Not Fitting in Elite Notions of Success Does Not Make Latinos Losers

Every time comprehensive immigration reform gathers steam, some new restrictionist trope emerges to show that Latinos are ambitionless losers who can’t be assimilated in the American mainstream. The latest one is that by the third — not first, not second, but third — generation Latinos stop advancing. They drop out of college, shun professional fields and become part of the great American underclass.

But such fears are overblown. For starters, they are based on systematically skewed data. Many Latinos stop self-identifying as Latinos by the third generation given the high rate of intermarriage. However, the Census Bureau relies on respondents' own identification when it classifies them. This means that the many educationally, professionally, linguistically and ethnically integrated Hispanics don't even get counted as Hispanics in various studies relying on Census data. 

In addition, I note in a column in the Washington Examiner this morning:

A new study by Jennifer Lee and others at the University of California, Irvine, examining the intergenerational mobility of various immigrant groups in Los Angeles, found that the educational attainment of Mexicans does stall after the third generation, compared to Asian immigrants. “However,” they note, “it is far from clear that this cross-sectional finding represents any kind of downward mobility or stagnation.”

Mexican median household income rises from $27,748 in the first generation to $53,719 in the second and $62,930 in the third. Likewise, the rate of homeownership rises from 35.2 percent in the 1.5 generation to 62.3 percent in the second and nearly 72 percent in the third-plus.

Go here for the whole thing.

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  • Bam!||

    Not Fitting in Elite Notions of Success Does Not Make Latinos Losers

    Stop success shaming.

  • cavalier973||

    People who want to "control the border" aren't even remotely serious, because they all want the government to do the job. That's like asking Elmer Fudd to catch you a rabbit.

    If they were serious about "controlling the border", then they would put their money where their mouth is, purchase all the land that runs along the U.S./Mexican border, and turn it into a giant pit bull farm.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    I can't imagine why the GOP can't support the DREAM Act.

    Earning citizenship by serving or learning is America 101.

  • Paul.||

    Not Fitting in Elite Notions of Success Does Not Make Latinos Losers

    I don't fit elite notions of success. Does that mean I'm not a loser?

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    How many cats do you own?

  • BuSab Agent||

    One less than I did 3 days ago. :(

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    Sorry to hear that.

  • Archie Bunker||

    Awkward...

  • ||

    Come on, Paul, you of all people know there isn't anything that can make you not a loser.

  • Paul.||

    Not even achieving elite notions of success?

  • ||

    Every time comprehensive immigration reform gathers steam, some new restrictionist trope emerges to show that Latinos are ambitionless losers who can’t be assimilated in the American mainstream. The latest one is that by the third — not first, not second, but third — generation Latinos stop advancing. They drop out of college, shun professional fields and become part of the great American underclass.

    The above passage is just teeming with examples.

  • Grand Moff Serious Man||

    Many Latinos stop self-identifying as Latinos by the third generation given the high rate of intermarriage.

    I typically put 'Other' or 'Two or more races' on any surveys or test forms unless I'm applying for a job.

    The latest one is that by the third — not first, not second, but third — generation Latinos stop advancing. They drop out of college, shun professional fields and become part of the great American underclass.

    Is there something un-American about squandering generations of economic mobility? Idiot nativists probably don't want to apply that same standard to all the white trash living on welfare.

  • ||

    Jesus, Serious, no one's going to listen to you. You're just some wetback loser who can't be taken seriously because you belong to the same ethnic group as George Lopez. It's like you don't even get or subscribe to identity politics. Also, can you give me a really good recipe for salsa?

  • Grand Moff Serious Man||

    who can't be taken seriously because you belong to the same ethnic group as George Lopez.

    You WOPs introduce organized crime to America and the country still accepts you.

    We inadvertently produce George Lopez and no one wants to give us a fair shake. What's up with that?

    Also, can you give me a really good recipe for salsa?

    I'd have to ask my aunt. Our family originating from New Mexico, a lot of the dishes I grew up with involve delicious green chile.

  • ||

    SERIOUS TOOK UR JERBS

  • Swiss Servator, alles klar?||

    GIMME BACK ME JERB!!!!

  • ||

    Green chile is awful. Living in El Paso and dating a native Mexican-American, I find this realization painful.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    You should totally get in on that Hatch chile scam.

  • Sidd Finch||

    some new restrictionist trope emerges

    Generations of Exclusion is 5 years old.

    Many Latinos stop self-identifying as Latinos by the third generation given the high rate of intermarriage.

    "When boxes of original files from a 1965 survey of Mexican Americans were discovered behind a dusty bookshelf at UCLA, sociologists Edward Telles and Vilma Ortiz recognized a unique opportunity to examine how the Mexican American experience has evolved over the past four decades. Telles and Ortiz located and re-interviewed most of the original respondents and many of their children. Then, they combined the findings of both studies to construct a thirty-five year analysis of Mexican American integration into American society. Generations of Exclusion is the result of this extraordinary project."

  • cavalier973||

    Telles and Ortiz identify institutional barriers as a major source of Mexican American disadvantage. Chronic under-funding in school systems predominately serving Mexican Americans severely restrains progress. Persistent discrimination, punitive immigration policies, and reliance on cheap Mexican labor in the southwestern states all make integration more difficult. The authors call for providing Mexican American children with the educational opportunities that European immigrants in previous generations enjoyed. The Mexican American trajectory is distinct--but so is the extent to which this group has been excluded from the American mainstream.

    I don't know; it seems rather a "top down" solution to a problem that can only be solved from the "bottom up".

  • PapayaSF||

    reliance on cheap Mexican labor in the southwestern states all make integration more difficult

    Strange. I am told that cheap labor has no negative effects.

  • Almanian!||

    Hmm. Hispanics, OK. But I wonder what Beck thinks about himself?

    /soy un perdedor

  • Almanian!||

    Also, I dream of the day people finally realize that it's the government that identifies/enforces all these "racial/social" categories, not....nature or something. People are sooo fucking stupid...

  • ||

    I look at the active, enthusiastic racism that people engage in today in the forms of identity politics and wonder how that's any different than the racism engaged in 100 years ago. I don't really see any functional difference.

  • wareagle||

    intentions. The people doing it today do so for noble reasons. The previous group was evil.

  • PapayaSF||

    Every time I hear about "Critical Race Studies" I think it's something from a Nazi university.

  • sloopyinca||

    How do I reach these kids?

  • ||

    I'm sure an undercover FBI guy will be along to help real soon.

  • BuSab Agent||

    The internet: where men are men, women are men, and kids are FBI agents.

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