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Dallas Mayor Blames Bike-Sharing Company for Recycling Bikes After City's New Fees Killed Bike-Sharing

Those bikes could still be on the road if Dallas hadn't demanded an $800 registration fee and $21 per bike.

New permitting and registration fees have killed off at least one bike-sharing company previously operating in Dallas, Texas.

Which means that instead of helping people commute, run errands, or visit friends, thousands of yellow bikes previously operated by Ofo, a Beijing-based bike-sharing firm, are now heaped in a city recycling center like a massive modernist monument to poor civic policy.

Ofo decided to pull out of Dallas after the city passed new rules requiring an $800 registration fee and permit fees of $21 per bike, according to The Dallas Morning News. While there were more than 20,000 shared bikes available in Dallas—including roughly 5,000 operated by Ofo—before the city's new registration fee system went into effect, there are now only about 3,500 such bikes available, the paper reports.

Bike-sharing companies and other app-based transportation options like electric scooters have popped up in many major American cities over the past two years, offering a competitively priced alternative to struggling public transportation systems and ride-sharing services. They are hip, useful, and environmentally friendly—in other words, they are everything that city transit planners usually love, except for the fact that they are operated by private companies instead of as public monopolies.

They also operate on razor-thin margins, with users typically paying only $1 per ride, plus additional per minute costs of a few pennies. It's the type of business model that might struggle to survive if subjected to huge fees like the ones imposed in Dallas.

But judging from some reactions, people are happy to blame the victim for the pile of useless yellow bikes waiting to be melted down and recycled. People including Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings.

Others have criticized Ofo for not donating their bikes to youth centers or other charitable causes after the company decided to cease operations in Dallas—something the company said it did with bikes that were in good working condition.

But criticizing Ofo for it's decision to trash bikes or donate them is missing the point. All those brightly painted bikes would still be serving as a useful and affordable transportation alternative if city officials had not driven Ofo out of Dallas. Rawlings can use Twitter to throw shade at Ofo all he wants, but his city government is what's ultimately responsible for that big pile of useless bikes.

Terrible, indeed.

Photo Credit: AY-COLLECTION/SIPA/Newscom

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  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Ofo's pulling out all over. You know who else liked to pull out?

    City Council approves new bike-share rules, prompting ofo to leave Seattle

    The Seattle City Council moved to make dockless bike share a permanent fixture in the city Monday, passing legislation that would allow up to 20,000 of the bikes to operate here, while also setting a nonbinding deadline for the city to build a network of protected bike lanes through downtown.

    The bike-share legislation, passed unanimously, allows up to four companies to operate in the city, each paying $250,000 for the right to scatter up to 5,000 bikes on the city's sidewalks.
  • Jerryskids||

    The bike-share legislation, passed unanimously, allows up to four companies to operate in the city, each paying $250,000 for the right to scatter up to 5,000 bikes on the city's sidewalks.

    Somebody might be confused about the difference between rights and privileges. And the difference between capitalism and fascism.

  • Cynical Asshole||

    You know who else liked to pull out?

    Ron Jeremy?

  • Cynical Asshole||

    The bike-share legislation, passed unanimously, allows up to four companies to operate in the city

    Nobody needs more than 4 bike sharing companies.

  • Sometimes a Great Notion||

    Just wait till they ban putting baseball cards in the spokes because it makes it sound like a motorcycle and that reinforces the stereotype that the combustion engine is good.

  • JFree||

    Seattle likes to make noises and spend a ton of money uselessly re bikes - while actually doing very little.

    The easy low-hanging fruit of biking is around schools. No bike racks there - no kids can really go to school by bike. Put bike racks there - and it forces better transport/safety decisions further away from those schools.

    Seattle public schools have 54,000 students. Roughly 3000 bike racks. And they think they really only need about 1500 more. No folks - you need about 20,000 more bike racks before there are enough kids biking to school to force changes in residential driving infrastructure/layout so the kids don't get killed.

    Americans still aren't even remotely serious about actual urban transportation. Just bureaucrats looking for union featherbedding re 'mass transit' - and drivers who ain't gonna let public land be used for anything but cars.

  • Agammamon||

    In 1980 they might have needed 20,000 more. In 2018 no parent is going to let their precious bike to school. Might be too hot. Might be too cold. Might rain. Might be too sunny. Might get grabbed by a predator. Might get hit by a car.

    I've got someone near me who drives their kid home. From the bus stop. 250 yards from their house.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    Meh. My former suburban neighbors did that as a group every day, on a dead-end street with houses 50 to at most 200 yards from the bus stop, in a fancy subdivision.

    Talk about raising entitled brats (and indulgent parents).

  • epsilon given||

    Bah, you forget the biggest risk of all!

    Namely, that police will detain kids walking home from the bus stop, and send social worker bureaucrats to the kids' homes, where they will find a pretext for removing the kids out of their homes and put them in foster care, while the parents have to spend $thousands to get their kids back, and have to watch their back ever after.

    We need to make sure that the kids are protected! And the best way to do that is to use the power of the State to ensure kids are kept in cocoons all their lives!

  • JFree||

    'Bike racks at schools' is one of the few govt expenses that imo can legitimately be called an investment.

    a)Responding to existing demand doesn't work in anything when existing demand is zero. idk the answer but the right ? is 'if you build it will they come?'.

    b)the benefits re kids health and kids acquiring an early freedom they can learn to expand on and defend should be both obvious and cross-partisan

    c)if a city is gonna go beyond car domination of public roads to multi-option, residential areas are the cheap/fast place to start. Setting schools as the key node for those areas avoids the 'last mile' problem and also forces bureaucrats to be accountable to at least parents. Whether parents care more about their kids independence or their own car dependence - well idk.

  • JFree||

    And bike racks also cost a lot less than current transport options. Every kid biking to school means one less kid needing a school bus or having parents drive. Buses are VERY expensive when you consider the capital, driver, fuel, parking space, and idle/downtime. Avg cost in the US is $700/student/year vs maybe $200/student/one-time for bike slots.

    70+% of buses could probably be eliminated entirely (in cities at least) with the remainder being mostly smaller vans for disabled kids or early elementary - or intradistrict shuttles if school districts ever revert back to individual school boards with intra-district competition.

  • Crazyotto||

    forcing snowflakes to bike by central government Fiat goes against the idea of communities running their own schools. JFree sounds like another socialists pretending to be a libertarian. We should abolish public education. Since we are stuck with the system $700 per student is rather reasonable rather adopting a Chi-Comm option.

  • JFree||

    JFree sounds like another socialists pretending to be a libertarian.

    No. I'm a classical liberal (but a big-L) who actually lives in a city - by choice - who only really gives a damn about expanding liberty for those who don't have much/any. And kids being driven around everywhere and sold fear so they turn into 'snowflakes' (your word) is pretty good evidence that that is EXACTLY the sort of group who is being denied liberty. The freedom to go places - on their own terms - is exactly the sort of freedom that kids want - the second they first learn to walk.

    How your solution - big expensive govt that drives kids around everywhere - in a bus - on a mass schedule - expands liberty is beyond me. But I'm sure you can rationalize that sort of nonsense.

  • Careless||

    Do you mean bike rack slots? Because 3000 racks sounds ok

  • JFree||

    The Seattle inventory of that says 'bike parking spaces'. So slots. And the entire report has nothing to do with actual kid mobility/transportation changes. It's entirely about 'bringing schools up to meet minimum school code requirements' (ie bureaucratic CYA re a different group of bureaucrats) - and the link between current bike spaces and ethnic/income disparities among different schools.

    IOW - the bureaucrats are self-guiding, clueless, and unaccountable to any group of voters on this issue. The entire 'bike' issue in Seattle looks like its entirely about commuting - which is the most useless counterproductive and expensive approach to changing a transport grid when people have already made their living/work decisions around a car-centered grid.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    No one wants to regularly commute to work in a city where it rains 9 months out of the year amd has both hot humid summers, and cold, often icy winters.

  • perlchpr||

    I don't get it. If there are companies banging on their door to give them a quarter of a million dollars to be allowed to... rent bicycles to the city, why would they artificially limit that to 4 companies?

    (No, I don't think they're actually going to get any applicants at all.)

  • JeremyR||

    It's like the taxi medallions in NYC. They create an artificial scarcity to justify a high price.

  • Crazyotto||

    Exactly the medallion system created an artificial scarcity that enriched the medallion owners, made slaves of taxi drivers and forced consumers into a medieval style transportation system where getting around the city is a crap shoot. But NYC and it's communist mayor are now trying to limit Uber and Lyft drivers. NYC gets the government they asked for ..

  • tlapp||

    Government greed has no bounds and worse can be protected by an armed police force.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    So, when the government indulges in rent-seeking, why is it not rent-seeking?

  • ||

    something the company said it did with bikes that were in good working condition.

    ...

    All those brightly painted bikes would still be serving as a useful and affordable transportation alternative if city officials had not driven Ofo out of Dallas.

    New math? If they weren't good enough for charity, seems they were destined for the trash heap anyhow.

  • Agammamon||

    Why would you give them to charity when you can recoup some of the cost through selling them for scrap?

  • HeteroPatriarch||

    Because you can recoup more of the cost through charitable contribution deductions.

  • Agammamon||

    Unless their accountants ran the numbers and found out they couldn't.

  • perlchpr||

    Even if the company hadn't donated them to charity, the city recycling center certainly could have.

  • epsilon given||

    But the recycling center bought those bikes with the intention of selling them as scrap themselves, so they probably weren't able to donate the bikes to charity either.

    Regardless, those bikes represent a business that had to be scrapped because of taxes and fees.

  • operagost||

    Then end up losing $2 million in liability lawsuits, when someone gets hurt riding one of the bikes.

  • croaker||

    And anyone with a bike would be fined for operating a shared bike system without a license.

  • epsilon given||

    Only if they let their roommate borrow a bike in a pinch. (Otherwise the bike isn't shared, and therefore there is no "shared bike system".)

  • epsilon given||

    As stupid as these comments are, it scares me to realize that ay very well be a matter of time before we hear about a story of someone who is fined for operating a shared bike system without a license for riding his friend's, or even his own, bike.

  • DevilDog943||

    I think that is the action I would have taken if I had to make the decision. FYTW would be my reaction to the attempted shakedown by Dallas city government.

    Full disclosure; I live in the Dallas area, but not in Dallas County. I categorically refuse to live in either political entity and despise the government officials of each. Admittedly, Dallas has a lot of good restaurants and other amenities such as the DSO and Dallas Opera, but I wouldn't live there even if you paid me to do so.

  • Dillinger||

    to be fair the only peeps I ever saw ON an Ofo were homeless who broke the locks ... also lots of Ofos tipped over IN the streets, not so many rolling ON the streets

    ALSO, there's still the orange and green bikes, so don't worry

  • BYODB||

    ^ This. I've seen piles of these bikes near various CVS.

  • ||

    BTW, that pile doesn't look so bad as compared to these.

  • SIV||

    A bicycle graveyard is a beautiful thing.

  • Dillinger||

    Brad (Brett?) the mechanical engineer on the other thread can make them all into guns.

  • perlchpr||

    I'm not sure there's any tubing on a modern bicycle heavy enough to safely use for firearm purposes.

  • Dillinger||

    safely make them into guns is another thing

  • Naaman Brown||

    British Sten and Swedish K receivers are simply metal tubes. Private Canadian builders of Sten guns used fence post pipe. Checking my mountain bike, the frame tubes could be adapted to building the receivers of blowback operated automatic weapons. For barrels, you would want to start with high pressure gas pipe.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    Yeah, so the Chinese people are technically and economically progressing from bikes to cars.

    And we have people advocating for Americans to give up cars and use bikes.

    What's next, donkey sharing?

  • Don't look at me.||

    Why donate things to a town that pretty much kicked you out?

  • tlapp||

    If all those free bikes were available the for pay companies would be run out of business and the government greed for fees would not get satisfied.

  • SIV||

    While I disapprove of the municipal government here seeing so many bikes destroyed is a beautiful thing.

  • Cynical Asshole||

    New permitting and registration fees have killed off at least one bike-sharing company previously operating in Dallas, Texas.

    Which means that instead of helping people commute, run errands, or visit friends, thousands of yellow bikes previously operated by Ofo, a Beijing-based bike-sharing firm, are now heaped in a city recycling center like a massive modernist monument to poor civic policy.

    The important thing is that people are now forced back onto public transit. /sarc

    It's kind of funny that these bike sharing companies seem to think they can just start operating in America without making sure the politicians get their cut. What do they think this is, a free country with a free market capitalist economy? Note to Ofo: we're far closer to your home country of China than anyone is willing to admit.

  • BillyG||

    Note to Ofo: we're far closer to your home country of China than anyone is willing to admit.

    Correction: Note to Ofo: Democrat Cities are far closer to your home country of China than anyone is willing to admit.

  • Devastator||

    Name some large cities over say 300,000 that don't lean left?

  • Longtobefree||

    The city simply cannot have a transportation option where individuals determine when and where they travel. Such transportation decisions must be made by the professional city planners.

  • Agammamon||

    So, off-topic - I quit my job. And by Christ, my ex-boss is like a psycho ex-girlfriend who can't get it through her head that its over when she's been dumped.

  • Giant Realistic Flying Tiger||

    Tell me the story, please.

  • Longtobefree||

    Once upon a time, there was an employee who quit his job. For this individual choice of personal freedom, he was hounded throughout the kingdom, until one day he found the internet, and posted happily ever after. The end.

  • Agammamon||

    In a nutshell:

    Not been happy working with this guy. He's massively disorganized and inconsiderate of other people's times and I've basically been running on a day-to-day schedule with him. As in I don't know if I'm working the next day until 1130 at night. And if I don't hear from him - that means I'm not working. And that could be for several days in a row followed by a sudden text telling me he needs me to open the next day. 9 months and haven't been paid on time - because he couldn't be bothered to make that happen. I've brought up these and other issues with him over this time but he blows them off.

    Last Tuesday he forgot to schedule me for work while he was out of town - and then freaked out that I wouldn't drop everything on 15 minutes notice to come take a shift. *Then*, after I told him I'd ensure the store was closed down properly if he wasn't back in town that night, I come in to close and find he's already there but didn't have the common courtesy to tell me so I didn't have to come in and close - I'm doing this off-the-clock mind, he's not paying for this.

  • Agammamon||

    In any case, I told him I quit that night, dropped the keys off the next day. He's now all repentant and telling me I'll not have any problems with being paid on time, etc, can I please still work, he at least needs me to cover so he can go home to San Diego each week or until he finds a replacement - which he still hasn't even started looking for - and how I should have told him that there were problems.

    Ultimately its a culture conflict - he's an Iraqi Chaldean and he's used to managing his family and Chaldeans and . . . apparently they put up with this sort of stuff. And if you don't get mad and get in his face and scream he doesn't think you're serious. Or at least that's how the dude who works in the restaurant next door deals with him.

  • perlchpr||

    Well, good for you for firing your boss. Mad sympathy. I have also had a Boss From Hell who had absolutely no consideration for anyone other than herself.

  • Conchfritters||

    Maybe use this episode as a way to squeeze more money out of him.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    Yeah, but for your crazy ex-girl friend analogy to apply, your boss/job needs to be super hot and provide amazing sex between spells of aggravation and wacky insanity.

  • James Solbakken||

    "he's an Iraqi Chaldean"

    The Bible warned us about the Chaldeans.

    Isaiah 48:20
    20 Go ye forth of Babylon, flee ye from the Chaldeans, with a voice of singing declare ye, tell this, utter it even to the end of the earth; say ye, The LORD hath redeemed his servant Jacob.

  • Devastator||

    Well then you're just being dumb and not a good objectivist at all. Fuck him and his couch, grind some mud in his couch and get the fuck away from that ignant bitch.

  • Aloysious||

    "It's not you, baby. It's me"

  • sharmota4zeb||

    Let me guess, he set up a fake profile on your favorite adult webcamming website, got you to tip him for private shows, and cajoled you into flying to Europe a couple of times to get a face to face date. I've been there, bro.

  • Agammamon||

    Christ no. This guy uses his cable company's email for *everything*. As in, until I fixed it for him, had one email account - through his cable company - to manage personal, personal buying, and business email for two separate businesses.

    Since I've been working there, the bookkeeper has had to come in from Phoenix and hand deliver our paystubs monthly because he couldn't handle printing them out from email.

  • chemjeff radical individualist||

    Guess the breakroom sex must have been really good.

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Was your boss like Jennifer Aniston from Horrible Bosses? 'Cause I gots to admit, that would be a tough job to quit.

  • Agammamon||

    Yeah, I don't know what Day's character's problem was, that sounds like a freaking awesome perk.

  • ThomasD||

    Once found myself in an untenable situation, mainly due to a lack of support from my boss, so I resigned. On my last day as everyone was saying goodbye my soon to be former boss came by being ever so nice (so I couldn't not see it coming) and then politiely asked "if we have any questions we can give you a call, right?"

    I said "sure, depending on the issue I'm sure we can work out a flat fee or an hourly rate."

  • ||

    OT: Her body, her choice. Right to privacy muthafuckas!

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Dead fetus, not dead baby. Huge difference. Put it in the compost bin.

  • Philadelphia Collins||

    Step 1. strip victim of humanity

    Step 2. genocide

  • sharmota4zeb||

    You know your city has a problem when taxes and regulations drive out a company based in China.

  • Longtobefree||

    Really? A start up bike share company doesn't have just over four million dollars laying around to hand over to a city just because - - - - what?
    And then those narrow minded capitalists took the four million the city was counting on and just left! And, as (probably) required by law, recycled what couldn't be used elsewhere. The nerve!
    Win for the company (they are out of a bad place)
    Win for the city (they do not have all those revenues, and the recycling laws were followed)
    I guess nobody loses except the citizens.

  • HeteroPatriarch||

    Where do you get $4 million? It's more like 100K. But still, it's an added cost out of the blue that provides no corresponding benefit.

  • perlchpr||

    I think he picked it up as "$800 per bicycle", which, to be fair, was the idea I got from the first readthrough of the article.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    That was in the Dallas plan for Phase 2.

  • Mickey Rat||

    "Others have criticized Ofo for not donating their bikes to youth centers or other charitable causes after the company decided to cease operations in Dallas—…"

    Point #6487 - "So, you think Ayn Rand wrote unrealistic villians?"

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    They were unrealistic. They weren't nearly as cartoonish as they are on real life.

  • BYODB||

    I live in Dallas, and most of these bikes lived on the side of the road since homeless people or just jackasses decided that returning them was too much trouble.


    Of course, they paid a bunch of people to drive around finding them. Such a good use of tax dollars, I'm sure.

  • JFree||

    It's a crappy business model running up against venal stupid bureaucrats protecting the status quo

    It wouldn't surprise me one bit if the two groups most opposed to bike-sharing and getting the bureaucrats to do this stuff are:

    a)drivers - who just don't want more bikes period

    b)cyclists - who in this country are obsessed with the racing/BMX/extreme subculture of biking. The last thing they actually want is granny and kids riding cheap bikes around the city leisurely - in street clothes - without helmets.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Lefties say the stupidiest things.

  • Crusty Juggler||

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    Do they make sexy, lacy ones for people like SIV? Chicken lingerie.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    Yes.

  • perlchpr||

    Baker's daughter liked to bring her favorite chicken, an Old English hen named Abigail, inside their house, and because chickens poop close to a dozen times per day, Baker needed a better system for managing Abigail's excrement.

    "And since just smacking her daughter on the wrist and telling her to leave the fucking farm animals outside never occurred to her, she started making chicken diapers instead."

  • Earth Skeptic||

    What happens when you roast them?

  • texexpatriate||

    No one who reads Reason will disagree with me on this: Ninety percent of the time when a government gets involved with someone's business model the result will be negative. It is all about government greed for power and money.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    No one who reads Reason will disagree with me on this:

    False!

    Ninety 100 percent of the time when a government gets involved with someone's business model anything the result will be negative.

    Fixed that for you.

  • I am the 0.000000013%||

    Both of you couldn't be more wrong!

  • HeteroPatriarch||

    It takes a special kind of dickhead to ruin a business and then complain about how the business disposed of its assets.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

  • jfelber||

    I'm glad they are gone. It was the liberal left that wanted these share bikes even though history proves them to be a failure. So it was big Dallas lefist government that shut them down, great. I live in a suburb of Dallas 20 miles from downtown and someone dumped one of these yellow eyesores on my lawn already. I didn't ask for them, I didn't want them. I just can't park my car anywhere I want on sidewalks on lawns or in parks, but these bike share companies did nothing to prevent this. As a Libertarian you have a right to operate a business, but your business has no rights to impact me without my consent. These bikes violated the rights of everyone because they weren't returned to where they were rented and dumped everywhere. If big government hadn't pushed the idea of bike shares to begin with no business would have blindly went into this market, but I'm not going to shed one teardrop because businesses still should have done due diligence, they did not.

  • Dan S.||

    Instead of sending them to a recycling center, they should have just removed (or deactivated) the locking mechanisms and allowed people to take the bikes and make them their own. They'd be cared for and there would be no surge of material at the recycling [no pun intended] center. If having a bunch of new, privately owned bikes in the city works, maybe some time in the future the city will be more amenable to bike rental.

  • Mark22||

    The citizens of Dallas screwed over Ofo and caused them massive losses. Why should Ofo do anything nice for the citizens of Dallas in return?

  • Earth Skeptic||

    Uh, no. Giving away free bikes does not increase the demand for rentals.

    Perhaps a free day or other trial period, but otherwise giving away the thing you want to rent just eliminates the customer base.

  • Dan S.||

    Presumably the number of rental bikes that were available was significantly less than the total number of potential rental customers (at various times). If not, the business would not have worked anyway. So people seeing their neighbors benefiting from having bikes would likely increase the number of potential customers in the future. But even if the company was never allowed back, just leaving the bikes where they were, permanently unlocked, and abandoning all claims to them would be cheaper than having to take them all to a recycling center. And Mark22: vindictiveness is never a good strategy in business (or life). If giving away the bikes would be cheaper than recycling them, give them away. Besides which, the citizens of Dallas are not the same as the government.

  • JFree||

    This ain't vindictive by ofo. It is the citizens/govt of Dallas that are the reason those ofo bikes were distributed like litter everywhere. Because like every other city in the US, there are nowhere near enough places to park them. Cities don't have any problem setting aside large amounts of public land for on-street parking of cars - often free. That waste is DESIGNED into the street system. We design our streets so that cars - and only cars - can get to anywhere from anywhere - and be easily abandoned for a short period of time so that people can do the stuff they need to do. Whereas every single bike parking slot has to run thru the constipated bureaucratic colon - where cars/drivers often get a functional final veto over the installation.

    giving those bikes away for personal use would simply mean those bikes continue to be litter - and those cyclists would not magically turn into advocates for more bike parking since they are marginalized people anyway. Stacking the litter up is a very visible demonstration of what a fucking waste the current transport system in Dallas IS.

  • Dan S.||

    giving those bikes away for personal use would simply mean those bikes continue to be litter

    No they wouldn't, because their new owners would have a vested interest in keeping them safe and operational.

  • JFree||

    If they get them for free, that vested interest equals the value of a McD's burger wrapper.

    And regardless, they STILL can't park them in anywhere near enough places - so they will still be left as what looks like litter everywhere whenever they are used.

    The bikeshare business model sucks because it assumes the existence of the same 'dockless infrastructure' that exists for - say - cars. That ain't true.

  • Mark22||

    vindictiveness is never a good strategy in business (or life).

    Vindictiveness would mean actively trying to harm the citizens. Ofo is merely not rewarding them.

    Furthermore, game theory, psychology, and real life tell us that it is foolish to reward bad behavior.

    Besides which, the citizens of Dallas are not the same as the government.

    The citizens of Dallas are responsible for their government and its actions. Even the citizens of North Korea are responsible for their government.

  • Dace Highlander||

    I'm pretty sure that only addictive drugs create a demand base using this model.

  • Helvetica Standard||

    lots of people commenting here who, apparently, don't have these things littering the streets... good riddance, these things are a curse. they junk up the streets. the first thing i saw when i came to downtown dallas was a limebike thrown into a large cactus. go around the corner, and you got half a dozen more limes piled up on the corner.

    they bring in unlabeled white vans to drop off limebikes by the dozen late at night and early in the morning. every ofo i've ever seen has had the logo shaved off, the lock removed, and has been chained to a post or a utility pole. count your blessings that these pieces of garbage weren't dumped into your cities overnight. you have the right to open and operate a business. but when it starts to negatively impact other people, or infringe on others rights, you can't cry foul. lame article from Eric who apparently has never had to put up with these things.

  • JoeBlow123||

    This. Where I live we have scooters and bikes littered everywhere. Rather annoying. Americans are dogs, if there is no threat of punishment or arrest they will all push all limits possible.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    But criticizing Ofo for it's decision to trash bikes...

    SPEAKING OF TERRIBLE, BOEHM.

  • Mark22||

    Others have criticized Ofo for not donating their bikes to youth centers or other charitable causes after the company decided to cease operations in Dallas—something the company said it did with bikes that were in good working condition.

    The arrogance and selfishness of these people is astounding. I think Ofo did the right thing by not rewarding the appalling choices that the citizens of Dallas made. Dallas tax payers should be glad they didn't get dragged into a big court battle over illegal takings.

  • Lucius Junius Brutus||

    Electric scooters and segways have no business being on the sidewalks (let alone bikes). They travel too fast to be included among pedestrian traffic. I encourage all pedestrians to obstruct, refuse to yield and "accidentally" bump (preferably with an umbrella) all of these interlopers if you encounter them on the sidewalk.

  • vek||

    Uhhh, honestly in a lot of places I think being on the sidewalk is less of a danger than being on the road. It depends on the nature of the road, how wide it is, etc but being on the sidewalk was often best when I biked when I was a kid...

  • Duelles||

    Since the mayor of Dallas is brain dead can we donate his brain to a forensic cemetery? What a dipshit. Donate to kids And people who are without them. His message is clear: children are not people. Just and moderate expression of his dipshitiness

  • Sparky Wilson||

    I don't blame Dallas for doing this. We have them here and they are a pain in the ass. I think the idea behind it is great and wish I would have thought of it, but it's the customers. They are left everywhere. In the middle of the sidewalks, in doorways, even saw a fight over one because the other close free one was a block down. The customer base has ruined a lot of people's opinions about them.

  • santamonica811||

    "But criticizing Ofo for it's decision to trash bikes or donate them is missing the point...."

    No it is not. It is making a second, different point. Which seems perfectly valid to everyone else except you.

    The first point (that this case is an example of over-regulation that hurts society and hurts people) seems valid to me. But to ignore the second point (ie, that--regardless of the merit of the first point--it is wasteful and vindictive to deliberately deny those discarded bikes from charities, schools, etc) seems like an odd thing to do.

  • JeremyR||

    They should have donated the bikes, but not the seats and said "This is what your goverment just did to us"

  • buybuydandavis||

    Looters

    They kill a company, then get upset when the company won't barbecue it's own carcass and feed it to them.

    I'd rather see the mountain of bikes bronzed and made into a tourist attraction to commemorate yet another attack by the Looters.

  • Hank Phillips||

    What do you expect from Dallas? In The Netherlands, Luud Schimmelpennink introduced the white bike sharing concept while politicians repealed prohibition there. Dallas is still into white sheets and burning crosses--oh, and men with guns out looting the populace.

  • kevrob||

    ... In The Netherlands, Luud Schimmelpennink introduced the white bike sharing concept

    It isn't paradise in NL:

    Arie de Beer, coordinator at Waternet, the Amsterdam Water Authority:

    "Yes, bicycle fishing is a peculiar story. Every year we fish up between 12,000 and 15,000 bicycles. Yeah, where do they come from? Well - the owners won't throw them into the water so quickly, so we assume that either theft or vandalism is the reason for the bicycles to end up in the water."

    - AP bike fishing story

    Consider shopping carts/trolleys/buggies at an ALDI store: they make people pay a 25 cent deposit. People return the carts to the rack to get their quarter back.

  • Owen Henry Windows||

    Yeah, those narrow minded capitalists took the four million the city was counting on and just left! And, as (probably) required by law, recycled what couldn't be used elsewhere.

  • Smith Johnson||

    I would like to get some of those bikes for youth who never had one

  • vek||

    In Seattle there used to be fixed dock bikes that nobody ever rode, that the city spent a ton of money propping up... Then these stupid dockless ones came around.

    I pretty much hate them personally, but people seem to be using them, which I suppose is an okay thing. As long as a city isn't subsidizing shit, giving them special privileges or whatever, I suppose they should be tolerated as private companies... But damn they do annoy me.

  • Crazyotto||

    Dallas over the last 20 years has been a mess of progressive politics and silliness. Rather than let the market fix the Bike issue they tried to capitalize on the success and generate a revenue stream for the city. So now they have 3,500 bikes in a city of over 1 million. Nice job City council! Nice work progressives! For those progressive Libertarians on this website please consider Mother Jones.

  • Agnes||

    Honestly......3,500 bikes is all we need. It's enough for it to be a fun novelty. If more people actually rode bikes, they could easily purchase one for like $70 at target or even a pawn shop. But they don't - so the ride share bikes shit up neighborhoods. Dallas trying to profit off of it and therefore pushing away businesses is one thing....but I'm honestly sick of these things and happy to see fewer. I'd walk by the lake on the weekends and would see people pulling bikes out of the lake...like several.

    I think the issue with these idealistic companies - is that they think everyone is going to be responsible and respectful and afterwards, think about what they can do to help reduce gas emissions while playing bocce ball and drinking a craft beer.

    At my nice workplace, people place their dirty mugs in a sink, right next to an empty dishwasher, and right below a giant sign that says - please don't place your dirty mugs in the sink. Wash them.

    It's got to be really hard to come up with a good, well meaning business idea and see what pigs do with it.

  • kevrob||

    ...purchase one for like $70 at target...

    Don't do that. I spent $100 at Tarjay and got a BSO: a "bike-shaped-object." It was a piece of crap, poorly assembled, that failed on me. Target wouldn't take responsibility for their "assembler's" poor work, and though the manufacturer supplied me with new parts under the warranty, much to my amazement, my local bike shop turned down the job of putting it back together, as some unnoticed damage had been done to the frame, making the labor charge to reassemble more than the bike was sold for, new.

    I found a 1990s, cromoly-framed Univega/Ben Lawee-designed hybrid on Craigslist for $40. I still have it. I need to get off my ass and ride it, though. +gazillions for shopping at a pawn shop - or a thrift shop. Check Freecycle.org if you need a freebie. I donated my joked bike to a local charity of retired guys who repair donated bikes and give them to those who need some kind of transportation to get to work. Putting a good frame in a landfill should be the last resort.

  • Hank Phillips||

    One of my first jobs was Dallas bicycle courier delivering blueprints to engineers. A blueprint is a pre-CAD technical drawing reproduction reeking of ammonia, and an engineer is someone more closely resembling John Galt than the sort of soft machine looter politicians infesting the Dallas City Council. A job back then was a quaint means of voluntarily earning rather than robbing or snivelling money from robbers.

  • I am the 0.000000013%||

    Is this the beginning of "Dictionary for millenials"? :)

  • Hank Phillips||

    Outside of Holland white bikes mark the spot where some lazy driver killed a cyclist. That is more like the kind of thing that would please the Dallas City Council. What good is the initiation of force if it doesn't produce some death?

  • kevrob||

    That's a "ghost bike," Hank. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_bike

  • TxJack 112||

    Yesterday the Mayor Pro Tem of Dallas resigned in disgrace after pleading guilty to corruption charges. He received $450,000 in bribes. Living in north Texas, I know the cesspool of corruption and stupidity that is the Dallas City Council. This is just another example of that deeply rooted problem.

  • majil||

    I am sure they were paid for these bikes by the scrap yard .They lost the ability to make a profit by the government and then the government wants them to give away the bikes for free instead of recouping some of their investment by scraping them ? JFC

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