Scott Brown Still ♥ The Craptacular Massachusetts Health Care Plan He Voted For As State Senator

Here's Tea Party dreamboat and new Bay State Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) yapping it up about the super-expensive health care plan put into place when Mitt Romney bestrode Boston like a god:

“What we have here is a free-market enterprise where we’re providing insurance on various levels to people in Massachusetts,” Brown said. “The plans in Washington are a one-size-fits-all plan that’s going to cost almost $1 trillion-plus and raise taxes at a time when we don’t need it.”

There's at least a few problems with the Massachusetts plan, which has nothin' to do with free markets and which Brown voted for as a state senator. It's given his home state the highest health-insurance premiums in the country. It's somehow managed to reduce the number of people covered, from 2.6 percent when the law went into effect to around 5.5 percent in 2008. And it's genuinely unpopular among the poor schmoes who are most affected by it. Explains Trudy Lieberman of the Columbia Journalism Review:

[In a story talking up the Massachusetts plan, The Washington Post] cited a Boston Globe poll showing that 59 percent of state voters supported the law. The paper acknowledged that 69 percent had supported the law last year, but found a silver lining—only 11 percent of those polled wanted the law repealed. “Divining voters’ motivation is difficult,” the Post concluded.

What the Post didn’t report was that this year’s poll did not ask people who were directly affected by the law whether they supported it. A year ago, Harvard pollster Robert Blendon and his colleagues asked that question, and found that only 37 percent of residents in that group supported the law while 56 percent opposed it.

More here.

Hat tip: Alan Vanneman.

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • Old Mexican||

    Somebody at Reason just loves that photo . . .

  • ||

    It's to balance out all the lobster-girl action of late '09 methinks.

  • Brian Sorgatz||

    I'm a little suspicious of the true motive for posting it. Is it sexual or rhetorical? I seem to notice it's only or mostly the guys, not the ladies, of H&R who post it. That makes me wonder if, instead of the honorable intention of admiring Brown's body, someone wants to reduce him to nothing more than tits and ass. (This distinction in motive is admittedly subtle, yet crucial.)

  • ||

    In a story talking up the Massachusetts plan, The Washington Post] cited a Boston Globe poll showing that 59 percent of state voters supported the law. The paper acknowledged that 69 percent had supported the law last year, but found a silver lining—only 11 percent of those polled wanted the law repealed.

    Bangs head on desk.

    "But...they *mean* well."

  • PIRS||

    For many, the point of voting for Brown was not that he is perfect but that he would throw a wrench in Health Care Deform. That, at least, he did. He is a vehicle to a destination. He is not the destination itself. If I lived in Mass. (I do not) I would have voted for him. I am glad he won. I know he is not a hardcore Capitalist.

  • .||

    Exactly. He's a warm body, one of 41 who can derail the abominable bill from hell. That's all we can ask of him.

  • ||

    The point of voting for Brown for many people was simply that Coakley is awful.

  • Death Panelist||

    Reasoners were never going to ♥ Scott Brown for long. He is a senator, after all.

  • Lobster girl equality act||

    ....me too.

  • Lobster girl equality act||

    Why has the picture not been flattened? I can't see his "one-size-fits-all plan" ;-)

  • ||

    I think the real question is why anyone ould want to see his one-size-fits-all plan.

  • Zeb||

    "It's somehow managed to reduce the number of people covered, from 2.6 percent when the law went into effect to around 5.5 percent in 2008."

    Um. How is going from 2.6% to 5.5% a reduction?

  • Spoonman||

    Presumably the number not covered went from 2.6% to 5.5%.

  • Steve Verdon||

    That is still an increase and then the sentence is missing a "not".

  • ||

    I think that Nick needs to explain the context of the numbers. As Spoonman notes, did the percentage of the population not covered by the insurance increase from 2.6 to 5.5?

  • Ghengis||

    "And it's genuinely unpopular among the poor schmoes who are most affected by it."

    So the people forced to pay their own way instead of free-riding don't like it? This is a surprise?

  • kc||

    it's unpopular with me, and I've paid for my own health insurance for a decade now. It's "unpopular" because it mandates a level of coverage higher than I need and has driven up the cost of my health insurance.

  • ||

    If Scott Brown wants to help run the state of MA into the ground with their health care plan, more power to him. I just hope he believes in federalism enough to not force it on the rest of the country.

  • Apostate Jew||

    A guy who posed naked in a women's magazine is now a Republican senator from Massachusetts.

    The apocalypse is truly nigh.

    (I am trying to think of the woman who would be his opposite number.)

  • ||

    Massachusetts health care reform is indeed working. The health care premiums' rise is a complex formula. It's not necessarily a direct result of the mandate to require residents to purchase a health insurance plan.

    Prior to Massachusetts health care reform. There were residents of Massachusetts who chose not to carry health insurance and/or were not able to purchase the state subsidized plans. Had one of these folks came down with a terminally ill disease they'd be walking away from treatment thousands of dollars in debt, of which the tax payers would likely be picking up anyways if they were not as well endowed financially as the Kennedys.

    Now the insurance company's law of numbers can afford thier insureds' treatments.

    On a second note. President Obama flew last minute to help Massachusetts Attourney General, Martha Coakley with her Cosmo spread, but alas it was too late. Senator Brown was much more well endowed.

GET REASON MAGAZINE

Get Reason's print or digital edition before it’s posted online

  • Progressive Puritans: From e-cigs to sex classifieds, the once transgressive left wants to criminalize fun.
  • Port Authoritarians: Chris Christie’s Bridgegate scandal
  • The Menace of Secret Government: Obama’s proposed intelligence reforms don’t safeguard civil liberties

SUBSCRIBE

advertisement