Detroit Has Run Out of Other People's Money

If there is a cure for Motown's fiscal woes, it's bankruptcy.

A sigh of relief swept through Detroit recently after a judge threw out a legal challenge to the “consent agreement” the city just signed with the state to clean its books and avoid bankruptcy. The lawsuit, filed by the city’s megalomaniacal legal counsel, represented a level of overreach ridiculous even by Detroit’s lofty standards. But in the tragicomedy that is Detroit, it would have been better if it had succeeded and expedited Motown’s rendezvous with bankruptcy.

If there is any solution to Detroit’s fiscal mess, it may lie in the legal, not political, arena.

Fiscal deficits have been a fact of life in Detroit for decades as residents and industry fled its high taxes, high crime, shoddy schools and erratic trash services, thus eroding its tax base. Now, however, Detroit is flat broke, with a $265 million deficit that it has run out of gimmicks to fix.

As I have noted on these pages previously, it can’t tax anymore because Detroiters are already taxed to the hilt. It can’t borrow any more because its debt is in junk territory. Had Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder not stepped in and let it borrow $137 million on the state’s credit card, Detroit would have defaulted on its debt obligations as well as payment to employees and vendors months ago.

But in exchange, Snyder wanted the authority to clean up the city’s books so that it wouldn’t be back rattling its tin cup again next year. His original proposal would have left Detroit Mayor Dave Bing—an NBA great whose athletic skills far outshine his political acumen—and the city council, a corrupt and dysfunctional entity, in charge of the city’s daily operations. But it would have handed the city’s finances to a board with powers to sell city assets, outsource services, lay off employees and void union contracts.

The last two items are the biggest drivers of Detroit’s fiscal mess. As businesses have fled, government has become the city’s biggest employer. Detroit’s legacy obligations far outstrip its revenues. Its accumulated unfunded liabilities currently stand at $12 billion—about half of which are legacy costs. This puts Detroit’s debt-to-asset ratio at 33:1; GM’s was 22:1 when it went into bankruptcy.

Bing and the city council have shown zero political will to tackle these costs thanks to fierce opposition by the city’s powerful municipal unions, which is precisely why Snyder wanted to bring in an outside board. This was much too threatening for city leaders, who joined hands with unions and professional race-baiters like Jesse Jackson and accused Snyder of orchestrating a white conspiracy to send Detroit’s predominantly black population “back to the plantation.”

Snyder quickly backed off and consented to a far more watered-down agreement that would leave Bing and the council in charge of implementing the reforms—and reduce the financial board’s role to mere oversight and advice. The dirty secret is that Snyder shied away from assuming financial control of Detroit—something he has done for four other Michigan cities with good results—because he understands just how toxic Detroit is and doesn’t want the political headache.

And given that Detroit’s legal counsel, Krystal Crittendon, made even this toothless agreement grist for a lawsuit shows that he is right. Rumor has it that she wants to run for higher office and therefore wanted to prove her bona fides to city unions. She sued on the loopy theory that the agreement violated a city charter provision prohibiting Detroit from entering into a contract with anyone owing it money, which, she claimed, the state did because it had not paid its water bills, among other things!

A judge summarily dismissed her case, but the fact that she decided to make it in the first place demonstrates the level of cupidity—and stupidity—that afflicts Detroit’s political classes. Indeed, it is inconceivable that Bing and the council will force Detroit’s recalcitrant unions to swallow the bitter medicine necessary to return the city to solvency, especially since Bing, contrary to his original promise, is now thinking of seeking a second term.

In any case, Snyder's $137 million credit line will allow the city to finish its fiscal year till July, when new tax revenues will start coming in. But within a few months, Detroit will run out this money. And when it does, absent radical reforms in the interim, Snyder will have to decide whether to continue bankrolling Detroit’s profligacy, engineer a state takeover or let it go into bankruptcy, precisely the options he faces now. Since the first two are not viable, it would have been a blessing for him if Crittendon’s lawsuit had killed the consent agreement and expedited the third. The more time Detroit loses in renegotiating union contracts, the more it runs up its legacy tab, the more draconian the cuts that would have to be imposed and the harder it will be to avoid Greece-style riots.

Many cities across the country are facing unsustainable legacy costs. But Detroit is uniquely impervious to political solutions because the ratio of its public moochers to private producers is far higher than others. There are too few Detroiters with a vested interest in fixing the city and too many with a vested interest in sucking it dry. Only bankruptcy will convince them that there is nothing more to be milked.

Whether even bankruptcy will wipe the slate clean is debatable given that the Michigan constitution deems public pensions a contractual obligation that can’t be “diminished” or “impaired.” Still, given how badly Detroit’s politicians have failed the city, courts are the city’s only hope.

Reason Foundation Senior Analyst Shikha Dalmia is a columnist at The Daily, where this column originally appeared.

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  • Whiterun Guard||

    Shikha if you and Lucy ever go the blue car route, can I play the Brad Pitt character (from the director's cut where there was a three-way)?

    Also Detroit is the bellweather for the rest of this country looks like.

    Also also your unfiltered hatred for all things Detroit is extremely sexy.

  • ant1sthenes||

    "What happened in Detroit can happen in all sorts of communities" - Barack Obama Campaign Ad apparently aimed at retards and residents of Michigan*.

    *Edited for redundancy.

  • Slocum||

    I don't think you quite understand the attitude of most Michiganders toward Detroit. Detroit accounts for 700K out of 10M people in MI -- 7% and still falling. So 93% of people in Michigan are not Detroiters and most are much, MUCH sicker-to-death of the antics of Detroit and its 'leaders' than non-Michigan residents could ever be.

  • ant1sthenes||

    No, the Michigan hate has more to do with me living in Ohio than anything regarding Detroit.

  • Jay Galt||

    Whether even bankruptcy will wipe the slate clean is debatable given that the Michigan constitution deems public pensions a contractual obligation that can’t be “diminished” or “impaired.” Still, given how badly Detroit’s politicians have failed the city, courts are the city’s only hope.

    So the pensions and contracts still exist even if the public entity ceases to exist? A ghost pays each month?

    In this show Germany is played by Lansing and Greece is played by the City of Detroit. The Riots come free of charge.

  • ||

    "...Detroit is uniquely impervious to political solutions...... the ratio of its public moochers to private producers is far higher ...........too few Detroiters with a vested interest in fixing the city and too many with a vested interest in sucking it dry.........are facing unsustainable legacy costs.

    .....the harder it will be to avoid Greece-style riots."

    Why would we want to avoid those riots? In addition to wiping Detroit's books we should let Detroit wipe itself. Let it turn into a smoldering heap of ash that will be blown into Lake St. Clair.

  • VoirDire||

    Agreed...let the riots come...CNN has been boring for sometime and watching the blacks burn their business and homes down while the Koreans shoot at them will make fascinating TV....oh wait a minute, the Koreans were shooting in LA...who will do the shooting in Detroit? Maybe we'll just have a cook out!

  • ||

    The Arabs will shoot them there. Dearborn will be left standing.

  • pinostabaum||

    terrorists!

  • Concerned Citizen||

    Burn baby burn!

  • Shirley Knott||

    You might be variously appalled, intrigued, and amused by photos of how far some parts of Detroit have fallen, and the residues left behind:
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/arta.....54index=0

  • db||

    I remember seeing those last year. Some of the images are quire haunting.

  • edcoast||

    You can't see them, but I imagine all of these places are just crawling with rats and cockroaches.

  • ||

    Sad. All that beautiful stuff.

  • Ted S.||

    Just bring back Devil's Night.

  • wT||

    +

  • Stephdumas||

    Stockton had goes the bankrupcy way and Los Angeles might be next. Motown had no other choices.

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    I got nothin' - we Michiganderanians live with this shit every day. "When's it finally gonna fold." Been wondering that for ~30 years....and yet it still stands.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

  • Chris Mallory||

    Bankruptcy will not help as long as Detroit has a 3rd world population.

  • ||

    ^THIS^

  • ant1sthenes||

    No, I think he meant "it has too many minorities", not "it has too many people dependent on the state". He pretty regularly makes racist/biogted/xenophobic comments.

    I mean, if that's what you want to ^THIS^, then I guess that's your business.

  • Harvard||

    You don't live here right? A racist statement if you will but nonetheless true. This city has been looted by black thugs, from Coleman Young to Dave Bing. In much the same way that Michelle assumes she is entitled to 17 annual vacations. It's what black politicians do, largely. Consider the rape reparations.

  • Stephdumas||

    By a coincidence, I spotted that "politically incorrect" video a short while ago on Youtube, that guy had the courage to said it loud.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkFPN5zUw3I

  • Lord Humungus||

    The Ruins of Detroit
    http://www.marchandmeffre.com/detroit/index.html#

    I had a (psycho goth) girlfriend in college who used to wander around the wastelands of Detroit. Of course she would also follow crows as they hopped from tree to tree...

  • concerned cynic||

    I am a fan of the art photographs of the ruins of Detroit, taken by Marchand and Meffre, images that speak eloquently about the Epic Fail that is Detroit.

    A milder form of this urban senescence afflicts much of the USA from Pittsfield MA to St. Louis. In my view, the American industrial heartland has only two vibrant cities: Chicago and the Twin Cities. Milwaukee gets by. The problem is bigger than just the car industry. Around 1900, midwesterners had a comparative advantage over the rest of the country when it came to designing and manufacturing machinery. That advantage is gone. The rest of humanity improved its skills, and the midwest did not improve its economic skill set.

    A very revealing detail: from upstate New York to Wichita KS, housing is quite cheap, even relative to incomes. Some cities, like Detroit and Flint, are cheap because they are high crime areas. But this cheap housing will eventually draw economic activity back to the midwest.

  • SIV||

  • ||

    another great Detroit moment

  • Mike Honcho||

    I can't wait to hear lefty economists' explanation of how Detroit completely fell apart. Probably centers around the evil corporations and their refusal to stay and get reamed by the city govt.

  • sarcasmic||

    Free markets, dude. Detroit was destroyed by free markets.

    If politicians had done their job, and prevented cheaper foreign made vehicles from entering the domestic market, then Detroit would still be a humming hive of industry.

    Alas, politicians fell asleep at the wheel, and allowed free markets to destroy the Motor City.

  • Randian||

    No, you have to come with an explanation that is completely ridiculous. That one actually makes sense. "Something something something speculators something something austerity"

  • Lord Humungus||

    *Ahem* I'll give it a try:

    If the automakers had given into the union, then wages for the workers would have risen which would have given them more money to purchase American cars. This would have stopped the decline of Detroit since these workers would have been proud to support their union brothers in the public sector.

  • UneasyRider||

    And then the price of the cars would have increased. Of course, this could have been countered by raising the workers wages again. I don't see a problem with this.

  • ||

    And they could produce lower and lower quality junk. Take a look at a Granada or Vega.

  • Xiver||

    Had the government not stepped in and raised the cost of Detroit labor in the first place there would have been no need for the government to step in and protect it's creature.

    If there are going to be unions, minimum wages, and the like, that are protected or mandated by the government , then it is the governments responsibility to protect those things. It must also be the government's fault when they collapse under their own weight.

  • wareagle||

    your conclusion misses one key point: govt will never accept responsibility for things that are largely its doing. The answer will either be that govt did not do enough/should do more, or corporate bandits raped its constituents.

    I do not disagree with your statement, but you will never hear supporters of the minimum, of unions, of all things govt to ever say that maybe there was too much govt.

  • anon||

    Alas, politicians fell asleep at the wheel

    Hah!

  • RonRonDoRon||

    "If politicians had done their job, and prevented cheaper foreign made vehicles from entering the domestic market" then we all could have continued driving crappier and crappier cars, but the unionized workers would have been fine. At least until we all decided it wasn't worth owning a car at all and chose to just walk. (Yes, hyperbole.)

  • ||

    “Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded- here and there, now and then- are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.This is known as "bad luck.".”

  • elephant4life||

    Oh come now. I recognize this, but shouldn't you have given credit where credit is due? A man with amazing insight into the human condition, and a true libertarian.

  • Your Old TV||

    Which is about as honest as righty and libertarian economists' explanation about how liberal policies made Detroit fall apart.

    Guess which one is lying?

  • Randian||

    What? You comment seems to be in English, but lacks meaning. Can you re-transmit?

  • wareagle||

    please explain how liberal policies are not to blame? Detroit has been solidly Blue for as long as anyone can remember, and it has gone through cycles of this.

    The city's glory days are gone; it supporters cling to a by-gone era instead of changing with the times; its voters keep electing the same people to fix the same problems, either unaware of or ignorant to the notion that trying the same approach and expecting different results is not sharp.

  • Your Old TV||

    Pittsburgh has also been a solid blue city for decades (as have virtually all major cities in the US). But Pittsburgh does not look like Detroit, in fact it is considered one of the most livable cities in America. Given that I can think of no examples of a major red city, you'd have a hard time making a case that it's politics that makes the difference between cities.

    Really, you'll have to do better than that!

  • NotSure||

    So what exactly made the place such a shithole then ? And more importantly what is the solution, higher taxes and government bailouts are not going to work.

  • califernian||

    No it's just that Detroit hasn't taxed people *ENOUGH*. It hasn't hired *ENOUGH* public workers. It hasn't driven out *ENOUGH* businesses. That's what he's saying . They jus tneed to TRY HARDER and then they will have a statist-workers paradise up there.

    Also, borrow more. And get more cops.

  • Your Old TV||

    Sorry, no, that's not what I'm saying. I'm not a liberal, and I'm not promoting liberal economics. I'm pointing out that politics and economics don't explain everything. Both Detroit and Pittsburgh are liberal cities. Both lost their major industries. But one is now thriving, and one is a crime-ridden shit-hole. So, what's the difference between them? It's sure not that Pittsburgh is suddenly electing libertarians. You'll need to look somewhere else besides politics.

  • anon||

    Fortunately, nearly all human behavior can be explained by economics.

    I suggest you hit up http://pittsburghpromise.org/. It's amazing how giving away money can "stimulate" economic activity.

  • Your Old TV||

    In order to give away money, you first have to have it. Why does Pittsburgh have it, but not Detroit?

  • JT||

    Pittsburgh was a shithole though. It just recovered. Pittsburgh today doesn't look like Detroit, but Pittsburgh 25 years ago did.

  • KDN||

    Pittsburgh was a ghost town as recently as ten years ago. But something happened in western and central PA to really juice the economy and get the moneys back flowings into the area. I wonder what that could have been; but I think it begins with an F and is despised by all right-thinking people.

  • UneasyRider||

    The steel industry and the parasitic union tied to it has left Pittsburgh. Perhaps Detroit could turn around if the same thing happened to the auto industry.

  • Slocum||

    But Pittsburgh has shrunk almost as much as Detroit in percentage terms. From a high of almost 700K, the population is down to just over 300K and still dropping (the pop of Pittsburgh shrunk ~13% in the 1980s, another ~10% in the 1990s and ~9% again in the last decade). But I guess 'livable and shrinking' beats 'unlivable and shrinking'.

    Detroit may ultimately end up in a similar situation -- with small urban core with loft-living hipsters...even as the working class people who used to depend on industry and government jobs continue to vanish. Actually, there's been a bit of urban hipster gentrification amidst the general chaos in Detroit for a while now.

  • PapayaSF||

    But Pittsburgh does not look like Detroit

    You are correct. According to the last census, via Wikipedia:

    Pittsburgh: 64.8% non-Hispanic white, 25.8% non-Hispanic black or African American.

    Detroit: 7.8% non-Hispanic white, 82.7% African American

    Just sayin'....

  • anon||

    Might I also add: Nobody wants to fucking freeze half to death during the winter, making both Pittsburgh and Detroit equal shitholes.

  • ||

    Pittsburgh's population is declining. It is a shit hole ghetto.

  • ||

    "among other things!"

    NEEDS MOAR !!!!!!!!!

  • ||

    your names are deranged genius, anonbot. Jes' sayin'

  • wareagle||

    Detroit simply speaks to the cognitive dissonance that is liberalism. No matter how many failures it produces or how catastrophic those failures are, its adherents will always insist that more govt intervention is the answer.

    The city should serve as a cruel morality play of what happens when an ideology based on looting becomes entrenched. But it won't. Not until its experience is repeated time and again across cities, maybe even states, whose key defining feature is a history of Blue.

  • Libertarius||

    See California. They're not far behind. California will be the ultimate self-refutation of neo-liberalism; the producers are fleeing the confiscatory tax rates and crushing regulations of California. Soon the only ones left will be moochers and Hollywood types, the preachers of the high church of mooching; they will see themselves destroyed by the monster they created.

    "This isn't what you wanted? A mindless world of ruins was not your goal?"

  • anon||

    Unfortunately, the liberals that sank California will disperse all across the country, finding new and fertile land to obliterate.

    I fear for our posterity.

  • dave b.||

  • burserker||

    keep them contained in Austin, they can't survive in the rest of the state

  • Alexander||

    All I want the government to do is pay for my beer and cigarettes. Is that too much? Maybe the occasional prostitute, I'd cover the tip of course.

  • Nike air max womens||

    A judge summarily dismissed her case, but the fact that she decided to make it in the first place demonstrates the level of cupidity—and stupidity—that afflicts Detroit’s political classes. Indeed, it is inconceivable that Bing and the council will force Detroit’s recalcitrant unions to swallow the bitter medicine necessary to return the city to solvency, especially since Bing, contrary to his original promise, is now thinking of seeking a second term.

  • Bruce Hall||

    Part of a long series of posts on Detroit's chronic stupidity:

    http://hallofrecord.blogspot.c.....broke.html

  • Bill Dalasio||

    Yesterday, I noted that California had a lot going for it, that a lot of good could be done with it in receivership. Detroit, not so much.

  • Virginian||

    Someone (can't remember who) has this theory that easy to exploit wealth is hazardous in the long run. His argument is mostly based on oil, but it kind of applies to California. CA is very rich in a lot of natural resources, has a vibrant tourism industry, something like 7 or 8 PANAMAX harbors, etc. So everyone assumes theres more wealth to skim, and regulations will never stop the flow because theres always plenty of production.

    Meanwhile some place like Japan knows the only way to keep their island alive is to continue producing useful goods that people are willing to buy, because otherwise they fall back to a subsistence community living off of fish and rice.

  • AlgerHiss||

    The extreme punk/thug Coleman Young had lots to do with making Detroit the sewer it is: Truly a piece of leftist, human debris.

  • Jodi Carroll||

    Please check out and share this new voter education website:

    www.VoteFacts.org

  • Registration At Last!||

    Three major American cities on Lake Erie:

    Detroit, MI;
    Cleveland, OH;
    Buffalo, NY.

    Each one has, over the decades, descended from economic powerhouse into profound economic morbidity.

    Is the geographical connection pure coincidence?

    Is the mismanagement and corruption in these three particular cities that much worse than, say, Philadelphia, or Chicago, or New York?

    Attributing the economic situation of these cities to bad governance is like attributing a car accident to a driver's failure to wear a seatbelt. Yes, you should wear your seatbelt to reduce the injury you suffer in a car crash, but the failure to wear a seatbelt does not explain why there was a car accident.

    Cities with corrupt, overbearing, prehensile governments exist all across America, but not all of them have fared as poorly as the Lake Erie cities. Perhaps an uninterrupted record of exquisitely competent governance would have saved these cities from their current fate, but there is some factor at work apart from government that distinguishes these three cities from others in America.

  • Raistlin||

    Yeah, I think they are all along one of the beams to the Dark Tower. The Beam of the Donkey, if I'm not mistaken.

  • Alexander||

    The real problem with those cities is that the government does not give away enough angel whispers.

  • curvedspace||

    Aw don't blame the poor body of water, now. Lake Erie may be the connection but not the cause. Governance is at the root in that it floats along when things are good and then when the economic rug pulls out they blame everyone but their own lack of foresight. Markets don't wait around for urban Democrat machines to suddenly develop civic pride and common sense. New York, Chi and Philly have advantages the others do not, one of which is, in investment terms, more diversified portfolios. And so they're less sensitive to decades of economic neglect. Their day will come if things go on as they are. As a reformed Philadelphian I can attest that they are not far off from Detroit, and vast tracts of that city might as well be Detroit. If not for the historic sites and the federal/state support who would go there? A longer story. Not here.

    That Lake Erie trio were doing well when manufacturing was looked upon more favorably. But their economies were based on single sectors and possibly on exporting of a single product category: Detroit (cars), Buffalo (wings) and Cleveland (um...football teams?) Now the watermelons are in control and I'm sure Dave Bing utters all the correct enviro-platitudes. Meanwhile his entire constituency is on food stamps.

  • concerned cynic||

    All American cities along the shores of Lake Erie are in marked decline, with parts of Cleveland being the least bad of the lot. That area used to have a comparative advantage at manufacturing, partly made up of college educated engineers, but mainly driven by blokes who were good at designing and operating machinery. The midwest had adequate public education in an era when much of the USA did not have public high schools. It's also where the world's oil industry began. The Great Lakes and railroads afforded cheap transportation for inputs and outputs.
    Before air conditioning, much of the USA was too hot and humid to support serious sustained economic activity. That the midwest was cold in winter was not a problem, because steam central heating was a technology that was well understood by 1880.

    The midwest no longer has a transportation or climate or education advantage, and finding new economic activities to replace the ones that have died is proving quite hard. I am a former Bethlehem Steel employee.

  • Kendrick1||

    Perhaps Detroit can get help from those Islamic saints in Dearborn!

  • Stephdumas||

    Or a coming of latinos around Motown. http://www.beinglatino.us/unca.....e-detroit/

  • curvedspace||

    The governor backing off his original demands was as wrong-headed as making the effort to help in the first place. What does the wider state gain by prolonging Detroit's death throes? When J Jackson appears on the scene it all becomes too obviously the plot of a white-guilt exploitation movie. And the governor is a member of the cast. Who will Detroit borrow from next, Carlos Slim? Doubt it. The New York Times has marginally more to offer as a once-great newspaper than Detroit does as a once-great city. Eventually Slim will be able to sell off the Times' trademarks to a Singapore holding company to use on their coupon web site. Unfortunately the governor's only incentive is the same as any other elected official -- just get me through my term. It's what gets governments in trouble in the first place. If not for that there would be no municipal unions, one of the most corrosive political entities ever to exist -- here confirmed. The only real -- and unmentionable (except by me) -- answer for the state is to dissolve Detroit, decertify it as a municipality and immediately stop hiring. Evacuate those who want to leave. Bus them to Beverly Hills or the Upper East Side and such-like bleeding-heart enclaves. Eat the effen undiminished and unimpaired obligations. They will diminish with time. In other words, do what the president will be doing to our elderly with the passage and SCOTUS rubber-stamping of the Unaffordable Death Act. Give Detroit a pill.

  • tee shirt pas cher||

    As I have noted on these pages previously, it can’t tax anymore because Detroiters are already taxed to the hilt. It can’t borrow any more because its debt is in junk territory. Had Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder not stepped in and let it borrow $137 million on the state’s credit card, Detroit would have defaulted on its debt obligations as well as payment to employees and vendors months ago.

  • ||

    iscal deficits have been a fact of life in Detroit for decades as residents and industry fled its high taxes, high http://www.lunettesporto.com/l.....-3_22.html crime, shoddy schools and erratic trash services, thus eroding its tax base. Now, however, Detroit is flat broke, with a $265 million deficit that it has run out of gimmicks to fix.

  • air max chaussures||

    Fiscal deficits have been a fact of life in Detroit for decades as residents and industry fled its high taxes, high crime, shoddy schools and erratic trash services, thus eroding its tax base. Now, however, Detroit is flat broke, with a $265 million deficit that it has run out of gimmicks to fix.

  • Voros McCracken||

  • concerned cynic||

    "...given that the Michigan constitution deems public pensions a contractual obligation that can’t be “diminished” or “impaired." " That, in a nutshell, is why Detroit city workers and teachers are intransigent. They assume that the state of Michigan will assume responsibility for their pensions. I predict that by 2020, ERISA will be amended to cover state and local govt. pensions. Cities and states with defined benefit (DB) plans will have to pay a tax, called an "insurance premium." When that happens, cities and states will stop enrolling new workers in their DB pension plans, and the transition to 403es will begin. I agree with Joshua Rauh when he argues that the unfunded liabilities of state and local govt. DB pension plans exceed US$4 trillion. On an actuarial basis, hundreds of American local authorities are bankrupt.

    100 years ago, it made economic sense to concentrate American car manufacturing in one city. Detroit was the Silicon Valley of that era, which has completely passed. Cars can be designed and assembled anywhere in North America. Detroit workers have no advantage over those anywhere else. The wages and benefits the UAW negotiated a generation ago are unsustainable.

  • BMFPitt||

    I have no idea how you do a story about Detroit and use any picture other than one from Robocop.

  • bopomtXQ||

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