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American-Backed Saudi Coalition Kills 40 Children in Airstrike, Injures Dozens More

The airstrike in northern Yemen kills 51 civilians and injures 79 more.

Abdulkareem Al-Zarai/dpa/picture-alliance/NewscomAbdulkareem Al-Zarai/dpa/picture-alliance/NewscomA Saudi airstrike in northern Yemen yesterday claimed the lives of 51 civilians, at least 40 of whom were children. An additional 79 people, including 56 children, were reportedly wounded. Given the dismal conditions of the area, it's likely more will die from the lack of adequate medical care.

The American-backed Saudi coalition says the attack was a retaliation for a previous attack by Houthi rebels that killed one Yemeni person. The coalition claims that the missile was intercepted and the fragments ended up hitting a bustling market square and a bus carrying kids. Colonel Turki al-Malki, a spokesperson for the coalition, insists that the airstrike "conformed to international and humanitarian laws." But Al Jazeera reports that the market was nowhere near any sort of Houthi rebel installation.

So far, the Pentagon has offered mixed messages about America's role in the disaster. One spokesperson told Vox that the Pentagon isn't sure whether American weapons were used in the strike or if the U.S. helped refuel the Saudi jets; another flatly denied any American involvement. Washington has yet to condemn the airstrike.

Regardless, this incident isn't an anomaly. Just a little over a month ago, the United Nations found that the Saudi coalition was responsible for a majority of the conflict's children casualties, and also that they were guilty of recruiting child soldiers. More than 5,000 civilians have been killed in this war so far, and U.S. support for the Saudis is adding gasoline to an already out-of-control fire. As Lee Keath of the Associated Press told CBS, American weapons, intelligence, and logistical help "has been vital for the coalition."

Photo Credit: Abdulkareem Al-Zarai/dpa/picture-alliance/Newscom

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  • Jerryskids||

    The coalition claims that the missile was intercepted and the fragments ended up hitting a bustling market square and a bus carrying kids.

    So it wasn't the Saudis at fault here, it was the enemy who recklessly defended themselves against the missile attack without considering where the debris was going to land who bears responsibility. Is the coalition spokesman by any chance a former NYPD police officer?

  • Hugh Akston||

    I'm just glad America is safe from Houthi rebels now that all of these children have been blown to pieces.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Fuck. Let's see who speaks out and condemns this.

  • Mongo||

    You'd think this would be bigger news.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    Dead foreigners barely pop up on our radar.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Dead Americans barely pop up on non-American radars.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    Don't worry. We'll keep killing foreigners until they do care about us.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Under Trump, we're killing less foreigners than Obama, Booosh, Clinton, Bush, Reagan....

    That's something.

  • Calidissident||

    No we aren't. Civilian casualties from US operations have spiked since trump took over

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Lies. Some Lefty on here cited 100,000 dead Iraqis.

    Thats far more than The 1.5 years of Trump.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    Colonel Turki al-Malki, a spokesperson for the coalition, insists that the airstrike "conformed to international and humanitarian laws."

    ALL PROCEDURES WERE FOLLOWED. What the heck do you guys want? To stop shooting missles period?!

  • Ken Shultz||

    Those of you who are opposed to the Trump administration hitting Iran with sanctions should defend that position within the context of Iran's ongoing proxy wars in Yemen and elsewhere--certainly if you're also complaining about American support for its allies on the other side of the conflict. The fact is that the less money Iran can get its hands on, the less they have to fund proxy wars beyond their borders. Meanwhile, Iran's financial support for its proxies in Yemen and elsewhere is one of the Trump administration's justifications for reimposing sanctions.

    Oh, and if we're going to talk about hardware sales to Saudi Arabia as if it were implicit support for every one of Saudi Arabia's misdeeds with that hardware, we should also ask whether those palates of cash Obama sent to the Iranians went to support Iran's proxies in Yemen and Syria. Even if a penny of it never went to the Iranian Revolutionary Army or Hezbollah or Iran's allies in Yemen, we're all aware that money is fungible, right?

  • Mongo||

    I'd think the Shiites would spend their last dime hitting the Sunnis and vice-versa.

  • Ken Shultz||

    The Persian street is getting pretty ticked off about the economy, and one of their biggest charges against the government is that they care more about what's going on in Syria and Yemen than they do about what's going on with unemployment, inflation, etc. in Iran.

    I think the Iranians saw the survival of Assad in Syria as integral to their own survival. They were afraid that the Arab Spring might turn into a Persian summer if it wasn't stopped in Syria. That's why they went all in on Syria. They're still afraid of what their own people might do if they ever get the chance.

    The Iranian Revolutionary Guard is good for guarding the revolution against both from ISIS extremists in Syria and everyday, average Iranians back at home. They'll be the last to get their pay cut, I'm sure.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    This whole thing is bullshiite.

  • Happy Chandler||

    1) There are already sanctions for Iran's support of terrorism. Those were separate from the nuclear sanctions.
    2) The sanctions regime had international support and was effective. The new regime is unilateral and will be much less effective.
    3) The money was theirs. And, I don't think it had anything to do with the roof of anyone's mouth.
    4) Before, the Iranians supported terrorism and proxy wars and had stopped their nuclear enrichment. Now, they are supporting terrorism and proxy wars, and can restart their enrichment without consequence.

  • JoeBlow123||

    You write a lot of junk that looks straight lifted from a Democratic newsletter.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Iran and Saudi Arabia are on the other side of the planet. The US shouldn't be involved at all in their regional conflicts.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Unfortunately, we don't get to live in the world as it should be, so we have to figure out what to do in the world as it is.

  • Hugh Akston||

    I wish we could all be practical and brave enough to defend Trump's every move the way you do.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Someone has to. Otherwise, the Lefties would threaten all Congressmen out of office and then the 40 remaining Democrat Congressmen would impeach Trump and Hillary would be installed as Queen.

  • Calidissident||

    "You can't criticize trump or else Hillary will become president!" was a dumb line before the election and it's completely moronic and insane after.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Yeah, Lefties are dumb. I will give you that.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "I wish we could all be practical and brave enough to defend Trump's every move the way you do."

    You man except for when I'm condemning his trade and immigration polices, right?

  • Ken Shultz||

    There's actually something wrong with you if you can't understand other people's positions apart from them being pro-Trump or anti-Trump.

    I think that's what we're talking about when we're talking about TDS.

    The things I wrote about would be true or not regardless of who was in the White House.

  • Yellow Tony||

    Are you going to mention Hillary too?
    We shouldn't be involved in this shit, period.

  • damikesc||

    This has zero to do with us.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Iran is a legitimate threat to U.S. security, and having allies is an excellent defense against such threats.

  • Mongo||

    Then we should make Iran a US ally (like we should've did with Saddam and the Baathists).

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Maybe we could install some kind of Shah or something. I like the way you think.

  • Mongo||

    I'd be fine with a loudmouth, cheezy, Persian rug-dealer/con man put in place through US hacking of their prez election.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Exactly, damikesc, Americans are free to go to these hotspots and take care of the people who are killing each other over religion or whatever other BS.

    Naw, they would rather sit behind that pretty sweet wall of Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Space Force military hardware and American fighting men/women.

  • JoeBlow123||

    It's not. But the Europeans refuse to defend their oil pipelines and sealanes so we do it. We do have an interest in the world economy not collapsing.

    Selling weapons to Saudis to kill people backed by the Iranians, the same Iranians who have threatened to blockade the Strait of Hormuz, is a pretty small investment into the conflict. Dirt cheap actually.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    The American-backed Saudi coalition

    If the media only explained what this meant.

    It means that no US equipment was used and the USA supports Saudi Arabia over Iran in Yemen.

  • JeremyR||

    It's funny how almost every article says just that, but no one ever mentions the rebels are Iran backed.

    That doesn't justify the incompetence of killing civilians like this, but it does explain why we are involved with the Saudis

  • loveconstitution1789||

    How is the USA even involved? The media blames the USA and Trump but I dont see any concrete examples of how the USA is involved.

    Equipment? Weapons? USA doing the droning?

  • Horny Lizard||

    USA is providing the intelligence and coordinates for the airstrikes from I can remember off the top of my head.

  • Texasmotiv||

    We are selling them weapons/equipment, refueling their planes, providing intelligence, refueling planes and it came out we also have a team of green berets training Saudi ground troops.

  • Texasmotiv||

    Whoops didn't mean to say refueling planes twice, but I guess we have probably done it more than once.

  • Rich||

    Colonel Turki al-Malki, a spokesperson for the coalition, insists that the airstrike "conformed to international and humanitarian laws."

    Especially the law of gravity.

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Jesus H. Christ. Can we please elect someone who will pull the fucking plug on this shit?

  • chemjeff radical individualist||

    Amen.

  • JoeBlow123||

    Who steps into the vacuum? Pussified Europe? Middle Kingdom China? A huge Middle East war?

    Can we bear those consequences? If yes, do it and leave. No, then we are stuck with a fucked status quo out of necessity.

  • JoeBlow123||

    Who steps into the vacuum? Pussified Europe? Middle Kingdom China? A huge Middle East war?

    Can we bear those consequences? If yes, do it and leave. No, then we are stuck with a fucked status quo out of necessity.

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    The coalition claims that the missile was intercepted

    Intercepted by what? Do the Houthi rebels have some kind of sophisticated anti-missile system?

  • JeremyR||

    And the root cause of this is Iran, funding the rebels with the ultimate goal of toppling not just Yemen but Saudi Arabia. (And as a side benefit, to possibly attack shipping in the area)

    And Iran is using the money Obama gave them.

  • chemjeff radical individualist||

    I knew eventually we would get back to "it's all Obama's fault".

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Its Booshes fault too.

  • Texasmotiv||

    And Trumps fault.

  • Jickerson||

    The US could just stop getting involved period, regardless of who is at fault here.

  • JoeBlow123||

    We unfortunately still need oil. And so do the Europeans and everyone else. If we are going to stop meddling then we need to be able to bear the costs and not just pretend massive instability in the Middle East (at least from the oil sellers) is no problem. Can we? Do we have the right infrastructure and systems in place to pull out?

    This is what libertarians should be striving for, moving towards a way where the USA can safely stop meddling or at least meddle in the most cost efficient manner possible.

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