Police

During a Routine Child Services Check, Cops Hog-tied a Mom and Carried Her Out 'Like a Pig Upside Down'

The home wellbeing visit resulted in Vanessa Peoples going to jail with a dislocated shoulder.

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For Vanessa Peoples—a 25-year-old nursing student living with her mom and kids in Aurora, Colorado—July 13, 2017, started out like any other day. But by late morning, police had hauled Peoples out of her home and hog-tied her: wrists handcuffed behind her back and tied to her legs, which were in shackles.

"You know how you tie a pig upside down and his feet are hanging from the stick?" Peoples tells Reason. "That's how they carried me."

Paramedics were called to the scene after Peoples said she couldn't breathe, and they made the cops loosen the chains so they could take her to the hospital. It was there that Peoples learned the cops had dislocated her shoulder. Then they took her to jail.

Her crime? About a month earlier, Peoples' 2-year-old son had wandered away at a family picnic in the park. He was swiftly recovered and completely unharmed—but this common, noncriminal occurrence attracted the attention of the authorities, which eventually led to a confrontation in Peoples' home. What happened was extensively documented by police reports, body cam footage, and interviews with Peoples, her mother Patricia Russell, and Erica Grossman, a civil rights attorney who took Peoples' case against the police.

In June 2017, Peoples and her kids—ages 2 and 4—were at a family gathering with about 15 relatives at a park. As her cousin was leaving, Peoples' younger son followed the cousin toward her car. A passerby saw the seemingly unattended child and grabbed him. Peoples came over and demanded the woman let him go.

"I'm telling her, 'ma'am, that's my son,'" Peoples says. "She's refusing to let go of him and talking on the phone. I didn't know she was talking to the police." 

The cops arrived a few minutes later, but the woman still refused to relinquish the child, according to Peoples. The cops then demanded proof that Peoples was indeed the boy's mother, even though her son was calling her mom and reaching for her, Peoples recalled.

Other relatives came over to support Peoples. Finally, the other woman released the child. The cops left Peoples with a ticket for child neglect and departed.

How long before Peoples noticed her son was missing and went to find him? About a minute, according to Peoples.

Even if the boy had wandered off, this is something that happens to many parents at some point in their lives. In England, a doting mom and dad took their child to a pub and later left in their separate cars. Their daughter came out of the loo and found they were gone. Her mom was not investigated for neglect, nor was her dad: David Cameron, who was prime minister at the time

As a family defense attorney, I've had my fair share of neglect claims just like these that land parents in the middle of a child services investigation. Cooler heads usually prevail and the investigations are closed pretty quickly. Middle-class parents often get the benefit of the doubt. Peoples—a low-income African-American woman—enjoyed no such luck.

Clearly, the authorities weren't too alarmed for the safety of Peoples' kids: It was a month before a caseworker came to conduct a follow-up well-being check. That's when the trouble really started.

The caseworker knocked on the door for a while and received no answer. Peoples had just given the kids their baths, and they were in the basement with her where she was doing some laundry. She hadn't dressed them yet, and when the kids ran upstairs, the caseworker saw one of them naked and leaning out the first floor window.

Concerned the kids might be alone, the caseworker called her supervisor and was told to contact the police. Soon, three cops arrived at the house.

"The front door was unlocked," wrote the police in their report. They announced that they were coming in and then entered the single-family home without either permission or a warrant. They also drew their guns.

"As I was going up the stairs, the sergeant has a gun pointed at my head, saying, 'This is the Aurora Police Department!'" says Peoples.

Unless there is an emergency—imminent danger to the kids—the government must obtain a search warrant to enter a home without the homeowner's consent. Nothing in Peoples' file, however, suggested there was enough evidence for a warrant. And once she came upstairs, startled and unarmed, any immediate concern that perhaps there was no one home with the kids evaporated. The cops didn't need to stick around.

Nevertheless, they asked Peoples why she hadn't answered the door. According to the bodycam footage, she politely replied that she was hard of hearing in one ear. The cops noted this point as a "concern," along with the fact that the children were undressed, the front window's screen was loose, and the door unlocked. They also noted that the family had "little food in the pantry."

At that point, Peoples called her mother, Russell, urging her to hurry home from her nearby doctor's appointment.

According to the bodycam footage, the home visit was nearly completed by the time Russell arrived, angry and demanding that the cops and the caseworkers leave. From there on, things became chaotic as police and caseworkers swarmed back into the house from the front doorway and started issuing orders.

Russell tried to go into a room to fix the children's clothing, attempting to close the door behind her. But the police did not want to leave her alone with the kids, and a struggle began.

"I told her I need to go in the room because she could not be in the room alone with the children," wrote an officer in the report. "She attempted to close the bedroom door on me again. I then pushed past her." The officer took hold of Russell and wrote that she "started to calm down."

Meanwhile, Peoples became upset with what was happening out of her view, shouting, "It's my house, my kids, that's my mom!" over and over again. She disregarded the cops' orders to stay back and attempted to move past an officer and join her mother in the bedroom. The confrontation then turned physical. One officer put his hand on her throat, according to the bodycam footage and the officer's own report. The officers then pushed the 107-pound woman face-first into a bean bag chair to stop her from moving.

Two or three cops pinned her as she began to flail, screaming for her mother. At that point, the cops decided to hobble her. Hobbles are a set of hand and ankle cuffs that can be attached to each other from behind, hog-tying the person. 

"My hands are handcuffed and tied to my feet," Peoples recalls. "My stomach and face were toward the ground. When they were in the process of handcuffing and hog-tying me, they dislocated my shoulder. I was telling them, 'There's something wrong with my arm. I'm in a lot of pain.'"

The cops carried Peoples outside and placed her in the backseat of a police car as she screamed "I can't breathe." At that point, they agreed to call for medical assistance for her, because she was having trouble breathing, suffering from an injured shoulder, and in pain from the restraints. Eventually, the police officers discussed removing the hog-ties, but took her out of the car and placed her on the grass in order to do so. The restraints remained in place until medics arrived.

Inside the house, the inconsolable screams of Peoples' 4-year-old calling for his mother are audible on some of the bodycam footage. A cop is heard repeating, "Mommy's okay," as Russell begged to go out to see for herself, only to be told that her own agitation "is not helping."

Recall that this all began when caseworkers came to the home just to make sure the kids were fine following the incident in the park nearly a month before.

The medics decided to transport Peoples to a hospital where she was given a sling, ice, and ibuprofen. Her good arm, and a leg, were cuffed to the bed "so I couldn't go anywhere," she says. After the examination, she was taken to the police department, booked, and placed in a jail cell. Her mother bailed her out around midnight.

Shortly before the police had hog-tied her, Peoples had managed to call her husband, Tevin Hike, to come help with the kids. He left his electrician's job and got there as quickly as he could. The police stopped Hike outside the home. He started to question the officers about why Peoples had been arrested, apparently "unaware that he was about to suffer the same fate," noted one of the police reports. The cops had found an outstanding warrant for Hike—for missing a court date for a speeding ticket.

As two officers approached Hike to handcuff him, he tried to go into the house. Officers warned him "not to fight," and notified him of the warrant against him. When Hike appeared to the cops to be trying to escape, one of them wrapped his arm around his neck, and pulled him to the ground in front of the house. The police report claimed that he had "resisted with all his might" before being placed in a cop car. On the bodycam video, one of the officers commented that he would be charging Hike with "as much as he can charge." Another officer joked that "maybe we should just take the whole house to jail." 

Several officers pressed the caseworker to take the kids into foster care then and there. But she pushed to allow the kids to stay with Russell, noting "foster care isn't good for kids." As they were leaving, a cop handed Russell her own ticket for obstructing justice. 

By the time Hike and Peoples had been taken from their home, at least seven police officers, as well as two caseworkers and a team of paramedics, had either come into their home or provided backup outside, lining the street with their cars and an ambulance. The sheer number of police and the detailed reports of how they subdued Peoples and Hike read as if it were a raid of El Chapo's headquarters. 

Peoples ultimately took a plea deal, which allowed her to avoid jail time. She had to accept regular visits from a social worker, complete a year of probation, pay a $200 fine, and enroll in parenting classes. She completed all the requirements and was released from probation two months early. But she still has reckless endangerment of a child on her record, which may hurt her ability to get a job when she finishes her nursing program. 

Peoples' case, illustrating the extreme force used in the course of a routine well-being check, is unusual insofar as it is thoroughly and clinically documented by seven different police officers. (Peoples and her attorney never received the social services file, and the primary caseworker could not be reached as she no longer works with the Adams County Social Services Department.) 

That using this type of restraint—a hog-tie—was unremarkable seems apparent from the female supervising officer's matter-of-fact comments: "I checked [Peoples'] hobble and handcuffs. The hobble was put on correctly with a waist chain and leg restrict. Each chain and the leg restraint was hooked with a handcuff. I did notice the waist chain was tight," and did "advise we needed to loosen the waist chain." 

The application of hobbles has been known for at least 20 years to cause significant breathing problems, sometimes resulting in asphyxiation and death. Peoples warned the cops she had asthma, even as they kept her tied up.

What is also unusual about Peoples' story is that she eventually secured legal representation to sue the Aurora Police Department for the injuries she experienced. The threatened suit settled out of court.

I have worked as a child protection system reform lawyer for over 35 years. I founded and led the Chicago-based Family Defense Center from 2005 through 2017, where I represented hundreds of parents accused of inadequately supervising their kids under the law's vague standards of proof and overbroad policies. Indeed, one of my lawsuits led the state to clear over 26,000 parents who had been listed as child neglecters for allegedly creating an "injurious environment" for their kids—a charge so vague and boundless that the Illinois legislature had expressly removed it from Illinois law decades before the child protection agency started to use it as a catch-all. The assumption that parents are "guilty until proven innocent" abounds in the child protection system, along with demands that parents must prove their constant attentiveness to their children or risk losing their kids to the foster care system. 

Such demands—ones that even Britain's Prime Minister couldn't satisfy if pressed—especially impact communities of color. Fully 53 percent of African-American kids will be investigated by child protective services in their lifetime. Countless black parents will be compelled at some point to defend their parenting against an abuse or neglect accusation coming at them from a stranger, professional, or neighbor. It is the stop-and-frisk of black parenthood.

And often, as in Peoples' case, it is not just child services that get involved, but also the police. Both child protection authorities and law enforcement have the power to judge parenting and apply sanctions. Caseworkers often call cops when mothers are reluctant to open their doors. For Peoples, it was the call to police at the park that led to the caseworker's visit, which, in turn, led to the call for police backup.

Often the concerns balloon once the family is put under a microscope. Though she was at Peoples' home only because of the incident in the park, the caseworker soon expressed concern that the child could fall out the window. She pressed this point, insisting Peoples admit she was insufficiently attentive.

Grossman, a civil rights lawyer with the Denver firm of Holland, Holland, Edwards and Grossman, took Peoples' case because of her firm's "visceral reaction" to seeing, on the bodycam footage, "a white man sitting on top of a black woman while tying her up like an animal."

"They were using a level of military force like they're at a huge crime scene instead of a child [well-being] check," Grossman tells Reason. "They did this in front of her two children without a hint of concern about the trauma the children would experience, in the name of making sure their mother was attentive enough." 

The lawsuit that Grossman prepared was settled with the police even before it was filed. Peoples' dislocated shoulder and the hog-tie made a presumptive case of excessive force. 

But most home visits by child protective services leave parents without recourse even when parents feel the authorities have overstepped their bounds. If not for the lawsuit, Peoples' case, too, would have never been exposed.

Dorothy Roberts, a University of Pennsylvania Professor of Law and author of the seminal work, "Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare," has argued against expanding mandatory reporting laws and home-visiting programs. "Even well-meaning recommendations to deploy social workers to conduct 'wellness checks' in homes will likely result in…expanding the state's monitoring and disruption of families," especially African-American families, she writes. 

The vast majority of parents subject to well-being checks are struggling to feed, clothe, and house their families. Poverty is often mistaken for neglect. Well-being checks, like the ones Peoples was required to continue to accept after her arrest, provide no concrete help, instead creating another hurdle parents have to meet in order to be left alone. Social service interventions that actually provide support instead of judgment would help keep families together, rather than tearing them apart.

The government's well-being check on Peoples' children left them with nightmares and a fear that the cops could come, tie up, and take away their parents.

"The cops forgot we were human," says Peoples.

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  1. Sort’a three years too late to be breaking news.

    1. In this thread, White Knight’s new sock “Yes Way, Ted” shits everywhere white knighting

      1. I don’t know who White Knight is. I commented on Reason way back in the late 2000s after I was clicking through channels and saw Ron Paul during the presidential debates. I commented under my own name back then, naively. Haven’t commented on Reason since until a few weeks ago as I was bored. I generally comment on other libertarian sites that are better moderated and use more effective platforms. But my account here is not a sock for any other Reason accounts. You may wish to work on your paranoia, though.

          1. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new…GFd after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

            Here’s what I do…>> CashApp

    2. Just another story story of unconstitutional Municipal Terrorism in America.
      Child Protective Services is a revenue extortion mob of epic proportions. Most of it is privatized, corporate & for profit. Just a few large corporate enterprises, operating deep in the background, run almost all of it nationwide.

      1. “You didn’t build those kids!”

        1. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new…WSa after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

          Here’s what I do…>> Click here

  2. “Cooler heads usually prevail and the investigations are closed pretty quickly. Middle-class parents often get the benefit of the doubt. Peoples—a low-income African-American woman—enjoyed no such luck.

    Clearly, the authorities weren’t too alarmed for the safety of Peoples’ kids: It was a month before a caseworker came to conduct a follow-up well-being check”

    i love when authors refute their own arguments.

    1. “Investigations are closed pretty quickly”

      “it was a month before a caseworker came”

      You’re saying taking a month to do a follow-up is quick?

      1. I think they’re implying that if it took them a month to follow up, and weren’t that concerned, that she was getting the benefit of a doubt.

        If they thought a low income black woman was serious trouble, they would have probably been there the next day.

        Not necessarily agreeing, but that seems to be the implication. It’s also likely that even if they did think she was serious trouble, that given the slow grinding bureaucracy it still would have taken a month. That said, it’s Aurora Colorado. Pretty sure they love their nanny state there.

        1. I’m guessing that they didn’t know she was black until they got to the house.

          1. True. Her name wasn’t Shaniqua; she don’t live here no mo.

            1. Racist much?

              1. Yes Way, Ted racist? He’s implying that the police couldn’t be racist until they got to the house.

                It’s people like you who have worked hard to make sure that “racist” means nothing more than “I don’t like what you’re saying”.

  3. Such demands—ones that even Britain’s Prime Minister couldn’t satisfy if pressed—especially impact communities of color

    Is the author planning to do another article where she supports this assertion?

    1. In the marvelous world of critical race theory evidence is unnecessary.

    2. The author posted a link to a study in the next paragraph. Did you accidentally or intentionally skip it?

      “Results: We estimate that 37.4% of all children experience a child protective services investigation by age 18 years. Consistent with previous literature, we found a higher rate for African American children (53.0%) and the lowest rate for Asians/Pacific Islanders (10.2%). “

      1. Linked it in the next sentence actually.

        1. And it still doesn’t support her claim.

      2. That study doesn’t support her claim.

      3. The author posted a link to a study in the next paragraph. Did you accidentally or intentionally skip it?

        Did you accidentally or intentionally skip over the “supports her claim” part?

    3. She supported it in the tenth paragraph:

      “In England, a doting mom and dad took their child to a pub and later left in their separate cars. Their daughter came out of the loo and found they were gone. Her mom was not investigated for neglect, nor was her dad: David Cameron, who was prime minister at the time.”

  4. All this because a suburban white woman pulled a Karen and called the cops for nothing. Stay out of it, Karen!

    1. Are you talking about the woman who snatched the kid up in the park? What makes you think that woman was white? Not that it couldn’t happen, but a white Karen snatching up a black kid and telling the kid’s Mom that she’s not giving it back is incongruous with my concept of most Karens. Maybe a rich, upper class white Karen would claim to know better what to do with the child, but, IMO, such a Karen wouldn’t be caught dead strolling through a public park snatching up black kids.

      1. “What makes you think that woman was white?”

        Because she called the cops. White woman are far more likely to call the police than black women.

        1. OK, now that you’ve said that lie out loud, now regail me with a factoid about how white women are more likely to snatch up black kids and tell black mothers they aren’t their kids than black women are.

        2. Ok cool you’re a racist.

          1. I can’t wait for him to explain to us how Jacob Blake’s shooting was a white woman’s fault.

          2. Yep, I’m a racist. Against the humans. You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy.

        3. The mother should have complained to the cops there and then about the woman grabbing and holding her kid, and demanded that the woman be charged with kidnapping. That might at least have given her some bargaining power. Then an agreement might be reached to drop all charges against both women.

          1. Darn, I wrote the same half an hour later without reading the comment thread first.

        4. Especially if their name is Karen

          1. Whites women who call cops that is

          2. She was Karen about the welfare of the child.

      2. Maybe Karen thought the kid “looked white”.

      3. Or, like any good Karen, she was going to make a point and get the “offender” in trouble.

    2. I never got the impression that Karen had to be white. That she tended towards whiteness because black moms don’t worry as much about how racist starbucks is and/or worry more about their kids being shot, sure. But the idea that a black woman couldn’t be obnoxiously overprotective of property or concerned with business that wasn’t hers is stupid.

      There have always been black Karens.

      1. Indeed. The “Karen Impulse” is universal among humans — and focusing on the white and female types of Karen waters down the problem the idea represents.

  5. “The cops forgot we were human,” says Peoples.

    No, honey, they didn’t forget. They don’t consider you to be human. Do you think you were treated special? You weren’t, this is how they treat people all the goddamn time. CPS is the worst of the worst as far as being sadistic fucks who will not abide any disrespect of their authoritah.

    1. In their defense, they are usually the same people who show up with bolt cutters to unchain kids from radiators when someone calls the cops because mom and dad passed out on the front lawn from a heroin bender. A few kids like that, a couple more “I have no idea how my 3 yr. old got meth into his system. Must be the Halloween candy!” and my soul would be pretty black too.

      1. Yeah, that fucking happens at least twice a day in Aurora.

        Cops’ souls being black is a recruiting requirement, *not* a consequence of the job.

        1. WTF? That first sentence was supposed to have a sarcasm tag!

          That totally does not happen twice a day in Aurora.

          1. NIBRS says 1400 murders, assaults, sexual assaults, and robberies. That’s 8/day. Assuming an obnoxiously low 1% of those crimes involve nuclear(-ish) families, you’re talking about wading into a situation where a teenage kid ripped off their parents or a dad assaulted a mom and you have to break up a family (or sit back and watch them rob and murder each other to death) every couple weeks.

            I freely admit the recruiting does little to select for the purest of souls, but to act like they should enjoy their work and thank us for every minute that they get to do it is pretty equally stupid.

    2. She was not acting human. Tell me how police moderate a dispute when the principals throw a tantrum. If she’s a mother and a wife, she will co-operate with other peace keepers.

      1. They don’t moderate disputes when their unnecessary presence is what caused the dispute.

        If they had been less caught up in ‘respect nah authority’s and had just left – no disputes, no issues.

  6. Seems outrageous, but I can’t escape the feeling while reading this that there’s other elements to the story we’re not being told.

    1. It’s weird how the story goes that police had their guns drawn but, when the video starts, nobody’s being held at gunpoint. It’s almost like the situation was de-escalating and someone, or a couple of someones, couldn’t allow that to happen.

    2. They were using a level of military force like they’re at a huge crime scene

      I didn’t notice this before. That’s a pretty slanted, contradictory, and ‘inaccurate on its face’ statement.

  7. “How long before Peoples noticed her son was missing and went to find him? About a minute, according to Peoples”

    About 20 minutes then.

    1. So when you brag to your bros that you lasted 20 minutes, it really means you blew your wad in a minute.

      1. No that’s just you.

        1. Only with your mom.

          1. His mom has been dead for a decade. If you have been jumping her bones, then you literally have been jumping her bones.

  8. “The cops arrived a few minutes later, but the woman still refused to relinquish the child, according to Peoples. ”

    Meets the definition of kidnapping; can be stretched to trafficking.

  9. Childishly one-sided accounts deriving from an apparent disdain for well-being checks involving children are likely to be persuasive with very few audiences.

    1. You expect the police and CPS to make a statement?

      1. No that’s just you.

    2. Reverend racist gets a good chuckle out of seeing Black people beaten by police, but still keeps a BLM sign on his lawn for virtue signaling.

      1. I guess it is nice that all of the various strains of disaffected, anti-social, stale-thinking misfits and malcontents can huddle for warmth at this site.

        1. I guess it’s nice you found a place to take a break from viewing kiddie porn

    3. It takes a village….

    4. Rev, here to suck the state’s cock some more.

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  11. Christ what assholes

    1. Yeah, can’t we all just say that CPS is scum and that the race of their particular victim here doesn’t effect that one way or the other? Also, the narc who grabbed the kid when he wandered off, what kind of asshole does this?

      1. Her name is Karen.

        And a Karen’s gotta Karen.

  12. Once again, Aurora, Colorado.

    Aurora–come for the CPS Shit Show, stay for the riots.

  13. In this lengthy article, the author failed to mention that most of these recent cases of harassment/arrest of a parent (for purportedly neglecting/endangering their child/children at a park, playground, sidewalk, car or other location near their home) have occurred in municipalities and states run by so-called progressive Democrats.

    To be fair, conservative Republicans are more likely to advocate arrests and prosecutions of parents (and removal of children) for marijuana or other illegal drug use (claiming their use endangers their children).

    Lenore Skenazi has written extensively about extreme enforcement of these anti family and anti child policies (that are enacted and imposed under the false guise of protecting children).
    https://reason.com/tag/free-range-kids/

    have occurred in deep blue jurisdictions controlled by woke progressive Democrats.

    1. The deep blue jurisdictions probably tend to have more CPS workers and cops, as well as Black residents. There’s significant overlap with democrat governance, police shooting, and swat teams showing up for a child “well-being” visit.

      1. And yet they keep voting blue so they can live on the blue plantation and get free stuff.

  14. A passerby saw the seemingly unattended child and grabbed him. Peoples came over and demanded the woman let him go.

    “I’m telling her, ‘ma’am, that’s my son,'” Peoples says. “She’s refusing to let go of him and talking on the phone. I didn’t know she was talking to the police.”

    The cops arrived a few minutes later, but the woman still refused to relinquish the child, according to Peoples. The cops then demanded proof that Peoples was indeed the boy’s mother, even though her son was calling her mom and reaching for her, Peoples recalled.

    Other relatives came over to support Peoples. Finally, the other woman released the child.

    The unfortunate lesson from this is that the best defense is a good offense, and Peoples should’ve accused this stranger on the spot of kidnapping. And so the sorry wheel keeps turning, where we’re all best off accusing and attacking others before they do the same to us.

    Come to think of it, why wasn’t it kidnapping? I guess because nobody complained that it was. Squeaky wheel, grease.

    1. Come to think of it, why wasn’t it kidnapping? I guess because nobody complained that it was. Squeaky wheel, grease.

      Not to defend the Karen’s actions, but kidnappers don’t usually call the police to report a kidnapping.

  15. “and the detailed reports of how they subdued Peoples and Hike read as if it were a raid of El Chapo’s headquarters. ”

    Are you… are you actually criticizing the police for properly documenting things? I thought that was something we wanted them to do?

    1. No. They’re criticising the police for acting the way they did.

  16. This is the nanny government that Progressives want right up until the point it backfires on them. Helicopter parents with influence keep pushing for helicopter government.

  17. Where to start? I guess with the true instigator.

    Was the passerby in the park arrested for kidnapping? If not, why not? From the article’s description, all elements of that crime were met.

  18. For cops, Aurora’s are even bigger scumbags than most. The department must be as rotten as any big city cop shop.

  19. It was for the safety of the heroes in blue.

    1. Stunningly, the CPS caseworker comes across as less shitty than the cops.

  20. Where in the city do people have to live to get police to pay attention like that, as if the NAZIs have just landed ashore?

    Impress the kids, show them how bad their mother has been, get them to question whether they will find fairness with anyone … drama like this isn’t going on in your part of town because everyone has their social role down, ready to pounce on any sign of irresponsibility or improper behavior, I would guess …

  21. “Peoples tells Reason”

    “Peoples said”

    “interviews with Peoples, her mother Patricia Russell, and Erica Grossman, a civil rights attorney who took Peoples’ case against the police”

    “Peoples says”

    “according to Peoples” (2x)

    “says Peoples”

    “Peoples recalls”

    You could have saved yourself a lot of time and effort by just letting her or her attorney write this piece for you.

    1. Yeah, they should have interviewed someone who was out of town that day.

      1. For instance…?

    2. Note that it appears they didn’t even bother to talk to the police department for comment.

      Because why get the other side of the story when it might get in the way of a good two-minute hate about cops?

      1. Oh, I see…the article is written by a defense attorney who benefits personally from smearing cops. And she works for Lenore Skenazy’s 501(c)3 organization “Let Grow”.

        Odd…this seems to have very little to do with Let Grow’s stated mission of advocating for improving child rearing to raise independent children, and far more to do with political advocacy. It also appears that Reason is now publishing articles that don’t even make a pretense of journalism, but are instead hit pieces tailored to a receptive audience to help the interests of charities run by members of the Reason staff as well as the personal business of their employees.

        That’s interesting.

  22. Quick, Robin, the Lenore Signal!
    A huge (L) pierces the night sky…

  23. I’ve been there.
    In the 80s, my 6 month old daughter was kidnapped by her grandmother.
    CPS got her legal guardianship instead of charges. Also, my kid got to live with her grandfather the serial prepubescent girl molester.
    CPS has nothing whatsoever good coming if they ever bother me again. All out of shits to give.

  24. “And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?… The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt! If…if…We didn’t love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation…. We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward.” ― Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn , The Gulag Archipelago 1918–1956
    “The great masses of men, though theoretically free, are seen to submit supinely to oppression and exploitation of a hundred abhorrent sorts. Have they no means of resistance? Obviously they have. The worst tyrant, even under democratic plutocracy, has but one throat to slit. The moment the majority decided to overthrow him he would be overthrown. But the majority lacks the resolution; it cannot imagine taking the risks.” ~ H. L. Mencken (1926). “Notes on Democracy,” p. 50, Alfred A. Knopf

    1. Put that damned mask on!!

    2. Great quotes, but sadly the politicians who pass these laws in the name of “protecting” kids and their elite supporters are never subject to them.

    3. And the masses who are cannot fight back much against a militarized police force, especially once they have been disarmed

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  26. Another bad mother.

    The police handled themselves properly.

  27. For Vanessa Peoples—a 25-year-old nursing student living with her mom and kids in Aurora, Colorado—July 13, 2017, started out like any other day.

    For the Polish military, out watching the German border, September 1, 1939 started out like any other day…

  28. There’s something annoying about “We need to hear the police side” and “the mother must be doing something wrong” comments.

    When I was a kid, my parents got tangled up with CPS, accused of “neglect”. Eventually, the charges were dropped, but my sister and I were even brought to Court to be witnesses (we weren’t called, thankfully), but I remember laying in bed, trying to sleep, plotting hunger strikes in case I was taken away.

    While there are cases when the CPS and the police are helpful, or even necessary, we need to remember that they can also cause just as much, if not more, damage to families they are called to check on. We should be wary of giving CPS and police power to do “welfare checks” on children, and in particular, avoid giving them extensive powers to take children away and put them in foster care.

    Once the police and the social workers found that the children were fine, they should have left. They shouldn’t have let the situation escalate the way they did.

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