Immigration

Immigration Is the Most Important Way To Beat China

The Senate’s Endless Frontier Act aims to spur innovation but leaves out immigration reform.

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The Senate will soon consider a bill that supporters say will help U.S. companies compete against China with innovative products. However, the bill leaves out the most vital element: talented people to produce the innovations.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D–N.Y.) plans to move forward with his Endless Frontier Act, which has several Republican co-sponsors and was approved by the Senate Commerce Committee on May 13. The bill gives new planning authority to the National Science Foundation, but contains no provisions to welcome and retain high-skilled foreign nationals, who in recent years have accounted for 70 to 80 percent of the full-time graduate students at U.S. universities in computer science and electrical engineering.

Advocates of industrial policy argue trade protection and government planning increase innovation. A review of the economic literature shows this is not the case. The critical factors for innovation are imports, competition, and immigration.

Immigration's impact on innovation is clear. As economists Giovanni Peri, Kevin Shih, and Chad Sparber found in a 2015 study, "When we aggregate at the national level, inflows of foreign STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] workers explain between 30% and 50% of the aggregate productivity growth that took place in the United States between 1990 and 2010″ [emphasis added].

Innovations are often developed through forming new companies. Research from the organization I lead, the National Foundation for American Policy, concluded that more than half of America's billion-dollar startups had at least one immigrant founder.

For example, semiconductors dominate the competitiveness debate, and immigrants helped start the two companies making much of the innovation in chips possible: Synopsys and Cadence Design Systems. Jim Keller, who has designed chips at Apple, Tesla, and Intel, and other companies in the field, pointed out a great deal of innovation was taking place in America in chip design but that "little of the activity would be possible…without advances in design software by Synopsys and its biggest rival, Cadence Design Systems," according to The New York Times.

The public-private consortium Manufacturing USA program, tasked with a central role in the Endless Frontier Act, has highlighted the cutting-edge robotics research of University of Connecticut associate professor Ashwin Dani, who came to America as an international student from India. However, more favorable legal pathways for students to work after graduation in our northern neighbor have doubled the number of Indians immigrating to Canada. At the same time, international students from India in graduate-level computer science and engineering programs in the U.S. declined by more than 25 percent in 2018–2019, deterred by restrictions on H-1B visas and long green card waits for Indians because of per-country limits and low annual ceilings on employment-based immigration.

The bill also provides funding for STEM education but appears to provide fewer U.S. student scholarships than the $1,500 scholarship and training fee that employers currently pay when they petition for an H-1B visa holder. Virtually ignored in the debate over producing more U.S. STEM graduates, that H-1B fee has funded approximately 100,000 scholarships for U.S. students in STEM fields over the past 20 years.

Congress should heed the advice of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) and enact policies to attract and retain foreign-born talent. The NSCAI advocated in its final report to create a startup visa for immigrant entrepreneurs, at least double the annual number of employment-based green cards, and eliminate the per-country limit (to prevent waits for permanent residence that can last decades). The commission also recommended expanding H-1B visas, typically the only practical way for a high-skilled foreign national to work long-term in America, while establishing a new "emerging and disruptive technology" visa.

Congress can follow the commission's advice to exempt from the annual limits for green cards international students who earn PhDs in STEM fields or, better yet, do so for master's degree students as well. Legislation can also provide work authorization to bridge the gap for students who complete their degrees and must wait for employment-based green cards, as in the Biden-supported U.S. Citizenship Act.

If the Senate starts to move forward with the Endless Frontier Act, we should expect an amendment from Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.) and Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R–Tenn.) that mirrors their Secure Campus Act. That bill prohibits Chinese graduate students from studying in STEM fields at U.S. universities. But the NSCAI concluded that banning Chinese graduate students from U.S. university STEM fields would be a gift to the Chinese Communist Party. "Immigration policy can also slow China's progress," according to the final report. "China's government takes the threat of brain drain seriously, noting that the United States' ability to attract and retain China's talent is an obstacle to the Chinese Communist Party's (CCP) ambitions. Increasing China's brain drain will create a dilemma for the CCP—which will be forced to choose between losing even more human capital, further slowing their economic growth and threatening their advancement in AI, or denying Chinese nationals opportunities to study and work in the United States."

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, the NSCAI chair, was asked about Chinese students at a congressional hearing. "It turns out the Chinese researchers are the number one authors on the key [A.I.] papers," said Schmidt. "If you were to get rid of all of them…you will, in fact, hurt America's A.I. leadership."

The vast majority of the graduate students at U.S. universities in math, engineering, and computer science are international students, primarily from China and India. If the Biden administration keeps a last-minute Trump regulation to make it more difficult for international students to gain H-1B visas by eliminating the H-1B lottery and favoring older foreign professionals, attracting new talent will get much more difficult.

No legislation is likely to help American companies outcompete their Chinese counterparts if Congress and the executive branch fail to enact more welcoming policies—or worse, impose new immigration restrictions.

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  1. Too bad Trump lost the election. He could have revived the Chinese Exclusion Act.

    1. Pretty sure sticking Asian American citizens in concentration camps or exiling them was a Democratic policy.

      1. As is holding them to higher standards for being accepted at American universities.

        1. 5his is a Troll meme based on the “End justifies the Means” fallacy and is chock full of lies. Like the false assumption that Grad School. people are needed to build industry. Seconfd lie, help can be imported on a Tech bisa, proving this is an immigration scam otself.

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    2. …Execution Act…

    3. The Chinese Exclusion Act is the way immigration and naturalization work in China today. There isn’t any, unless you have ethnic Chinese ancestry.

  2. They likey the foreign students because they pay more money. It’s got nothing to do with countering China or free trade, and universities don’t care about that anyway.

    1. Agreed – The State universities here valued the foreign student enrollment greatly.

    2. For graduate school, the scam is even worse. The US government gives research grants. Those grants require graduate students to do the work. There aren’t enough US graduate students to do the work so they hire foreigners in large numbers, and they lower academic quality as much as is necessary to fill the positions.

      In other words, foreign students are a vehicle by which universities can obtain large amounts of federal funding in the US.

      1. The more I hear about the workings of the university system, the more I’m convinced it’s a giant scam.

        1. And yet, so many of you squealed here at the suggestion to let students try to discharge their loans in bankruptcy.

          Despite it most likely bending over the Academy, and forcing it to annihilate its Victims Studies Departments.

          1. Students chose to take out those loans. Why should the taxpayer foot the bill?

            However, what i could get behind is class action suits of the universities for breach of contract, with damages to be paid out of their endowments.

            1. “Students chose to take out those loans.”

              As with any loan that’s part of bankruptcy proceedings.

              1. This. Fine if (insert racial/sexist slur here) racks up 10,000 in unsecured debt and walks away in C.7. Not fine if kid buys the bullshit of, “Just get any degree…and give ’em a firm handshake when you ask to see the Hiring Manager.” Then hits the real world, and finds that corporate America would much rather hire an H-1B with fake creds, than hire the kid.

                Got it.

  3. Bombing the three gorges damn and firebombing the rest of Wuhan would be a good start too

    1. It may fall on its own.

    2. That would be a casus belli entitling China to feed us a bunch of nukes.

      I hope you don’t think China still has the LOL 300 that FAS has claimed they’ve had since the 80s. WaPo, of all places, had an interesting article on some DC area professor having his upper division classes use public sourced information to flesh out the PRC’s equivalent of the Strategic Rocket Forces. They came up with low 4 digits for weapons and launchers. I see no reason to doubt them, not with China having both Russia and the US as deterrable enemies.

  4. To defeat China, we must become China. Why does this feel like paid CCP propaganda?

    1. Weird, it’s not a Suderman article.

    2. I fail to see how cramming 6.5B people within our borders and leaving the rest of the world as open ground for China effectively thwarts China.

      If we aren’t talking about bringing everyone here, then what does immigration have to do with *effectively* countering China.

    3. Isn’t that the reverse of: “To be The Man, you’ve got to beat The Man?”

    4. China has an extremely restrictive immigration policy, that largely only lets people in based on Chinese heritage. Opening our borders to skilled workers is not becoming China.

    5. we but most of the shit China sells so alls needed is to STOP BUYING FROM THE BASTARDS!

  5. It’s nice to see Schumer waving the flag of his home country, but why is he waving an American flag as well?

    1. What a fucking douche bag; along with the other turds NY keeps electing.

  6. Ok so where the hell is OBL? Expected him to be first up on this one.

  7. Even more important than “beating China,” immigration is the best way to increase the wealth of billionaires like Reason.com’s benefactor Charles Koch.

    Need proof? In 2020, the last full year in which the US had an alt-right white nationalist President, Mr. Koch actually lost $5 billion. That happened because Drumpf prevented him from hiring his favorite employees — cost-effective foreign-born workers.

    But in 2021, with Joe Biden in the White House and our borders finally open, Mr. Koch is already up almost $8 billion. Expect the richest people on the planet to keep getting richer as long as Democrats run Washington and the cost-effective labor keeps flowing.

    #ImmigrationAboveAll

    1. Yay! Koch industry, world’s leading producer of delicious taco trucks.

    2. shuō Cáo Cāo, Cáo Cāo dào, as they say.

      1. Only took nine minutes to summon him, that is kinda creepy

  8. Today in the comments of Reason magazine, fifty-centers will again conflate opposition to illegal immigration with opposition to legal immigration and pretend that they are exactly the same thing.

    “If you think immigrants should immigrate legally it means you’re a racist who hates having more doctors.”

    1. Sounds nice but Legal and Illegal is whatever the law says it is. i.e. politicians and bureaucrats whims.

      1. Wrong definition about what a law is… but that is certainly an accurate description of how laws are treated.

  9. If you want more skilled immigration, get rid of low skilled and illegal immigration; they are mutually exclusive.

    1. GOOD POINT

  10. foreign nationals, who in recent years have accounted for 70 to 80 percent of the full-time graduate students at U.S. universities in computer science and electrical engineering.”

    Maybe those spots should be taken by U.S. citizens. it well recognized that universities give favor to forgein students because of how much more they have to pay. it not because they are brighter than Americans it because of the money

    1. Graduate students are largely paid for by the US government through research grants. Such graduate positions aren’t attractive to Americans because they pay little and have bad job prospects. They are attractive to third world students.

      Universities use these foreign graduate students as placeholders ands money makers, because they get their overhead no matter what.

      The US government wastes way too much money on research grants. There are too many academics, too many programs, etc. If you’re smart, you do something different with your life.

      1. “They are attractive to third world students…. that were kaking 45 cents a day in ….( enter name of Turd World shit hole Nation were supposed to let run our Country….)”

        Fixed it for you.

  11. Instead of going through all the hassle of backing Laotians in Laos against China, Philipinos in the Philipines against China, Japanese in Japan against China, Vietnamese… Nepalese… Indians… Pakastanis… Mongolians… lets just make them all move here, fork over money to our universities to get jobs or work manual labor, learn our culture, and make them all oppose China that way.

    *That’s* how you oppose China without becoming China!

  12. We welcome all immigrants to America, especially the Chinese. They keep the FBI
    employed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese_spy_cases_in_the_United_States

  13. Remember when Redd Foxx told this joke?:

    “There are 800 million Chinese! And they keep coming! That’s what they’ve been doing! That’s why there’s 800 million of them!”

    Pepperidge Farm Fortune Cookies Remembers…

    1. “I brought a gallon of Fantastik and a mop…”

      1. I had missed that particular joke of his back in my college days of listening to his X-rated “party tapes.”

        Then I caught it on YouTube last night on Video in a Plain Brown Wrapper.

        I was eating at the time and I was laughing so hard, cottage cheese got stuck in the back of my nose!

        I hadn’t laughed so hard since he played Fred G. Sanford and called Aunt Esther “Son Of Wolf-Face.!” The “G” is for “Good times!” 🙂

    2. ” …more people we should have killed!”

      Al Bundy

  14. Depending on foreigners for progress is precisely why we’re in this situation with China in the first place.

    1. Despite some extremely militant protests by Americans, (Seattle 1999) Bill Clinton, along with bi-partisan congressional approval negotiated China to enter the WTO (World Trade Organization) in 2001. Since then America has lost manufacturing jobs while China gained them.

  15. Hey, Stuart. You want STEM workers? Here ya go. Data from the Census Bureau confirmed that a stunning 3 in 4 Americans with a STEM degree do not hold a job in a STEM field—that’s a pool of more than 11 million Americans with STEM qualifications who lack STEM employment. The US Census shows that of those college graduates who majored in Computers, Mathematics and Statistics (1,959,730), 50.81% did not hold a job in a STEM field (i.e., Computer Workers, Mathematicians and Statisticians, Engineers, Life scientists, Physical Scientists, and Social Scientists). Of those who majored in Engineering (3,340,430), 50.54% did not hold a job in a STEM field[1].

    These are constantly growing numbers: Rutgers Professor Hal Salzman, a top national expert on STEM labor markets, estimates that “U.S. colleges produce twice the number of STEM graduates annually as find jobs in those fields.”[2]

    There’s a glut of untapped STEM-trained domestic workers.

    The H-1B visa was created with the Immigration Act of 1990 under the pretext of easing a STEM labor shortage. Any notion of a 30-year labor shortage doesn’t pass the laugh test. It shows a complete ignorance of how labor markets function in a free market society.

    [1] US Census Bureau (July 10, 2014), Census Bureau Reports Majority of STEM College Graduates Do Not Work in STEM Occupations, Release Number: CB14-130

    [2] Salzman, Hal (September 15, 2014), STEM Grads Are at a Loss, U.S. News

    1. Tech companies like to create an oversupply of STEM workers: increased supply means lower cost.

      In addition, the average quality of America’s STEM programs has deteriorated greatly over the last few decades. Turns out, most people are just not cut out to write software or do math.

      1. “Turns out, most people are just not cut out to write software or do math.”

        I remember reading that back in the 60s before writing software was something one could study at university, the programmers were overwhelmingly women. The men were mostly involved in the hardware and had a background in electrical engineering. The programmers were drawn from many fields.

        1. Yes, and in the 1960’s computers were programmed in programming languages that could be described on an index card, programs were a few kilobytes large, and if software crashed, it was no big deal.

          Computers programs have gotten a million times bigger since then, they run vital infrastructure, they are networked, and they are under constant attack. Developing good software requires top-notch mathematical skills, plus an attention to detail that even most mathematicians lack.

          The fact that universities produce a glut of bad programmers is one of the reasons we constantly suffer from cyberattacks and software failures.

          1. “Developing good software requires top-notch mathematical skills”

            A good knowledge of math can’t hurt, of course, but if the programmer is not capable of communicating clearly with fellow programmers, or worse yet, the clients, math isn’t going to be enough. Illiterate programmers are doomed to failure.

            It’s unfair to put all the blame on illiterate programmers, though. Illiterate end users also need to take more care.

            1. You’re confusing cause and effect. The reason people skills are so important is because we have a glut of bad programmers. And it corrupts the entire industry, as bad programmers produce bad tools and bad APIs.

              1. ” The reason people skills are so important is because we have a glut of bad programmers.”

                I disagree. Ability to communicate is fundamental in almost any human endeavor. Especially one like programming which involves many people working together and separately towards a common goal.

                I’m not sure that math skills are as important as you are making them out to be. Maybe back in the 60s when memory was so tight and processing time was extremely expensive, programs had to be optimized and a mathematical analysis would have been helpful in that cause. It still is today but with the cost of memory and computing getting progressively cheaper, that kind of optimization is not so important as it once was. A love of puzzle solving and exploration as well as persistence is a good substitute for math skills.

                1. Ability to communicate is fundamental in almost any human endeavor.

                  And for software, that communication ought to be in formal, precise language, like the statement of a mathematical theorem. But the programmers churned out by our “universities” are largely incapable of communicating that way.

                  I’m not sure that math skills are as important as you are making them out to be. Maybe back in the 60s when memory was so tight

                  I’m not talking about optimization, I’m talking about the ability to produce software that has well-defined behaviors and is demonstrably correct and free of security holes.

                  A love of puzzle solving and exploration as well as persistence is a good substitute for math skills.

                  And that sums up better than I could why software quality remains so poor.

                  1. ” I’m talking about the ability to produce software that has well-defined behaviors and is demonstrably correct and free of security holes.”

                    You mean like programming along the lines of the functional paradigm, which sees programs essentially as mathematical expressions? Isn’t this paradigm coming at long last back into style these days? Especially with the introduction of multicore hardware and parallel processing. If this is what you are driving at, then I agree that functional programming could lead to many improvements. But functional programming is still programming. It’s not math. I don’t think you need to be particularly clever at math to be able to write sound functional programs.

                    1. Writing correct software is the same as creating mathematical theories and writing mathematical proofs, in any programming language. Modern functional languages help with the bookkeeping and documentation, but they are neither necessary nor sufficient. You can take the same approach in assembly.

                      Most people can be taught the principles and they can apply them to small problems, but few people have the ability to hold the complex abstractions in their mind necessary for solving real-world problems. Everybody can be taught the basics of basketball, few people have the physical and mental makeup to play at a modern competitive level.

                      People who program by “puzzle solving and exploration” can continue to do so in functional programming languages, and they end up producing code that is no better than in other languages.

                    2. “Writing correct software is the same as creating mathematical theories and writing mathematical proofs”

                      Writing software is an interactive process aimed at accomplishing some practical goal. Proofs are fine as an academic exercise, but unnecessary for practical application. The ancient Egyptians and Sumerians used Pythagoras to construct their buildings and measure land without an inkling of proving the math that lay behind.

                      It seems you are underestimating the power of the functional programming paradigm, even though it treats programs more as math than other paradigms, making it more easy to debug and test. Its emphasis on immutable data means that the left and right side assignment statements can be substituted, something other paradigms can’t claim. X = X + 1. You can’t do that in functional programs because it makes no sense mathematically.

                      I thought you’d take heart in the growing popularity of this functional programming paradigm, with its imposition of mathematical constraints and discipline on programmers, but you do nothing but pooh pooh it.

                    3. Writing software is an interactive process aimed at accomplishing some practical goal. Proofs are fine as an academic exercise, but unnecessary for practical application.

                      I didn’t say that you should prove programs correct; I said that the act of writing correct programs is literally the same, and requires the same skills, as a complex mathematical proof.

                      The ancient Egyptians and Sumerians used Pythagoras to construct their buildings and measure land

                      The ancient Egyptians also didn’t build sky scrapers or undersea tunnels or nuclear power plants.

                      Its emphasis on immutable data means…

                      … not what you think it means. Sure, it has the side benefit of easing testing and debugging, but that’s not why it’s there.

                      I thought you’d take heart in the growing popularity of this functional programming paradigm, with its imposition of mathematical constraints and discipline on programmers, but you do nothing but pooh pooh it.

                      I didn’t “pooh pooh” it at all. Functional programming makes life easier both for bad programmers and for good ones; everybody should use it. But it will not turn bad programmers (i.e., people who don’t produce correct code) into good programmers (i.e., people who do).

                      You believe that programming is like carpentry or cooking: something most people can learn and get good enough at for professional work. Based on such beliefs, governments distort the market and invest massive amounts of money on teaching people to code. And my point is: the outcomes of that are a lot of unhappy coders, a lot of management headaches, and a glut of bad, insecure, buggy code.

                    4. “I said that the act of writing correct programs is literally the same, and requires the same skills, as a complex mathematical proof.”

                      It is not the same at all, literally or figuratively. A computer program needs to undergo extensive testing, and it only needs to be shown to be adequate to the task. If there is confusion as to what the task actually is, that brings us back to my original point, poor communication skills. Mathematical proofs are completely different. They don’t need extensive testing with various scenarios to be proved correct as any computer program does. The correctness of a proof lies in something more fundamental: its logic.

                      “But it will not turn bad programmers (i.e., people who don’t produce correct code) into good programmers (i.e., people who do).”

                      I’m struck by the pervasive pessimism of your comments here. Functional programming demands a certain mathematical rigor and discipline from programmers. I don’t see how the paradigm can’t help but improve even mediocre programmers as long as they have a mind to better themselves.

                      “You believe that programming is like carpentry or cooking: something most people can learn and get good enough at for professional work.”

                      I don’t care about professional work. Millions learn to write without becoming professional writers, no reason the same shouldn’t hold true for programming, which gives computer users a mastery over their computers they wouldn’t otherwise have.

                      “You believe that programming is like carpentry or cooking”

                      I don’t believe that. Even a mediocre worker isn’t going to give their customers a chair that doesn’t have its legs or a soup that is inedible. Yet buggy software is released all the time. It’s not the programmers fault. They are not responsible for the decision to release programs. That’s the task of their managers who may not be programmers at all.

                    5. It is not the same at all, literally or figuratively.

                      If you have written a correct program, you have performed a mathematical proof. That’s a mathematical fact, and the major motivation behind functional programming.

                      A computer program needs to undergo extensive testing, and it only needs to be shown to be adequate to the task.

                      That’s no doubt how you and 95% of the programmers out there approach programming. And that’s why software is so buggy, insecure, and unsafe.

                      As I was saying: only a very small number of people actually have the skills and mindset to write correct programs. The rest produce software in the way you describe. And that would be excusable if at least their numbers would make up for the low quality, but in actual fact, the large numbers of unqualified programmers are probably responsible for us having less usable software than we would otherwise have.

                    6. I’m not sure I’m following you. 95% of computer programs are incorrect and need to be extensively tested and debugged. They are full of errors regardless and it’s the programmers fault and not the fault of the managers who ultimately are responsible for how and when the software is released. 5% of computer programs are correct and don’t need to be tested or debugged because they are mathematical proofs in fact. Can you give me an example of one of these correctly written programs? Perhaps an internet browser, as I’m always open to trying something new.

                    7. I made no statements about the percentage of computer programs or the necessity for testing. I made a point about the skills of programmers.

                      A small percentage of people can write code from a specification that usually passes all tests the first time it compiles; there is no trial and error involved. Don’t trouble yourself with figuring out how they do it.

                      You say that the software industry is dominated by people who program by trial-and-error and require the management and collaboration of large numbers of people. I agree.

                      Hence my point: the average quality of America’s STEM programs has deteriorated greatly over the last few decades. Turns out, most people are just not cut out to write software or do math.

                    8. “Turns out, most people are just not cut out to write software or do math.”

                      But you are unable to point out an internet browser which was correctly written. It seems that you are willing to use incorrectly written browsers. And that incorrectly written software produced by mediocre programmers is adequate, though can be improved.

                      I think you protest too much.

                    9. But you are unable to point out an internet browser which was correctly written. It seems that you are willing to use incorrectly written browsers. And that incorrectly written software produced by mediocre programmers is adequate, though can be improved.

                      You’re arguing a straw man of your own creation. I simply pointed out that flooding the labor market with programmers through government programs discourages highly skilled workers from entering, has lowered software quality, and has made software development less efficient.

                      The point is obviously lost on you since you have no idea of what programming other than by trial-and-error looks like, and since you apparently like, and benefit from, the current, government-subsidized arrangement.

                2. Math skills as they apply to logic is important in programming. But there are other ways to getting logic than through the math department. It might behoove educators to consider cross discipline in logic. Put the philosophy students in a math logic class and the programming and math students in a philosophy logic course.

          2. “The fact that universities produce a glut of bad programmers is one of the reasons we constantly suffer from cyberattacks and software failures.

            Lie. thats IT Admins too G-D stupid to copy and swap drives several times a day and system designers stupid enough to expose such systems to the internet

    2. “There’s a glut of untapped STEM-trained domestic workers.”

      A good number of those trained in STEM are functionally illiterate, and unable to express themselves verbally or in writing. It’s not surprising that they are unemployable in their fields.

      1. The foreign born STEM graduates are little better. Turns out, spending massive amounts of money on STEM education doesn’t magically turn average people into scientists. And this now feeds on itself, where poorly trained STEM graduates are teaching the next generation.

        1. “The foreign born STEM graduates ”

          That’s a ridiculously broad brush. European, especially Russian and Eastern European students come closest fulfilling the potential of a university education.

          1. Let me spell it out for you. In the past, only the best and brightest high school students (here or abroad) went to university; these days, it’s between 50-70%. That is why average quality has been declining to massively. That’s not a “broad brush”, that’s a statement about populations.

            As for European, Russian, and Eastern European students, they weren’t any smarter on average than Americans. It’s just that only the very best of them ever made it to America, both because the US was highly selective in terms of admissions, because they were desperate, and because the US was good at attracting the very best.

            None of that applies anymore. US universities have become mediocre, it’s easy to get an excellent education abroad, and the quality of life abroad is comparable to or better than the US quality of life.

            The more the US opens its borders to the broad masses and the more money it spends on university education for its people, the more mediocre it will become and the more unappealing it will be for top-notch, skilled immigrants.

            I don’t regret my choice to come to the US half a century ago. These days, I wouldn’t give the US a second look for a university education or immigration.

            1. ” It’s just that only the very best of them ever made it to America, both because the US was highly selective in terms of admissions, because they were desperate, and because the US was good at attracting the very best.”

              I’ve met Eastern European students in Taiwan, Japan and Korea that would take your breath away. There’s just no getting away from the fact that university education in Eastern Europe is a serious business.

              “the more mediocre it will become and the more unappealing it will be for top-notch, skilled immigrants.”

              I’m not terribly worried about this. It seems morally dubious for a poor nation to educate their talent only to have it poached away from them by a wealthy nation that is incapable of educating their own.

              1. I’ve met Eastern European students in Taiwan, Japan and Korea that would take your breath away. There’s just no getting away from the fact that university education in Eastern Europe is a serious business.

                So you seriously believe that university education in Eastern Europe is so great that it produces students that “take your breath away” at an exceptionally high rate, but somehow those students choose to come to inferior US universities. Why would that be?

                Sorry to disappoint you; those universities don’t have any magic for turning mediocre and untalented students into top notch scientists and engineers. When you see those students abroad, you’re simply seeing a biased sample of the top 1% of students from those countries, the ones with the talent, skills, and drive to make it out.

                I’m not terribly worried about this. It seems morally dubious for a poor nation to educate their talent only to have it poached away from them by a wealthy nation that is incapable of educating their own.

                So you are agreeing with me that the premise of the article is wrong; immigration is not going to help the US to “beat China” because the US is increasingly unattractive to foreign workers. You simply don’t care.

                1. “Why would that be?”

                  Foreign study is an adventure that young, gifted students are in a position to explore. People are particularly curious to experience life in America, which Hollywood has made so attractive.

                  “When you see those students abroad, you’re simply seeing a biased sample of the top 1% of students from those countries, the ones with the talent, skills, and drive to make it out.”

                  I’ve seen many students abroad. from many countries, including the USA. I’ve been most impressed by Eastern Europeans (including Russians).

                  “So you are agreeing with me that the premise of the article is wrong; immigration is not going to help the US to “beat China” because the US is increasingly unattractive to foreign workers.”

                  I don’t care whether or not the US is increasingly unattractive to foreign workers. Foreign workers will find other countries or they will stay home. America isn’t going to beat China because it has lost the ability (or desire) to educate its own young.

                  1. Foreign study is an adventure that young, gifted students are in a position to explore. People are particularly curious to experience life in America, which Hollywood has made so attractive.

                    As someone who immigrated to the US, let me tell you: intellectual elites don’t come to the US because of Hollywood or to “seek adventure”. We weigh the costs, risks, and benefits of moving to the US carefully.

                    America isn’t going to beat China because it has lost the ability (or desire) to educate its own young.

                    Yes, America has lost that ability because of Americans like you, Americans who favor mass immigration of low skill workers and who embrace multiculturalism. But it isn’t inevitable that people like you will succeed at destroying America.

                    1. ” intellectual elites don’t come to the US because of Hollywood or to “seek adventure””

                      I’m talking about students. Who by definition aren’t elites. Students are typically young, curious and open to new adventures and experiences. Foreign study is one way to satisfy these entirely natural and healthy urges.

                      “But it isn’t inevitable that people like you will succeed at destroying America.”

                      If America has already lost this ability, then it’s too late. People like me have already succeeded in destroying America and we should be thinking about moving on and destroying some other country. Any suggestions?

                    2. I’m talking about students. Who by definition aren’t elites.

                      You think the top three graduates of an Eastern European country are not an elite? You think that when they come to the US to enroll in graduate-level courses their freshman year, they do that because they are attracted by Hollywood celebrities? Seriously?

                      Top students do what they always have done: they look for top professors, cutting edge research programs, and the best facilities to let them pursue their interests. Hollywood and lifestyle has nothing to do with it. They’d study in Siberia (or even Urbana Champaign) if that is the best place to go.

                      People like me have already succeeded in destroying America and we should be thinking about moving on and destroying some other country. Any suggestions?

                      I’d suggest you spread your ideas of “success and prosperity through open borders” to China, but China is too xenophobic and racist to pay much attention to you. They are focused on winning instead.

                      If America has already lost this ability, then it’s too late.

                      The UK left the EU to regain control over immigration and economic policy, and it looks like they are on the path to recovery. France and Germany have both started to reject multiculturalism and mass immigration as well because they recognized it’s not working, and they are getting increasingly serious about enforcing cultural assimilation, linguistic competence, and ending ghettoization.

                      The US still has a large number of smart and productive people. If you stop mass immigration and end progressive politics and multiculturalism, the US can recover. It will take decades to assimilate and educate the glut of low skill workers the US foolishly admitted, but it is possible.

                    3. “You think the top three graduates of an Eastern European country are not an elite?”

                      If they are students, they are still learning the ropes. Maybe their teachers are elite. Students, no.

                      “Top students do what they always have done: they look for top professors, cutting edge research programs, and the best facilities to let them pursue their interests.”

                      I’m talking about students. Most don’t care about who their professors are, they want to get through their study with minimum fuss. Top students typically want more out of life than a job writing code.

                      “If you stop mass immigration and end progressive politics and multiculturalism, the US can recover. ”

                      Socialism is the next big thing, and monoculturalism is a dead end. But fear not. If the US is destroyed, migrants will simply find another country. The world is a big place.

                    4. I’m talking about students. Most don’t care about who their professors are, they want to get through their study with minimum fuss.

                      Indeed, most students don’t care. The top ones do.

                      But fear not. If the US is destroyed, migrants will simply find another country. The world is a big place.

                      The default state for societies is authoritarian and illiberal. A few nations in the West have managed to escape that default state over the last few centuries. If they revert, there is no place to go.

                      Socialism is the next big thing, and monoculturalism is a dead end.

                      There is no multiculturalism under socialism. Socialism demands strict conformity to state-imposed cultural norms.

        2. My boss complained about the foreign contract programmers regularly. He thought the Indian coders never took the initiative to do things on their own and had to be prodded through every step. The Chinese programmers were good but pretty obstinate about making any changes that were suggested. One was so bad they referred to him as Dr. No.

          1. I had a friend whose carpel tunnel grew so bad that a second programmer, from Serbia of all places, had to be hired to literally lend a helping hand.

        3. It’s lowering of standards to make not as good students feel better about themselves. You know the Museum of Science and Industry is pushing STEAM? It’s hilarious. While creative thinking is key to engineering, art is creativity without boundaries. STEM still has hard boundaries that must be worked within.

          1. STEAM is an abomination. I earned my PhD in Organic Chemistry, an actual STEM profession. Great art of any genre is fine, but it doesn’t get us to the moon. It doesn’t cure cancer. Why not add philosophy and call it STEAMP? PSTEAM? Or how about business? STEAMB! Please feel free to add your own to further dilute the field.

            1. STEAMING PILE OF CRAP!

              STEM is a fraud to get School kids to buy tech toys from China.

              Free coronavirus with each purchase! Spread it to your friends!

          2. “art is creativity without boundaries”

            There’s only so much you can do with paint and canvas. These are boundaries. Physical limitations. Great art is said to ‘push the boundaries.’ The idea that boundaries in art don’t exist is muddle headed.

            1. art is creativity that produces nothing useful.

              1. It can get you laid though.

      2. @mtrueman – I’ll be waiting for you to cite your source of this information. Something tells me that I shouldn’t hold my breath for it.

        1. ” I’ll be waiting for you to cite your source of this information.”

          Crying won’t help, praying won’t do you no good.

          1. The I.Q. of the readership of this site is abysmal.

            1. Even worse. It’s average.

        2. @mtrueman is correct that US-born university graduates are not very good. But that’s largely because too many people go to university in the US in the first place.

          Where @mtrueman is wrong is in the belief that the US can fix this by importing foreign students. As a smart foreign student, what motivation would I have to go to a mediocre US university that produces mediocre graduates, in particular given the sorry state of the US economy and US society?

          1. “Where @mtrueman is wrong is in the belief that the US can fix this by importing foreign students. ”

            I really don’t give a damn whether or not US ‘imports foreign students.’ And I am completely against the idea of ‘beating china.’ I have a valuable ceramic plate from the Ming era with a charming scorpion design. Beating it is the last thing on my ming.

            I favor open borders. Migration has always been our solution to escaping poverty and oppression. America is a perfect example. Puritans escaping religious persecution, Irish escaping famine. etc.

            1. I favor open borders. Migration has always been our solution to escaping poverty and oppression.

              Yeah, that’s what an ignorant, entitled American would think.

              And I am completely against the idea of ‘beating china.’

              Well, at least you are showing your true colors. Having experienced socialism first hand, I do not want it to dominate the globe. Chinese communism is even worse, because Chinese culture is deeply totalitarian, racist and xenophobic.

              You have to be either profoundly ignorant or profoundly masochistic to be looking forward to the life of an oppressed ethnic group in a Chinese world empire, and if the US drops the ball, that’s where the world is heading.

              1. China is a country. china is ceramics. Big C little c.

                1. I’m sorry, based on your past postings, I assumed you were a bad speller rather than making a feeble attempt at being clever.

                  1. I urge you to revisit my past postings with an eye to feeble attempts at being clever. My spelling is impeccable. I long ago mastered that whole they’re there their business,

              2. “and if the US drops the ball, that’s where the world is heading.”

                There’s a billion Indians who might not be willing to give up so easily.

                1. India is a troubled country and incapable of standing up to China. And even if they could stand up to China, Indian culture and politics is little more desirable than China’s.

                  The West needs to stand up for itself again or it will be wiped off the face of the earth, and with it, any semblance of individual liberty, human rights, free markets, and self-determination.

                  But, again, we have already established that you just don’t care.

                  1. “India is a troubled country and incapable of standing up to China.”

                    They’ve both been around for over 5000 years. I don’t see either of them being wiped off the face of the earth.

                    “The West needs to stand up for itself again or it will be wiped off the face of the earth, and with it, any semblance of individual liberty, human rights, free markets, and self-determination.”

                    Back in the 1980s people were wringing their hands over Japan destroying western civilization. Meanwhile, there was a book published in Korea not so long ago predicting Korea would soon be the world’s most powerful nation. You have to admire the confidence and openness to the future of these East Asian upstarts. American’s self loathing and or arrogance is no substitute.

                    1. I don’t see either of them being wiped off the face of the earth.

                      Neither do I. The question is: which culture and values will dominate the world over the next few centuries. And the two options are classical liberal Western values or totalitarian Chinese values.

                      Back in the 1980s people were wringing their hands over Japan destroying western civilization.

                      Yes, and to anybody with half a brain, those predictions were obvious nonsense. The vast majority of predictions you read about in the media are sensationalized and wrong, aimed at gullible audiences. That doesn’t mean that there are no geopolitical threats or that one can’t analyze them at all.

                      You have to admire the confidence and openness to the future of these East Asian upstarts.

                      The Soviet Union, Imperial Japan, and Nazi Germany were confident, open, rapidly modernizing upstarts as well. They were also totalitarian, racist, and xenophobic. China is carrying on that tradition. And, true to form, many Americans sympathize.

                      American’s self loathing and or arrogance is no substitute.

                      I agree. Which is why Americans would do well to reject your world view, which is based on self loathing and arrogance.

                    2. India is a troubled country and incapable of standing up to China.

                      They’ve both been around for over 5000 years.

                      Neither country has been around for 5000 years. Both countries, for political reasons, are trying to create a myth of millennia of continuous history as a way of trying to justify the existence of a massive centralized, authoritarian nation state. You saw the same thing happening in Japan and Nazi Germany. That sort of thing impresses gullible progressives to no end, but it has no basis in reality. And if you applied the same sloppy standards to Western civilization, you would have to conclude that it is far older than either.

                    3. “Neither country has been around for 5000 years.”

                      When, during the past 5000 years, did China and India not exist?

                      As far as the next few centuries are concerned, democracy and liberal values have failed, and Chinese authoritarianism has little appeal, even to the Chinese. Today’s young people will probably have a better handle on what the future holds. They don’t feel the attraction of either of your two options.

                    4. When, during the past 5000 years, did [the countries of] China and India not exist?

                      I suggest you pick up some history books to answer that question for yourself.

                      Today’s young people will probably have a better handle on what the future holds. They don’t feel the attraction of either of your two options.

                      Yup, again, that’s pretty much the progressive belief system and the belief system that gave us FDR and European fascism. We’ve been down this road before.

                    5. “We’ve been down this road before.”

                      One thing I share with the youth of today is their optimism. They simply don’t believe that the future comes down to a choice between 19th century capitalism and 20th century fascism, as you evidently do.

                    6. One thing I share with the youth of today is their optimism. They simply don’t believe that the future comes down to a choice between 19th century capitalism and 20th century fascism, as you evidently do.

                      The youth you speak of is, in fact, simply choosing 20th century fascism/socialism. And just like a century ago, they think it’s something brand new that has never been tried. I’m not surprised that you “share their optimism”.

                    7. Fascism/socialism is always a movement by optimistic youth.

                    8. Again, I urge you to listen to today’s youth. They do not see their future as a choice between 19th century capitalism and 20th century fascism. They are looking to the future while you can’t seem to get over the past. I like the past too. Even further back than the past couple of centuries: the diggers and the true levelers, and others besides. But nobody is going to revive them. Nobody is going to revive the examples from the past couple of centuries that are central to your thinking. Get over it.

                      Also many of the problems with software and programming could be ironed out with more effective communication. We all admire the mathematical skills of a Rainman (Dustin Hoffman 1988) but nobody is going to hire him because of his abysmal lack of communication skills.

                    9. Again, I urge you to listen to today’s youth. They do not see their future as a choice between 19th century capitalism and 20th century fascism.

                      Do you think that the 20th century youth who supported fascism and communism saw what happened in the 20th century as their future? Of course not. Today’s youth is stupid in the same way as yesterday’s youth, and youth of 2000 years ago.

                      They are looking to the future while you can’t seem to get over the past. I like the past too.

                      I don’t like the past. My family repeatedly lost everything in Europe due to religious wars, fascism, and socialism. I don’t want America to repeat the mistakes that Europe, Japan, Russia, or China have made.

                      Nobody is going to revive the examples from the past couple of centuries that are central to your thinking. Get over it.

                      You and your favorite youth are doing it right before our very eyes. And you are so ignorant of history that you are completely oblivious to it.

                    10. Also many of the problems with software and programming could be ironed out with more effective communication.

                      In a software industry filled with hundreds of thousands of people like you, the equivalent of short order cooks for software, that is no doubt true.

                      We all admire the mathematical skills of a Rainman (Dustin Hoffman 1988) but nobody is going to hire him because of his abysmal lack of communication skills.

                      The smartest programmers don’t “get hired”, they create startups in some high value niche market and make tons of money. Ordinary programmers don’t play in the same league. And it’s no surprise you would find it difficult to communicate with them.

                    11. “Today’s youth is stupid in the same way as yesterday’s youth, and youth of 2000 years ago.”

                      Sure, but youth also tends to be more optimistic, less cynical, more courageous, more capable of sustained effort. There are many positives about youth which you seem determined to ignore. You also have nothing good to say about computer programmers who are not math wizzes. Such negative, bitter attitudes. Youth will ultimately determine our future. And our future does not come down to a choice between 20th century fascism and 19th century capitalism, as you evidently believe it does. The world offers us a wealth of choices. There are over 500 brands of breakfast food on the market. The idea that our future comes down to a choice between two options, both proven failures, is just cheap jack cynicism.

                    12. Sure, but youth also tends to be more optimistic, less cynical, more courageous, more capable of sustained effort. There are many positives about youth which you seem determined to ignore.

                      There are lots of positive things about the young in every generation, even this one. But they have been indoctrinated in leftist ideology are are making bad choices about the future of this country.

                      You also have nothing good to say about computer programmers who are not math wizzes.

                      Yes, in the same way that I have “nothing good to say” about myself as a basketball player. If you graduate 100000 computer science students per year, they are simply not going to be very good on average.

                      And our future does not come down to a choice between 20th century fascism and 19th century capitalism, as you evidently believe it does. The world offers us a wealth of choices.

                      That may be, but today’s youth are, in fact, choosing 20th century fascism/socialism.

                    13. “That may be, but today’s youth are, in fact, choosing 20th century fascism/socialism.”

                      Well which is it? You don’t even know the difference apparently.

                    14. That may be, but today’s youth are, in fact, choosing 20th century fascism/socialism.”

                      Well which is it? You don’t even know the difference apparently.

                      We’re talking about a group of people. Many are choosing fascism, many others are choosing socialism. That wasn’t too hard, was it?

            2. Without borders we would be subject to all the good and bad the World has to offer. Including more terrorism (the 911 hijackers were here on student visas). Dangerous, illicit drugs. Gang warfare.

              Borders can never be entirely open. The closest thing we have is the U.S. Constitution, which is Federally enforced. And even then, a lot of commerce is still regulated (example alcohol, marijuana, produce).

              So if you favor open borders you are not talking realistically, you are talking idealistically. Let’s please only consider the real situation between the U.S. and other countries. I can’t just walk into any country and get a job. I can’t buy property in many countries (India, Mexico and China for example). In many countries I can’t immigrate there, because I am not of local genetic descent. Which is absolutely racist and bigoted.

              The U.S. can no longer cower at racist and bigoted laws that are present in other countries. The world is just too small now. And you actually can’t run from the dictator (ask Kim Jon Un’s brother, if he were alive an not assassinated by Kim, while in a Malaysian airport).

              Because of open borders, the U.S. literally had to fight 2 wars on the other side of the planet. That cost the U.S. thousand of lives, hundreds of thousands of injuries, and tens of trillions of dollars.

              Sorry, but you are not paying attention to history. Border and immigration must be closely regulated, for the health, safety and peace of everyone.

              1. “Let’s please only consider the real situation between the U.S. and other countries. ”

                The world is a lot bigger and older than the US. You’ve blinkered yourself from the start if you believe that. I’ve said it before, migration has always been our most effective solution to escape poverty and oppression. Your dog in the manger attitude is crass and uncharitable.

                “I can’t just walk into any country and get a job.”

                You’d be surprised at what you can accomplish with a little smarts, gumption and determination. From the sound of it you lack all three so I’m not surprised at your inability to find work.

                1. Hardly, it’s called reality, deal with it.

                  Study some history and proceed with a prepared mind and body.

                  Fantasy notions that we can have open borders will lead to continuing wars, be they trade wars or real one.

                  1. “Hardly, it’s called reality, deal with it.”

                    Billions do. And with a lot more humility than you are showing us here. You think you are owed a living based on an accident of birth? Hardly, it’s called reality, deal with it.

                    1. Oh you think I am anti-immigrant. So far from the truth.

                      Right now half the H-1b visas go to Offshore Outsourcing companies, that do not sponsor anyone for a Green Card. Anyone who refuses to think, but wants to keep the current idiotic random chance lottery (where the Offshore Outsourcing companies win more than half the H-1b visas). Is in fact the worst kind of anti-immigrant.

                      The completely ignorant kind.

                      The kinds of changes that I propose and advocate for will create more U.S. citizens from immigrants. The idiocy that currently exists is in fact a case net effect anti-immigrant programs, that are anti-immigrant because no cares to actually take a look at what is really happening.

                      Further, the United States should use its right to enact reciprocal tariffs, to get other countries to trade fairly. And if they never do trade fairly, we should not allow a mercantile situation to develop between ourselves and the other country. As we did with China, when the U.S. failed to be able produce the necessary PPE during the early stages of the Covid pandemic.

                      And we should vet everyone we can who moves across our borders. If we had done that in the year before 911, thousands of American lives would have been saved, thousands more wouldn’t be horribly maimed. Yes, we gave more than we got, but that was because we were the wrong kind of police men, and we had no choice because of the idiocy of people who believe we can even think about having an open border.

                      Too bad if you think I have an attitude, that doesn’t cover up for your appalling ignorance. That attitude saves lives, your attitude endangers everyone. Your kind of attitude is the kind of ignorance that causes a whole country full of people to walk backward without even realizing it, to resign their responsibility, without a thought in their heads.

                    2. Your comments led me to believe that you are another resentful bigot who thinks he’s owed a living on the basis of his place of birth. And someone who tells us it’s impossible to work in a foreign country but hasn’t got the courage or resourcefulness to have attempted to do so. Probably doesn’t have a passport, come to think of it. This board is rife with such bigots.

                      As for the rest of it, tedious public policy prescriptions and half baked boring historical revisionism.

                    3. Way to go with the strawman fallacy. Call me a bigot, then beat up on the imaginery character of your own invention.

                      Fail to understand anything I am saying because of your fake dilusions. Fail further to learn or even raise a question (so that you might learn something) about actual history.

                      And I have worked in other countries. But getting an actual work permit, was practically impossible. In all cases, I had to travel under and work under the clout of a major Japanese corporation which I was working for at the time. Which in asian countries will allow you to work for a few months without an actual work permit (although it is illegal to do so).

                      That being said, hey in Japan it was clearly stated that people of Japanese decent can get work permits. People of non-japanese decent, well se la vi, and sometimes very quickly. Fortunately I never suffered such quick departures (and strange returns after the lawyers fixed it all up, for a few months).

                    4. I’m glad you were able to work in Japan. As I said before you’d be surprised at what humans can accomplish when they put their mind to it. I particularly admire those central Americans who migrate on foot or via the tops of trains overcoming the elements, hunger, thirst, criminal organizations, jack booted government thugs of all stripes. What splendid people they are!

                    5. Then I think we both agree that having 11 million people, in our country, with no path to citizenship is wrong. One thing I try to make clear, in all my posts, is that I abhor any form of disenfranchisement.

                      I don’t believe in letting people in, without vetting. But if we can vet these citizen candidates, then we should. And we should actually enforce our immigration laws, including deportation, but not without a reasonable path to citizenship for those that are not doing anything criminal, want to stay here the rest of their lives, and are loyal to the Constitution.

                      We might still need to close the border from time to time, either because of Pandemic, or even to keep our quality of life, that’s our right and sometimes it is necessary.

    3. H1-B’s are indentured servants. 3 years and you’re back, unless you luck out for renewal and you get another 3 years. If you are really lucky, you might get sponsored for a green card but good luck with that. Corporations rather have the experience level low so labor costs are low.

      1. “Corporations rather have the experience level low so labor costs are low.”

        I assume you mean American corporations. In Japan, for example, low levels of experience in new employees means that the company takes charge in training and inculcating its corporate culture. If costs are low, workers experience more job security.

    4. AWESOME POST. 15 thumbs up!!

  16. I’m not sure it makes sense to tangle an industrial policy bill with immigration video l control updates.

    However, I would like to offer my own proposal: update the per-country limit from 8% to 12%, at least for employment based visas. It is silly that less qualified people from, say, South Korea, have an easier time immigrating here than people from India, just because India is a larger country. With a 12% cap, we would still ensure that immigrants come from a bunch of different backgrounds, but the increase would reduce the number of EB2 slots that go unfilled and are given to EB3 immigrants.

    1. Ah.. auto-correct. Not sure how “video l” got in there.

    2. Switching from an idiotic random chance distribution of H-1b visas to an allocation based upon salary, is the best single change we can make. Right now, Offshore Outsourcing companies take most of the H-1b visas, and they pay the lowest salaries. And to do what?

      Copy business process, for Americans to train their H-1b replacements, as a prelude to moving entire departments, overseas (typically to India).

      If we instead switch to a salary based allocation, many of the redundant H-1b applications, would simply never get filed. Immigration lawyers like the idiotic lottery, they are being very vocal about, in board rooms and in court rooms and in chat rooms. But they don’t have their clients best interest in mind. They simply want to generate for money for themselves as a result of redundant H-1b applications.

      With an idiotic lottery, Silicon Valley companies only have a 1 in 4 chance of winning the H-1b lottery. If you switch to a salary based allocation, those chances would increate to 1 in 2 or better. But the immigration lawyers will never tell their Silicon Valley customers this, because the truth is so precious (in actual $$$) that it must be hidden in shroud of lies.

  17. LMFAO… 15-years ago Europe practically collapsed due to massive immigration. This is one issue Libertarians have no idea what they’re talking about but are just a cult of “right” to trespass lobbyists.

    Who founded the USA again??? No – It wasn’t China!

  18. “LEGAL” Immigration Is the Most Important Way To Beat China

  19. “However, the bill leaves out the most vital element: talented people to produce the innovations.”

    Because, apparently, Reason doesn’t think Americans have any talent in science and technology, as shown by us still riding horses and using whale oil lamps.

  20. Only one person has mentioned how many Chinese graduate students have turned out to be spies.
    There are plenty of Americans who will innovate, especially if we stop the corporate welfare of the H1 visa program.
    This brings in lots of Indian computer programmers who work for lower wages.
    We should stop giving large corporations a ready supply of low cost foreign workers.

    1. One thing is needed to fux this.

      Tort Reform. Caps on personal injury suits.

      An Attorney told me in the 80s that oncecupon a time, it was Product liability suits. Small money.

      Now the Gravy Train is Personal Injury and the awards skyrocketed.

      Made in China avoids that

  21. Maybe they should keep the Best and Brightest to assist Turd World Countries like China in securing VIRUS LABS.

    Chink-a has had a recurring problem with that.

  22. Sure let’s let in as many engineers and scientists from China and India as the tech companies would like. Will help lower labor costs as STEM wages will drop to a point that the best and brightest US-born will choose higher paying careers such as finance or law. I’m sure none of the immigrant engineers or scientists would ever think of stealing IP and bringing it back home to compete against the US.

  23. There is nothing wrong with changing from an idiotic lottery to a salary based allocation of H-1b visas. Doing just that, will exclude the lowest paying H-1b employers, which are the Offshore Outsourcing companies.

    We can carve out an exception for non-profits by simply setting a percentage of H-1b visas available to non-profits, that would represent the number that such organizations would **win** in the idiotic lottery. In that way, the idiotic lottery would still be available to non-profit organizations.

    In fact, by excluding low paying employers from the H-1b system. Many Offshore Outsourcing companies will simply select to not participate in the H-1b lottery, and instead turn to the U.S. Free Labor market. In doing so, actually effectively double the number of H-1b visas available to non-profits and Silicon Valley companies.

    We know from DOJ vs Facebook, that Facebook is finding 30x more qualified local STEM/IT workers than it can hire. That lawsuit was filed after the Presidential election, it wasn’t a political ploy. The case involves discrimination against people of U.S. origin in the U.S. labor market. The DOJ has been routinely settling such cases for 100k per violation. Facebook is accused of 2600+ violations over just a 1.5 year period of the investigation.

    Facebook and the rest of Big Tech can lie all they want to the press and the public, and invent a mythical worker shortage. The reality is Facebook receives hundreds of resumes per STEM/IT job ad. Of those hundreds, Facebook admitted (to Federal investigators) that it finds 30 or more (of those hundreds) are fully qualified and Facebook would hire them, if they actually had the jobs (that Americans are allowed to apply for).

    Big Tech is lying, they find 30x more local STEM/IT workers than they can actually hire. And the evidence is in DOJ vs Facebook at the U.S. DOJ website. Lying to Federal investigators carries a heavy Obstruction of Justice criminal penalty. If you, or anyone you know has information that run counter to the actual information given to the DOJ from Facebook HR employees. Please contact the DOJ immediately.

    So far, no one has filed a counter claim, not even Facebook.

    1. At the very least if employers are claiming they desperately need the H1-B workers and it’s not just a matter of paying low wages then they should set the minimum H1-B salary to something that’s considered decent compensation – say $150K / yr + benefits at an absolute minimum.

  24. I don’t know what the future will be. I think cooperation can achieve a win-win situation and it will be better to introduce talents.
    https://www.orologilusso.eu/rolex-replica

  25. The only immigration reform we need is a 3 generation moratorium on immigration.

    One, we have sufficient home-grown idiots to deal with.
    Two, we don’t have jobs for any of the few immigrants notComebback ng welfare. American jobs only, dig?
    Three, Liquefaction isn’t just a geological term – it also applies to societies, and we’re oversaturated with third world rejects. Go home. Comebback

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