Homeschooling

Why Are Public Schools Fighting To Keep Home School Kids Off Their Teams?

In West Virginia, advocates have been fighting to pass the Tim Tebow Act since 2011. They're on the verge of scoring a partial legislative victory.

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"I am a home-schooler trying to play sports at high levels in order to get into college," says Caleb Carter, a 17-year-old soccer player from Charleston, West Virginia. "I'm seeing all these players that I've competed with for years…[chasing] after their dreams, and I'm sitting here frustrated knowing that I can't because the Tim Tebow Bill didn't pass."

In 1996, Florida passed the first law allowing home-schoolers to play on public school teams, and since then, over 31 states have followed suit. These laws are often named after Tim Tebow, the former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner, who was able to play football on his local school team thanks to the Florida law.

In West Virginia, advocates have been fighting since 2011 for home-schoolers to have access to school sports teams. And they're on the verge of scoring a partial legislative victory.

"The Tim Tebow Act is something that has been on the table and in discussion in West Virginia for almost a decade," says Jamie Buckland, the executive director of Appalachian Classical Academy, a tutorial program for home-schoolers, and a leading proponent of the bill. In 2017, the Tebow Act passed in the state legislature but was vetoed by Gov. Jim Justice.

"I have a son and he's a really good pitcher," says Buckland, "and he missed out on those 11th and 12th-grade years of being able to play any organized sports."

In 2017, Gov. Justice passed a law that effectively allows home-schooled students to play school sports if they take four state-approved online courses per year.

Caleb Carter tried to meet the online course requirement during his freshman year but found the mandate too onerous. "He ended up having to go to the school three to four times per week because they wouldn't allow him to take even quizzes without being proctored by someone at the school closest to us," says Tiffany Carter, Caleb's mother.

"I don't know of any student who has pursued virtual school for more than one year," says Buckland. "[The state] is asking parents to sacrifice a curriculum that they have designed for their child specifically."

On March 2, 2020, the West Virginia state legislature passed a bill reducing the requirement for online classes from four to one. Gov. Jim Justice is expected to sign the bill.

Buckland says that this version of the Tebow Act is a step in the right direction, but that the fight isn't over. "We are settling for it this year," Buckland says, "with the intention of amending it next year."

Produced by Qinling Li and Arthur Nazaryan; Cinematography by Arthur Nazaryan and Qinling Li; edited by Qinling Li; Graphics by Lex Villena.

Photos: 173247005 © Jbcalom - Dreamstime.com

Music: "Daisy" by Chad Crouch, Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License; "Remnants of Effervescence" by Brylie Christopher Oxley, Attribution License; "machinery" by Kai Engel, Attribution-NonCommercial License.

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  1. Why should home schooled kids get to use tax payer funded facilities? It’s not like their parents pay those taxes is it?

    1. Hope that was sarcasm. We all pay the taxes whether or not we use the system. Doesn’t even matter if you have kids, you pay the taxes. I think it really boils down to money for the Public School. Many of them (if not all) get dollars for each kid that is enrolled. I also think it is way many kids are not flunked out, the schools want the $$.

      1. Everybody has to pay taxes! Even businessmen, that rob and steal and cheat from people everyday, even they have to pay taxes! Otherwise its like stealing from the government!

        1. “… rob and steal and cheat people everyday”?!

          What kind of motherfuckers are you patronizing? And if they’re cheating you everyday, why keep patronizing them?

          1. It’s a quote from “It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” — which is perhaps the funniest movie ever filmed.

    2. I don’t know about where you live, but around here property taxes pay for schools. It’s not like you can opt out of paying taxes because you don’t have kids.

      1. Or because your kids don’t go to government schools.

      2. Don’t have any kids, have houses in 3 states, paying school taxes in 3 states…

        Not 3 houses like Bernie has…one is a fishing cabin inherited from my grandparents, one is the “old” house almost ready for sale, one “new” house…I stayed in the old house for about 1.5 years before moving to join my wife, who moved immediately after buying the new house because her job is mostly work-from-home or traveling.

        Still, years one paying 3 school tax bills without ever having had a kid in any of the schools chafes just a bit.

  2. I’m sorry, what part of ‘home schooled’ did you not understand?

    If you don’t GO to a school, you can’t be part of that school’s team.

    Join a league.

    And, if you’ve been home schooled, you really don’t need the incessant re-run of high school senior year that is college. You were well past those people in your homeschool 5th grade equivalent.

    1. If you don’t GO to a school, you can’t be part of that school’s team.

      Join a league.

      If ever there were a law that I would point to that was preceded by the phrase “There ought to be a law…” this would be it.

      College and pro sports recruiters fly all over the hemisphere looking for talent even in the remote corners of shitholes. The country is blanketed in travel sports leagues for most every kid that’s able to move on two legs and lots of kids who can’t. The idea that you have to get on to a HS team in order to meet a recruiter is stupid.

    2. You were well past those people in your homeschool 5th grade equivalent.

      Reading it again, I’m hesitant to the point of slight disagreement. We all went to school with kids who were dumb as rocks but wanted to play sports. They managed to show up to “free” school 5 days a week to do so and most usually passed. At least one of the home schooled kids in this article is having trouble making it 4 days a week and not even necessarily for four days. Really? The HS kids make it 5 days a week and probably practice too. I went to a pretty small (Jr. and Sr.) HS and we had two weeks of 2-a-day practices in the summer to weed kids out.

      I absolutely agree that homeschooling on average is better than public school but that’s judging it a bit by some larger social and moral standards outside the home/parents control and, in no way means that it produces better students or athletes than public schools. I’ve never looked at Tim Tebow’s grades but I’m gonna guess that his calculus scores were not in the top 10% of his HS.

      1. and not even necessarily for four days.

        As in, can’t make 4, say, 1-hourish appointments in the same place every week.

      2. The kid is already carrying a full HS curriculum, one which is probably more demanding than his neighbors in the union school have. Then he has to break a chunk out of his day to make the trip to school, take the required course, then go back home and complete his work for the day, having lost a couple of hours of productive time, THEN go back for sports practice.

        1. I understand mid-terms and finals requiring proctoring. However “quizzes” really shouldn’t be factored into grades much in most cases. Quizzes usually test very recently acquired knowledge rather than demonstrating holistic “what have I learned in the whole class and how can I fit that knowledge together?”. Quizzes also often seem to be mostly intended to motivate kids to keep on top of studies. They are sometimes used to gauge individual students’ progress and need for additional help closer to “real time” but with the high teacher:student ratio in most home schooling environments, the value of this seems substantially diminished.

          As a result, it seems rather ridiculous to make home schooled students show up for proctored quizzes. If mom and dad let the kid cheat on the “home” version of quizzes it will show up in mid-terms and finals.

          If cheating on remotely administered quizzes is really a concern because it would be unfair to “public schooled” students who would find it harder to boost their final grades by cheating, perhaps home schooled students should be given an option. They could either show up for quizzes in person or choose that the weight of quizzes in final grades will be set to zero and the weight they would have had will redistributed to the mid-term(s) and final.

    3. “You were well past those people in your homeschool 5th grade equivalent.”

      Uh, what? There are serious problems with public schools, but the idea that all home school kids are well beyond all public school kids is absurd. There are so many factors at play here, not the least of which is the ability of parents to teach their own children.

      I’m glad I wasn’t home schooled because my understanding of math and science surpassed my parents before I was 10 years old. I went through the public school system and now I’m a successful engineer. I wish I could say the same about my siblings, who were home schooled, but I can’t. They’re all struggling.

      1. Many home schoolers do not teach their kid directly. There are many organizations that teach classes for different subjects. Our son was home schooled for most of his education. We taught him maybe 3 classes. He went to other places for the rest of it. Why, because they were way better teaching it than us. We just wanted control of his education. Not on religious ground but on an actual educational ground.

        For instance, in HS, I had him do Economics and Personal Finance. Truly the best two classes he has ever taken. Public school doesn’t even remotely teach those.

        He did his Senior year at a local community collage. Had to take entrance exam. They said to give 3 hours for it. He finished in about 40 minutes. Result? Take any classes you want. He actually told me that there wasn’t anything on the entrance test that he didn’t know by his freshman year of HS.

        1. For instance, in HS, I had him do Economics and Personal Finance. Truly the best two classes he has ever taken. Public school doesn’t even remotely teach those.

          I’m reading this as you live in or near the shittiest of public school systems or, maybe, are completely out of touch with public schools at large.

          For me at a HS in an average school district in the rural midwest, Economics was an elective that I chose for two semesters (Micro and Macro). Home economics (personal finance) was required with shop. All of our drafting, shop, automotive, and engineering classes explicitly covered pricing and budgeting with drafting, shop, and automotive having estimates/quoting as part of the final. Our typing class covered things like invoicing and tabular data, and our computing classes covered personal finances (with Lotus 1-2-3!) and did more advanced “computational accounting” (functions to calculate compound interest, ledgers and account tracking, tables, etc.) as part of the second semester. My sons’ schools do similar with less drafting, automotive, and shop and more technology focus.

          Admittedly, you can/could get out of public schools with very little exposure to economics, but ‘not even remotely’ levels of exposure would only be the most averse students in the worst of school districts.

      2. “I’m glad I wasn’t home schooled because my understanding of math and science surpassed my parents before I was 10 years old.”

        Not sure when I surpassed my mom’s understanding of math and science, but it was somewhere around there. Didn’t hurt me at all.

        “They’re all struggling.”

        Home schooling means freedom. Freedom can be the freedom to fail or to succeed. Don’t measure how things work with anecdotes.

        1. It also include the ‘freedom’ to commit educational neglect against your children, by teaching them toxic racism, or to fail to teach them science for fear that will make them question religious dogma.

          Parents wanting to shield their children from ‘evil-lution’ is one of the drivers of homeschooling these days.

          1. I’m curious — are you lying, or merely ignorant? All of the popular homeschooling programs have science education far above grade level.

  3. > “I have a son and he’s a really good pitcher,” says Buckland, “and he missed out on those 11th and 12th-grade years of being able to play any organized sports.”

    Oh well, easy solution, just enroll your kid in public education like a normal person.

    1. Or form a Little League team. Community supported – only costs those who participate or want to contribute. Easy. There should be an equivalent of Little League for football too, so we can stop wasting taxpayer dollars on multi-thousand dollar scoreboards and public address systems and football stadiums for public schools.

    1. What would be really fine and funny would be for home-schoolers to start their own leagues and eventually have the public schools screaming how unfair it is.

      1. I am sure the high school sport associations in most states wouldn’t even let them compete.

        1. That is indeed a problem: the tendency to create closed circuits of competition. If it’s not formally closed, they at least make member schools fill out their schedules in a way that leaves little or no room to schedule matches outside their membership, such as with an independent team. So until you have enough home school athletes to form entire leagues without needing to travel too far, they have no way to compete.

      2. What would be really fine and funny would be for home-schoolers to start their own leagues and eventually have the public schools screaming how unfair it is.

        “Individual team” sports like track or swimming could probably happen, but Imagine an NBA team that, instead of practicing together in the gym full-time all practiced at home and played games on weekends together. It would be like watching the 2004 Olympic team. And I say this as someone who’s made their kids watch this as a cultural rite of passage.

  4. “Why Are Public Schools Fighting To Keep Home School Kids Off Their Teams?”

    I can’t watch the video because of my IT department’s settings, so I guess you answered this question in the video.

    But for those of us who can’t see the video, the article asks a question and never even bothers to answer it. Do you clowns have any editors at all?

    1. > Do you clowns have any editors at all?

      this is an astroturfed fake newsmagazine/opinion site that’s raison d’etre is to promote the views of billionaires, chiefly the Koch brothers. of course they don’t fucking have editors.

      1. What they lack in editing talent they make up for with hacks that have the word editor in their title.

    2. When the ‘fight for $15″ got started, the editors were replaced by an app.

  5. The team is supposed to represent the school. If you don’t attend the school, it seems perfectly reasonable to me that you can’t be on their team. If home schoolers are allowed to join the teams of schools they don’t attend, why not allow teams to recruit members from other schools? In my state, that’s specifically against the law.

    1. In my state you can attend and compete for any school in your district. And sometimes outside your district.

      This isn’t any different. Assign them to the school they would normally attend.

      If this kid were really any good, the high school coach would have made this work.

    2. “If you don’t attend the school, it seems perfectly reasonable to me that you can’t be on their team.”

      If you don’t attend the school, does it seem perfectly reasonable to have to pay taxes to support the team?

      1. Obviously the libertarian position is that there shouldn’t be government schools in the first place, but as long as we have public schools, then, yes, I find it reasonable that everyone should pay and school teams should be limited to those who attend the school. My preference would be that public schools limit themselves to academic and practical education, and that extracurricular activities like music and sports be operated privately and paid for by parents, as the are in Europe.

      2. “If you don’t attend the school, it seems perfectly reasonable to me that you can’t be on their team.”

        Here in PA, we have kids who attend one school and compete in a sport for another school, because the school they attend doesn’t offer that sport.

  6. Why does public schooling need to be an all or nothing proposition? Many students have different needs that a single system isn’t best equipped to meet. I just don’t understand why tax-paying state residents cannot have some choices here. The arguments against allowing home school student participation come across as punitive in nature. It’s terrible to punish these kids because the public system isn’t the best fit for them in all aspects.

    1. “Why does public schooling need to be an all or nothing proposition?”

      Teacher’s unions. + FYTW.

      1. This.

        “Why Are Public Schools Fighting To Keep Home School Kids Off Their Teams?”

        Leftists: BFYTW

        It’s all about Leftist power, keeping their ability to indoctrinate children. Therefore they make escaping their grasp as onerous as possible.

    2. I just don’t understand why tax-paying state residents cannot have some choices here.

      Exactly. Removing the concept of choice is the end goal for the educational system. Resistance is futile.

    3. “Why does public schooling need to be an all or nothing proposition? Many students have different needs that a single system isn’t best equipped to meet.”

      It’s designed to make you into a good Prussian cog. It’s a feature, not a bug.

  7. Because having a kid escape the indoctrination, er, education provided by the public school system really annoys teacher unions who see themselves as representing some species of angelic beings and those who reject them should be consigned to the outer darkness.

    1. Remember when the complaint about homeschoolers were that they had limited opportunities for socialization?

      1. You don’t get any socialization on a sports team, only in a classroom where you get detention for talking to your classmates.

      2. The “socialization” kids get on high school sports teams is generally more appropriate for a baboon troupe than human society.

        1. 1. No, that is rather unfair

          2. Have you experienced general human society? And you think it is more elevated than a baboon troupe?

          1. You’re opposed to having higher aspirations?

            1. I am opposed to unrealistic expectations.

              1. You consider it unrealistic to hope for society to rise above savagery? I have to wonder if YOU have experienced much of human society, and where your experiences were so I can avoid those places.

                1. Human nature has no history. Furthermore, O was objecting to the notion that socialization in a public high school setting is more elevated over a sports team.

                  1. socialization in a public high school setting is more elevated over a sports team.

                    That’s not what I said. I meant that the culture of and surrounding high school sports teams is brutish and violent, among its other flaws. We should want more positive socialization for our young people.

              2. You have an unrealistic opposition to unrealistic expectations.

        2. The “socialization” kids get on high school sports teams is generally more appropriate for a baboon troupe than human society.

          Because if the baboon hangs off of it’s mother at home it’s less of a baboon?

        3. I find this completely at odds with most people experiences. My high school sports taught me teamwork, how to deal with disappointment. How to peservere despite losing. How to stick with something once I got started, even when it got tough. Etc.

          1. VD was a debate club guy. That’s where he learned the suave sophistication, good manners, and right-thinking that help him accurately judge who is, and who is not a baboon. The sort of thing lesser brutes tend to lose on the field when another baboon knocks it out of them.

            1. That response exemplifies what I meant. Thanks.

        4. I think you owe the baboons an apology.

          1. It’s true that the baboons have the excuse that their violently imposed social order is necessary for their survival. Humans can choose to be better.

  8. Sounds a little like wanting to have your cake and eat it too!

    1. How can you eat a cake if you don’t have it?

      Note: The saying actually started out the other way around, implying someone wanted to eat the cake and still have it after. Which makes at least a little bit of sense.

      1. What is not understandable that once you eat the cake, you no longer have a cake?

        1. Intellectual property?

        2. Cake? or death?

          1. The cake is a lie.

    2. Never have understood that proverb.

      If I have a cake, I can eat it. Seems really obvious to me. I have a cake, and I eat it.

      1. Once you eat the cake, it is no longer a cake.

        1. THE CAKE IS A LIE.

      2. it wasn’t about cake it was about the leftovers in a breadpan – the stuff stuck to the side of the pan after the loaf is taken out

        it’s about shit-eating the queen was telling them to eat shit.

        1. She never said it. It’s an old trope. Something that was rumour mongered about various rulers over thet centuries. Unfortunately for her it stuck; she, a young victim of the patriarchy who had done much work to improve the lives of the poor. But she nobly accepted her death sentence. What a world we live in

          1. Paul Harvey lied to me? sad face

  9. The local school system is asking for a property tax increase in the election next week. They put an advertisement on Facebook explaining that one of the things they intend to pay for with the tax hike is expanding their program to combat bullying off campus. Given what I have see here as to how that can be turned into social.me DC is surveillance do they think that is a selling point?

  10. There are good reasons to support the bill, but this isn’t one:

    “he missed out on those 11th and 12th-grade years of being able to play any organized sports.”

    No he didn’t. High school baseball is a recent innivation in a lot of places. I graduated in the 1990s, and we didn’t have HS baseball then. You played Little League, and then the older kids played Legion. “Boys of summer” implies… summer. When there is no school. I live in PA right now, and the first half of the HS baseball season is always a shambles because none of the fields are really ready to play until mid April.

    Similarly, rec soccer is at least as big as school soccer. And more kids every year opt out of school sports in favor of club or travel teams so they can play with kids at a similar skill level.

    Finally, one thing not mentioned here is that HS sports are deeply political. Say you live inner city and homeschool: Which school team would you play for, exactly? Sometimes the school lines are not drawn based strictly on domicile location. We already have a huge mess with how kids get assigned to sports with charter schools, and people are always mad about the Catholic schools and how kids get to play for them.

    Not saying it’s impossible. But all that goes toward answering the question as to why states might be objecting. They KNOW that parents who care about sports will choose to homeschool based entirely on who has a good football team, or where their favored coach is located. Yeah, sure, fine. But it does cause chaos.

    1. ” High school baseball is a recent innivation in a lot of places. I graduated in the 1990s, and we didn’t have HS baseball then.”

      Um, what? Maybe your high school didn’t field a baseball team, but I have a list of local HS league champions going back to 1932. These were very small schools, almost all of which have since been merged into larger school districts. This is in rural PA. I also have seen yearbooks going back to the 1920s from various relatives (now dead) and they had baseball and other sports – although these were bigger city schools.

      1. I never argued that HS baseball didn’t exist. I said it’s new in certain places. I live in Elk County, and our high school did not have baseball until the 1990s. As discussed, it’s not like baseball was not played at that time. People played Little League and Legion. What’s not to understand? Here is a story about the demise of Legion, and how they do compete with HS teams in a lot of ways, although AAU and Showcase are seen as bigger concerns:

        https://www.inquirer.com/high-school-sports/american-legion-baseball-decline-military-aau-showcases-20190727.html

        Either way, the idea that you can’t play baseball unless you play on a HS team remains fase.

        1. And I never said there was no youth baseball other than high school.

          The problem is, that if you’re trying for something like a college scholarship, it may be the only baseball available during the spring. Playing summers-only doesn’t help the cause, especially in northern states where you can’t play in the winter.

    2. They had high school baseball teams in FDR’s concentration camps during WWII.

  11. “I have a son and he’s a really good pitcher,” says Buckland, “and he missed out on those 11th and 12th-grade years of being able to play any organized sports.”

    “He ended up having to go to the school three to four times per week because they wouldn’t allow him to take even quizzes without being proctored by someone at the school closest to us,” says Tiffany Carter, Caleb’s mother.

    These anti-social retards are aware that their local High School probably has 5-6 good pitcher who go to school a full *5* days a week, right?

    Not saying they should be excluded as policy but Jesus Christ does this reek of helicopter parents turning it up to 11 for their special snowflakes.

    1. As a matter of principle, I don’t see a good reason to restrict home schoolers from joining HS sports teams. But in this specific instance I want to tell that kid to suck it up and follow the rules because, as much as we all might hate it, much of life is about following a bunch of pointless, time-wasting rules. The kid had better get used it to it.

      1. As a matter of principle, I don’t see a good reason to restrict home schoolers from joining HS sports teams.

        Not as broad, state-wide policy. I could certainly see a coach, school, or team (or several) saying they didn’t want an athlete on their team whether he attended the school or not.

        Pretty much everywhere coaches and teams start to develop athlete’s skills, tactics, and strategy over the course of a HS career. For a homeschooler to be able to pick and choose which team he’s going to be on is pretty overtly unfair and counterproductive in the other direction.

        1. There are a few steps between what I wrote and what you’re talking about. A home schooler simply declaring which team they will join and that being the end of it is silly. They should be treated the same as students who attend the school, which means they would most likely have to try out for whatever team they want to join. Tryouts give coaches a some discretion on who is allowed on the team.

          1. There are a few steps between what I wrote and what you’re talking about.

            Didn’t mean to imply that’s what you were saying as much as saying “Agreed within reason.” Not 100% sure I agree with the ‘same as students who attend school’, I could see reason in coaches saying ‘no home schooled kids even at tryouts’ while being forced to at least allow public students to try out but, yea, within reason, agreed.

  12. I have to say I’m impressed by the number of posters who think people shouldn’t have access to government services they’re being taxed to provide.

    1. Well, there are rules, right? If I am a 55 year old guy who used to play semi-pro basketball, I can’t play on the local middle school’s team even though I am paying taxes to support the school. I can’t use the chemistry lab over the weekend to run phlebotomy tests that need to do for my job at the local hospital. Even though I pay taxes to support the school. I can’t go take the city plow truck and use it to plow my driveway, even though my taxes paid for the truck.

      1. Also, the underlying counter position is an unstated, “It’s OK for the state to take your money as long as they let you use the stuff they spent it on.”

        I’m in favor of equality before the law but “equality first” pretty much guarantees you’re overlooking something more important.

    2. Calling membership on a sports team a “service” that the government “provides” is a strange way of looking at it to me.

  13. The answer is bleedin’ obvious. Teacher’s unions are threatened by anything that isn’t 100% all-in public school. They will do anything to hurt a kid who isn’t in their club.

    1. Why would someone serious about a career in professional sports want to waste time with a high school team where threatened unionized teachers are almost certain to be involved?

      1. For everyone serious about a career in professional sports there are probably 100 or more serious about a full or partial college scholarship.

        1. Wouldn’t reading books and studying be the way to get a college scholarship? Scholars tend to spend their time that way.

          1. Scholars tend to spend their time that way.

            You’re just guessing.

        2. The people I’ve known attending college on a sports scholarship all had zero interest in scholarship.

  14. Clearly, the right answer here is to eliminate football as a public school responsibility, and let communities field their own football teams through the equivalent of Little League – where those who WISH to contribute to that sport are free to do so, while those who do not are free to refrain from such contributions.

    Not to allow freeloaders and moochers to participate in sports on someone else’s dime.

    1. You could make the same argument for anything the school does. Look, if you want your kid to learn chemistry, build your own lab at home, or get with a group of likeminded people to build a lab you can share. No more of this freeloading at a public chemistry lab. Anyway, those who want to learn algebra and spelling can spend their own resources on it, not mine.

      That’s a sound argument, logically, and a lot of people make it. But generally most people do see value in public provision of services such as education. What all that should involve is a matter of debate as well. But the argument is that society as a whole benefits from public provision of certain things like education. And some people think that sports in general–football included–provides enough benefits that collective action in warranted.

      1. Also, it suffers a bit from anti-pragmatism or is/ought fallacy. What are we gonna do; till under the football, basketball, baseball, and tennis courts around every school in the country? Turn all those public lands over to private sports organizations? Bus kids to 4-5 different locations for activities instead of the usual 2-3?

        Where I live, schools, non-scholastic sports leagues/organizations, and the park district(s) are pretty tightly interwoven. Getting rid of schools wouldn’t solve the collective/exclusive sports problem and would negatively affect non-school related community sports programs.

    2. Actually the right answer here is to eliminate public schools entirely.

    3. Excellent idea.

      OTOH, there is a valid reason for making athletic activity part of the school week, so team sports are an outgrowth of that.

  15. Much of the non-local funding for schools is based on numbers of students in attendance each day, so a student who uses school resources without attending is expensive to the school.

    1. Since the parents are paying the same taxes as those who send their kids to the union schools, the problem is administrative rather than practical. The money is being put into the system, so the system is to blame if the money doesn’t get to the school.

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  18. So we have leftists demanding that boys claiming to be girls participate in girls sports, but they won’t let a few home-schooled kids play on their local sports teams? If the home-school boys claimed to be girls, would the left fight on both sides of the issue?

  19. “Why are public schools fighting to keep homeschool kids off their teams”?
    A) Because they cannot tolerate free thinking, pro liberty individuals jeopardizing all the hard work they put into indoctrination. A homeschool kid, following his interests as a individual, and far exceeding them academically and athletically, would stimulate free thought and challenge their authority.
    This must not be allowed.

  20. Why are government schools fighting to keep home school kids off their teams?

    The simple answer is home school kids show just what a failure government schools are, and the government employees and politicians getting kickbacks from the government employees don’t like it.
    When the mere resources of two parents, who also pay taxes for public schools from which they get nothing, where one often forgoes work to teach their children, better educates their children than “professional” government school employees, voters will start questioning the value of government schools.

    That’s the simple reason government creates mandates rules for private and home school options, that make them more expensive and creates unnecessary hurdles for them to jump.

  21. One, where I live (Detroit Suburbs) there are already school districts who can’t for good varsity teams because all the best players are on club teams with better coaches, unrestricted schedules, etc.

    Two, sports is one of the last things of value that most of these urban schools have to offer. If the kid from an underperforming downtown school can escape the violence and lazy union teachers and also get noticed by college athletics…why not leave?

  22. I think I’m actually in favor of the “libertarian” option here: End school sports.

    Schools should have “PE” or something, to teach the basics of staying physically fit and healthy, but full-on sports leagues and teams? Sorry, but sports are popular enough that they can exist privately just fine. They don’t need the state subsidy.

  23. The objection is probably due to the assumption that homeschoolers learn almost nothing–this assumption exists because public school folks pretty much just run into the failures of homeschooling, not the successes.

    Also, human nature being what it is, there is also the possible corruption of a child who is being “home-schooled” but is really spending their time getting in better shape, etc. which is unfair to the public school kids who are spending those 8 hours in a classroom instead of the gym/field.

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