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A Libertarian Builds Low-Cost Private Schools for the Masses

Don't waste time arguing about public education, says Thales founder Bob Luddy. Head for the exits.

Bob Luddy was tired of trying to convince North Carolina educrats to improve the state's public schools, so he built his own network of low-cost private schools that the government can't meddle with.

A libertarian businessman based in Raleigh, North Carolina, Luddy made his fortune as the owner of the nation's leading manufacturer of commercial kitchen ventilation systems. CaptiveAire has factories in six states, and its 2016 revenues were $400 million. But what does fabricating stove hoods and building HVAC systems have in common with turning out successful students? More than you might think.

Luddy became interested in education when he observed that many hires at CaptiveAire lacked the basic math and science skills to thrive on the job. He volunteered to co-chair a statewide education commission and met with North Carolina officials to voice his concerns. "They were happy to discuss all of these ideas," Luddy says, "but they weren't going to implement any of them."

The last straw for Luddy came in 1997, when he ran for a seat on the local school board and lost. It turned out to be a "great blessing," he says, because it led him to start focusing on creating alternatives to the traditional public schools.

Almost immediately, he filed a charter for Franklin Academy, which today is the third largest charter school in North Carolina, with about four applicants vying for every kindergarten spot.

But Luddy wasn't satisfied. "Charters are far better than the [traditional] public system," Luddy says, "however, there's still regulation...and over time, the bureaucrats are going to continue to load more regulation on charters."

In 2007, he decided to take a more radical step by creating a non-profit network of schools called Thales Academy. Influenced by economist Albert Hirschman's classic 1970 treatise on political science, Exit, Voice and Loyalty, Luddy conceived of Thales as a way to give families "exit."

"'Voice' is [when] you go to vote [or you] express an opinion...Exit...is like Uber...where someone comes up with an entirely new idea, they bypass the existing industry, and they get amazing results."

It was necessary to set the cost of attending Thales within reach of most families. Tuition is $5,300 for elementary school, and $6,000 for junior high and high school. At that price point, Thales is able to cover its costs with only a few exceptions: It takes advantage of North Carolina's tax-exempt financing for school construction, and Luddy himself makes a one-time contribution to help defray capital costs with each new facility. Luddy also provides about 6 percent of the student body with financial aid that covers up to half the cost of tuition, and 34 students (1.5 percent) receive financial aid through North Carolina's Opportunity Scholarship Program.[*]

So how does Thales get by with so little revenue? (North Carolina's public schools spent about $9,300 per pupil in the 2015-2016 school year.) One factor is that it doesn't serve kids with severe learning disabilities who are more expensive to educate. Luddy believes those students are best served through North Carolina's school voucher program.

Another way Thales saves money is by spending significantly less on infrastructure than the public system. In 2013, the town of Rolesville, North Carolina got a new public high school that cost $76 million. A year later, Thales opened a $9 million high school two-and-a-half miles away. Though much smaller, when divided by the number of students each building can accommodate, the Thales school cost half as much. One difference is that Rolesville High School has tennis courts, a football field, and a baseball diamond. "Modern day public schools," says Luddy, look more like "sports complexes."

Thales schools also have no auditoriums because they're too expensive to build, heat, and cool.

Another savings is on personnel. There's no cafeteria, and thus no cafeteria staff. There are no school buses, and thus no school bus drivers. There's also hardly any support staff, and fewer actual teachers. Thales targets a teacher to student ratio of about 26 to one, compared to one teacher for every 15 kids in North Carolina's traditional public schools.

Most schools boast about small class sizes, but Luddy is proud of having large classes because it demonstrates efficiency, in the same way that when CaptiveAire can produce more stove hoods with fewer employees, the savings ultimately get passed on to customers. Thales is able to accommodate larger class sizes by grouping kids in the same classroom who have roughly the same command of the material. This way they can all follow the lesson with less individual attention from the teacher. It's part of a pedagogical approach called "direct instruction," which Luddy believes provides a superior education in a more efficient manner.

"In business we look at outcomes," Luddy says, "did we gain sales, did we please our customers? Schools don't look at it this way. We have a big building. We have sports. They're all inputs."

As Thales enters its tenth year of operation, Luddy and his team have grand ambitions. There are currently 25 new Thales schools in the planning stages that would extend the network's reach into Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida.

"The old educational establishment is gradually declining," says Luddy, "so one of my goals is to be a shining example of what can be done so that others will follow."

-----

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  • Half-Virtue, Half-Vice||

    *Standing ovation and tears*

  • MoreFreedom||

    I agree - I'd like to tell Mr. Luddy THANK YOU. But then, I don't want to interrupt his work either.

  • commonsensewins||

    Absolutely: Bravo!! Now, get into Arkansas and Missouri!

  • Zunalter||

    I appreciate that the focus has moved away from reforming the public school system, which flatlined 20 years ago at least, to giving them the middle finger and walking away entirely.

    I hope that eventually we can figure out a libertarian way to educate special needs students as well, as leaving them behind in the last remnants of public schools seems like a bad outcome.

  • Hamster of Doom||

    As far as analogizing goes, I see this working much the same as cooking.

    It has to be done. Some people really enjoy doing it. Much waxing poetic about "Mom's *insert dish here*", but a lot of talk - very quiet talk, mind - about lumpy gravy, tough roasts and a few packed lunches that live on in vivid memory.

    Eventually, when the Overton window adjusts enough that a good portion of people can say out loud that they don't enjoy home-cooking from either perspective, the market steps in. Millions throw away their whisks with a sigh of relief and order take-out.

    I tell you, I used to be AMAZED how many grown humans couldn't feed themselves. One of the front gals once asked me for my recipe for tuna salad sandwiches. I'm not sure I fully understood the meaning of "gobsmacked" until that moment. She and her ten year old made it all this time without starving. And we're supposed to be past the age of miracles.

    Then I got it. Grow up in a rural area, where the options were eat what's in the cupboard, go to the only convenience store for twenty miles, or starve. (Alternately: Kill one of the chickens in the yard.) The cities have things that the sticks can't, such as an enormous diversity of options which means humans don't have to personally know how to do everything.

    Specialization of labor, motherfuckers. Some people really do want to work with special-needs kids, and will get a hell of a kick doing so and do a great job. Let those rare people market it.

  • Hamster of Doom||

    Shorter HoD:

    Robots.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Tell me more about your mom's insert dish...

  • Hamster of Doom||

    There's something fantastic possible here with a double-boiler and something something chafing, but I'm coming up blank.

    Over to y'all.

  • Juice||

    giving them the middle finger and walking away entirely

    But still paying for it.

  • MoreFreedom||

    Special needs kids, need special schools.

    There are a lot more kids who need better education, and Mr. Luddy is showing the way. Once the government schools go by the wayside, there will be people looking to help the kids with special needs - it's a far smaller market.

  • Lee Genes||

    Thales is able to accommodate larger class sizes by grouping kids in the same classroom who have roughly the same command of the material.

    This right here. Mainstreaming is an utter failure.

  • Brochetta(MEDIOCRE_NEGRO)ward||

    But...but what about the stupid kids! They get smarter through osmosis by being around the smart ones!

  • Ted S.||

    Every time we did group activities, it was the smart kids doing all the work and everybody getting the same grade. Fuck that.

  • ant1sthenes||

    Yes, but according to the law of conservation of intelligence...

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    Doesn't the law of conservation of intelligence hold that, since what you don't use you lose, over time all intelligence will be found in Conservative hands?

    *snerk*

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    I don't mind this so much. My only concern is the other extreme, where you see students marked as on a path at some point that is largely inescapable.

    I suppose I personally really sympathize with that due to that being my own story. When I was young I was unfocused, and did poorly in school. As I got older I became a lot better and was taking advanced courses all through high school.
    If I had been tracked hard early on I would not have had that opportunity.

    Now, I am not saying that these are the only two extremes, but just that it is something to keep in mind.

  • Lee Genes||

    A real hero

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Thales is able to accommodate larger class sizes by grouping kids in the same classroom who have roughly the same command of the material.

    I can hear teachers across America snorting in derision.

    "We group them by age. That's how we've always done it."

  • Hugh Akston||

    It's kind of interesting that it took a factory owner to break the factory education model.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Not just a factory owner, an American factory owner. MAGA!

  • Mainer2||

    Hey, I've been in the private sector, they expect results.

  • ant1sthenes||

    But he is a capitalist factory owner, breaking the communist factory model. It's not that nonsensical when you look at it that way.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Exactly. Sort by age and then teach to the slowest in class. As for the quicker ones, if they're so damn smart, they can read up on their own.

  • Mindyourbusiness||

    Isn't it amazing that a success story like this hasn't shown up in the news media?/s

  • The Late P Brooks||

    If there is any segment of American life more in need of a massive upheaval of innovation and creative destruction, I don't know what it might be.

  • Microaggressor||

    Health industry?

  • Raven Nation||

    I have it on good authority that the only reasons American education is failing is because of No Child Left Behind.

  • chemjeff||

    "so he built his own network of low-cost private schools that the government can't meddle with."

    ... on the backs of orphan labor!

  • ||

    "Only for white children!"

    "Schools that exclude the handicapped and disabled!"

    Etc.

    /progs

  • DesigNate||

    I'll post it to my facebook feed and see what kinds of fucktarded comments I get in return and let y'all know.

  • ||

    You're a brave man, Nate.

  • Charles Easterly||

    He takes the big risks, so we don't have to.

    No wait.... This is H&R.

    *Thinks for a moment and nods to self*

    Sure, Tonio, he may appear as if he is being brave, yet I have it upon good authority that Nate is only doing this to be a jerk to the Facebookery Crowds.

  • DesigNate||

    Damn skippy.

  • DesigNate||

    I haven't contributed much lately so I figured it was the least I could do.

    If I had to guess though, especially based on the lack of comments on the actual post, it will be largely ignored. Probably don't want to acknowledge that there could be other ways besides government schools.

  • ||

    Billionaires, Trump, one percenters, privilege?

  • ||

    Standing by, rubbing hands in anticipation!

  • Charles Easterly||

    Did you reconsider that comment before posting it on H&R?

    I think not.

  • ||

    LOL...I am well aware of everything I post and how the preverts around here read it.

  • Charles Easterly||

    In that case, enjoy the popcorn you likely had prepared in anticipation.

  • Ceci n'est pas un woodchipper||

    I'm going to bet something along the lines of 1.) excludes poor children and impoverishes needy school districts and 2.) no accountability, fly-by-night operation that ruins children's educational opportunities as a profit-making scam.

  • Long Woodchippers||

    Accountable to the customers. Disappoint them and be out of business.

  • Christophe||

    Pfff. Customers don't know what's good for them. Something something fast food...

    /derp

  • Lee Genes||

    Well, it's obviously only for white and asian kids, otherwise it would have sports facilities.

    /proggie

  • ||

    Of course. And if this kochtopus is allowed to get away with this, children will be dying in the streets again and women and minorities back in chains.

  • ||

    "that the government can't meddle with"

    I'm not convinced that is a thing.

  • $park¥ is totally a Swifty||

    "They were happy to discuss all of these ideas," Luddy says, "but they weren't going to implement any of them."

    "We can talk about whatever you want to talk about, Mr Luddy."

  • DenverJ||

    You know who else was interested in what children were being taught?

  • Half-Virtue, Half-Vice||

    Carrie Nation?

  • Microaggressor||

    Marc Levine?

  • Swiss Servator||

    Socrates?

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Another way Thales saves money is by spending significantly less on infrastructure than the public system. In 2013, the town of Rolesville, North Carolina got a new public high school that cost $76 million. A year later, Thales opened a $9 million high school two-and-a-half miles away. Though much smaller, when divided by the number of students each building can accommodate, the Thales school cost half as much. One difference is that Rolesville High School has tennis courts, a football field, and a baseball diamond. "Modern day public schools," says Luddy, look more like "sports complexes."

    Thales schools also have no auditoriums because they're too expensive to build, heat, and cool.

    Another savings is on personnel. There's no cafeteria, and thus no cafeteria staff. There are no school buses, and thus no school bus drivers. There's also hardly any support staff, and fewer actual teachers. Thales targets a teacher to student ratio of about 26 to one, compared to one teacher for every 15 kids in North Carolina's traditional public schools.

    I like everything about this.

  • Hugh Akston||

    I'm not clear how the no cafeteria thing works. Do they just eat the kids who fall behind on the curriculum?

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Bring their own lunch and eat in a classroom?

  • ||

    Anarchy!

  • Hamster of Doom||

    Hugh has clearly never read Anne of Green Gables or the Little House books.

  • ||

    And all that paw ever really wanted was some white sugar and white bread. Not sure why he didn't think of selling Half Pint into slavery. What sort of patriarch was this guy?

  • Raven Nation||

  • Lee Genes||

    Well without federal matching funds that subsidize every crappy meal served, what's the point of having a school cafeteria?

  • ||

    Well, all of the kids are going to die now anyway since they no longer have Michelle's nutritional oversight.

  • Microaggressor||

    They might even consume full fat milk despite the authorities' strong science-like recommendations. Their poor, young arteries will seize on the spot!

  • marshaul||

    Joke I know, but I went to a private school without a cafeteria for some years. Lunch and "recess" were the same thing; we had a lengthy break in the middle of the day. If the weather was nice, the kids would at at picnic tables outside. If not, they'd eat in a classroom.

    This model provides greater choice even when it comes to mean time. Some kids would talk and have a slow lunch; other kids would eat really fast in order to play basketball the rest of the time. Public schools at the same level in my state were still herding kids en masse to the cafeteria, where they would all be forced to sit (with correct posture) and "eat" for the requisite duration.

  • marshaul||

    meal time, though I'm sure plenty can be said for "mean time"

  • ||

    When he gets down to zero teachers and no school buildings, then he's really making progress.

  • IceTrey||

    That's called the Khan Academy.

  • IceTrey||

    That's called the Khan Academy.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    There are six-thousand people in Rolesville, and their high school has six tennis courts?

  • Lord Rollingpin||

    That's a 1000 people per court. The matches must be amazing.
    500 at each end.
    'It's tennis Jim, but not as we know it!'

  • Crusty Juggler||

    I'm going to hope those courts were donated.

  • Long Woodchippers||

    It did say 2200 students, so it must cover a wider much wider than just Rolesville.

    I went to school in the 70's in a suburban district that had a total population of around 15k and had about 200 kids per grade, around 2500 total which would be a little over 15% of the total population.

  • Buddy Bizarre||

    People were having more kids back then.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    I did not hear the 2,200 number, so that makes it less worse, but still, six tennis courts?

  • ||

    There's no cafeteria, and thus no cafeteria staff. There are no school buses...

    See? Deliberately excluding poor children! /prog

  • chemjeff||

    Well, when the orphan labor is all used up, gotta do something with 'em...

  • Microaggressor||

    I bet he'd even be okay with kids walking to school. It's like he just wants them to be picked up by vultures so he can save a few pennies and make a PROFIT off the CHILDREN.

  • Get To Da Chippah||

    The video said no school nurses. I could see this being a concern for parents. Do they just slap a band-aid on for most things, keep an epi-pen around for emergency allergic attacks, and call 911 for everything else?

  • Charles Easterly||

    epi-pen

    I haven't seen his writing for a long time. Perhaps Epi got lost in one of those perilous Washington State mists.

  • Riven||

    We can only hope.

  • Charles Easterly||

    Heh.

    Interesting picture. More importantly, how have you been?

  • Riven||

    No complaints! Studying for the Series 7 and 66, so that takes a lot of my time and attention, for sure.

    Still do a lot of lurking, though!

    And yourself?

  • Charles Easterly||

    I am unfamiliar with the terminology, and a brief search prompts me to ask if "Series 7 and 66" has anything to do with selling securities.

    Regardless, I hope you study sufficiently to perform admirably on your exams/tests and in your future occupation.

    I am not unwell either, thank you.

  • Riven||

    It does, indeed. It's my plan to be a financial advisor, and part of that plan is taking and passing those two exams. Laaaaame. Thought all my studying was done when I got out of college.

    It's almost like "Buy low, sell high" isn't enough!

  • Charles Easterly||

    It's almost like "Buy low, sell high" isn't enough!

    Priceless knowledge indeed.

    I'm glad for the update and I hope that you'll do well, as I seem to recall that you are one of many individuals on H&R who have ethics/morals.

    Clearly these exams seem important for your progress and future goals. Don't muck about, as a buddy of mine might say.

    Take care.

  • Elwar||

    I always thought the whole school nurse thing was just in movies and TV shows like South Park. I know in elementary school we never had one. If you got sick you just went to the main office and they called your parents to come pick you up.
    I even broke my arm in 6th grade. They called my mom and she drove me to the hospital.
    What does a nurse do at the schools? Cure the kid? Give them drugs?

  • ||

    Things like this are the reason why the DOE needs 6 billion rounds of ammunition and their own swat team.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Excellent video. Two things the piece did not mention: the teachers do not have to be state certified, and apparently they are all cute.

  • ||

    So the guy's been grabbing some pussies? MAGA!

  • ||

    "Cheap labor. Unaccredited teachers." /progs

    See, this is really too easy.

  • Microaggressor||

    Another thing. He mentioned that a master's degree wouldn't be valuable if the teacher wasn't good at teaching. He obviously believes in meritocracy, which automatically makes him racist.

  • Enjoy Every Sandwich||

    "In business we look at outcomes," Luddy says

    Evil! Pure evil! Nazi-level evil! Everybody knows that Money Is The Metric!

  • dschwar||

    And Intentions. Don't forget about Intentions.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I'll post it to my facebook feed and see what kinds of fucktarded comments I get in return and let y'all know.

    CHERRYPICKERS!

    OUTCOME INEQUALITY!

    BIGOTRY!

  • ||

    Racism has to be in there somewhere.

  • ||

    I think they could very effectively also accommodate learning disabled students, but such a system, done right, would take a while to implement. But I predict lefties will be screaming that they don't take on learning disabled students and how it's ableist and racist and whateverist.

  • Raston Bot||

    reason, i'd like to read more on the voucher solution for the severely disabled sometime during Nat'l School Choice Week. my current belief backed up by nothing is that there is not [right now] a solution. IOW no successful voucher/charter system exists to bring the severely disabled into the classroom and educate them with the able students which is the #1 concern i've heard from my friends with disabled children.

  • robc||

    They should start a charter school for disabled children.

  • Raston Bot||

    i get that. the right model has not been developed and who would know the right model better than the parents themselves. the right model has been developed for poor urban kids, why not disabled kids.

  • Trshmnstr, Grump Apprentice||

    the right model has been developed for poor urban kids, why not disabled kids

    I don't purport to have an answer, but I have a hunch. Poor urban kids largely suffer from the same problems: a culture that really sucks and parents that choose to not parent. By applying a minimal barrier to entry (you actually have to enroll your child in charter school), you weed out the worst of the worst and are already partway to a solution.

    Disabled kids aren't remotely as homogeneous, and a simple barrier to entry doesn't fix their issues. The quadriplegic who is mentally capable of keeping up is in a fundamentally different position than the kid with a congenital brain defect and will never grow past the mental age of 6. One needs a certain regimen of accommodations, the other a completely different set.

    What really needs to happen, IMO, is that we need to separate the babysitting portion of school from the education portion of school. However, the social shift we've seen in the last 50 years from parent as primary caretaker to teacher as primary caretaker makes this distinction all the more blurred.

  • kbolino||

    no successful voucher/charter system exists to bring the severely disabled into the classroom and educate them with the able students which is the #1 concern i've heard from my friends with disabled children

    FTFY

    The problem with integrating the severely disabled* into general classrooms is that they are by definition unable to learn in the same way. It doesn't make any sense for either the disabled students or the non-disabled students.

    * = Depending on what is meant by "severely disabled", there may be some exceptions to this rule

  • Ceci n'est pas un woodchipper||

    I sympathize with parents of special needs children, but it's hard enough for a teacher to effectively teach a classroom of children without having to also deal with multiple children needing special accommodations in situations where the children in question are severely handicapped. The social/self-esteem argument doesn't really hold water either, because a child who might benefit from the social integration is also savvy enough to realize that they're being treated differently. Nobody wins.

  • Raston Bot||

    i'll accept your assertion as the cold, hard truth

  • kbolino||

    Yeah, I'm not trying to be mean. Everybody wants the "best" for their own kids but public schools are inherently a balancing act between competing interests.

  • Mainer2||

    Any discussion of changing the government run schools immediately runs up against rampant "what-about-ism". Any time I talk about it with friends or family, they inevitably ask, what about the poor kids ? what about the disabled ? what about the kids whose parents don't care ? So I've learned....don't get drawn into a criticism that a replacement for the status quo must be perfect in every way.

    My answer is that the schools have been "in crisis" my entire life. (When I was a kid, Ivan could read, and Johnny couldn't.) There are kids in Camden NJ, East LA, south side of Chicago that are getting screwed in their chances in life right now. What about them ? And alot of times they will see that maybe, just maybe the status quo isn't serving well. So why not try something different.

  • Raven Nation||

    don't get drawn into a criticism that a replacement for the status quo must be perfect in every way

    This is actually pretty good advice for all similar discussions: "since government program X is really fucked up, why does the non-government solution have to be theoretically perfect."

  • Mainer2||

    This is where it's possible to bring people around, at least a little. When i get into a political conversation, it's usually because someone is complaining (Typically about schools or health insurance). When I gently point out there is another way, they are conditioned to recite "what abouts". At that point it's easy to ask why they are defending a system they were just complaining about. Then recite the old definition of insanity. If i'm not a prick about it, I've had some success getting people to at least think about alternatives.

  • kbolino||

    It's called something like the unicorn fallacy. You can't get someone to consider a libertarian solution because they are holding up the status quo as far superior despite any evidence to the contrary. You are arguing against the existence of a unicorn to someone who firmly believes that unicorns exist.

  • Mainer2||

    They exist and are somewhere in the pile of manure which is the status quo.

  • NoVaNick||

    I don't know how much they spent on a fancy new playground at my kid's public school, but I'm sure it was a lot. Don't get me wrong, schools should have decent facilities, including a playground, but it seems that so many now are substituting extra toppings at the expense of the crust-and many probably have as many support staff as they have teachers.

  • Raven Nation||

    This has been playing out at universities too: vast sums spent on non-educational facilities. And, in some states, the support/faculty ratio is approaching 1:1.

  • Lord_at_War||

    NVN-

    That why my response to people who complain that college costs too much is "Who do you think is paying the $100K/yr salary for the Executive Secretary of the Vice-Provost in the Dept. of Diversity"?

  • Philippe Lemoine||

    It's also relevant that, after the Obama administration spent billions of dollars to overhaul failing schools, a federal analysis found that it had no significant effect: http://necpluribusimpar.net/links-01232017/.

  • kbolino||

    An outcome which anybody who has paid any attention to school "reform" efforts over the last 50 years could have predicted. It's funny to me because every time they claim that money is correlated with success and thus they have to spend more to improve outcomes, they weaken the very correlation they claim matters most.

  • Long Woodchippers||

    It was likely 20 or 25 years ago when I was still listening to NPR on my morning commute that the ran a week long series on a possible teacher's strike in Utah. After 4 days of illustrating how low paid the teachers were it was mentioned in literally the last minute that the state ranked in the very top nationally at academic excellence.

  • Mainer2||

    Mark Zuckerberg threw away $100 million dollars by giving it to the Newark school system.

  • Raston Bot||

    silver lining

  • Tyler.C||

    Money is the metric damnit!!!! Won't you learn?

  • Mainer2||

    Mrs Mainer points out that people in the public schools always refer to "our" children. Since we don't have kids, but pay taxes for the schools anyway, her question is simple. Where are "our" kids when we need the grass mowed or the snow shoveled ? They are our children when you want my money, shouldn't that make them our kids when there are chores to be done ?

  • Charles Easterly||

    Methinks the lady presents valid points. It seems to me that a sometime prominent television personality made a similar point.

  • Mainer2||

    Indeed. Parents need to get away from this private notion that those are their kids. OTOH if they did have to do chores for me, I might trigger them by talking about "hard work".

  • Paper Wasp||

    You guys are hilarious. Dontcha know, it only "takes a village" when they're talking about reaching into your wallet?

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    Hysterical Teachers' Union initiative to outlaw key elements of this in 3...2...1...

  • josh||

    i have a relative who thinks that school choice only exists because public schools are so bad. that would be insightful if she didn't also think that public schools were only bad because of school choice.

  • Holger da Dane||

    How awful. Those evil profiteering glibertarians! How dare they educate our children cheaply in order to make happier and more competent adult workers in 20 years!!1!

  • Acosmist||

    Charter school

    Private school

    Pick one. Fake news ftl.

  • QuagMyers||

    I'm very curious as to how the teacher pay compares to those in the public school system.

  • Joe_C||

    Awesome. I hope he makes that 100 schools into a thousand and keeps going. His first 25 will be worth 1000 public schools at the very least anyway.

  • da journo||

    i'm concerned about what might be required of the organization as a "non-profit" and what incentives that status gives them. any thoughts? do they get tax breaks competitors might not?

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