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School Resource Officer Who Failed to Confront Mass Shooter Previously Defended Cops Living at School Rent-Free

Scot Peterson, SRO of Marjory Stoneman Douglas, also failed to assist a CPS investigation into Nikolas Cruz.

ParklandIan Witlen / Rmv/ZUMA Press/NewscomScot Peterson, the 54-year-old Marjory Stoneman Douglas school resource officer who resigned after security footage revealed he made no effort to engage alleged mass killer Nikolas Cruz during the rampage last week, previously lobbied Broward County school officials to continue funding a program that allowed cops to live in mobile homes on school property rent-free.

Not only did Peterson fail to confront Cruz—he also failed to assist a previous investigation, undertaken by state authorities, to determine whether Cruz was a threat to himself or others. His mistakes compound the errors made by other law enforcement entities, including the FBI and Broward County PD.

The housing program was in effect at 32 different Broward County schools. Officials reasoned that cops living at the schools would mean 24-hour security. But a 2015 audit determined that the program was a waste of money.

The auditor said, "Frankly, I'm embarrassed," and "I would shut it down immediately," according to the Sun Sentinel. Officials could find no evidence that the live-in cops were deterring crime.

Officer Peterson took a different view.

About a dozen officers from the program attended the meeting. They called the report skewed and lauded the advantage of keeping law enforcement on school grounds.

"These colleagues work hard. We are crime prevention, an audit report will never show how much we prevent," said Scot Peterson, an officer who has lived at Atlantic Technical College in Coconut Creek since 2000. He said he's arrested several juveniles for breaking into school property.

Yet according to the audit, one of the officers had even made the decision to sublet his on-campus mobile home to two people who weren't police officers. Most of the officers did not turn in monthly reports detailing their activities, and failed to respond to 73 percent of security alarm triggers. But ending the program would be unfair, said Peterson. "You are talking about the livelihood of some of these people," he said at the time.

The housing program for school resource officers wasn't really about safety. It was welfare for state employees. Seen through this lens, Peterson's utter failure to confront the shooter isn't particularly surprising.

The New York Times has more information on Peterson:

In February 2016, the sheriff's office received what it described as "thirdhand information" that Mr. Cruz "planned to shoot up the school" and had posted a picture on Instagram of a "juvenile with guns." A deputy determined that Mr. Cruz had knives and a BB gun and forwarded the information to the school resource officer at Stoneman Douglas High. That was Deputy Peterson.

The Times also notes that the Florida Department of Children and Families—the state's child protective services agency—investigated Cruz in 2016 but determined that he was not at risk of harming himself or others.

According to the agency, its Adult Protective Investigator (API) attempted to talk to Stoneman Douglas's SRO (Peterson, presumably) about Cruz, but:

The school resource officer was contacted and refused to provide specific information to the investigator. Florida law does not give APS the authority to compel law enforcement to provide additional information during an investigation.

We can add this oversight to the lengthy and ever-growing list of catastrophic law enforcement failures at play in the Parkland shooting. Don't let anyone say putting even more cops in schools is a reasonable response.

Photo Credit: Ian Witlen / Rmv/ZUMA Press/Newscom

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  • Rich||

    Most of the officers did not turn in monthly reports detailing their activities, and failed to respond to 73 percent of security alarm triggers.

    I presume this means only 27% of security alarms were responded to by live-in officers. Although there could be rationalizations (e.g., non-live-in cops responded), it looks bad.

  • BambiB||

    Seen through this lens, Peterson's utter failure to confront the shooter isn't particularly surprising.


    It doesn't just look bad... it IS bad. But it's nothing new.

    Cops waited... 4 HOURS? - at Columbine.
    Cops waited... half the night? - at the Pulse nightclub massacre.
    This cop waited... 4 minutes?... listening to gunfire and screams.

    I'd bet he doesn't even feel guilty about it. After all, his NUMBER ONE goal was probably to "go home safe".

    That's why we need to allow Concealed Carry Permit holders to carry on campus. Folks like the football coach have skin in the game, and they can either act heroically and die, or act heroically and kill the bad guy... if they're permitted the right tools.

  • markm23||

    The good news is, the sheriff fired this coward.

  • Res ipsa loquitur||

    Did he ? My understanding is he quit and now gets a 75% pension for the rest of his life.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "School Resource Officer Who Failed to Confront Mass Shooter Previously Defended Cops Living at School Rent-Free"

    In the context of the news and arguments that unfolding over gun rights and due process, this is a shithead observation.

    This is like pointing out to Mrs. Lincoln the day after the assassination that in addition to shooting her husband in the back of the head, John Wilkes Booth also broke the speed limit as he was getting away.

    Other than to point out what a shithead you are, Robby, how do you expect reasonable people to react to that? You're the most obtuse ass-wipe to ever grace Reason's masthead--and I've been reading since the '80s.

    "Not only did Peterson fail to confront Cruz—he also failed to assist a previous investigation, undertaken by state authorities, to determine whether Cruz was a threat to himself or others."

    There's the lead--not that Robby would recognize it.

    Determining whether Cruz was a threat to himself or others it the criteria necessary to hold him for observation in a mental hospital--to gauge the severity of the threat he posed. In California, anyway, that's good for 72 hours.

    If they'd put him under observation, looked at his social media posts, and gotten testimony from the people around him, he almost certainly would have been committed--by a judge--and this atrocity probably wouldn't have happened.

  • $park¥ leftist poser||

    Other than to point out what a shithead you are, Robby, how do you expect reasonable people to react to that? You're the most obtuse ass-wipe to ever grace Reason's masthead--and I've been reading since the '80s.

    Stay classy, Ken. Does John know you're insulting Robby without him?

  • DajjaI||

    You are obviously a mental illness industry shill but why should I call you a shithead even though you freely use the term against others you disagree with? In fact I think there is a valid and deeper issue here, which is that the security system is deeply corrupted on these campuses because they live on them and have too many intimate interactions with the people they are charged with policing. And he was the one arguing for it - that's important. Honestly I wouldn't be surprised if he was part of the bullying ring that instigated this kid to explode.

  • Ken Shultz||

    It was a bit of a syllogism.

    In context, "A" is a shithead observation like example "B".

    There may not be a reasonable way to react to "A" without first disavowing the shit-headedness of "A".

    The conclusion makes a judgement of the author--based on this piece as well as, presumably, others like it--in contrast to all the other authors under the same masthead since the 1980s.

    Criticizing people isn't necessarily an ad hominem, you know:

    Fuck-faces kill their own people for no good reason.

    Stalin killed his own people for no good reason.

    Stalin was a fuck-face.

    Calling Stalin a fuck-face because he killed his own people isn't an ad hominem.

    Saying that Stalin was wrong about collective farming because he was a communist fuck-face is an ad hominem.

    You see the difference?

    P.S. I stopped working in that mental hospital years ago. I don't claim any expertise, but I do claim some familiarity.

  • DajjaI||

    Robby isn't Stalin. Kind of the opposite, in fact. I believe an apology is in order:

  • Ken Shultz||

    I wasn't comparing Robby to Stalin, you dolt.

    I was comparing the structure of two syllogisms.

  • DajjaI||

    You are very angry. I hope you get the help you need. I am here for you if you need someone to talk to. But - at least this might be an example of the bullying this child was subjected to by this SRO (who assured us we were safer if we paid for him to live on school grounds).

  • Elias Fakaname||

    No help is needed for Ken, as Ken is correct. Robby is frequently obtuse in his writing. Ken had it nailed when he said that the cop's prior involvement with the shooter is the real story here.

    Not sure why you can't see that. Are you secretly Robby?

  • ||

    Robby isn't Stalin.

    I've never seen them both in the same place at the same time, I remain unconvinced.

    I think the real question is, Robby's hair or Stalin's Moustache?

  • Griffin3||

    Robbie isn't Stalin. This news bit is a marginally useful piece of evidence in the fight against public money being wasted on SROs, and the stats mentioned in the article are more useful than the details related to Mr. Petersen.

    You went beyond the pale, here.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Seriously?!

    Is this how low our standards have fallen?

    I refuse to water my comments down for people who aren't smart enough to follow freshman level logic to understand.

    Criticizing people isn't necessarily an ad hominem regardless of whether we're talking about Adolf Hitler or Florence Nightingale, and if you think I just compared Hitler to Florence Nightingale, then you're too dumb to read my comments.

  • Griffin3||

    Hey, you don't have to make me happy. You usually make well documented and reasonable arguments, and the few times I don't agree with you, I stop to make sure I've got decent arguments on my side.

    Calling one of our hosts "the most obtuse ass-wipe to ever grace" ... well, just add some bold and all caps, and you join the paste-eaters. It was a Hihn move, just own up and move on.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Oh that bit about him being the biggest ass-wipe to grace Reason's masthead came from the heart.

    He's certainly a huge downgrade from Julian Sanchez, Tim Cavanaugh, Kerry Howley, or Radley Balko--and not all of them were dyed in-the-wool libertarians either.

    At least they weren't oblivious.

    I bet Robby and ENB were cheap.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    Robby is deserving of a great deal of criticism. He writes a lot of drivel. You should really apologize to Ken. You are out of line.

  • VOTE MILES||

    Looks to me like a false syllogism, which is a fallacy.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    I think it's a valid observation in the debates we're having over solutions, as some of those proposed answers to the problem is beefing up schools. To me all this goes to the sole conclusion that any protection scheme put forth that includes the forced offloading of self defense onto a third party is deadly folly.

  • Ken Shultz||

    I appreciate that, but those observations about beefing up schools are hardly related to the question of free rent.

  • Jeep's Blues||

    I agree re: Mr. Soave's errant lede however the media's response still seems to be firmly stuck in the "anger" stage of this tragedy. Scapegoats are required.

    WRT an involuntary hold my parents (in California) live across the street from a diagnosed schizophrenic. This individual, who lives alone, will at times hand water her lawn and douse neighbors or passersby with her hose while cursing random inanities at them. Occasionally she approaches her neighbor's houses and confronts them, which she did one day at my parents's residence while my mother was home. My mother didn't answer but later told my brother, a police officer, about it and based on a litany of complaints from other neighbors a unit was sent to the woman's home.

    After an interview and in spite of her medical condition the officers still did not have enough actionable criteria to place her in a hold (code 5150 in California). Criteria in Florida is likely different however issuing a hold even when existence of a 'mental illness' is on record is not as simple as it may sound.

  • Ken Shultz||

    It's not.

    It's what the PET team can document.

    It's always going to be a judgement call, to some extent, as to whether someone is a danger to himself or others, but in this case?

    If the officer failed to communicate to the PET team from the state psychiatric hospital that this kid was a known danger to the school's students--the reasons why everyone was instructed not to let him on campus with a backpack, etc.?--and that wasn't communicated to the PET team for some reason, then that's a big problem.

    If it was this cop's responsibility to testify to that and if he failed to do that for whatever reason, then that's a major hiccup. Banning bump stocks certainly isn't about to fix the problem of government employees failing to give pertinent information to a PET team.

  • Jeep's Blues||

    "If the officer failed to communicate to the PET team from the state psychiatric hospital that this kid was a known danger to the school's students--the reasons why everyone was instructed not to let him on campus with a backpack, etc.?--and that wasn't communicated to the PET team for some reason, then that's a big problem."

    Indeed. It seems many opportunities by responsible adults to intervene in this troubled young man's life were either minimized, ignored or neglected. It's notable even now how the loudest narratives emerging from this tragedy revolve around looking for someone, or some group, or some ideology, or some object on which to assign blame and very little discussion has been dedicated to examining the etiology of this young man's pathway to alienation and, ultimately, destruction.

  • Ken Shultz||

    At the moment, the solutions on offer seem to be about adding things that are unrelated to this tragedy or wouldn't have prevented it--even as they ignore the fact that government employees had both the means and opportunity to prevent it given the information and resources that were already at their disposal.

  • Tionico||

    or to the NICS system, as the Air Force hooh hahs failed to do in the Sutherland Springs shooting case. NO CONSEQUENCES for the dweebs that "forgot" to report this guy's disqualifying criminal history.

    Once more, it ain't the existing gun control laws in place we ALL have to suffer under.... its the worthless eedjits working for government and sucking on the public teat failing to do THEIR JOBS. But gunnit want to place MORE draconian restrictions on US? Sumthin' wrong wit dis pitcha.....

  • Unlabelable MJGreen||

    how do you expect reasonable people to react to that?

    So now this is a question worth discussing?

    I'm so confused.

  • Robert||

    HyR bloggers have already covered those other aspects, so why shouldn't Mr. Soave focus on what remains? I think this was an interesting & important contribution to the whole picture.

  • Bubba Jones||

    On the contrary. It speaks to why he was a SRO. Previous threads had discussed the question of whether he was a good guy who panicked or he was a free loading bureaucrat.

    This answers the question.

  • Roger the Shrubber||

    Agreed that it's wrong to imply that the rent-free arrangement has anything to do with the shooting. The real lead WRT this arrangement is that the entire relationship between the schools and the police is regarded by the police as a method of personal enrichment. The public is going to demand their presence and you can be sure it's going to cost them. And when they fail to perform, well, you were a fool to think that they were in it for anything but the money.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Exactly. It's more than just the issue of putting armed guards on school property--and how much that will cost, too.

    Our politicians are talking about doing away with due process to deprive people of their Second Amendment rights, and Robby wants to talk about whether they should get free rent?

    Either Robby doesn't oppose flushing due process in the pursuit of violating people's Second Amendment rights, or he's completely oblivious to what's important to libertarians and why.

    I think Robby writes about libertarians the way nature reporters might write stories about wildlife. You don't need to be an armadillo to write stories about armadillos, and because you write stories about libertarian issues doesn't mean you're a libertarian. If he weren't here, he might be writing about software, cars, travel, or something else. Writing about something doesn't make you that thing.

  • $park¥ leftist poser||

    Wow you're such a whiny cunt lately.

    Maybe, as others have said, Robby wrote this article to highlight one more idiotic thing the loser cop did since other writers here have covered pretty much every angle. But no, if every writer doesn't publish every article in the exact way you say they should then they're an asswipe.

    Frankly I'm surprised anyone bothers to ready your bitchy cunt comments anymore.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    Sparky, you are out of line. Ken makes a good point, whether you're willing to see it or not. There is no whining. You too should apologize to him.

  • Tionico||

    no, Robby is not on about whether these worthless freeloading coppers are getting free rent. He's on about their overall poor character, laziness, milking the public for all the free/repurposed stuff they can manage to claim as their own while returning little to no value. That particular SRO turned tail on several scores..... and promoting his fellow freeloaders getting free rent is of a piece with the rest of the creep's evident character.
    Far better to hare the teachers, who are in direct contact with the kids daily, are already trusted by the kids, and who are clearly motivated to do what they can to protect and help their charges. Witness Mr. Aaron Feis, who literally laid down his life for those few students he tried to save. How about if HE had been lawfully armed? And taken out the perp before he got off his second round? We'd have maybe two students dead, and one perp dead. Instead, we've got fifteen students, two VERY good teachers, all dead, and a live perp who will now force the waste of a few million bucks of public money to "prosecute". HOW is that all a "win"?

    I'd far rather see Mr. Feis and thousands of his cohorts armed and trained.... and for NO extra tax money, provide the best security service anywhere except possibly Israel.

  • silver.||

    During the Tech shooting there was a Holocaust survivor who barricaded the door with his body while his students escaped through the window. He was shot through the door. Several other professors lost their lives doing insanely brave things, and these people can be found at basically every spree shooting.

    Contrast that to to the visual of three armed police officers hiding behind the doors of their cruisers in Broward county until further backup arrived.

    I know which ones I would want to be packing heat around my kids.

    Arming the teachers was the reaction to the Beslan school siege (one of many terrorist activities at the time) in Russia, and it worked.

  • Zeb||

    This is like pointing out to Mrs. Lincoln the day after the assassination that in addition to shooting her husband in the back of the head, John Wilkes Booth also broke the speed limit as he was getting away.

    No it's not. That's a terrible analogy.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Reports I've read suggest that this cop avoided confronting an active shooter, which may have resulted in a dozen children dying, and, also, that he may have failed to provide crucial testimony to a PET team from a state mental hospital that might have prevented this shooting from taking place in the first place--but he wants to make a big deal out of free rent?!

    That might be darkly hilarious in a Monty Python sort of way--some weeks from now, I suppose. But maybe he should wait until all the dead children's bodies are buried before making those kinds of jokes.

    Oh, wait . . . the free rent "crack" wasn't a joke at all, was it? Robby was dead serious, wasn't he.

    In the meantime, we're talking about defending due process and the Second Amendment from those who want to flush them because of this shooting--and Robby thinks the headline issue is about free rent for state employees?

    Robby has no idea what's important to libertarians or why--so he's just throwing it all against the wall to see if something sticks. And this piece of shit article is hardly the only example. I generally try to avoid reading his crap, but sometimes it stinks so bad, in the name of libertarianism, that somebody needs to speak up and say something.

  • Zeb||

    One blog post is not "making a big deal" out of anything.

  • Tionico||

    most of the other dirtbag details about this SRO have been in the public forum already. His defending his fellow freeloaders has not been..... and fits right in to the overall picture of this loafer.

    It strengthens the meme that paying huge amounts of public money to hire "professional" "security" for our schools is a waste. Costs a lot (but "its fer th' chilluns, ya know") and returns no signficant value to anyone but those slopping at the public trough thus enrichened.

    Robby's underlying point stands..... hirelings do NOT stand up for the little guy in danger. They all make sure they go home every night. And pay as little as possible for that home.

  • ||

    You're the most obtuse ass-wipe to ever grace Reason's masthead--and I've been reading since the '80s.

    I completely disagree. Not because I know you're wrong but Shikha's more than a little obtuse and there are a few others that could easily produce a 3-way photo-finish.

  • Tionico||

    these details taken together paint a picture of a lazy dirtbag coasting on the public teat, and not delivering much of anything in return. He had lived in the rent free schoolyard situation, and defended others doing so in the face of a rotten track record of the 'benefits" to the public for the costs involved. Seems a self-centred freeloader. And WHY did he not provide any further information about the eventual perp when asked by a government agency tasked with helping to see to the safety of the community? What, did he WANT to see this guy "succeed" in his evil plan?

    No, Robby does a service to THINKING people. A man's treack record IS important. How he conducts himself over a period of time is what defines his measure. And this wannabe "hero" being able to carry off his diabolical plan is part of the fruit of a rotten track record that was NOT examined to see it more clearly. Robby does we who care, and are astute, a good service. Ya kin stick that in yer pipe and smoke it, I don't care, but you are out of line to trash this author.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Maybe the First Responder™ thought the shooter was Lyin' Ted Cruz, the madcap Canookistan christianofascist who fries salted bacon on the hot barrels of assault rifles to frighten mo-hammedans. I'd be frightened, and I'd bet money and lay odds Ken woulda Schultzed his cammie panties. As it unfolds, I see a moron who listened to Democrats and Republicans telling how the initiation of force is a responsibility and deontological duty. Then in the middle of the Altrurian Final Solution, a First Responder™ is convinced that retaliatory force in defense of individual rights wasn't his deontological department after all. Better the kids should all pack heat or study untruanted over the web.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    OK, so these cops didn't deter much crime, but can they change a tire? Asking for a friend.

  • Tony||

    In my experience they'll pull over to make sure you're not doing anything smack-related and then leave you to change it on your own.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    The fact thst you missed the reference is wholly unsurprising.

  • Red Tony||

    Is it the fact that Robby flunked out of the Police Academy?

  • Tionico||

    it depends on what the tyre wants to change into.........

  • Otis B. Driftwood||

    Scot Peterson will die thousands of times before his death. What a fucking coward.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Well, if he chooses to take the coward's way out, I for one wouldn't miss him.

    -jcr

  • loveconstitution1789||

    To be fair, if there were more police living on the school campus then more police could have ran away from the crime with their tails between their legs.

    I hope this resource officer did resign and gets nothing in pay. I saw somewhere that he may have quickly retired.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Officer Peterson went home safely that night, yes? Then mission accomplished.

  • Frank Thorn||

    Fox news said a local reporter went to his house but was turned away by 6 cops, apparently guarding him from the media.
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018.....eport.html

  • $park¥ leftist poser||

    So brave.

  • Marcus Aurelius||

    And a valid use of tax dollars.

  • Tony||

    Thank god we have a scapegoat that isn't in the shape of a mass-murder machine! And, bonus points, everyone gets to imply that they'd run into live AR-15 fire in the course of their 20K/year job like the movie baddasses we all are.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    I'm literally laughing out loud now.

  • Wolf 359||

    I agree. Everyday there's evidence the police are a bad investment.

  • Hank Phillips||

    The Republican prohibition laws and Democrat looter laws the politicians order the cops to enforce could not possibly have any other outcome than whack-job amokness and official cowardice both rewarded with impunity. Instead of stretching a rope, the perp moves from mom's basement to a government cage surrounded by Cowardly cops living off taxes. The takeaway is that the LP really needs to drop that anarchistic vigilante death sentence plank from its platform.

  • JFree||

    He was paid 80k/year before overtime. His pension is now 75% of the 5 highest years.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Tony never lets facts or mathematics get in the way of him making an illogical point in the bitchiest way possible.

  • Wolf 359||

    Tony's GRREEAA- really bad at Reason posts.

  • Maven Houlihan||

    Every single government employee is grossly underpaid. And someone else should pay more in taxes to raise their salaries.

  • Tony||

    All the more reason to avoid being turned into pulp.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    Hey dummy.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Fucking hell. I'm sure you could get Tony to run away from danger for nothing!

    -jcr

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Actually, you could get Tony to run into live AR-15 fire just by saying that there are libertarians in there, enjoying a discussion without his input.

  • Brian||

    Ostensibly, only heroes like this should be able to use force and stop evil doers.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    He probably watched the movie ""The Dead Zone", and in the third act, when Martin Sheen uses a toddler as a human shield when a sniper is trying to take him out, the cop probably tho "what a badass!".

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zcZJF81jt4w

  • Scarecrow Repair & Chippering||

    A: The shooter is a waked out kid with zero combat experience.
    B: The shooter is focusing on his current targets and probably won't notice the door opening.
    C: Even if the shooter does notice the door opening, he probably isn't facing the door and will have to shift focus and move body in reaction.

    The odds are pretty good that the cop, who already has a pretty good idea from sound alone where the shooter is, will shoot long before the shooter even starts shifting focus.

    All this should go through the cop's mind as he is moving into action. Even if he has to wait a few seconds to get his actions in mind, that's still far better than cowardly staying clear.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    He could have at least tried. It's too bad he can't be individually sued for his cowardice.

  • KevinP||

    If it is your job to protect the school then you do whatever is necessary to protect the school, even at the cost of your own life.

    Would anyone seriously argue that firefighters should not rush into burning buildings? That they should have stayed out of the twin towers on 9/11? Yes, you risk your life when you take up some jobs. If you don't like the risk, don't take the job!

    I am well trained with both handguns and AR-15. The AR-15 is just a rifle. It is not some magic blanket that wards off bullets. It is absolutely possible for a handgun shooter to take down a rifle shooter inside a building.

    But the coward cop did nothing.

    Here is a recent case where a police officer took down a would be rampage rifle killer with a long shot from a pistol while outdoors.

    The Cop Who Stopped Larry McQuilliams


    Quote:
    McQuilliams opened fire at the courthouse, a bank, and the Mexican Consulate before turning his sights to the Austin Police Department at 2:32 a.m. Johnson was standing near HQ, holding the reins of not one but two horses when McQuilliams arrived, shooting wildly.

    Still holding onto the horses' reins with one hand, Johnson returned fire with the other. With a single shot from Johnson's Smith & Wesson M&P; .40 pistol, McQuilliams lay dead on the pavement more than 300 feet away, his might-have-been-deadly reign of terror cut short.
  • Chip Woodier||

    Does nobody recall the Garland cop that stopped 2, count em, 2 terrorists armed with murder rifles...with a handgun?

  • John C. Randolph||

    Proud of your cowardice, are you Tony?

    -jcr

  • Tony||

    I'll have to take your word from it behind an anonymous internet handle that you'd run into AK fire.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Anonymous? I use my own name, sunshine.

    -jcr

  • loveconstitution1789||

    You, Tony, would never help some kids being shot at. That we know for sure.

    Plus, we know that you want to take away every American's constitutional right to have armaments and protect those kids or stop a shooter.

  • Elias Fakaname||

    The only use Tony has for kids is to pleasure himself using young boyflesh.

  • Tony||

    Arms race. The evolutionary concept that refers to the literal version we're talking about. Look it up. We can keep selling weapons of greater murder capacity forever. Where do you draw the line? Sorry, where do you start taking a wet shit on the constitution?

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Tony, you've been shitting on the constitution your entire adult life.

  • Tionico||

    Had Mr. Aaron Feis been not disarmed by present laws, I'm more than certain he'd gotten off at least one round at the sick perp. However, being disarmed, all he could do was literally lay down his life to try, hopelessly, to protect a few of his students. He ran TOWARD the gunfire, KNOWING he was not armed. There WAS one real hero... sadly, no teeth, claws, or fangs. Not even a handy baseball bat. Sick......

  • Definitely Not Tulpa||

    I'd never rush into a burning building to save someone's life, but then again the State isn't paying me to do that exact thing.

    If you take everyone's money with the promise that it is your JOB to run into live AR-15 fire, then get your ass in there and charge.

  • JFree||

    This all seems a very good argument for restoring the militia. 'Nightwatchmen' type duties. Geographically well-distributed via cheap 2-bunk mobile homes that take up a parkingspace or two. Could probably buy 5-8 of those for one years pay for a FT professional. Broward County has roughly 150,000 18-24's (main 'reserve duty' age). Rotate two of them who've finished their basic/unit training in every couple weeks. Two there means they have backup and 24/7 coverage is actually realistic.

    Militia is so much cheaper than FT 'professionals' - and far better suited for generalist patrol/watch type duties. Only question is whether Americans have the character anymore to do that.

  • I can't even||

    Vet some parents who have permits. I would use vacation time one day a month to hang out at my son's school. If your own child is in there, not much question how you a guard would react regardless of firepower.

  • JFree||

    Adding parents could easily be done within the militia framework. They would have already had that experience earlier. But replacing anything with a parent is a bad idea. That merely creates protection for one child and I can imagine many situations in which other children would end up in greater harm as that parent makes choices.

  • mortiscrum||

    Hiring the type of person who has time to sit in a trailer in the parking lot, with a gun, waiting for trouble? No thanks.

  • Tionico||

    the need is for daytime security when the kids are there. Nighttime live in "help" does naught for that.

    How's about providing ALL adults who are at the school on a regular basis for any legitmiate purpose to also carry their own handguns concealed... just like they do everywhere else they happen to go.... hardware, bank, church, grocers, coffee, park, restaurants.... WHY are they all disarmed when they show up at school? They already have handguns, functional carry rigs, and the Mother May I Card. Provide some specific training to better equip them to handle the environment of a school, and let them each decide. No one thinking of mounting such an attack would know who does/does not carry, and the odds of at least a handful of armed and trained adults at the school all the time would be a STRONG deterrent. How many Brinks money trucks get hit every year? Why not? Simple.. dey gots armed guards. Are not our kids more precious than what's inside the money truck?

  • JFree||

    Yeesh. A 2-man detail covers that post close to 24/7 (it's called a 12-hour shift). Has no one ever heard of militia/reserve duty? After the basic/unit training (which means TRAINING - total of maybe 16 weeks over first 3 years), they serve for 2-4 weeks/year for x years. In exchange for maybe 4% off their taxes (sales/income) during those years on reserve. And yeah - that means those are the sorts of people who view their obligation to society more in terms of time rather than cash. Which is perfectly fine unless we have decided that our entire society is nothing but a whore to banks.

    No - society is not generally going to provide 'arms training' to random civilians outside the organized militia. That is why one ORGANIZES the militia. And once the militia is organized again, then there is no reason for people to simply abdicate any security to 'professional' bureaucrats and leeches

    It's like Americans are just getting stupider by the day. Must be the fluoridated water.

  • LarryA||

    The problem with anyone on school property as a guard against mass killers, including LEOs, security officers, parents, militia, etc., is that they have nothing to do. Almost all of them will never see a mass killer. You aren't going to find good people who will put up with a job like that.

    Of course, schools will find things for them to do, like DARE programs and using the SRO for discipline that should be administered by faculty. But that's a bug, not a feature.

    Arming employees, however, whether they are teachers, administrators, custodians, bus drivers or cafeteria personnel, means the people have real jobs to keep them busy.

    The same way licensees who everyday carry work at their jobs, and just carry, until SHTF.

  • JFree||

    I am really stunned that no one here seems to even remotely understand what a militia/reserve even IS anymore. And this notion of self-arming 'employees' (presumably because there has NEVER been a case where a spree shooting has been conducted by someone who actually KNOWS the place - like a student or an employee) - by itself without previous training (like you know the militia) - is like some utterance of willful stupidity and social signaling.

  • SIV||

    When seconds count, police are only leaving the scene to retire on a full pension.

  • Red Tony||

    That's not true. They just have to search a car for objects that might someday somehow someway be used to commit a crime and confiscate those objects from their irresponsible owner first.

  • Robert||

    Why just those objects, when they can more conveniently take the whole car?

  • KevinP||

    So the lessons learned from the Parkland school shooting:
    * Local police were called to the shooter 39 times, but he was never arrested or committed which could have placed him on the background check list.
    * The Broward County Sheriff's Office was informed twice that the shooter was planning a school shooting, but did nothing.
    * The FBI were informed two times, once very credibly, that the shooter was planning a school shooting and did nothing.
    * The police officer assigned to guard the school hid outside the school building like a coward in the critical moments while the youngsters inside he had to protect were slaughtered.
    * This is all the fault of the NRA.
    * Law abiding citizens should disarm and trust the government to protect them from criminals.

  • I can't even||

    * The Sheriff is the kind of piece of shit who would purposely hide as many of these facts as possible while showing off on CNN's staged townhall.

  • Ranter||

    This x 1,000,000,000
    All these 'DO SOMETHING' panicking citizens seem to think that entrusting *more* confiscation authority to the corrupt, lazy swine on grand display here would be a great idea.

    Not only is the Sheriff handing out cushy, nepotistic admin jobs to all his buddies, the fat oaf charged to safeguard the school - who failed spectacularly - is allowed to retire with benefits rather than being sued into oblivion for his history of incompetence.

    Folks, here's exhibits A and B for why a good portion of us don't think surrendering rights to our "competent public servants" is a good idea. Can you imagine the killbox these assholes could make of your everyday drug warrant raid?

  • jjsaz||

    What I want to know is how many sexts he turned in. Any chance you can dig that up? I mean seriously an SRO might not have the corporate to confront an active shooter with an AR-15, that's dangerous, to him, but sexts, that's the real danger facing kids today! I mean a young woman having to live down the infamy of knowing other people have naked photographs that she sent only to her boyfriend could end her life before it even begins!

  • mashed potatoes||

    Just read this apparently the level of corruption in Broward county between school and sheriff is something to behold..

    https://tinyurl.com/yanou3dg

  • Bubba Jones||

    That thread lost me when it started asking about secret service being on the scene...

  • sarcasmic||

    The cop was in an impossible situation. If he confronts the shooter then he's going to get fired for putting officer safety at risk, and if he doesn't he's going to be called a coward.

    The fact is that cops don't prevent crime. It's not their job, and the Nazgul agree. Police investigate crime, and poorly at that. They are armed to protect themselves from us, not to protect us from criminals.

  • Alcibiades||

    There's a high probability the cops could have prevented the Columbine shooting. They were alerted to the existence of a webpage where they outlined some of their activites and drew up a warrant but failed to follow through and serve it. After the shooting, realizing the potential for embarrassment and legal liabilty they denied to the press they had any inkling of Klebold and Harris' intentions. It took a leak to make them come clean and admit their incompetence.

    So:
    1. Columbine; had evidence of illegal activity and failed to act.
    2. Texas church shooting: failed to enter his convictions for domestic abuse into the database that would have
    prevented him from buying weapons.
    3. Parkland shooting: had evidence Cruz was mentality unstable and dangerous and failed to act.

    Hardy inspires confidence.

  • Sal Paradise||

    If memory serves about Columbine, the cops and SWAT didn't go into the school until well after the carnage. Safely in the rear with the gear.

  • Alcibiades||

    Correct, they just waited outside for a considerable period of time before going in during which one of the teachers bled out and died while students desperately tried to stem the bleeding and keep him alive and signal for outside assistance. His life could easily have been saved. It's all documented in Dave Cullin's excellent book Columbine.

    What's really interesting from the book is that all the initial reporting and for a while after was just plain wrong.

    There was no trenchcoat mafia, they wore trenchcoats to hide the weapons. They weren't being bullied, in fact had done some bullying themselves. They weren't social outcasts, they had an extensive social circle.They didn't listen to Marilyn Manson, didn't like his music.

    Harris was retro-diagnosed as a genuine sociopath, he played the other adults like a Strad. telling them exactly what he though they wanted to hear to avoid getting in more trouble. The only individual who was able to see through to his real personality was the mom of a friend they had fallen out with, which really ticked him off, he even managed to convince his military dad that everyone else was just out to pick on him.

    The cops had a genuine chance to stop Columbine from happening and blew it.

  • silver.||

    Virginia Tech shooter was not correctly entered into the state police database for background checks. He had been mandated to obtain psychiatric help.

  • Brendan||

    Sandy Hook - several reports to local police about this threats, reporting person referred to state police.

    Truly too bad that they didn't go interview (just interview) the future shooter about these accusations. Everything we've read about him after-the-fact suggests he would have set off alarm bells that could either caused deeper investigation or a stern warning to his mother that she could be held responsible for what he does with her firearms (something along those lines).

  • LarryA||

    I read that the mother was trying to get him committed, but the mental health gears were grinding slowly.

  • ||

    Yes, add more layers of regulation and bureaucracy to this inglorious clusterfuck of incompetence.

    That'll fix things real good.

  • ||

    "These colleagues work hard. We are crime prevention, an audit report will never show how much we prevent," said Scot Peterson, an officer who has lived at Atlantic Technical College in Coconut Creek since 2000. He said he's arrested several juveniles for breaking into school property."

    Is it me or do teachers (unions as a whole) use the same kind of excuses and rhetoric?

  • tlapp||

    Yet liberals want you to give up your guns and trust government to protect you. Like usual I'd be better off making my own life decisions and taking care of my needs on my own.

  • Harvard||

    Exactly my take on all this. Leave me alone to provide my own protection. If I determine a threat has it's sights mo me, then I lay down heavy fire. If I was wrong, you can do with me what you will. Unless, of course, I ever meet Tony. At which time I shall lay down heavy fire without further provocation

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Tony is harmless because he is, by choice, entirely powerless sans the backing of government jackboots.

  • Tony||

    I hate cops and think they kill people for sport.

    And I'd rather they have guns and not you. That's how much I hate you.

  • silver.||

    I'm far, far more scared of police than I am of any law-abiding gun owner. If they have a concealed carry permit, then they've been thoroughly vetted and are substantially less likely to commit any sort of crime than the general public. No felon / person barred from owning a firearm would be dumb enough to open carry in public, so I'm not worried about them, either.

    So the only people I'm worried about are those who own guns illegally. They clearly don't care about the law, they clearly have some access to firearms, and they clearly are not going to mind further gun control.

    Straw purchases and other diversion methods are already serious federal crimes with up to a decade of prison-more than most violent offenders serve.

    Handguns, which account for 60+% of firearm deaths, are already restricted to those above 21.

    During the previous "assault weapons" ban from '94-'04, crimes with firearms did not decrease. "Assault weapons" is a nonsense term for scary-looking rifles. It'd be like banning red sports cars because they get into more accidents than other colors. People will just get another color because the performance would be identical.

    If you sincerely worry about being shot by an otherwise law-abiding citizen your fears are unrealistic.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    "And I'd rather they have guns and not you. That's how much I hate you."

    That's ok Tony, if I had my way, every one of you marxist pieces of shit would be deported to Antarctica, or deposited face down in landfills. Your kind are responsible for every evil thing in the world. Directly, or indirectly. Just and existential threat to real humans.

  • Clyde Dotson||

    Peterson was 54 years old. Sounds like something I have heard called ROAD in the military. Retired On Active Duty. He was off the street waiting for his pension, or he was already retired and this was a job to make ends meet, not to show any valor. Personally I think they should put new graduates of their academy on this kind of duty for say 2 years. You get more aggressive and more active people that way. It's almost like the military. It's the 19-22 year old people that do the shooting and dying. The older people mostly have sufficient rank to stay back off the Forward Edge of the Battle Space.

  • LarryA||

    "More aggressive and more active" cop and high school kids. What could go wrong?

  • Sebastian Cremmington||

    This is argument for more cameras powered by AI on campus and fewer cops.

  • Fooseven||

    Goddammit, the nra tentacles are everywhere!

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Good. The more Americans that push the NRA into absolute 2nd Amendment protection the better.

  • Flinch||

    Correction: the NEA tentacles are everywhere. Unions put teachers first, and anything that threatens that gets shoved to the bottom - including our kids.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    NRA forever!

  • Flinch||

    Lots of news in this story. I am gobsmacked that CPS got stiffarmed by the police: their job does not exist without police support and they can all go home. Sounds like the entire county government is broken, and I wonder how much of the 60%+ that voted for Hillary in 2016 were felons. I hope Sessions cracks open a civil rights investigation, but as usual... where's Waldo?
    But one other observation: the so called "resource officer" that 'took a position' instead of entering the building and engaging the shooter may possibly be a symptom of bad training, and not really a coward as some suggest. If he was sitting in on security policy briefings with teachers, he was receiving the wrong information and absorbing directives crafted for the unarmed/untrained. Specifically, the mantra of 'see something/say something' means there is no other action once a phone call is made. But during security breach, somebody has to DO something - and that day it was him. It may be his brain was switched off after listening to too much policy crafted for teachers. Calling somebody and hoping they will take care of the problem is fine for fire, but it is only half a policy for a shooting and qualifies as a non-security system. See if you can get congress to work under the conditions the school did if you doubt that.

  • ThomasD||

    You are a sheriff's deputy before you become a resource officer.

  • ThomasD||

    Broward County SD.

    Not PD.

    In Florida sheriff is county. Police is incorporated city.

  • Mudpupp||

    This reporter, Robby Soave, must be a liar, and a criminal.
    If another reporter lied or committed a crime, then all reporters did.

    At least that is the logic he uses to judge all cops by the action of one.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Yep, they all are.

  • Eman||

    in a completely unquantifiable way, something about this headline made me think I was still reading salon.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Still? Why would you ever start?

  • PreacherPatriot1776||

    This only confirms Sundance's reporting over at The Conservative Treehouse.

    23. The most serious of armed robberies etc. were timed for later in the month or quarter. The really serious crimes were timed in the latter phases of the data collection periods. This way the student criminals were almost guaranteed to get away with it.

    24. Now. You can see how that entire process gets worse over time. Present corruption (the need to hide the policy) expands in direct relationship to the corruption before it. This is where the School Police come into play.

    25. Understanding the risk behind the scheme, it became increasingly important to put the best corrupt cops in the schools. *BEST* as in *SMARTEST*. Those SRO's became the ones who were best at hiding the unlawful conduct.

    26. Again, over time, the most corrupt police officers within the system became the police inside the schools. These officers were those who are best skilled at identifying the political objectives and instructions.

    27. Those "School Cops" also have special privileges. It's a great gig. They get free "on campus" housing close to the schools they are assigned to etc. They're crooked as hell and the criminal kids how just how to play them. It's a game. Also an open secret.

    https://biturl.im/ZHvvH

    https://biturl.im/ybZK1

  • Pat001||

    Events of this week have been educational. I had no idea that in an active shooter scenario, the deputies' primary concern is THEIR personal safety, not mine. I was on the fence about concealed carry for myself but no longer.

  • Hank Phillips||

    It's the same story every time--since the Philistines held their vigil to ban basalt eyefuls after Goliath was cut down in the very flower of youth!

  • Deplorable Victor||

    Pigs and social workers are evil.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Cop unions are OK with brother offissas shooting unarmed teenagers in the back, and riddling small dogs with bullets--even gunning down scabs and free riders wih uppity notions about choice--but facing actual danger in defense of individual rights is nowhere in the cards, union demands or job description, sorry.

  • بوابة الازهر||

    i think we will see more more cops in schools this year

    Teacher Update data Azhar.eg
    Employee Info Update azhar.eg

  • بوابة الازهر||

    i think we will see more more cops in schools this year

    Teacher Update data Azhar.eg
    Employee Info Update azhar.eg

  • modrsbook||

    thanks for customer care tedata

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