California Regulators Attempt to Kill Sriracha

Why did state regulators shut down the company's sales for a month and push the hot sauce's maker to consider leaving the state?

Rooster sauceTtony21Last week California health regulators ordered the makers of Sriracha hot sauce to suspend operations for 30 days. The 30-day hold comes despite the fact the product has been on the market for more than three decades and that “no recall has been ordered and no pathogenic bacteria have been found[.]”

So what’s the issue?

The problem, reports the Pasadena Star News, is that Sriracha is a raw food.

“Because Sriracha is not cooked, only mashed and blended, Huy Fong needs to make sure its bottles won’t harbor dangerous bacteria,” writes the Star News.

Aren’t three decades of sales sufficient proof of that fact?

“The regulations outlining this process have been in existence for years,” writes California health department official Anita Gore, in a statement she sent to L.A. Weekly, “but the modified production requirements were established for the firm this year.”

In other words, the state changed the rules of the game.

Gore cites FDA regulations pertaining to acidified foods as a basis for her agency’s action.

And she writes this: “A scheduled process is the process that is adequate for use under conditions of manufacture for a food in achieving and maintaining a food that will not permit the growth of microorganisms having public health significance. It includes control of pH and other critical factors that may be established by a competent process authority.”

What in the name of all that is holy could Gore possibly mean by that?

“We cannot go into further detail about their process,” she explains, “as it is a trade secret and cannot be divulged.”

Thanks to the state-mandated shutdown, there’s now a national Sriracha shortage.

How did this happen? From every indication, Sriracha appears to epitomize the California foodie dream of turning fresh, local ingredients into something wonderful.

An L.A. Times piece on the product earlier this year reported that “each chili is processed within a day of harvesting to ensure peak spiciness.”

Is raw hot sauce like Sriracha some sort of nefarious new invention? Well, no.

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  • Ted S.||

    What in the name of all that is holy could Gore possibly mean by that?

    "Fuck you that's why", of course.

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    California won't back down. The bureaucracy has been challenged in public, there's no way that they will relent at this point or they will be seen as a paper tiger.

  • Rich||

    "Huy Fong needs to make sure its bottles won’t harbor dangerous bacteria"

    What are the California health regulators doing about the vast quantities of dangerous bacteria harbored by *their own bodies*?

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    Washing their hands compulsively, like Lady MacBeth?

  • AlmightyJB||

    California regulators are bacteria.

  • juris imprudent||

    That sir is an insult to bacteria.

  • jtreehorn||

    Wait till Mrs Gore discovers Kim Chi and Sauerkraut. Fermented foods just teeming with bacteria.

    How does she feel about the weeks worth of smegma thats been collecting around the top of the ketchup bottles at the Waffle House?

  • Rich||

    [a week's] worth of smegma

    Nice band name.

  • Agammamon||

    Or ceviche

  • Sevo||

    "Wait till Mrs Gore discovers Kim Chi and Sauerkraut."
    Or blue cheese.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Alright guys, enough.

    For our californian brethren's sake (that's you too, sevo) let's hope she never, ever hears about these awesome foods.

  • Surly Chef||

    Or just any basically any cheese.

  • JD the elder||

    Seen this story?
    http://www.sfgate.com/food/che.....926637.php

    Basically, the FDA is banning Mimolette cheese because of "too many mites". Never mind that the mites are only in the rind, not the edible part of the cheese, or that nobody has ever gotten sick from them, or that people have been importing Mimolette for years and the FDA didn't care. The FDA's reason is apparently "FY, TW."

  • Epi1317||

    ...that terrifying yogurt.. we better hide that from her too.

  • XM||

    Koreans make Kimchi at home. It's a bothersome and time consuming process, but the ladies do them anyways. And no, California is not going to flood ethnic markets with health agents making sure Kimchi is properly regulated.

    Even if they do, so what? They banned shark fin soup, the Chinese grumbled a bit, and now it's ancient history. Breaking the rules is so easy here too, I've been to number of Asian eateries that let you eat exotic animals or smoke. 37 mil population, that's more than Canada.

  • thom77||

    WHAT ABOUT THE YOGURT? WHEN ARE THEY GOING TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THE YOGURT?????

  • VG Zaytsev||

    The charges are all transparent bullshit, which would be reported if we had a free press in this country.

    So here's what happened: A politician tried to shake them down - and they politely told that person to fuck off - at which point the regulatory dogs were sicced on them.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Yup...

    Huy Fong Foods CEO David D. Tran said this controversy is being driven by a real estate deal with the city that turned sour.

    He says Irwindale actually wooed Huy Fong Foods to town a few years ago and provided a nice piece of land. The deal was that Huy Fong would pay $250,000 a year in interest, sort of like rent, and then pay off the parcel with a balloon payment at the end of the 10-year deal.

    However, Huy Fong got a bank loan and decided to purchase the property early, thus depriving the city of millions via those annual payments.

    Amazing how after 30 years of business this guy just now has a problem with regulators. I'd suggest he move operations to Arizona or New Mexico; it'd be expensive up front, but not having to deal with CA regulators is priceless. Also, the hot, arid environment might even give the sauce a bit more kick.

    Here's a nifty story about the sriracha company.

  • Mike M.||

    I knew that this was another Gibson Guitars type situation all over again.

  • ||

    "wooed Huy Fong Foods"

    That was the one where Patrick Swayze and those other dudes dressed like ladies, right?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    We have our best men on it.

    “It’s important to note that in all the reviews of this program that have been done, in fact, there have not been actual instances where it's been alleged that the NSA in some ways acted inappropriately in the use of this data,” he continued. “But what is also clear is from the public debate, people are concerned about the prospect, the possibility of abuse. And I think that’s what the judge and the district court suggested. And although his opinion obviously differs from rulings on the FISA Court, we're taking those into account.”

    Is it just my imagination, or is that a flagrant, outright lie?

  • ||

    With the welcome mat seemingly no longer to be found in California, word has spread that Huy Fong is looking to leave the state. Rumors of a move to Philadelphia are swirling.

    Philly? Isn't the whole point to be near where the chilies are produced? Why not Hatch, NM or something? Just not Deming, stay away from Deming.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Yeah. I try to grow as many chiles as possible every year and I live in PA.

    One cold, rainy summer could wipe them out.

    Last year I had twice the plants and got about half the usual harvest due to shitty weather.

  • ||

    My experience is that the chilies grown in Europe suck ass. Only Turkey seems to be able to produce some decent jalapenos.

  • General Butt Naked||

    You could probably grow some good ones if you babied them and had a greenhouse, but large scale growing needs heat and sunlight for good peppers.

  • ||

    Well you'd think someplace like Spain or Hungary would have enough sun but doesn't seem to. They are spicy but lack any real flavor. I went to NMSU and it's hot as hell in the summer, that seems to be what they like.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Yup. And coincidentally NMsU is the center of the pepper universe.

  • ||

    Yeah, the modern larger less spicy pepper was bred there.

    Also, had a friend who was a banker, quit his job and bought himself a chili picker, when these things were first replacing hand picking in the early 90s. Never really panned out for him, unfortunately.

  • ||

    A bowl of fried Padrons at an outdoor cafe in Madrid in late summer will disabuse you of that notion. We tried growing them when we lived in Texas, and although we got more heat than the Spanish ones, we never did quite capture that flavor.

  • ||

    Hungary has more sun than Portugal or Italy?

  • ||

    Yes, once upon a time, I used to wonder why people in hot climates tended to eat spicy foods.

    One attempt to grow chilies in a cool climate resolved the question.

    People in hot counties eat hot food because that's where chili peppers grow.

  • Steve G||

    Just correlation. I think the causation is that hot food actually paradoxically cools you down, or at least it feels that way.

    http://www.cracked.com/article.....y-day.html

  • ||

    ---"I used to wonder why people in hot climates tended to eat spicy foods"---

    Another reason for this is that food tends to spoil faster in warmer climates, as opposed to cooler ones. Therefore, there is more need for spices to cover the smell/taste of spoiled food. Regional cuisines developed before the advent of refrigeration.

    Regarding Hungary, I lived and worked there about 15 years ago. The local peppers (paprikas) tend to be vrey tasty, but not a lot of fire unless you get them from the farmers.

  • Agammamon||

    The cost time delay of shipping is so minimal that its rarely worth bothering with.

  • GregMax||

    They should build their plant her in NM.

  • GregMax||

    Misspelling 1 out of 7 words is a reflection of my CA education, not my NM lifestyle.

  • General Butt Naked||

    "plant her"?

    I barely know her!

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    The peppers come from the Central Valley. They should relocate to Bakersfield, Barstow, or maybe Nevada.

  • ||

    If they're looking for a business-friendly environment, I'd suggest they stay out of Philly. The city's trying to shake down Yuengling for the "business privilege tax" right now.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    But how many economists believe the moon is made of green cheese?

    When economists study the minimum wage, they generally find that it either creates a small number of job losses, or leaves employment untouched. But once in a blue moon, their math does suggest a link between a higher-wage floor and job creation.

    Why might that be? There are a few potential explanations. But the one we care about today frames the minimum wage as a kind of economic stimulus. The key is that poor and middle class families tend to spend more of their income than the wealthy, since they're often struggling to meet basic needs. So by taking money from businesses and giving it to their worst paid employees, raising the minimum wage might, in theory, increase consumer spending—which in turn boosts the economy and creates jobs.

    Let's translate that into the real world for a moment. If you give a McDonald's franchise owner an extra dollar, they might save it. But if you give a McDonald's cashier an extra dollar, they're almost certainly going to spend it quickly, like the next time they go to buy groceries. Since the U.S. is fueled by consumer spending, we're all better off it that money gets used to purchase some milk and eggs than if it gets stuffed in a bank account.

    Got money?

    SPEND IT!

  • ||

    Yeah, because new capital totally isn't created from savings. Jesus fuck.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Or that prices increase with expenses and demand.

  • ||

    So much the better as far as government is concerned. Inflation = higher GDP and they can all stand around patting themselves on the back for jumpstarting the economy.

  • Irish||

    Let's translate that into the real world for a moment. If you give a McDonald's franchise owner an extra dollar, they might save it.

    And what will happen with this saved dollar? Will it be hidden under a mattress, or will it be loaned out or used for capital accumulation?

    These people are idiots.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    Once in a blue moon as in right now. Not to mention the fact that a minority of papers suggest no-to-minimal impact while a majority aka consensus aka democraseh show job losses.

    And can someone explain how buying an imported product from China in Walmart or gasoline (oil) imported even from our friends in Canada causes massive economic benefits for the US? Free trade good, but that is not the basis of their "stimulus" claim.

  • Irish||

    There's also the little issue that if studies only show any benefit 'once in a blue moon' then it's possible that those studies that differ drastically from all the other studies are simply outliers or had poor methodology.

    One of the biggest problems with the modern tendency towards study worship, in which any study that confirms a person's biases is simply assumed to be true, is that it results in people completely ignoring that studies are produced by fallible human beings.

    Human beings have biases, are prone to mistakes, and are often scummy enough to purposefully manipulate data to get the desired result. As a result, if a very small minority of outlier studies find job growth, it's possible those studies are just wrong.

    We'll never know without actually looking at the methodology of the individual studies, but fly-by-night media outlets like the Atlantic have no desire to delve into the studies to the extent necessary to do so.

  • SQRLSY One||

    /|\ … “…and are often scummy enough to purposefully manipulate data to get the desired result.” No, no, NOOOO, say it ain’t so!!! Next thing ya know, you’ll be a-tellin’ me that the Easter Bunny is not real, and I will be utterly crushed… Not listening any moar, nah-nah-nah-nah…

  • AdamJ||

    "And purposefully manipulate data to get the desired result."

    Sounds like you could be talking about Krugman, but "scummy" is too nice a word.

  • Daily Beatings||

    And can someone explain how buying an imported product from China in Walmart or gasoline (oil) imported even from our friends in Canada causes massive economic benefits for the US?

    In order to see this you have to use Ricardo's Comparative Advantage or Heckscher-Ohlin theory to understand this. Basically it's less resource intensive to purchase certain goods from other countries which produces a net consumer gain for US consumers.

    Don't ask me to further elaborate since I only got a C in International Economics.

  • My Dog Bites Better Than Yours||

    Every "once in a blue moon", someone wins big on the lottery, but that doesn'nt mean it's a good idea to cash out the 401K for scratch-off tickets.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Except that extra dollar, and all of the others that accompany it, will be worth less.

    More money in circulation = less valuable money. Supply and Demand. It's the most basic of economics lessons, and they just don't fucking get it.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Surprise, surprise...

    Democratic socialist performs logical leaps and contortions to argue that the constitution doesn't guarantee the right to bear arms.

  • Freedom Frog||

    We need to start saying loudly and strongly that if you want a military gun, go join the National Guard – they have one for you to use. Otherwise, government at all levels has the right to limit guns just as it does drugs, tobacco, gambling, alcohol, tainted meat and a host of other evils. There is simply no constitutional right to individual gun ownership.

    Some actual reading might help this clown out.

  • ||

    There is simply no constitutional right to individual gun ownership.

    SCOTUS, bitch. Live by the courts, die by the courts.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Ummmm...

    In asserting the link between the right to bear arms and military service, we should not be distracted by the 2008 Supreme Court decision (District of Columbia v. Heller) that discounted the militia clause of the Second Amendment. The five justices who voted for it were all Reagan and George Bush appointees, and the decision is no more worthy of respect than such subsequently repudiated decisions as those declaring African Americans ineligible for citizenship, or upholding the Japanese Internment Act.

    Doesn't count, because Bush.

  • ||

    I'm sure he's equally anxious to dismiss the result of National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, being as it was decided by a Bush appointee.

  • General Butt Naked||

    ...or Bush appointee John "Penaltax" Roberts.

  • ||

    That's who I meant ;)

  • MSimon||

    /|\
    | Because I can.

  • Irish||

    The five justices who voted for it were all Reagan and George Bush appointees, and the decision is no more worthy of respect than such subsequently repudiated decisions as those declaring African Americans ineligible for citizenship, or upholding the Japanese Internment Act.

    This is a hilariously tortured analogy. Being in favor of a type of freedom is somehow the equivalent of being against freedom in earlier times.

    I don't think Orwell could have even imagined this type of thinking. But then again, Orwell armed himself and went to Spain to fight fascists, so he actually seemed to understand the utility of an armed population and the need to combat tyranny.

    “That rifle on the wall of the labourer's cottage or working class flat is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.”

    - George Orwell

  • GamerFromJump||

    You mean the Internment Act first passed by Democrat hero FDR?

  • General Butt Naked||

    To the wackos that claim the constitution only allows for gun ownership by militia members I always ask if they'd be happier if 100 million gun owners formed a citizen's militia.

    They don't like the thought of that.

  • Sevo||

    "Some actual reading might help this clown out."

    Using one unconstitutional regulation to justify another prolly isn't gonna be helped by reading.
    Brain transplant?

  • General Butt Naked||

    I like what spooner had to say about the constitution:

    “...whether the Constitution really be one thing, or another, this much is certain --- that it has either authorized such a government as we have had, or has been powerless to prevent it. In either case, it is unfit to exist.”

    There's no stopping the authoritarians and the free shit army when they team up with an ignorant and easily frightened populace.

  • Slammer||

    Another gem from Spooner:

    "A government that can at pleasure accuse, shoot, and hang men, as traitors, for the one general offence of refusing to surrender themselves and their property unreservedly to its arbitrary will, can practice any and all special and particular oppressions it pleases."

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    There's no stopping the authoritarians and the free shit army when they team up with an ignorant and easily frightened populace.

    Sure there is. Not that I advocate such an action at this point in time.

  • Anomalous||

    This moron doesn't even know that in this country, government has NO rights, only powers, that were intended to be quite limited.

  • Virginian||

    Germans who wish to use firearms should join the SS or the SA - ordinary citizens don't need guns, as their having guns doesn't serve the State.

    Anyone know the source?

  • mad libertarian guy||

    We need to start saying loudly and strongly that if you want a military gun, go join the National Guard – they have one for you to use.

    And of course no can really buy a "military gun." My AR15 isn't a "military gun" and neither is any other of the many guns I own.

  • Rabban||

    Pretty sure my Mosin was a military gun, once upon a time.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    That may be the dumbest argument I've ever heard. So it links gun ownership to militias (and he's correct about the standing Army debate). But that linkage doesn't change what the second part of the clause says...

    ...the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

    The first part of the clause is justification for the second. It could just as easily said...

    Because people need to shoot opossums, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. And it doesn't change the fact that people have the right to keep and bear arms. The reason is superfluous.

    His conclusion is simply bogus.

  • Kid Xenocles||

    Indeed, a reassessment of the validity of the first clause might be in order, and it might no longer hold (though I don't think this is the case), but even if that clause were as absurd as "Because the sky is green with yellow polka dots" the second part would still be the law, and it is pretty strongly worded.

  • The Rt. Hon. Serious Man, Visc||

    The Second is the essentially an affirmation of the thesis of the Declaration of Independence: if your government becomes despotic and abusive of your rights, you have a right to overthrow it.

    "The security of a FREE State" does not refer to keeping the US free from foreign tyrants but from tyrants at home as well. So the question I pose to gun grabbers is if they honestly think, after 8 years of screaming about Bush fascism, that the US government can never become despotic. They don't like thinking about or will insult you as paranoid.

  • Irish||

    That's my favorite part. The same people who compared Bush to Hitler somehow arguing that it's paranoid to think your government can become authoritarian.

  • Kid Xenocles||

    No, I agree. I'm just saying that even if you were to successfully debunk the justification or show that it had been overcome by events you still have to go through the process of overturning the actual law part of it.

  • James Anderson Merritt||

    From the article: "There have been no state militias since 1903, and there is no longer a constitutional right to gun ownership. It doesn’t exist!"

    The 2nd Amendment itself recognizes that there is a right to keep and bear arms. Like all other rights enshrined in the Constitution, this one PREDATES and is INDEPENDENT of the document. So clearly the right exists, regardless of its relationship to militia service; the 2nd Amendment merely tells the government it binds that it must respect -- not even infringe -- that right. The reason given for the prohibition on infringement is to promote militias, but no language makes that prohibition contingent on someone's membership in a militia or even the existence of militias. The Amendment says that the RKBA is a right of "the people" (meaning an INDIVIDUAL right -- this is the same as "the people" who have a right to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, according to the 4th Amendment).

    The guy who wrote this article (a "life-long community organizer"!), declares that gun control supporters need to take the strongest position: completely denying the individual right to own guns. Fair enough. Then be a man about it and quit trying to interpret the language and history of the 2nd Amendment to suit your agenda. Call for outright repeal of the 2nd Amendment and its replacement by an Amendment that explicitly provides for gun control. And good luck with that in the USA.

  • db||

    Isn't this the same factory that had anonymous "public complaints" against it for.smelling bad, after years and years of operation? Yes, something smells, and it is.most likely a government shakedown of a successful business that somehow crossed the.wrong bureaucrat.

  • ||

    In fairness, I think they had just begun operations at that particular location over the past year, so the complaints from residents may well have been legit.

  • prolefeed||

    The factory is surrounded by millions of people, so finding someone to complain wouldn't be hard.

    But, now that the charge has shifted from the possibly legitimate accusation that it is sending off irritating fumes, to baseless "the same process that has been safely used for decades by Tabasco and Sriracha is maybe unsafe", it's time to assume bad faith by the government.

  • Acosmist||

    Bullshit. They're two separate events. Take your proggy property rights theory to huffpo.

  • Redmanfms||

    Hi Murcan 2!

  • Acosmist||

    Nope. What PM said.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Tragic fall from grace. It's like an old black and white movie with a starving little old lady sitting on an orange crate in a huge freezing apartment, staring at some family heirloom worth millions.

    The argument more is -- tends to be, well, you have got four van Goghs. You know, why don't you just sell one of those, because you have still got three? It's a total failure of public trust to do that. It's the most damning admission of failure.

    There's no precedent of a city selling a collection in that way. There would be the argument from the attorney general that you can't liquidate that stuff. It doesn't belong to the city, in the way that a fire engine does. It belongs to the public. That's why money was given. That's why works of art were given. And we're going to stop you from doing it.

    Guess what, Shirley. YOU FUCKING FAILED. Admit it.

    Sell the fucking thing, and move to a little bungalow in the country.

  • General Butt Naked||

    How about this:

    Sell the art and hire some artists with a bit of the money to produce exact replicas of the pieces. Unless there's something magically enriching by seeing an original work compared to a replica.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Yep, because the only reason that city government exist is to collect and hoard valuable artwork.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    It doesn't belong to the city, in the way that a fire engine does. It belongs to the public.

    Well, based upon the city's current financial situation, I'd say the city has been overpaying "the public" for quite some time. Think of it as "the public" getting paid up front for the sale of THEIR artwork.

  • prolefeed||

    Government owned anything isn't owned by the public, it is temporarily owned by whoever in the government, usually legislators but also bureaucrats, can dictate how it is used.

    To say that government stuff is owned by the public is to assert that the largest criminal gang in a jurisdiction is really somehow "us" rather than "them".

  • ||

    The link to ABC News has lots of quotes by a resident statist boot licker. Apparently the onus is now on Sriracha to show their commitment to their customers and "community".

    Huy Fong Foods is prominently in the public spotlight and both customers will be watching closely to see how they respond, said Chris Malone, co-author of The HUMAN Brand: How We Relate to People, Products & Companies.

    "Their words and actions will reveal a lot about who they are and what they care about, which greatly impacts customer loyalty and public opinion," Malone said.

    Huy Fong Foods CEO David Tran has remained mostly out of the spotlight, but Malone said the recent media attention is a "golden opportunity for him to show that Huy Fong places the best interests of its customers and community ahead of its own short-term profits."

    As a loyal customer, I hope they move out of CA ASAP and continue to produce the exact same sauce in the exact same manner and make as much short-term profits as the market will bear. And Malone, go fuck yourself.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Personally, I hope that the owner only cares about his profits, because the quickest way to lose said profits are to sell a dangerous and or unpalatable product.

    I'd take that any day over some incompetent jerkwad that wants me to buy his hot sauce because he cares about "the community" (whatever the flying fuck that's supposed to mean).

  • General Butt Naked||

    Also...

    For those that say Ayn Rand could only provide straw-like caricatures of progressives, behold Chris Malone. That shit could have been taken directly out of Atlas and nobody would have thought twice.

  • ||

    I love how they give this occutard paragraph after paragraph to dish out advice on how Sriracha should run their company.

    "There may be some incremental costs associated with being a good citizen in the local community, but they pale in comparison to the damage that can be done to the company's good reputation if they are widely viewed to care only about themselves," he said.

    Don't worry, a few incremental costs, you know, just the price of being a good citizen.

  • ||

    "There may be some incremental costs associated with being a good citizen in the local community, but they pale in comparison to the damage that can be done to the company's good reputation...

    If true then they already have an incentive and the regulatory boot on their neck isn't really necessary.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    "There may be some incremental costs associated with being a good citizen in the local community,

    The only way that they were not 'good citizens' was in refusing to pay some corrupt local pol.

    So clearly Chris Malone thinks greasing the hands of pols is more important than selling a product that people want to buy.

    Fuck that little fascist piggy.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    "There may be some incremental costs associated with being a good citizen in the local community,

    The only way that they were not 'good citizens' was in refusing to pay some corrupt local pol.

    So clearly Chris Malone thinks greasing the hands of pols is more important than selling a product that people want to buy.

    Fuck that little fascist piggy.

  • ||

    On the contrary, I think Rand's characterizations of statists show a depth that far surpasses the real thing. The only difference is she understood them too well, so they were unrealistically honest with themselves about their motivations.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    I need to reread. It makes me feel better knowing the end of civilization was accurately predicted using reason, even if we were powerless to stop it.

  • AdamJ||

    Also see Arnoud montenourg, France's minister of industry. I think he was inspired to be just like Wesley Mouch.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    Amen Snark!

  • Agammamon||

    You know what sucks about winters in Yuma? The sun doesn't come up until almost 8 am. And it got under 40 degrees last night, still only 44.

    But tamales later

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Apparently the onus is now on Sriracha to show their commitment to their customers and "community".

    Anti-collectivist bastards; how dare they put their own interests ahead of the community?

  • Anomalous||

    I think they show their commitment to their customers by putting out a kickass product. That's all that anyone should care about.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    In asserting the link between the right to bear arms and military service, we should not be distracted by the 2008 Supreme Court decision (District of Columbia v. Heller) that discounted the militia clause of the Second Amendment.

    But the Obamacare decision, now THAT was some solid, carefully reasoned Constitutional analysis!

  • MSimon||

    Supported by Wickard and Raich.

  • ||

    I figured this was going to be related to the previous zoning complaints from residents near the factory. I'll never understand why any business would choose to locate in CA.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    "There may be some incremental costs associated with being a good citizen in the local community, but they pale in comparison to the damage that can be done to the company's good reputation if they are widely viewed to care only about themselves," he said.

    And again, the Genius Class completely refuses to recognize the two way transaction on which every business enterprise is completely dependent. That business is engaged in the single most important act of "engagement" with the community. They provide value for money, as perceived by their customers, in a completely voluntary transaction.

    No government functionary can make that claim.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    It's just that most don't don't know what they want, so we need TOP. MEN. in order to provide value they didn't know they needed in exchange for tax dollars.

  • Lord Peter Wimsey||

    There's a Save Sriracha Facebook page (in addition to the Sriracha "fan" page). I Liked it.

    One click and you can stick it to the Man. Sort of. Okay, not really. But if the internet can be used to ruin a drunken Communications Director's career, surely it can be used to save the world's greatest hot sauce.

  • Count Negroni||

    It may be a "Destroy Only" medium, without a "Protect" setting.

  • Irish||

    Yeah, I'm mildly more worried about the ease with which Americans are turned into a lynch mob than I am about some dipshit woman I'll never meet being a racist.

  • Virginian||

    And she wasn't even being racist, really. Unless we're going to condemn Family Guy/South Park style humor as irredeemably racist.

  • AlmightyJB||

    I prefer to see them move and take their tax dollars somewhere else.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    If I were in business in CA

    Nevermind, I'd never be in business in CA.

    I get wanting to leave, but why PA? Unless things have changed in the Keystone state, that's just trading one regulatory shithole for another.

    Why not pick a business friendly right to work state with low taxes?

  • VG Zaytsev||

    I'm in business in CA - not exactly by choice as I've lived here since I was a child and have family connections that keep me here (for now).

    One egregious aspect of the regulatory environment here is capriciousness and arbitrary enforcement (although that is also the only thing making it possible to stay in business). You can go years and years with no problem as Huy Fong did and then have the hammer dropped for no objective reason other than your business has grown to a noticeable size.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    Arbitrary enforcement is what keep tyrants in business. It's what gives them their power.

    Nice business ya got there. Be a shame if anything were to happen to it. Now, give me what I want.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Land of the Free

    Law enforcement agencies from across Los Angeles County arrested nearly 500 drivers over the weekend for driving under the influence and more arrests are likely as they continue their crackdown during the holiday season.

    Over the next several days, DUI checkpoints and extra local DUI saturation patrols will be deployed throughout the county, law enforcement officials said.

    --------

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, checkpoints have provided the most effective documented results of any of the DUI enforcement strategies, while also yielding considerable cost savings of $6 for every $1 spent, Trisler added.

    Stops were made.

    Civilians were pinched.

    Revenue was generated.

    The Social Contract was enforced.

  • Irish||

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, checkpoints have provided the most effective documented results of any of the DUI enforcement strategies, while also yielding considerable cost savings of $6 for every $1 spent, Trisler added.

    Citation needed.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    There were 4 checkpoints within 2 miles of my home last weekend. And in unusual locations as well. Fuck these pigs.

  • ||

    I was under the impression that the vinegar used in hot sauces, and/or the capiscum was sufficient to kill bacteria. It's the same process used in pickling. The acid and salt prevents bacteria from growing.

  • AlmightyJB||

    Yeah, nothing going to grow in that hot sauce. This is complete BS. Huy Fong's Garlic Chili sauce is liquid gold. I guess I need to stock up.

  • ||

    Capsicum targets mammals, apparently because they grind up the seeds with their molars. Doesn't affect birds and presumably bacteria, mold, etc. But yeah, vinegar and salt are excellent preservatives.

  • Kid Xenocles||

    Interesting. But what if the seeds are already ground and the capsicum released? To birds respond to pepper spray?

  • Surly Chef||

    No. Birds can't detect it at all. It's not a matter of concentration from grinding up the seeds. Which is kind of obvious since peppers are spicy to varying degrees even without eating the seeds. Birds swallow the seeds whole and shit them out far afield to grow.

  • Kid Xenocles||

    Cool, thanks.

  • Edwin||

    I read that the reason the plant wanted to deter mammals was because birds are much better seed-distributors

    probably no theory as to why exactly the trait evolved is proveable

  • The Late P Brooks||

    while also yielding considerable cost savings of $6 for every $1 spent

    Some definitions would be nice, too.

  • ||

    I was waiting to pickup takeout and having a drink at the bar when I notice the guy sitting next to me is reading a thing about SpaceX on a tablet. We chat for a moment about how cool it is, and then Boehner's ugly orange mug pops on the TV.

    "You know, those Tea Party people are really crazy," he says.

    I try to stop my face from contorting while I say, "Eh, he's an establishment Republican, and they don't really get along with the Tea Party types."

    He then leans in closer like a friend about to tell me something in confidence, and in slightly hushed tones of earnest conviction he adds: "They really do want America to go bankrupt." Thankfully at that point I get saved by the bell, and while taking my food I make a lightly pained expression and say, "Well, I don't really think so. Anyways, see ya."

    Blah. This time of year sets me on edge to begin with.

  • Virginian||

    This stuff really pises me off. I mean by any reasonable definition America has been broke for fucking decades.

  • Lord Peter Wimsey||

    And this is how much of America thinks. I know people with PhDs and law degrees who say the same shit. Now, drop down a few rungs from these educated folks to some of the...disadvantaged people who chimed in on the HasSheLandedYet meme/lynch mob and you get a real sense of the country you live in.

    There is no libertarian moment. There is only a dumb-ass moment, which alternates between the mob and the chattering classes.

    Well-educated attorney I know (earns in the mid seven figures; houses, nanny, all the rest) - "I'm worried Texas will secede. If they do Ted Cruz will be president and he will most likely reintroduce slavery."

    He was not kidding at all.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    "They really do want America to go bankrupt."

    That word- I do not think it means what you think it does.

  • Irish||

    Well, because of the Keynesian multiplier, every dollar we spend comes back as $1.30. As a result, by not spending you are bankrupting America by not giving us an extra 30 cents which we could then spend and get more multiplier.

    You see, every progressive, when he first comes of age, is given a magical trip to Keynestopia, a land in which lives the multiplier fairy. After a long and arduous journey, our progressive captures the multiplier fairy and brings it home. For the rest of his life, any time the progressive wants to claim that one of his policies will magically make the economy boom, all he has to do is shake the multiplier dust onto the policy, and it will work exactly as planned.

    It's science.

  • Irish||

  • AlmightyJB||

    That's awesome:)

  • AlmightyJB||

    That's awesome:)

  • Irish||

    The burnt wood version looks amazing.

  • 2ndClassProle||

    Yeah, looks really great.

  • Sevo||

    It'll be outlawed in NY by the end of the year.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Who needs 620 rubber bands?

  • mad libertarian guy||

    NO one needs an assault rubber band machine.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Hey, look, everybody! the World's Most Interesting Powerful Man is only human!

    President Barack Obama has a lot on his plate, but he freely admits that being a dad is his most important job – and that means worrying about his daughters dating.

    While Obama says that his daughters Malia, 15, and Sasha, 12, are sensible and make good decisions, there’s something else that sets him at ease.

    In an interview with comedian Steve Harvey that aired Friday, the President admitted that the first family’s Secret Service detail makes him a more relaxed dad.

    “I’ve got men with guns following them around all the time,” Obama said as Harvey laughed. “So that kinda makes me a little less nervous about it.”

    That's so cute. I wonder if he tells them he has a guy listening to all their phone calls and scouring their messages, or wants it to be a surprise?

  • Irish||

    I wonder if he tells them that if they'd been born to a different Daddy who happened to live in Yemen he might have have them drone killed by now.

  • DK||

    Or if they ever get involved in a Choom Choom Gang Bang, they won't have to worry, but their dates might.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    I wonder how many proggy heads are going to explode from that comment.

  • DK||

    You mean as they laugh hysterically in their best cognitive dissonance way?

  • ||

    Obama: I might be intimidating to daughters’ suitors

    C'mon, everyone, pretend Il Douche is intimidating or he's going to go on another pouting jag.

  • Warrren||

    And then hop on his bicycle while wearing mom jeans.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I wonder how many proggy heads are going to explode from that comment.

    Government guns GOOD.

    Civilian guns BAD.

  • Rwanda Sykes||

    "first research things like what the health department regulations are regarding acidized foods in Pennsylvania.” why didn't they do that when they built their factory in California?

  • Sevo||

    "why didn't they do that when they built their factory in California?"

    Did you read the article? CA changed the rules *after* they moved.

  • Warrren||

    You can't spell capricious without CA!

  • Sevo||

    And given the way the CA gov't operates, you'd think someone would change the spelling of "stupid" to match.

  • DK||

    You're just not trying. There's:

    vacuous
    scatterbrained
    nonsensical
    lunatic
    crazy
    cracked

    and the best synonym for stupid of all:

    Barack

  • Sevo||

    Winna!

  • Gator||

    You are right on target!

  • prolefeed||

    They'd been operating in CA for a while without these kinds of problems. I guess they assumed that the government wouldn't turn on them.

    But, really, moving to Philadelphia to escape big government? The hell?

    Try someplace like Texas or Arizona.

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    I love that stuff! The Fascists may have finally pushed me over the edge!

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    I'm in Jersey and get this in the Asian delis/markets. Didn't know it was a CA thing

  • alinaresquivel||

    Start working at home with GOOGLE!YAHOO. ABCNEWS AND MORE GLOBAL SITES... It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this - 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link,
    C­­A­­S­­H­­4­­6.­­com

  • Edwin||

    It's so stupid that they're asking for processes to ensure microbe-growth

    How about the tons of preservatives sriracha has?* Pretty sure they help kill the bacteria

    *not that I'm saying it's a bad thing; it's awesome that you can leave sriracha out even in tropical weather and not worry about it going bad. Though my comment may be mistaken, because I think the sulfates just preserve the product from an oxidation/oldness standpoint, not by killing bacteria, I can't remember exactly what sulfates/ides do

  • Edwin||

    OK apparently there's both sorbate and sulfite in it,
    sorbate stops microbes
    and I looked it up and sulfite does both, stops oxidation and curbs microbes

  • Lord Peter Wimsey||

    "I can't remember exactly what sulfates/ides do"

    They kill children and make it easier for terrorists and drug dealers to operate.

    I would've thought that were obvious.

  • thorax232||

    Well if the smell is a problem its a problem. They can't just fix it and move on? All this other crap is unnecessary.

  • RishJoMo||

    Jap Flappy is not going to like that man.

    www.PrivacyTru.tk

  • ibcbet||

    a super sauce

  • 7m||

    sriracha sauce is very good.

  • OCPhoto||

    Sad that a man who fled an oppressive government to find success must do so again to sustain that success.

  • Free Society||

    The city, which had welcomed Huy Fong Foods, soon filed a nuisance lawsuit against the company.

    This reminds me of the Red Wedding

  • MaggieMansfielddva||

    uptil I saw the draft for $8854, I accept ...that...my brother was like realie earning money in their spare time online.. there brothers friend haz done this 4 only about seven months and recently paid for the depts on there home and bought a gorgeous volvo. see page
    ===========================
    WWW.HomeProfitSystem.COM/tec30
    ===========================

  • Gator||

    Hey - Huy Fong Foods, move your operation to North Carolina! We have a lot of eager unemployed workers, and are not over regulated (yet)! Check us out!

  • alaamiah||

    Thank you very much

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