Webathon

You Asked Reason Editors Anything. Watch How We Answered!

Or, in how many ways does Reason Roundtable resemble Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse?

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We have many fun traditions that have arisen during the decade-plus of running annual Reason webathons, none funner than having our editorial brass respond directly to the brain-tickling queries, insults, and philosophical problems posed by you, our very favorite audience. How many other magazines of opinion allow not only for an open comments section (legal exposures notwithstanding), but annual AMAs? Not bloody many, I'd wager.

Won't you please encourage such responsiveness by donating to Reason right the hell now?

Well, this year we asked for questions as part of our weekly Reason Roundtable podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Matt Welch, and man, did you people deliver. In a special bonus Webathon dispatch that tests the outer limits of the Non-Agression Principle by taping in the same room, your humble Roundtableists give their own reasons for the giving season, then tackle all the important, listener-generated questions. Such as:

Which editor can fire the others? How many black leather jackets does Nick own? What's the best outcome for impeachment? What are recommended books, recommended political strategies for Rep. Justin Amash (I–Mich.), and recommended cocktail ingredients from Suderman? Why does Katherine hate ownership, why does Nick hate libraries, why does Reason hate people who talk to Richard Spencer? When are we going to get our fancy debt crisis and why don't people talk more about New Zealand? What is the most libertarian musical genre? Which fictional character would make the best president? And most importantly, who is the best baseball player who does not belong in the Hall of Fame?

Those are just some of the questions you can listen to us try to answer below, from around the ping pong table of Reason's D.C. office. Enjoy! Then remember to subscribe to Reason podcasts, and of course…donate to Reason right the hell now.

Cameras by Meredith Bragg and Regan Taylor. Edited by Ian Keyser.

NEXT: The L Word Returns, With an Unwelcome New Obsession With Identity Politics

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  1. //Which fictional character would make the best president?//

    Stepan Trofimovich Verkhovensky, who is basically the sum total of everything Reason has come to admire.

    Second in the running is Gregor Samsa, because he’s a fucking cockroach and spends the entire novel hiding in his room.

    1. Stepan Trofimovich Verkhovensky, who is basically the sum total of everything Reason has come to admire.

      Not sure if I should cry or laugh.

    2. President Malcolm Reynolds.

      Generally runs on a philosophy of “Mind your own business”, will shoot anyone in the face who fucks with his people.

    3. Varvara Petrovna Stavrogina is a wealthy and influential landowner, residing on the magnificent estate of Skvoreshniki where much of the action of the novel takes place.
      She supports Stepan Trofimovich financially and emotionally, protects him, fusses over him, and in the process acquires for herself an idealized romantic poet, modelled somewhat on the writer Nestor Kukolnik.[22] She promotes his reputation as the town’s preeminent intellectual, a reputation he happily indulges at regular meetings, often enhanced with champagne, of the local “free-thinkers”.

      Jesus, I knew a couple like this.

      1. I always found this description apt:

        “He fondly loved, for instance, his position as a persecuted man and, so to speak, an exile. There is a sort of traditional glamour about those two little words that fascinated him once for all and, exalting him gradually in his own opinion, raised him in the course of years to a lofty pedestal very gratifying to vanity. In an English satire of the last century, Gulliver, returning from the land of the Lilliputians where the people were only three or four inches high, had grown so accustomed to consider himself a giant among them, that as he walked along the streets of London he could not help crying out to carriages and passers-by to be careful and get out of his way for fear he should crush them, imagining that they were little and he was still a giant. He was laughed at and abused for it, and rough coachmen even lashed at the giant with their whips.”

        1. “imagining that they were little and he was still a giant”

          The essence of American progressivism.

  2. “Which fictional character would make the best president?”

    Woodrow Wilson Smith, aka the senior.
    His first and only action would to abolish the executive, legislative and judicial branches, then go fishing.

  3. Hi team,
    you guys have done a fabulous job absolutely. Nothing to ask you anything here why because regularly I will be reading the articles from reason i didn’t find any points to rise. Keep doing the same thing and i hope i will receive more quality editing from you guys. Certificate attestation

  4. As they are being run by corporate, i have little hope

  5. Big surprise: Suderman comes across as reasonable in this. Nick filibusters. Matt flounders. KMW announces the abandonment of purple hair.

  6. It is a forward slash /
    back slash is a \

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