More About Obama's Ditchweed-Level Response to That Marijuana Question

As Terry Michael argues (and me here), President Obama's answer yesterday to a question about legalizing pot was pathetic and outrageous. Here's more in that jugular vein, from John Lingan at Splice Today:

The justifications for legalizing pot are many and varied, from the unbelievable stress that the drug war places on our criminal justice and law enforcement systems to the fact that such policy has done nothing to curb marijuana use over the last decade; more people are going to jail for nonviolent crimes, while production of opium and cannabis have both doubled and the society-wide rate of use has remained at 1998 levels. But more importantly, the economic crisis and the recent escalation of gang violence in Mexico have punctured whatever puritanical groupthink bubble remains in place to prevent this legislation from changing. We literally can't afford to waste money and resources fighting this worthless battle anymore.

Whole thing here.

Bonus: Watch Charlie Lynch, a medical marijuana dispensary owner in California who faces decades in jail, on Larry King Live tonight. The show is dedicated to debating whether pot should be legalized.

More on Lynch and the horrible treatment he has received:

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • ||

    Was Lynch sentenced? I thought the judge was awaiting some clarity from the Administration. Did I miss something?

  • ||

    But more importantly, the economic crisis and the recent escalation of gang violence in Mexico have punctured whatever puritanical groupthink bubble remains in place to prevent this legislation from changing.

    Actually, I think that amongst the simpleminded who adhere to the groupthink, the violence in Mexico reinforces the need for the WOD. After all, it being used by the Obama administration as a reason to escalate the WOD (see, e.g., Hillary's comment that it our insatiable demand is the root cause of the violence).

  • ||

    It will also usher in a War on Guns that may serve Il Duce to disarm Americans - maybe even dis-leg them, or dis-eye them!

    Ok, seriously, buy more musket balls.

    And gold.

  • ||

    Hillary's use of the word "insatiable" was interesting, though. Perhaps she's tacitly acknowledging that the demand will never go away.

    Senator Webb will be spearheading a comprehensive review of our criminal justice system, with plans to specifically focus on drug policy.

    If the Obama administration is true to its word about being evidence-based, such a review will inevitably come to the right conclusions about cannabis laws. Just like a similar commission did under Nixon, who, of course, ignored its recommendation to decriminalize cannabis.

  • ||

    Tony,

    Don't hold your breath on this one.

  • duster||

    His response was pathetic and outrageous, but less so than all other presidents(except Carter) of my lifetime. At least he didn't follow it up with a bunch of drug war mythology.

  • Paul||

    Hillary's use of the word "insatiable" was interesting, though. Perhaps she's tacitly acknowledging that the demand will never go away.

    I merely interpreted that as a snobby acknowledgement of a weakness in Americans that must be cured. You know, like how environmentalists talk about "our" insatiable desire for big SUV's and gated communities? Same thing. It's a behavior to be stopped, beaten down, weeded out and changed.

  • jtuf||

    If everyone American who ever tried marijuana called the White House on 4/20 and asked Obama to legalize it, what do you think would happen?

  • guy in the back row||

    His response was pathetic and outrageous, but less so than all other presidents(except Carter) of my lifetime. At least he didn't follow it up with a bunch of drug war mythology.

    I agree. At least it got onto the list of questions; in the past the MSM would never ask such a question.

  • Beaker||

    I agree. At least it got onto the list of questions; in the past the MSM would never ask such a question


    I think you're grasping at straws. The local media in these parts is absolutely voyeuristic about any mention of pot by anybody.

  • KalvinJefferson||

    The prohibition on drugs has been a colossal failure.Weneed to look at market based solutions todecriminalise drugs as wll as restoring constutional government.

  • ||

    I notice that the little poll on Larry King's web page is running 64% to 36% in favor of legalization.

    It's rather sad that so many people still believe that prohibition is a good idea.

    -jcr

  • ||

    His response was pathetic and outrageous, but less so than all other presidents(except Carter) of my lifetime. At least he didn't follow it up with a bunch of drug war mythology.

    Setting the bar a wee bit low, aren't we? I seem to recall something about Obama's administration ending med MJ raids in states where it's legal, yet all the Obamatarian dead-enders want to talk about is how his rhetoric isn't quite as bad as previous presidents.

  • jtuf||

    Bloggers on the Scientific American website are debating marijuana legalization now. I think Obama's cavalier dismissal of legalization hit a nerve and might push legalization supporters to rally.

  • B||

    Evidently the response was so poor because the questioner wasn't planted in the audience like the rest of the questioners were.

  • ||

    My husband and I are seniors. My children are adults. This question about legalization of marijuana and the flippant way Obama fielded it are extremely upsetting. I guess I have to say that no one has had or has a drug problem, although one of my sons' has an alcohol problem, but he's a functioning alcoholic.

    We all STRONGLY support the legalization of marijuana for many reasons: a. because the phony war on drugs has not worked and is an abysmal failure
    b. because it would help the economy a great deal..
    c. Because too many of our citizens are in prison for a victimless crime of drug use and we are contributing to a system that makes the penal system a BUSINESS !!!
    d. Because marijuana, unless other drugs does NOT lead to the use of other dangerous drugs and the propaganda about it has not been bought by thinking Americans; only the most closed-minded, reactionary fanatics buy into that
    e. Marijuana DOES have medically useful use, esp. for cancer patients dealing with chemotherapy but also for glaucoma and other illnesses.

    We supported Obama, I campaigned for him and when he glibly comments about who is on the net, he should wake up and learn that many, many Americans do not buy into this terrible abuse of our legal system monetarily and morally to punish people who at the worst hurt themselves, not others. And most use a drug much much less harmful than our acceptable, respectable, more popular and dangerous drug, alcohol.
    When will our government leaders "GET" this ???

  • Federal Dog||

    "When will our government leaders "GET" this ???"

    You really are missing the point. Selective prohibition is a multi-billion-a-year dollar industry for numerous federal and state government employees. It exists primarily because they are defending their cut of an obscenely lucrative global black market.

  • Federal Dog||

    Sheesh: Bad editing. It is, of course, a "multibillion-dollar-a-year industry."

  • SunflowerPipes||

    I respect Obama and though I understand he chooses reasons to play down the issue of "immoral" drug use, I believe he should have shown some respect to the issue and use the same meaningful insight and common sense honesty that he was elected for. During the inauguration Obama chose to highlight the Presidency of Abraham Lincoln a man who led this country through one of its most divisive times. The civil war was remarkable because it pitted brother against brother and displayed to history the inhumane brutality that Americans are capable of inflicting on one another when they fall on opposing sides of a powerful ideology. There are a lot of similarities between the war on drugs and that "civil" war of old. The war on drugs American has once again pitted American against American in a battle of suffering, divisiveness and bloodshed. We as Americans need to exercise our collective control of government and call, email or write a representative and by doing so make the drug war an issue that has to be dealt with now rather than a lingering one to be laughed off and prolonged as long as it is politically prudent to do so.
    SunflowerPipes.com

GET REASON MAGAZINE

Get Reason's print or digital edition before it’s posted online

  • Video Game Nation: How gaming is making America freer – and more fun.
  • Matt Welch: How the left turned against free speech.
  • Nothing Left to Cut? Congress can’t live within their means.
  • And much more.

SUBSCRIBE

advertisement