Police

Amir Locke's Death Should Incense Anyone Who Cares About Gun Rights

The 22-year-old man was shot by a Minneapolis police officer during the execution of a no-knock warrant on which he was not named.

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An officer with the Minneapolis Police Department SWAT team shot and killed a 22-year-old man early Wednesday morning during the execution of a no-knock raid, reinvigorating debate around a law-enforcement tactic that many say is ripe for abuse.

The victim, Amir Locke, who appeared to be asleep on the couch that morning, was not named on that warrant. In a matter of about three seconds, body camera footage shows the man—buried under a thick white blanket—stirring to the sound of the cops' entry with his hand on the barrel of a firearm. Officer Mark Hanneman then shoots him three times.

Interim Minneapolis Police Chief Amelia Huffman initially said that Hanneman shot Locke because Locke pointed his gun "in the direction of officers." But the footage released by the government appeared to contradict that: Locke's gun was pointed to the side, and his hand was on the barrel of the weapon, not the trigger.

He owned the gun legally and had a concealed carry permit, according to his family's legal representation. "My son was executed…and now his dreams have been destroyed," said Locke's mother, Karen Wells, at a press conference Friday. "They didn't even give him a chance," echoed attorney Ben Crump.

Locke's death is likely to exert further scrutiny on no-knock raids, which have come under fire in recent years for their dire unintended consequences. In this case, the St. Paul Police Department requested that the SWAT team use a knock-and-announce warrant, but the Minneapolis officers reportedly countered that they would only move forward with a no-knock raid.

The March 2020 killing of Breonna Taylor sparked a great deal of debate over police tactics after the 26-year-old woman died when Louisville Police shot her during the execution of a drug raid targeting her boyfriend. But the raid itself is not the only circumstance Taylor and Locke's cases have in common. In Taylor's case, her partner, Kenneth Walker, exited the bed, retrieved a gun, and fired one shot upon hearing someone barge into Taylor's apartment. He told authorities he thought it was her ex-boyfriend breaking in. The police responded, shooting Taylor five times.* Walker was subsequently charged with attempted murder, though that was ultimately dismissed in May 2020.

Walker also had a license to carry.

Taylor's story gained widespread traction in the media. Here's one that didn't: Andrew Coffee IV of Gifford, Florida, was recently acquitted of murdering his 21-year-old girlfriend, Alteria Woods. But no one—including the state—posited that he'd shot Woods. Deputies with the Indian River County Sheriff's Office shot her 10 times during a raid that targeted Coffee IV's father. Coffee IV opened fire after cops threw a flash-bang grenade into his room and smashed his window. The state charged him with the attempted murder of a law enforcement officer along with the felony murder of Woods, a controversial rule that allows the government to charge someone with a homicide they didn't carry out if it took place during a related offense.

During his trial, the defense argued that he believed the cops to be intruders and shot in self-defense, an argument that ultimately persuaded a jury.

Locke's scenario should bother just about anyone who supports the right to carry a firearm. The Second Amendment does not discriminate, nor does it evaporate as soon as the government enters the premises, particularly when considering that the Founding impetus behind it was to protect against a tyrannical state.

The National Rifle Association (NRA), the country's premier gun advocacy group, has yet to make a statement on the killing. They've struggled with this before. Consider Philando Castile, who was shot and killed by St. Anthony Police Department Officer Jeronimo Yanez in 2016 during a routine traffic stop after Castile calmly indicated he had a firearm in the vehicle. (St. Anthony is a suburb of Minneapolis, located about five minutes across the Mississippi River.)

The NRA remained silent for quite a while until August 2017 when then-spokesperson Dana Loesch said that the organization declined to defend Castile because he had marijuana in his car at the time of his death. As of this writing, no NRA spokesperson has responded to Reason's request for comment.

*CORRECTION: The original version of this article misstated where Taylor was positioned when police shot her.

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  1. Interim Minneapolis Police Chief Amelia Huffman initially said that Hanneman shot Locke because Locke pointed his gun "in the direction of officers." But the footage released by the government appeared to contradict that: Locke's gun was pointed to the side, and his hand was on the barrel of the weapon, not the trigger.

    The footage needs to be arrested for contradicting a police officer.

    1. Heh.

      Yeah, must be disinformation.

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    2. I'm looking at the photo at the top of this article. The person in the photo seems quite clearly to have his right hand on the stock of the firearm with his index finger along (not yet on) the trigger and his left hand on the barrel.

  2. These really piss me off. If you are going to bust into someone's house unannounced, you need to expect that they will try to defend themselves.
    The cops signed up for a dangerous job and are supposedly trained on how to react in stressful situations. Some dude trying to sleep isn't.

    1. They're trained to shoot the moment they feel threatened.

      1. And then told they are justified in feeling threatened every minute of every day

        1. They're trained that everything around them is a threat, when they have it backwards. They're a threat to everything around them.

          1. This is an absolute fact. The single most dangerous individuals the average American will ever encounter, are the Police.

            1. Is that true for you? Sounds like you live in a bubble. Not true for me a hundred times over.

              1. Its true for most of us until it isn't.

        2. Feeling? What are they, Drama Class Students?

          No, generally unemployable losers that cant get real jobs elsewhere and want to suck off the Govt tit.

      2. And then lie about what they saw.

    2. the cops do it deliberately to play the victim to then pretend it gives them the right to shoot amyone that moves, or doesnt move.

      This is what happens when ex military become cops.

      Theyre only trained to kill.

      Then blow smoke up their asses about " youre terrorist hunters" and everyone becones a terrorist.

      The goddamn Feds have even brainwashed Fire Depts with anti terrorist training.

      Sickness squared.

      1. "Minneapolis Police Chief Amelia Huffman initially said that Hanneman shot Locke because Locke pointed his gun "in the direction of officers."

        And the PENALTY for her LYING is what, exactly?

        The City desperate to cover this up will do Diddly Squat as they try to weasel out of paying for it.

      2. I agree with you for the most part, but you're wrong on the ex-military. The 11B's (infantry) are trained to kill, only under orders. 31B's (military police) have more psych and situational training than most civilian police officers get in 10 years. So give some of them a little more credit than todays undertrained civilian police officers.
        Don't get me wrong, this is still a disgusting, vulgar display of power.

      3. Dave, you have a lot of dumb opinions, but this set may be close to the top. The military is not 'only trained to kill.' Not everyone 'becomes a terrorist' if the person is intelligent and well trained. And, though there can be a victim or us vs them mentality with police, it isn't always the case.

        This said, this instance is grotesque abuse of position, negligence, and needs to be prevented by rigorous reform of laws, immediately. Will that happen? Fuck no.

    3. It would be a tragedy if someone kicked open that officer's door in the middle of the night and shot them multiple times.

  3. Some things never change.
    The local sheriff had visited the Branch Davidian compound many times, always arriving during the day, in a marked patrol car and wearing his uniform. No one was injured.
    The feds broke in in the middle of the night wearing all black, and a massacre occurred.
    Well, we are half way to a constitutional convention, maybe we can get rid of no-knock when we get rid of asset forfeiture.

    1. The ATF attacked the Davidians during the day. You could see the guys on the roof getting shot.

      1. i have the video.

        Three Feds went in a 2nd story window. Seconds later, two on the roof start shootung into the room the three justvl went in!

        One ass clown Fed shot himself in the leg climbing a ladder.

        The video shows a military tank with a flame thrower incinerating a building where the entrance to the underground bunker was. That killed 22 women and children.

        I called and talked with the Constitutional lawyer from Indy who investigated all this.

        She said a black helicopter flew down her street but bombed the wrong house- they blew up one that looked like hers.

        That all was thanks to Bill Clinton

        1. No, that wasn't a flamethrower. That was sunlight reflecting off of aluminized insulation, which is obvious in the complete clip (the one you've seen was frozen at that frame).

          The fire was started by the tanks knocking over Coleman lanterns. The best research indicates that this was done after FBI snipers killed unarmed people who had come out the back door. After some time for discussion, the final assault was launched.

  4. Mr. Binion needs to revisit the basis for his assertion that Breonna Taylor was in bed when shot.

    1. That's the best you got? That Taylor wasn't in bed? Geez, dude. In the dictionary next to "grasping at straws" is your picture.

      1. You might be ascribing some motivation to my comment that you don't have evidence to support. Getting facts wrong in an article is bad for one's credibility.
        (FWIW I oppose drug prohibition, no-knock raids, civil asset forfeiture, and qualified immunity (as currently formulated); and also think there should be a rebuttable presumption of police misconduct when body cameras are not used (excluding true undercover situations)).

        1. If you want to claim the article is wrong on that point, you ought to up some evidence to support it, rather than simply asserting it.

    2. The worse misinformation here is pretending that Breonna Taylor was some sort of unrelated bystander, by saying cops "shot her during the execution of a drug raid targeting her boyfriend".

      The cops raided Breonna Taylor's apartment on purpose, because they thought Breonna Taylor herself was storing illegal drugs there. This is a fact. The search warrant supports it.

      They had seen her receive & hold packages there for her drug-dealing ex-boyfriend, and they suspected these packages contained illegal drugs. Turns out they didn't, but it wasn't crazy to suspect they did.

      The same night Breonna Taylor was shot, the cops *also* conducted a raid several miles away to catch the ex-boyfriend himself.

      But that doesn't detract from the fact that the cops who shot Breonna Taylor specifically raided her apartment because of something she did (i.e. receive packages for a drug dealer). She was not some sort of unrelated bystander.

      None of this means no-knock raids are good; I think they're awful.

      But any notion that this particular no-knock raid resulted in the death of an unrelated bystander is false.

  5. You people make me sick. You don't like the War on Drugs, you don't like Qualified Immunity, you don't like Asset Forfeiture, you don't like indiscriminate SWAT raids, you don't like the judicial double standards applied to cops, you don't like the public union rules that make it impossible to fire bad cops - it's like you won't even admit that cops are literal gods among men to whom the laws don't apply. Cops are the greatest heroes Mankind has ever created, goddammit! They should get a pass on being psychopaths!

    1. "Minneapolis police officer" is to "police officer" as "Goebbels" is to "German" or "O'Grady" is to "Catholic priest".

      Fact is: in most towns, there is no problem with police; police officers are neighbors and friends who obey the law and generally look out for their community.

      I know, that's hard to understand for someone like you, who evidently is a dysfunctional person living in a dysfunctional community.

      Policing is a local matter. If you don't like the way it operates in your community, fix your damned community, stop whining about "police".

      1. Cops are always a problem because they all enforce drug prohibition.

        1. And un Constitutional anti gun laws.

          1. Depends how far you get from places like DC and Sacramento.

            I neighbor of mine is a refugee from California, and we were admiring another neighbor's Barrett .50 one day. A Sheriff's Office SUV drove by, then whipped a U-turn and skidded to a halt in front of the yard.

            The newcomer was ready to run, but the deputy came up and we all spent the next few minutes admiring the Barrett and talking guns. The visit ended with the deputy mentioning that they get all the boxed .50BMG ammo they ask for, so the next time we were going to go out to shoot, let him know and he'd bring some in exchange for the chance to crank off a few rounds.

        2. Weirdly, and counter daveca's bs opinion on the matter, I have a buddy who was a state trooper, and military, who used to try to help folks out by having them toss, 'lose' weed or paraphernalia if he had to take them in. So, not all cops, not all the time. Overall, yeah, the badge is an indicator that trust is not there.

        3. Drug prohibition, just like all other laws, is put in place by the people who run for office and ARE ELECTED. Don't like a law? Run for office, get elected, and change it.

        4. Nope. Plenty of cops have no involvement with dope law, one way or the other, and most of the rest are after the people who are causing real problems in the community, not the ones who don't.

      2. Cops could always NOT enforce bullshit laws?

        1. Sheesh - you really want the cop on the street to decide not to enforce the law? Is that all laws, or just the ones you don't like?

          1. How much do you trust the cop to know which ones are BS and which make sense?

            Hint: No cop can enforce ALL of the laws on the books. The good ones pay attention to the good laws, and they don't have time for the bad ones.

    2. Hear! Hear!

  6. Locke's scenario should bother just about anyone who supports the right to carry a firearm.

    Yeah, I'll worry about that as soon as I get facts from some credible news source.

    Reason's reporting in this area is worthless and characterized by repeated lies and omissions.

    1. It's unfortunate that it was Locke and not a member of the B team.

    2. ^ Reason has earned this level of contempt.

      They should be ashamed and contrite.

      1. Agreed, on Binion's and this magazine's in general, complete lack of credibility. But this is looking like a time where the stopped clock is actually right.

        AIUI, Locke had whatever MN calls a license to carry, and the FN 5.7 he had with him, was his. By the cops' own admission they no-knocked three different residences looking for their homicide suspect. Because their CI told them the suspect would be there. And they never get it wrong, right Tuttle & Nichols? Anyway this guarantees that at least two different residences where the Bad Guy couldn't be there, were going to have their civil rights trod upon by armed invaders.

        The apartment manager let them into the apartment where Locke was sleeping, where the time between they screamed at him and then shot him, was something like three seconds or less.

        I hope the cop who came up with this idea, plus in an even more perfect world, the judge who signed the warrants, all get as many Federal charges as they can eat.

        Horrible, horrible turn of events, that will only be emphasized so even greater tragedies can result.

  7. The NRA remained silent for quite a while until August 2017 when then-spokesperson Dana Loesch said that the organization declined to defend Castile because he had marijuana in his car at the time of his death. As of this writing, no NRA spokesperson has responded to Reason's request for comment.

    Dear Reason,

    However, the shit I'm seeing in the mainstream media on Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter about how the NRA doesn't care about black gun owners because they haven't said anything about Philando is so disingenuous it's sad.

    - Colion Noir, NRA-recruited commentator, on NRA News July 10, 2016

    Stop writing, go back to school, and learn how to do even the most barely competent amount of investigative journalism.

    Fuck You,
    Mad.Casual

    1. Colion Noir, NRA-recruited commentator, on NRA News July 10, 2016

      I mean, FFS, the video is titled 'Philando Castile - Media Fans Flames Of Racism' and Philando was shot on July 6.

      I fully acknowledge that Noir and the NRA have parted ways as the NRA has fucked up it's spending and freely admit that I still follow Noir and not NRA News. But to continue the abject lie you stated is an insult to Noir, Black people, Journalism, the NRA, the law, and the truth.

    2. As of this writing, no NRA spokesperson has responded to Reason's request for comment.

      I would, and did, tell you to go fuck yourselves too just for being so racist and stupid and you didn't even disingenuously accuse me of being racist.

    3. Colion has a good channel.

    4. These sorts of events keep happening in Democrat Party dominated cesspits.

      Rather than noting that the 'brave truth tellers' at Reason would rather rag on the NRA.

  8. Hold each judge issuing no knock warrants criminally and financially responsible as an accessory.

    1. Instead, they bench them

  9. Medical cannabis was legal in Minnesota in 2016.

    1. I don't defend the shooting of Castile and I don't mean to support every action the NRA has ever taken or will take, but it's still not Federally legal and any organization that's going to set national standards for ranges, shooting sports competitions, certification classes, etc., etc. would be wise to take a more passive approach to such cases. I don't recall the details of Loesch's response, I would consider "We have both officers and civilians in our membership and we defend their right to defend themselves equally." as better than her reply (or what I can recall), but not substantially different.

      Moreover and in turn, even if they had given whatever the perfect response might be. It's pretty clear that mendacious dumbasses like Binion would still falsely accuse the NRA of not standing up for the gun rights of black people and then wonder why they don't answer him when he asks them about their opinion on the shooting of a black gun owner.

      1. Loesch was employed by that outfit the NRA outsourced their comms to. Dana likely came up that line on her own. The NRA would have reserved comment unless the cop got convicted. The NRA doesn't issue statements when a white lawful gun owner get's capped by police either.

        1. Yeah, as pointed out above, so was Noir and his reply was in the news less than a week after Castile was shot. Not only were the cries about "The NRA doesn't care because Castile was black." slanderous and racist lies, they were also lies intended to impugn traditional organizations and taciturn decision makers for refusing to be a part of misinformed-modern-media, hot take, clickbait culture.

          People all over the internet repeatedly question "Why is the NRA silent over the Castile case?", "Why is the NRA silent about Breonna Taylor?" and "Why did Loesch mention Marijuana, which was legal, in the Castile case?" Nobody, but nobody, is asking "Why is/was the NRA silent about the Nicholas/Tuttle shooting?" Because the NRA isn't as reactionary racist as you motherfuckers are and, more importantly, want to paint it as being.

          1. Because the NRA isn't as reactionary racist as you motherfuckers are and, more importantly, want to paint it as being.

            Sorry, not just reactionary racist, but also violently anarchist as well.

            Not to impugn but, does the GOA have a statement about Castile? Does the GOA have a statement about Taylor? Does the GOA have a statement about Tuttle/Nicholas? Nobody cares. And they don't care because if they can portray an organization as large and diverse as the NRA is/was as a bunch of violent, racist rednecks, who cares if the GOA thinks among themselves that they aren't a bunch of racist rednecks?

            If anyone wonders why the NRA doesn't issue a statement on any given public shooting, look at Kyle Rittenhouse. Speak softly and shoot the motherfuckers trying to kill you for putting out a dumpster fire.

        2. Truth be told, the NRA is pretty hesitant to take any stand against law enforcement period. Part of this , IMO is due to the fact that so many LEO's are the ones that instruct the NRA sponsored concealed carry and hunter safety courses

      2. ""We have both officers and civilians in our membership and we defend their right to defend themselves equally."

        Thats the approach MUSLIM TERRORISTS USE.

        They plant MUSLIM TERRORISTS in civilian populations

        Fail.

  10. These damn raids have been a problem for well more that a decade, but the cops don’t want to stop. It’s generally a no win deal for the inhabitants of the building being raided. The cops shoot them and get away scot-free, they shoot at the cops and get charged with crimes.

    It needs to stop but nobody in any position of influence will stop it.

    1. It needs to stop but nobody in any position of influence will stop it.

      Vicious cycle. People in positions of influence have gates on their communities, home security systems, and dogs. Cops don't no-knock because if you don't announce well before setting foot on the property, you can and will get bitten, shot, or both. It's not racist, as Nichols/Tuttle (and others) demonstrate, it is slanted against the urban poor.

    2. How far back do these kinds of raids go? At least back to the 1990s and they've been a problem for as long as they existed.

      1. There was a rather infamous raid in Santa Barbara in the 80's, around the time of "zero tolerance", where a homeowner got surprised in bed one morning by the cops. Who saw the gun near him, killed him, and the marijuana roach in the ashtray post facto made it all OK.

        It's been a thing for awhile.

      2. At least back to 1971.

        Look up Kenyon Ballew.

  11. The cases cited in this article have something in common -- the person murdered by rampaging police officers was black. In the eyes of law enforcement, black people shouldn't have legally owned and licensed weapons and shouldn't defend themselves against intruders.

    1. The cases cited fit a narrative.

    2. I guess your city might be like that.

      My town isn't. But then, once you get away from the cities, skin color ceases to be important to people.

  12. I agree with most of those posting here that no knock warrants are a really bad idea. Perhaps in a hostage situation or something similar, they might be appropriate.

    On the other hand, I have been fooled before in these incidents, where information slowly emerges that changes the narrative somewhat. All that has been released about the warrant was that it was related to a homicide investigation. Locke was apparently not the target of the raid, but he was in the apartment, and the cops do seem to have managed to hit the apartment named in the warrant this time.
    I would like to know who they were looking for there, and why that person was wanted. Then, how Mr. Locke happened to be there, and his relationship with the target.
    He might be absolutely innocent, and just unknowingly in the wrong place, a victim of police abuse and violence.
    Or it could be that his roommate is a mass murderer.

    Time will tell.

    1. I agree with most of those posting here that no knock warrants are a really bad idea. Perhaps in a hostage situation or something similar, they might be appropriate.

      On the other hand, I have been fooled before in these incidents, where information slowly emerges that changes the narrative somewhat. All that has been released about the warrant was that it was related to a homicide investigation. Locke was apparently not the target of the raid, but he was in the apartment, and the cops do seem to have managed to hit the apartment named in the warrant this time.

      The two points are illogically apologist. That is, you're denouncing a practice that lowers the bar and then lauding the police for meeting the criteria of that lower bar.

      After sixteen years at large and twelve years on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list, Bulger was arrested in Santa Monica, California, on June 22, 2011. He was 81 years old at the time of the arrest.[61][62][63]

      Bulger was captured as a result of the work of the Bulger Fugitive Task Force, which consisted of FBI agents and a Deputy U.S. Marshal. According to retired FBI agent Scott Bakken, "Here you have somebody who is far more sophisticated than some 18-year-old who killed someone in a drive-by. To be a successful fugitive you have to cut all contacts from your previous life. He had the means and kept a low profile."[64]

      A reward of US$2 million had been offered for information leading to his capture. This amount was second only to Osama Bin Laden's capture reward on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.[65][66] Bulger had been featured on the television show America's Most Wanted sixteen times, first in 1995, and finally on October 2, 2010. According to authorities, the arrests were a "direct result" of the media campaign launched by the FBI in fourteen television markets across the country where Bulger and Greig reportedly had ties. The campaign focused on Greig, describing her as an animal lover who frequently went to beauty salons.[67]

      Some of the weapons found in Bulger's apartment
      Authorities received a tip from a woman in Iceland that Bulger was living in an apartment near a beach in Santa Monica.[68][69] The Boston Globe identified the tipster as Anna Björnsdóttir, a former model, actress, and Miss Iceland 1974, who lived in Bulger's neighborhood.[69][70] A day later, "using a ruse, agents and other task force members lured Mr. Bulger out of his apartment", "arrested him 'without incident', then went in the house and arrested Greig".[67][71]

      I don't know the details of the warrant. I'm pretty sure whomever they were looking for wasn't Whitey Bulger. I'm also pretty sure that the video evidence shows Locke sleeping on the couch.

      1. There were warrants for 3 separate apartments in that building alone. https://www.boleroflatsipgliving.com/

        We don't know anything about the homicide case or suspect(s).
        Could be based on an informant, geolocation or they just wanted to seize the female resident's phone

        1. Again, the guy they shot wasn't Whitey Bulger. They guy they wanted wasn't Whitey Bulger. 24-48 hrs. of detective work and they'd almost certainly have the guy they wanted with his pants down in a public restroom. No shots fired. No innocent people killed.

          1. They knew Whitey was dangerous, so instead of bursting into his apartment they surrounded him outside and captured him without incident.
            That's what bothers me the most about cops breaking into houses with guns drawn. It's not because they believe they are in danger. If that was the case they'd grab the guy while he's getting his mail. They do it for the thrill. They do it to terrorize. They do it to kill pets and destroy property. They do it for a chance to kill another human being.
            And people wonder why I have zero respect for anyone who seeks out a job in law enforcement.

            1. That's the dirty secret. Cops don't actually do this on people they know are dangerous, they ambush those guys outside. You're right. The entire premise for these raids is disingenuous, at least among informed decision-makers.

          2. Indeed. Whitey Bulger is dead, so he was unrelated to this incident.

            I hate the idea of no-knock raids. We are out in the country, and if someone breaks down my door, they are probably going to get shot. Home invaders watch "Cops" too, and sometimes yell "Police! Search warrant!" when they smash into a house to torment and rob the occupants. If the cops did break down my door, it would likely be because they mixed up the address.

            There are also some circumstances where such a raid might be the best option, and many more where it would be unnecessary and dangerous. I can see that when there are multiple dangerous suspects, apprehending them simultaneously can have some advantages. Other articles claim the warrants were for three individuals.

            The article expects all gun owners to be incensed by this case, but we don't really know much about it, or the victim. It seems absurd to expect people to have strong opinions about an event where few facts are known.
            "He owned the gun legally and had a concealed carry permit, according to his family's legal representation."
            That representation is Ben Crump. I would not trust any statement made by Crump without some proof.

            1. Save for a hostage situation, there is no need for these types of raids, even for murderers.

  13. You do understand that the NRA is largely owned, lock, stock, and barrel, by law enforcement and they would never, never say anything against the great blue line. It does line their coffers with considerable sums of money after all as the regular cops are pretty much like a lot of us who aren't giving up anything to government excesses. Many are still happy to be authoritarians and don't believe in the the amendment that comes just two doors down.

    1. It's not lock, stock, and barrel and, even if it's stock and barrel, the membership and voting process prevents lock ownership.

      If it's owned lock, stock, and barrel by the police, LaPierre is the one who warned everyone, in no uncertain terms, about jack-booted thugs.

    2. The problem is that their large membership in the law enforcement community helps legitimize them, as well as contributing a lot of their dues, but then what are you going to do once a large fraction of your membership shares another interest that at times can conflict with that of the organization's purpose for the other members?

    3. Sure, rather than blaming the actual authorities in those jurisdictions so much better to find a scapegoat.

  14. I remember reading something about, like, a Justice for Breonna Taylor Act that was supposed to end no-knock raids. I'm sure those dirty, filthy, ignorant Republicans must have prevented this bill from passing. Amir's blood is on their hands.

    1. Yep, it's not like the Minneapolis PD doesn't have a Chief who could simply order the department to cease all no knock raids.

      Nope, her hands are clearly tied. She bears zero responsibility for any of this...

    2. I bet Rand Paul probably threatened to filibuster it.

      1. He wrote it, and was the main sponsor.

        1. >>>>The Joke<<<<>>>>Head<<<<<

  15. There seems to be something wrong with the Minneapolis police department. This is not even close to their worst act, who remembers the unarmed woman they killed when she approached a police car? Not that man? I am not surprised as she was white and the media did little reporting on it.
    No-knock warrants should be severely curtailed and only used in the most drastic situations, i.e. as someone mentioned above hostage rescue, and even then should be a last resort, after negotiations etc have failed. And after they are used, there needs to be a thorough after actions report and investigation to insure that the situation warranted one, with serious penalties for anyone that abused the system. Qualified immunity needs to be drastically reformed, for all levels of government (not just the police). Judges should be held accountable for bad warrants (police know which judges will sign off on questionable warrants and which ones won't). District attorneys should be eliminated, and their departments combined with public defenders offices, and lawyers randomly assigned as either defense or prosecutor. Instead of electing DAs we should be electing city or county lead attorneys, who are in charge of both public defense and prosecutions, so they have to run on a record of both. Montana rural areas have an interesting system, where they don't have public defenders. Private attorneys are contracted by the county when a public defender is needed. Not certain how well it works but it's interesting. We also don't elect DAs we elect county attorneys. Their primary responsibility is dealing with legal issues for the county, i.e. advising on state laws, interpretation of contracts etc, then if there is need they will act as prosecutor. Of course this would may not work in a large urban area. That is why I suggest a public attorneys office that handles both defense and prosecutions, and nobody is assigned to either a defense or prosecutor role, but is instead assigned on a case to case situation, i.e. one case you're the defense attorney, the next time you're the prosecuting attorney. Additionally, there should be an independent oversight review board that reviews all cases, especially plea bargains, to root out unethical behavior, such as overcharging to force a plea. Judges should also be accountable and aware of the entire plea bargain process and responsible to some form of oversight and discipline when they approve coercive plea bargains. All police academy graduates should be instructed and tested on the Constitution, and all veteran police officers tested on their knowledge of the Constitution.
    Finally, I would combine all armed federal agents under the federal Marshal's office, with the exception of the Postal Police (because it's mentioned in the Constitution), with their primary mission to investigate any and all civil rights violations (especially any violation of the Bill of Rights, all ten amendments) corruption, etc by local law enforcement at all levels, and enforcement of federal laws as a secondary mission, that they coordinate with local law enforcement. The only exception being if local law enforcement is the target, either primary or secondary, of the investigation, in which case they should be required to coordinate with state law enforcement. And the federal Marshals should have to release public reports quarterly on their actions. And be liable for any local laws they break while performing their duties.

    1. The US Coast Guard should be left in place as well, but return it to either the department of commerce, or the DoD. Eliminate the DHS.

      1. So, in this expanded Federal Marshal's office what I see, is say the IRS has a tax cheat that needs arresting, they have to obtain a warrant and have the Marshals enforce it. For some, such as National Parks and USFS, all policing down by uniformed marshals, the same for border enforcement and immigration enforcement. INS only job would be approving visas, rescinding visas when appropriate, and other clerical duties, all policing handled by the Marshal's office. And all reports should be reviewed by both houses of Congress and by the USSC automatically. And both the congressional hearings on the reports and the USSC review should be open to the press, no closed door sessions.

    2. All police academy graduates should be instructed and tested on the Constitution, and all veteran police officers tested on their knowledge of the Constitution.

      Police training in the US is basically pro forma. The only countries that train less are Iraq, Afghanistan, and Papua New Guinea. Other countries aren't even close. Much of the time that is spent training in the US is spent on how to use a weapon and combat tactics so there is almost nothing about how to deescalate or alternatives to blast away. 25% of people killed by cops have mental health problems. Cops spend 10 hours training to assess mental health. Combine that with - again by far - the largest portion of the population in prison and what we are really faced with in the US is that we don't give a shit about constitutional niceties. Those are to be resolved in court - not in daily practice. The goal of cops is to get as many people as possible in jail or six feet under. They are successful with that and that is what we the voters are demanding of them.

      1. Each state sets their own standards. Arizona requires passing a 585-hour course, about 8 weeks of training, just for basic certification to be a cop in the smallest town in the state. That's not what I would call "pro forma."

    3. NKW are bc theyre too fucking lazy to do surveillance.

      And too cowardly to knock.

    4. " the media did little reporting on it."

      Youre surprised the Police State Media ignored it?

      Whats on tv besides police state programming?

      Its disgusting.

      Bring back wonens roller derby. And not the modern pussy- pacifist kind. Brutes trying to bash each others faces in. That was entertainment!

      1. All of the participants are too busy marching with Antifa.

  16. Freaking NRA cowards not defending Castille.
    The 2A doesn't say "RKBA shall not be infringed except if you have pot in your possession."

    1. 1 million +

    2. Imagine the screams of self-righteous anti-gunners if the NRA came out in support of someone who turned out to actually be someone who needed to be shot.

      Better to stay out of it, and let the legal process run its course.

  17. Why doesn't this ever occur with corrupt corpos?
    Makes you wonder.

  18. This will continue as long as we allow law enforcement policies that prioritize the preservation of evidence above the protection of human life.

    1. The only lives law enforcement care about are their own. Remember that the public that they protect is everyone else. Any individual they come into contact with is a subject who must obey or die.

      1. If only you really believed that.

  19. Why would Locke having a concealed carry permit have any relevance on whether he could leaglly shoot someone breaking in and attacking him in his sleep?

    You legally have the right to kill people who do what the officers did. He doesn't need a concealed carry permit for private property.

    That is the issue with no knock raids, it sets up a scenario where both parties involved are legally allowed to shoot and kill each other in the name of self defense.

    1. "You legally have the right to kill people who do what the officers did."

      Not in VA. Police state.

    2. I think we have gotten to the point where no knock raids should no more. Get your guy another way. Stake them out. Same if it’s a raid fir drugs. Maybe we shouldn’t raid for drugs anymore either. The war on drugs has been one of the worst things to ever happen. Time to end it.

      1. The WoD has made billions in profit for the criminal justice and warehousing system.

        'Criminal' refers to the system and warehousing...

  20. The NRA doesn't take positions on individual shootings. You might think they should, but they're not hypocritical.

    1. I was told several years ago NRA went full on Leftist.

      Big money corp.

  21. During his trial, the defense argued that he believed the cops to be intruders and shot in self-defense, an argument that ultimately persuaded a jury.

    If the cops don't announce themselves and present their warrant, they ARE intruders.

  22. " The occupant pointed a gun at us."
    " The occupant posessed a gun."
    "The occupant sat up when we entered."
    " The occupant had a permit so he might have had a gun."
    " The occupant had no permit so probably has an illegal gun."

    The occupant was black and wanted suicide by cop."
    Do we get the notion the cops are pathologically lying psychopaths?

    This was dramatized in Chuck Norris movie where the cop planted a gun on a victim.

    Art = life.

  23. "...Taylor's story gained widespread traction in the media..." And therein lies a large part of the problem. The only thing that gains traction in the media is whatever advances their leftist gun control narrative. A good example is the recent study by Johns Hopkins University that lock downs produced little or no results in stopping the spread of Covid. The published study by Johns Hopkins has resulted in literally radio silence among the mainstream media, with not a single mention of the study by CNN, MSNBC, NYT, or WaPo. Because the study didn't fit their narrative. And so it is with the gunning down of innocents by the police. Unless there is some element that conforms to what the big media wants presented to its readers, no one hears a word about it.

  24. Thesexasshole copsxwere too LAZY or was it INCOMPETENT to put a camera where they could see who went in the apartment to know who was in it?

    Was this another " wrong address?"

    The fucking PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVERS ARE MORE COMPETENT.

    And this was a SWAT team? This incompetent!

    It would be a joke if it wasnt for them out murdering people.

    But the murderee was black so the White Establishment will try to bury this before hes buried.

  25. Anyone else sick of Ben Crump swooping in anytime there is a shooting and trying to get himself as much airtime as possible. Ben Crump loves him some Ben Crump amirite.

    1. Ya, though I guess part of that is how much of this crap keeps happening in Minneapolis. Still,I wouldn't be surprised if he runs for office or something soon.

  26. Cops cannot be trusted with no-knock raids. They frequently ransack the incorrect house and kill people they have no warrant to apprehend. Wait out front for your perp to exit. Good ol' fashioned police work.

    1. Recall about 8 years ago cops raided a house on Sunday noon?

      A FEDERAL JUDGES HOUSE.

      She was not amused.

  27. So, yet another no-knock warrant killing in a Democrat-run city, with Democrat DAs and Democrat councils, a police chief hired by the Democrat mayor and a police department governed by rules laid down by the Democrat city government? How can this happen?

  28. correct headline:
    Reason.com Wants the NRA/GOA To Respond Without Knowing All Of The Facts

  29. What a naive, ignorant article! So, according to this author, because Locke's hand was on the barrel and not the trigger, the cop was supposed to, what? ask him politely if he intended to eventually shoot or just fondle the gun? Every legal gun owner knows that, in the presence of a cop, you do not reach for your gun. Period. The police announced themselves. The warrant was legal. The only problem was the guy who didn't follow the rules. Now his family is looking for a payout, after ignoring their son's past behavior. The other lesson is this: if you sleep at the home of known criminals, you just may get in trouble yourself. Ask Breonna Taylor.

    1. The exicution of a "no knock" warrant is DESIGNED to cause confusion and surprise for the occupants of a dwelling. The victim in this case was asleep, and woke up AS EXPECTED, surprised and confused. A common tactic of home invaders and armed robbers is to announce that they are police, and they'll often dress in a way that resembles the police. The victim was shot within about three seconds of the police entering, and never pointed his firearm at police. If that's not bad enough for you, the warrant was executed solely for "officer safety" reasons. They were looking for people, and it's highly unlikely that had those people been there, that they could flush themselves down the toilet and escape. Essentially, what appears to have been a completely innocent, law abiding citizen died because the safely of police was deemed to be more important than the safey of innocent victims of the police. As a law-abiding citizen, I have no reason to suspect that the police are going to barge into my home in the middle of the night. ANYONE coming through my door is getting shot, whether they say they're the police or not. If the police actually have a warrant for me, they can serve it after I've had first cup of coffee in the morning so that I'm less likely to mistake them as hoodlums looking to make a quick buck.

  30. When you weaken 4th Amendment rights (which outlaws warrantless search & seizure) it also weakens 2nd Amendment gun rights. That’s irony and hypocrisy.

    When you say any constitutional right is optional when convenient - instead of a legal restraint on authority - you have no gun rights either. Gun owners have been nearly silent on 4th Amendment rights for several decades. That same logic will be used to take away 2nd Amendment gun rights.

  31. A couple of questions come to mind re the above mentioned circumstances.

    1. What’s up with the NRA, of which I’ve been a Life Member since 1975 or thereabouts.
    2. Regarding the antics of some police agencies and the personnel thereof, again what’s up with these organizations and their personnel?

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