Y)) high precision GPS coding.

  • sarcasmic||

    The costs aren't avoided. They're dispersed.

  • John||

    Yes and no. I make my cost back plus profit for eternity given today's IP laws. The government just incurs the cost.

    If we had more sane IP laws, the case for it wouldn't be as good. Also, I think Kinnath makes a good point below. The reason why we have all of these great devices that use GPS is because GPS was there and people figured out how to use it. I am not convinced at all that a private company would have ever assumed the risk of spending that kind of money with no real idea what it would be used for or if there would ever be any return.

  • some guy||

    Since the government put up the satellites, everyone is free to build a device that picks up the signal without having to pay royalties. And that is a good thing.

    It's a good thing if you don't pay taxes. But all you have to do is encrypt the signal and lock down your hardware. The military currently has the ability to do this with the existing constellation. If war breaks out and we don't want the Russians or Chinese using our constellation we can deny it to them while maintaining the capability for ourselves.

    Many large industries would willingly fund a commercial GPS if public GPS did not exist. Airlines, shipping, automobiles, etc. would all see the obvious benefit and would be at the front of the line to make sure they had access.

  • John||

    Many large industries would willingly fund a commercial GPS if public GPS did not exist.

    Now they would because they know there is money to be made. But no one knew that before it was built. Kinnith below is right. No way would they have funded such a thing not knowing how anyone would use it. We only have all of these great applications because people had access to it and figured out how to use it. That is great. But "if we put this up we can figure out all kinds of ways to use it" isn't going to get a company to spend tens of billions of dollars.

    GPS never would not have happened without the government. And of course you can encrypt. And when you do that everyone in the world who uses GPS pays you a tax for using it in perpetuity long after you have recovered your cost. That is great for you. And that is how the market does and should work. But it is not so great for the rest of us. We are paying you forever when we could have just paid the government once.

  • ||

    (see my comments below under kinnath's double post)

    The first cell phones had the ability to triangulate position. You would have had very inaccurate moving maps based upon that. It wouldn't have been long before someone said I can fill this demand better...

    ...no satellites required.

  • John||

    Francisco,

    If we could get crappy but pretty much works GPS for a very low price or totally kick ass GPS for billions, the lower priced option would have won. The cell phone carriers would have just done triangulation and we wouldn't have satellite GPS.

    I don't know why people have such a hard time admitting this. GPS is a very special case. Admitting that yes, we all have gold plated GPS because the government spent money where the private sector would not have really doesn't justify anything beyond having GPS is fun.

  • some guy||

    All the industries I listed have known about the benefits of accurate navigation since their birth. The benefits of GPS weren't speculative to them.

    But it is not so great for the rest of us. We are paying you forever when we could have just paid the government once.

    Do you seriously believe that you are only paying the government once? GPS satellites have a lifetime and must be replaced. Your continuing fees to a commercial GPS company would cover that maintenance. Furthermore, a commercial satellite network would probably be better than the one we have because it would be geared towards commercial needs, rather than military.

  • AlexInCT||

    Actually because they are military satellites they are far better hardened to withstand crap that would kill commercial satellites, so I am not sure this assumption is correct.

  • DarrenM||

    But no one knew that before it was built.

    And only Government officials could do it because they were the only ones willing to gamble billions of dollars of OPM in the knowledge they would not go to prison for it.

  • John||

    And one last thing. Encryption wouldn't work. GPS doesn't require you to read the content of the signal. It is the signal itself that you use. All that is required is a receiver to pick up the signals from two satellites and a very accurate clock. You then compare the timing of the two signals to get your position. It wouldn't matter if the signal was encrypted. All I need is to pick up the signal. I don't need any information from it.

    So no, you couldn't encrypt. I don't' see how a private company could have prevented anyone and everyone from using their GPS system.

  • kinnath||

    You are incorrect. Rather that delve into the details of how GPS works, why don't you just trust me on this one.

  • robc||

    Not entirely true, there is a reason the original GPS had a blur, the military didnt want anyone else having hyper-accurate positioning, so there was something like a 100m blur on it originally.

    Clinton got rid of that, which made GPS usable for real applications.

  • ||

    So no, you couldn't encrypt.

    Bullshit!

    For years, the military had better accuracies than the GP. It wasn't until the late 90s that this capability was released to the public.

  • kinnath||

    The military still has way better accuracy than civilian GPS.

  • John||

    For years, the military had better accuracies than the GP.

    But was that because of the satellite or the accuracy of their equipment on the ground? Yes, if you classify the equipment necessary to get really accurate readings, people can't use your system. But last I looked a private company couldn't do that.

  • kinnath||

    GPS broadcasts separate signals for civilian and military uses. The military signal is protected so that civilians cannot use it.

  • some guy||

    All that is required is a receiver to pick up the signals from two satellites and a very accurate clock

    Not true. The signal includes when the signal was sent and where the satellite was when it sent it. Your receiver needs that information to do your calculation.

    Also, this is the system that exists. It's not the system that would exist if it had been commercially developed with profits in mind.

  • sarcasmic||

    GPS doesn't require you to read the content of the signal.

    Actually, it does. To be accurate the receiver must know the position of the satellite as well as the delay between signal being sent and received. To know this data must be sent and read. That's why GPS for civilian use was notoriously inaccurate until Clinton ordered that the signal no longer be scrambled.

  • kinnath||

    GPS Selective Availability:

    http://www.gps.gov/systems/gps/modernization/sa/

    The new satellites no longer support SA, so in the very near future it won't even be possible to reimpose SA.

  • some guy||

    The new satellites no longer support SA, so in the very near future it won't even be possible to reimpose SA.

    True. But my point is that SA is a possibility.

  • John||

    Ah that is a good point. You have to know the position of the satellite. I wasn't thinking.

  • sarcasmic||

    You were thinking of locating a transmitter with multiple receivers, as opposed to locating a receiver with multiple transmitters.

  • kinnath||

    Right, the starting point of your triangulation process is moving at high speeds very far from where you are. You need to know where the satellite and when it was there.

    And then you need to worry about doppler shifting (those buggers are moving pretty fast) as well as atmospheric conditions, and a bunch more technical shit. I'm a fairly smart engineer, and I can barely understand what the GPS guys are talking about when they talk about designing new products.

  • kinnath||

    Let's not forget relativity. The satellites move faster enough to effect time.

  • some guy||

    And they sit higher up in Earth's gravity well. That matters too. GPS is probably the only commonly used thing that actually needs to care about general relativity.

  • kinnath||

    Yup. When the US was busy fighting the evil empire and deficits didn't matter, they spent billions and billions of dollars putting up satellites so they could drop munitions with pin point accuracy.

    All the cool consumer applications were made by private parties of course.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Yes, but at what cost? That's what people miss when they claim that only the government could afford to develop systems like that. If this had been a purely private endeavor from the get-go, would launch costs be even 10% of what they've been? Bet not.

  • kinnath||

    I basically assume that government projects cost at least 10 times as much as a privately funded project would cost.

    But that still makes the development and rollout of the constellation itself a 10 billion dollar problem at least. This is for a system that has never existed and for which there are no known commercial application. The commercial, consumer application of GPS occured at least a decade after GPS rollout out.

    No one has deep enough pockets to run such a project that doesn't have the ability to take money out of the pockets of every member of the population under threat of imprisonment.

    Nature abhors a vacuum; some other lower-cost, lower-capability may have evolved to fit the niche of public GPS. But the version of the GPS that exists to day only exists because of the military application that drove it into being.

  • kinnath||

    The Global Positioning System satellite network perhaps.

  • ||

    I had this discussion with a friend the other day. I put it to him that had the government NOT launched the GPS constellation, similar functionality would likely have been incorporated into cell phone towers.

    The free market solution may have been initially less robust, but would have been significantly less expensive and would have grown into the same functionality we have now. Of course, you wouldn't be able to use it to drop bombs.

    Completely speculating, of course.

  • kinnath||

    Cell networks do a great job of covering populations, but totally suck at covering geography.

  • Robert||

    Isn't Google starting to do it with balloons?

  • ||

    The free market solution may have been initially less robust, but would have been significantly less expensive and would have grown into the same functionality we have now.

    I've got LTE in the middle of nowhere MT.

    There would be MORE towers to fill the gaps. Probably would be driven by the airline industry. A free market navigation upgrade that the government just can't seem to get done.

  • sarcasmic||

    ROOOOAAAADDDZZZZZ1111!!!1!!!

  • John||

    You got me. My favorite stat about that is OSHA. OSHA was passed in the early 1970s. At leas the last I looked in the mid 1990s, the on the job accident rate was exactly the same by any statistical measure as it was the year before OSHA was passed. So basically, OSHA hadn't resulted in any increase in workplace safety. But it made people feel good and like the government was doing something. So there is that.

  • some guy||

    Just like the Dept. of Education has had no effect on education, the DEA has had no effect on drug use/abuse, and the DoE has had no good effect on domestic energy prices.

  • sarcasmic||

    What are you talking about? In all of your examples government has reduced quality and increased prices. That is an effect. Sure it may not be the intended effect, but there has been an effect.

  • some guy||

    Yeah, yeah, "no good effect".

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    According to OHSA website:

    ◾Since 1970, workplace fatalities have been reduced by more than 65 percent and occupational injury and illness rates have declined by 67 percent. At the same time, U.S. employment has almost doubled.
    ◾Worker deaths in America are down—from about 38 worker deaths a day in 1970 to 13 a day in 2011.

    Doesn't indicate source, and I have to wonder how much of that can be attributed to things like changes in tort law rather than OHSA, but for what it's worth there it is.

  • IamNotEvil||

    To be fair it is a lot harder to get crushed by a coffee cup than by a 40 ton industrial press.

  • Whahappan?||

    But injuries and fatalities were on the decline before OSHA, and OSHA didn't affect the rate at all. There's no reason to think the rates wouldn't have declined just as much, or more, without OSHA.

  • Ornithorhynchus||

    NASA did NOT invent Velcro. That's one of those annoying myths that never seems to go away.

    Velcro was invented by some Swiss guy in the '40s.

  • sarcasmic||

    What about Teflon? Or Tang? Or steak and eggs for breakfast?

  • ||

    A Swiss herder who noticed burrs sticking to his livestock's fur, and thought that might be useful technology. So, fuck NASA (in fact, I'd never heard anything about NASA inventing velcro - only the story about the shepherd).

  • grey||

    Threading sucks, missed your comment giving just credit for Velcro.

  • Mike M.||

    The Panama Canal.

  • ||

    Probably legitimate.

  • Mike M.||

    I know a lot of libertarians don't agree, but I think that major road, bridge, tunnel, and canal projects are precisely the sort of thing that the government is for and what they should focus their energy and attention on.

  • ||

    I'd put it this way. Of all the illegitimate shit the government does, infrastructure is the least offensive.

  • some guy||

    Yeah, if they focused only on national defense and infrastructure I'd be content.

  • DK||

    Can anyone name ONE government success story?

    The atomic bomb / nuclear power? Can't think of a free-market path to the atomic bomb. It would be interesting to see how far along we'd be with nuclear power, even without government regulation.

  • ||

    I'll bet, if nuclear power wasn't an offshoot of a WMD, it would have been less regulated and perhaps farther along.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I'm not sure that given patents and the government not killing it with regulation that nuclear power wouldn't have been developed by private sources.

    I do think what would not have happened would be dropping it on two cities killing tens of thousands. That was government all the way.

  • anon||

    Can't think of a free-market path to the atomic bomb.

    Really? You can't make the step from nigh infinite dirt cheap energy to what happens when reactors break?

  • PapayaSF||

    I'm OK with the Office of Weights and Measures.

  • ||

    Ahh yes, the ultimate pusher of incrementalism.

  • John Tagliaferro||

    Can't think of a free-market path to the atomic bomb.

    Mining and excavation industry.

  • Invisible Finger||

    Can anyone name ONE government success story?

    The government's pretty good at killing people indiscriminately.

    Not too good at killing exact targets though.

    They should just change their mission statement.

  • grey||

    Sorry, but I think we have to take Velcro from the gubbmint as well. I think that success would go to George de Mestral, the original patent holder and then the many commercial companies that later found uses.

  • Gorilla tactics||

    If we can put a man on the moon...

  • John Tagliaferro||

    Electric car on the moon. Might be another century before they get a recharging station for those things.

  • some guy||

    As inner-city depots became dangerous and decrepit, bus companies failed to alter their business models.

    I would rather get picked up off the street in any Chinatown than have to go to any Greyhound depot. True story.

  • John||

    The success of the china town buses wasn't just about bus stations. It was also about point to point service. The bus companies still stopped at every small town and took forever to get there. The genius of the Fun Wa was that it took you directly to the next big city down I 95. And that was what got people riding.

  • some guy||

    Exactly. Also, as they mention in the story, old school bus depots are always sketchy as hell compared to Chinatown (and that's saying something).

  • albo||

    "Hey, little girl, I'm a modeling agent. You wanna be a big star?"

    --every sketchy dude at the Port Authority

  • Rhywun||

    I've taken it between the NY and Boston Chinatowns and there's nothing at all sketchy about either. Then again, a lot of people define "sketchy" as "more crowded than the mall".

  • some guy||

    Or "dirtier looking than my kid's school".

  • Rhywun||

    Yeah, that and the fact it cost 1/4 what Greyhound was charging.

  • ||

    Yep - I'd be willing to bet Greyhound spent some scratch lining a few legislative pockets.

    Last time I took the Greyhound, it was to Panama City FL for spring break. Our first stop after Union Station in DC was literally 5 miles down the road (Shirlington). Then another 7 or 8 miles after that (Springfield). Took us over 24 hours.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Excellent point. The last time I rode Amtrak we stopped at every tiny village whose politician got it on the route and a trip that could have been a few hours was an all-dayer. That was the last time for me an Amtrak in more than one sense.

  • Rhywun||

    I see that on some routes, but not others. The one I took all the time between NYC and Buffalo stops only at a few large cities and skips all the small cities and villages that used to have stations back in the day. There's no rhyme or reason to it - so yeah, it must be politics.

  • some guy||

    When you include getting to and from the station Amtrak is rarely faster than taking a car and always much more expensive. You'd probably be better off renting an economy car than taking Amtrak.

  • John Tagliaferro||

    I always 'thank' Lincoln for things like this.

  • albo||

    If Chuck Schumer is for it, I'm against it. If he told me redheaded libertarian women were hot, I'd have to double-check it.

  • kinnath||

    I didn't realize the new Wendy's spokes lady was actually an Aussie.

  • ||

    What are the prices like on these things? We've got megabus down here now and I can get to Austin in 3 hrs (about the same as driving) for 5 bucks.

  • robc||

    Looks like Fung Wah got started charging $10 for NY to Boston. But it looked from reading the window in the clip it is now $15.

  • Mickey Rat||

    I believe it is now priceless.

  • John||

    The Vamoose that runs from Washington to New York is $30 one way.

  • some guy||

    That includes wi-fi and power outlets, right? Clean bathrooms?

  • JW||

    Appropos...Vamoose isn't a Chinatown bus company. It's owned by Hasidics.

  • ||

    I suppose things are more expensive over there (and worse traffic) but at that price I'd just drive so I'd have a car. Then again I'm already doing that at the $5 price point.

  • ChrisO||

    Driving to New York from DC includes expensive tolls and parking. It's actually cheaper to take the Vamoose bus than it is to drive.

  • some guy||

    Yeah, what are the tolls up to now? $40 round trip, give or take? And you'd probably be lucky to find parking in NYC for under $20 a night. Throw in $4/gallon gas and the bus starts looking real good.

  • Robert||

    Excellent research, Jim. Do you have any evidence or other reason to believe FMCSA's action will be a continuing one leading to consolid'n of the intercity bus industry, rather than a temporary spasm in rxn to pressure that'd built up for a long time and has now been relieved?

  • sarcasmic||

    Hosted by Naomi Brockwell.

    I wonder what else she does well besides brock...

  • robc||

    Opera, apparently.

  • robc||

    From her website:

    Naomi is fluent in English, French, German, and Italian, and speaks conversational Russian. She plays piano, guitar, drums, percussion, recorder, and ukulele, and has performed in orchestras, jazz bands, concert bands, and acoustically throughout Australia. She is a state gold medal-winning Irish Dancer, and is highly trained in many other forms of dance.

  • sarcasmic||

    But does she do any of it well?

  • Irish||

    She is a state gold medal-winning Irish Dancer

    Well, at least one thing.

  • anon||

    and is highly trained in many other forms of dance.

    I'd like to find out specifically which other forms first-hand. I'll report back.

  • ||

    The best _____well.

  • Mickey Rat||

  • SugarFree||

    Did someone warn this poor lady about the comments section of the publication she is producing videos for?

  • JW||

    And ruin Matt and Nick's fun? I think not.

  • SugarFree||

    They do get a perverse joy out of throwing this poor people into the deep.

  • JW||

    Well, they do warn her about you, not that I blame them, with all your trans-dimensional cooties.

  • John Tagliaferro||

    She is an Aussie, so it is like throwing her to the sheep, which she must already be familiar with.

  • ||

    Does anyone else think that might be invisible furry hand?

  • ||

    I mean, just think about the odds. How many female Australian libertarians can there really be?

  • Brett L||

    Who said Naomi is a libertarian? A lot of hungry young actresses do gigs they aren't proud of.

  • ||

    Why must you ruin my fantasy, damn you?

  • Brett L||

    Because IFH continues to spread the malicious rumor that my mother dresses me funny well after the gf has taken over those duties. The yak vomit odor comment is, however, all too true.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    My girlfriend dressed me this past weekend. It did get a ton of compliments (and more importantly she liked it), but I couldn't help but feel like an idiot. Also I couldn't help but feel insanely overheated and sweaty. Seriously, a sport coat when it's 85 out?

    I'm still debating if the experiment was worth it.

  • JW||

    Did you get the sex from it?

    Then, yes.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    JW, that's the question. Would I have still had sex without the outfit?

  • JW||

    JW, that's the question. Would I have still had sex without the outfit?

    There's quantity and then there's quality.

    Now whether or not you would have still gotten laid, that's only a question that the gf can answer, but my bet is that she was especially appreciative that you followed her instructions that day.

    It should have at least been good for anal.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    It should have at least been good for anal.

    Clearly you missed the series of threads on this topic.

  • Art Vandelay||

    Did you get a blowjob out of it? Then yes.

    Otherwise, no.

  • sarcasmic||

    (and more importantly she liked it)

    That's what matters.
    Here's a little secret: If she's happy, you're happy.
    It's that simple.

  • Irish||

    Who said Naomi is a libertarian?

    I follow her on twitter and she periodically retweets the Cato Institute and was geeking out about attending a luncheon with Arthur Laffer.

    Either she's a libertarian or is in deep cover as some sort of sleeper agent.

  • CE||

    Sleeper agent you say?

  • Auric Demonocles||

    If so I'm going to have to propose to her.

    I seriously might not do any work at all for the rest of the day... Attractive, cute accent, working on a libertarian project, according to robc's research extremely intelligent... and redheaded?

    I think I need more Reason.tv...

  • robc||

    If so I'm going to have to propose to her.

    Its my research, dont I get some sort of dibs?

  • JW||

    dont I get some sort of dibs?

    If you hadn't been so busy stalk...researching her, then you would have.

  • Brett L||

    If renting better looking TV talent is what reason is spending my contributions on, I'll have to see if I can't steal a little food from my new baby's mouth to give a little more next fundraiser.

  • Irish||

    It's impossible for them to hire better looking talent since no one is more attractive than Matt Welch.

  • Brett L||

    You forgot the /no homo. Or maybe you didn't.

  • ||

    What's hilarious about this is that bus travel is probably more environmentally friendly, but lets regulate it out of existence.

    That Obama really does care about the environment!

  • creech||

    Luxury buses could easily replace choo-choo trains on Amtrak at half the cost, twice the environmental friendliness, and be much more convenient to boot.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Rickshaws. Solves the illegal immigration problem, too, as we can make each illegal a rickshaw driver for, say, seven years. No more immigration problems, green energy, and mass transportation on the cheap. Win, win, win.

  • CE||

    And plenty of new jobs too!

  • ||

    Oh, I forgot how much they love their choo-choos.

  • JW||

    Luxury buses could easily replace choo-choo trains on Amtrak at half the cost,

    The railroad unions would like a "word" with you.

  • ||

    The railroad unions would like a "word" with you.

    If only there had been stagecoach and blacksmith unions, there'd be no global warming.

  • sarcasmic||

    These entrepreneurs dared to act without begging for permission and then begging to be told how to run their business. If they had played the game instead of thinking it's a free country, and instead of acting on their own worked together with government, they would be in business today. But they didn't. That's why they're being shut down.

  • Evan from Evansville||

    The Greyhound bus station at ~2:10 looks a lot like the one in Evansville...

  • Curtisls87||

    Note that while the Feds shut down Fung Wah, it's the city of New York that wants to "license" them. Ask a NYC cabbie what his "license" costs, and you'll know the true motives, here.

  • John Galt||

    Thirsting for a ginger ale.

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