George Mason University President Takes "Immediate Steps … To Advance Systemic and Cultural Anti-Racism" (Updated)

"My vision is nothing short of establishing George Mason University as a national exemplar of anti-racism and inclusive excellence in action."

|The Volokh Conspiracy |

Yesterday, I flagged an email from Gregory Washington, the President of George Mason University. He announced some a high-level program for accreditation titled "Transformative Education through Equity and Justice: Anti- Racist Community Engagement." The email was vague on specifics. In July, Washington sent a follow-up email to the George Mason community with very specific initiatives. (Update: I was forwarded this email today, but it was dated July 23). He explains, "My vision is nothing short of establishing George Mason University as a national exemplar of anti-racism and inclusive excellence in action." Washington explains that anti-racism will be incorporated into Curriculum and Pedagogy, Campus and Community Engagement, University Policies and Practices, and Research Training and Development. I have pasted the entire email below the fold. Here are four high points.

First, the most significant change concerns hiring. The email explains:

Equity Advisors are senior faculty members, appointed as Faculty Assistant to the Dean in their respective schools. Equity Advisors participate in faculty recruiting by approving search committee short lists and strategies and raising awareness of best practices. Additionally, they organize faculty development programs, with both formal and informal mentoring, and address individual issues raised by women and faculty from underrepresented groups.

If I am reading this policy correctly, these equity advisors could have a veto at every stage of the hiring process.

Second, the University will now consider "implicit bias" for tenure decisions.

We will develop specific recommendations for the renewal, promotion, and tenure processes that address implicit bias, discrimination, and other equity issues (e.g., invisible and uncredited labor) to support faculty of color and women in their professional work.

This policy is framed as a way to "support faculty of color and women." But could an applicant's failure to abide by implicit bias justify a denial of tenure? That is, a junior faculty members refused to comply with the implict bias re-education program. Would he be penalized by the University?

Third, the University will "require an anti-racism statement on all syllabi." We should be clear. Anti-racism is not some sort of mundane statement favoring diversity. Nor is it a legal disclosure required by federal law (Title IX or ADA). Anti-racism is a political viewpoint. George Mason is a public institution. This requirement is likely a violation of the First Amendment. Consider an analogy that my colleague Jon Adler has raised elsewhere. In the 1950s, a public institution required faculty members to include anti-communism statements on their syllabi. That would be a 9-0 case at the Supreme Court.

Fourth, the University will consider names of buildings:

We will convene the University Naming Committee to evaluate names of university buildings and memorials to ensure they align with the university's stated mission to serve as an "academic community committed to creating a more just, free, and prosperous world."

Umm, the University is named after a slaveholder. Yesterday, I predicted that George Mason University would simply rebrand itself as GMU University–where the initials do not stand for anything. George Washington University will also rebrand at GW–where the initials do not stand for anything.

Throughout this entire email, Washington does not define "antiracism." Antiracism is not the opposite of racism. I worry about my my alma matter, Scalia Law School. Declaring independence is looking better by the day.

Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2020 8:37 AM
Subject: President Washington Announces Task Force on Anti-Racism and Inclusive Excellence

Hello Fellow Patriots,

In the days that followed the murder of George Floyd, I sent you a message that promised action to address racial inequities that persist here at George Mason University.

As I enter my fourth week as president, I want to share with you the actions we will begin to take, as a community of Patriots.

George Mason University enters this national conversation with an admirable track record as a pace-setter of action for racial justice, and for truth-telling about our own past.

We are proud to draw upon the expertise of

  • The Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center, one of the first of its kind in the nation.
  • The Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, one of the nation's few schools dedicated to social justice and peace, and one of the very best.
  • The Enslaved People of George Mason research and memorial project, the ground-breaking undertaking by our own faculty and students to tell the full truth of our university's namesake so that we may learn and grow from it.
  • And of course, we take pride in hosting Virginia's largest and most diverse university student body, with a majority of our students representing communities of color, and our Black student population in particular recognized as among the nation's top academic performers.

These are just some of the many examples of excellence and inclusion around racial justice that the Mason community has undertaken. They make us proud.

But we have work to do if we are to ensure that every student, faculty, and staff member is welcomed and respected as a full equal in this community of learning.

And the uncomfortable truth is not everyone at Mason feels equal, or is treated equally.

So, today I am creating the President's Task Force on Anti-Racism and Inclusive Excellence, and giving its members some big assignments.

  • We need to know where systems, practices, and traditions of racial bias exist at George Mason University so that we may eradicate them.
  • We must build intentional systems and standards of anti-racism that will keep racial injustices from regenerating.
  • I want George Mason University to emerge from this exercise as a local, regional, and national beacon for the advancement of anti-racism, reconciliation, and healing.

This task force will have a broad focus, with particular areas of emphasis including short-term and long-term improvements to how we approach:

  • Curriculum and Pedagogy
  • Campus and Community Engagement
  • University Policies and Practices
  • Research
  • Training and Development

The task force will comprise many of Mason's luminaries in racial justice, who will be joined by national experts in this topic. Members will be announced over the course of the coming weeks, and they will represent the full diversity of George Mason University, including racial, ethnic, gender, sexual identity, and religious identity.

The recommendations that we act upon will be incorporated into the university's planning and budgeting process to ensure they have the priority and resources to take root and flourish. I am not interested in reports that sit on a shelf, only to collect dust.

Many reforms at Mason will require thoughtful consideration over time by the task force and university leadership. Others are obvious, overdue, and simply require executive leadership.

So, in keeping with my pledge to deliver actions and not just words, I am announcing immediate steps that we are taking to advance systemic and cultural anti-racism at George Mason University.

The many steps that we have identified are available in their entirety on my website, president.gmu.edu. The categories of immediate steps we are taking include:

Policing

In addition to state-mandated anti-racism training for all police personnel, we will convert the existing Community Police Council into a Police Advisory Board that actively monitors the nature of police activity and reports its findings to me.

University Policies­

A number of university policies and practices that carry racist vestiges in their practices will be examined and/or curtailed, including:

  • Faculty salary equity – We will complete and act upon a faculty salary equity review and work with the schools and colleges toward correcting any issues over a three-year period.
  • Inclusive excellence planning – At the college and school level, we will establish Inclusive Excellence Plans that articulate the vision and definition of anti-racism and inclusiveness for that unit. The task force will develop a metric-driven template for units to use.
  • Implicit bias training – Mason will establish an Inclusive Excellence Certificate Program that certifies that the schools and colleges have completed Implicit Bias Training and have established Inclusive Excellence Plans.
  • Implicit bias recognition in faculty promotion and tenure – We will develop specific recommendations for the renewal, promotion, and tenure processes that address implicit bias, discrimination, and other equity issues (e.g., invisible and uncredited labor) to support faculty of color and women in their professional work.
  • Equity Advisors in every academic department – Equity Advisors are senior faculty members, appointed as Faculty Assistant to the Dean in their respective schools. Equity Advisors participate in faculty recruiting by approving search committee short lists and strategies and raising awareness of best practices. Additionally, they organize faculty development programs, with both formal and informal mentoring, and address individual issues raised by women and faculty from underrepresented groups.
  • Recognizing and rewarding adversity barriers in promotion and tenure – We will develop specific mechanisms in the promotion and tenure process that recognize the invisible and uncredited emotional labor that people of color expend to learn, teach, discover, and work on campus. 

Racial Trauma and Healing

  • We will increase the support provided students, faculty, and staff through Mason's Counseling and Psychological Services for students, and Human Resources for faculty and staff.

Curriculum/Pedagogy

  • We will finalize development and implementation of required diversity, inclusion, and well-being coursework.
  • We will require an anti-racism statement on all syllabi.

Buildings and Grounds

  • We will convene the University Naming Committee to evaluate names of university buildings and memorials to ensure they align with the university's stated mission to serve as an "academic community committed to creating a more just, free, and prosperous world."

Community Engagement

  • We will grow our K-12 and community college partnerships by 50 percent, and become a true partner in the development of our region.
  • We will establish a lecture series on anti-racism and inclusive excellence to establish a collective consciousness among the campus community.

Resource Commitments:

  • We will identify associated budget to achieve above immediate actions, beginning with an initial $5 million commitment over three years to strengthen initiatives already underway and to fund critical priorities that need immediate attention.
  • We will identify an Executive Director for the Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center.

Leadership in an anti-racism environment demands that we recognize how our history has shaped our view of the world and how our own actions can reshape it.

My vision is nothing short of establishing George Mason University as a national exemplar of anti-racism and inclusive excellence in action. Given the considerable head start we have on most of our sister institutions in the United States, this is a vision we can realize.

So, Patriots, let's get to work.

Gregory Washington

President

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  1. This is what the faculty wants (including, I would bet, the majority of the law faculty), and they deserve to get it good and hard. If some of them end up like Rubashov, that will only make me laugh.

  2. So he’s is appointing commissars to insure the reliability of all faculty?

    1. Why is the direct and obvious parallels to the early days of totalitarian regimes not obvious? Answer: because those were mass movements, too.

      Trumo is the distraction. The Phantom Menace, if you will.

      “So this is how liberty dies, with thunderous applause.” – Senator Padme

      1. You have the analogy and quote just right.

  3. Another reminder that academic honorifics do not equate to wisdom. Why do Virginia taxpayers tolerate paying such administrators more than their governor or more than any federal officeholder?

    1. I didn’t realize that GMU was public.

      This raises 1st Amd issues, both in terms of speech *and* religion.

      1. Are you afraid a public school might ask students to mouth the words “under God” to flatter superstition, or something?

      2. Against my better judgment, I’ll bite…

        What are the religious freedom issues you perceive here?

        1. I argue that “institutional racism” is a faith-based concept and hence a religion not unlike Christianity. If a public IHE can’t impose Christian values by fiat, how can it impose these.

          Conversely, if my Christian beliefs require me to treat others equally, independent of race, the state requiring me to do otherwise is the same issue as _W VA v. Barnette_.

  4. My favorite was “the invisible and uncredited emotional labor that people of color expend to learn, teach, discover, and work on campus.”

    1. And the parallel to “The Emperor’s New Clothes” is also missed by those screetching how beautiful his sequined emeralds are.

    2. I suppose that is a way to give credit for “life experiences ” and offset privilege.

      1. In a discussion of “life experience”, I like to point out that my right hand is a size larger than my left, and ask how many other people can match that.

        You have to have done considerable manual labor for your dominant hand to be bigger than the other — to have developed the muscles more.

    3. ” “the invisible and uncredited emotional labor that people of color expend to learn, teach, discover, and work on campus.”

      That’s what I mean by religious value.

      That statement is impossible to prove on an evidence-based basis. There is no way to objectively prove that persons of translucence don’t expend similar invisible and uncredited emotion labor.

      This belief must be accepted on the basis of faith — and faith-based beliefs are inherently religious beliefs.

  5. Hmmm…I’m not seeing many “Patriots” here. (Note my capitalization of “Patriots”…his capitalization. I don’t know what it means. Or maybe I do, and it scares me.) Any Fellow Patriots out there who want to declare so?

    1. Patriots is the name of the GMU sports teams & nickname for students. It’s not in relation to the term Patriot/Patriotic. It’s like anyone who goes to Ohio State being refereed to as a Buckeye. Now, how long until GMU drops the Patriot moniker due to supposedly racist connotations?

  6. I feel I am uniquely qualified to be the Executive Director for the Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation Campus Center? Where do I apply?

    1. Be sure your CV shows clearly all the invisible labor you have expended – – – – – –

      1. “Clearly” being the operative word. Very nicely done.

  7. “require an anti-racism statement on all syllabi.”

    I would dearly like to know what this would have to do with, among many others, Math classes.

    1. Shoot. I was writing my own response (below) while you were posting this. Mine should have been nested under your comment..

    2. Math? MATH?!
      why would they continue to teach such racist drivel?

  8. Road to hell is paved . . . etc etc.

    I don’t question the motivations here, and I think opponents of this proposal would be wrongheaded to do so. But, as proposed, this seems unwise, probably illegal, and the wrong path, for all the reasons already mentioned.

    If I were doing standup comedy, it would be easy to do a 5-minute bit on just the required statement on all course syllabi. Imagine the statement for a math class. . .

    “In this introductory math class, racist and intolerant words and symbols will not be used or tolerated. This includes, but is not limited to: , ≠. “Greater than” or “less than” are obviously racist at worst and demeaning at best. And the same for “not equal to.” All of these symbols can be replaced by using =. The jury is still out on the use of ≈ and ~. Students will be informed in writing about these two particular symbols, but I pledge that no one will be expelled or suspended for using these 2 in the interim. After all, I want this classroom to be an open and encouraging environment.”

    The jokes. They write themselves.

    1. Interesting, the ‘greater than’ and ‘less than’ symbols cannot be used…they disappeared from my post when I hit “submit.” Totally ruined the joke, of course.

      [grumble, grumble] 🙁

      1. Those characters are HTML code markers and hence can’t be used for anything else as they will be read as HTML code.

        It’s all ASCII to the computer and those are control characters.

        1. To the computer, it is all just ones and zeros.
          And they are, in fact, equal.

          1. To the computer, it’s all just low and high voltages. Differentially the same, of course.

            1. I thought we still were at *a* voltage or *no* voltage, aren’t you describing an analog signal?

              1. Been a long time since I paid any attention to digital specs, but my memory says anything less than, say, .05V was one signal, anything greater than, say, 3.25V was the other signal, and what it did in between was anybody’s guess.

                I vaguely recall something about no signal ever dropping to truly absent. But all this was a long time ago.

        2. Thanks for the info. It is weird to me that, inside Reason, I can’t successfully use “greater than” and “less than”…which are actually symbols on my common keyboard keys. but CAN use (via cut-and-paste, which I did do) the ‘not equal to’ symbol. What makes that one particular symbol so different to Reason? I guess I should try cutting-and-pasted those other two verboten keystrokes from the same math website I used for not-equal to. I’ll do that here (which will make no sense to anyone, but so what) 🙂

          >
          <

          1. Assuming that it isn’t a pasted graphic, those characters likely don’t correspond to the same ASCII number, likely a hexadecimal.

            For example, old (pre-1950) typewriters lacked the 1, 0, and ! keys — you instead used Oscar, lima, and a combination of ‘ and . for those characters. It worked perfectly fine when a human was reading it, but you can’t substitute 0 and O for a computer, for a long time the former had a slash through it to identify it.

            Remember that a computer doesn’t care — and for a real fun time, you can redefine someone’s keyboard from the standard QWERTY to something else. I’m not going to say how, and it’s probably criminal, but it’s not difficult. The computer doesn’t care.

      2. Testing something out here
        %60 percent 60
        < ampersand pound 60;

        1. HTML coding errors do funky things that often defy explanation — you can find the typo in the source code that is causing it, but as to why it did what it did — it’s worse than unix.

    2. Nice but sometimes I wonder when jokes like that start sounding more like reality than parody.

      Irony: I took Calculus at GMU while stll in high school. It was approaching the level of the two top tier schools in Virginia (UVA, VT). It’s sad it will stop improving with this BS.

    3. The removal of the giant penis monument in DC to a slaveholder is long overdue.
      BTW the name of the city and its district are hurtful micro-agressions that must be stopped.
      Ross Perot described the place well: The source of the giant sucking sound.

  9. “We should be clear. Anti-racism is not some sort of mundane statement favoring diversity. . . . Anti-racism is a political viewpoint. . . . Throughout this entire email, Washington does not define “antiracism.” Antiracism is not the opposite of racism.”

    An editor would have caught that.

    1. Editors cost money; commenters are free.

  10. Is Mr. Washington changing his name too?

    1. Founding fathers need more defense. They had an excellent concept of freedom, that it was inherent in you, and exists prior to government, and is not a gift from the rich or powerful.

      Their error was in who they extended this to. The subsequent 150+ years involved battles to increase this to everyone, who now enjoy its fruits.

      This should not be given short shrift because of furious political goals of the moment.

      1. Nm, don’t look at me

      2. Stop defending the craven founding fuckers; they were hypocrites.

    2. It’s far too late for GWU Pres. Washington to change his name. Same for Denzel Washington, and George Washington Carver and the State of Washingon and the City of Washington. Cancel them all — RACISTS!!!! (I volunteer to serve on the committee to apply these rules.)

  11. I look forward to the president’s forthcoming groveling to atone for his parents culturally appropriating “Gregory” (Gregory Hines is just one of many well-known black people) and for inheriting the family name of a well-known slave-owning white male.

    I wonder what his new name will be. He certainly can’t pick one for himself, as that would just be extending his white privilege. Anti-racism requires sacrifice and admitting mistakes, not propagating them.

    1. Mr. Washington is black.

      1. A lot of freedmen took last names like Washington — for quite patriotic reasons. But that was then….

      2. If blacks can be derided for acting like whites (oreos), the reverse is also true. I suspect a lot of blacks are laughing at this honky trying to grab favor by pretending to be black just because of his skin color.

      3. Pres. Washington is Black? So what? So was Uncle Tom!

  12. Now is the perfect time for reparations…there is literally no downside as the Fed can’t hit its inflation target. The dollars are simply demand for products and services so productive Americans would end up with the reparations payments to descendants of American slaves.

  13. What’s remarkable is that in response to some terrible racial injustices many public and private institutions across the country have reacted – and over-reacted – to those acts. All sorts of “anti-racist” measures were adopted. This is an example of it.
    Yet we continue to hear the claim that America is a institutionally- and structurally-racist nation. How is this so? If we were really institutionally racist then how do you explain all of these reactions? A thoroughly racist nation simply doesn’t respond this way – for good or bad. Is there racism in America. Yes. Are we structurally racist? What’s the evidence? Simply because there are racial disparities in many social statistics?
    When blacks were lynched or mistreated in the South during Jim Crow and little if anything was done in response, then you had evidence, proof, of institutional racism. But those days are thankfully long gone.

  14. “Gregory Washington, the President of George Mason University . . .” Is the asshole going to rebrand himself?

  15. So are they going to limit Blacks on the basketball team to 13% of the roster?

  16. If this foolishness is not checked, and if the Bitchy Little Marxists are permitted to burn & loot with impunity, then sooner or later we actually will see pissed-off White guys — who are *not* “White supremacists” — going into a place like GWU and burning it flat.

    Century-old wooden buildings will burn a whole lot better than steel-framed brick storefronts, and bucolic landscaping will make fire truck access more difficult.

    A note to Kirkland and others, this is a prediction.

    1. Remember those fantasies. They may provide solace as better Americans are stomping your bigoted right-wing aspirations into submission.

      You will continue to comply with the preferences of your betters, clingers. You can whine and moan, stutter and mutter, rant and rail about it as much as you wish . . . so long as you toe the line established by the liberal mainstream.

      I suggest you open even wider, to make swallowing all of this damned progress easier. But we have passed the point at which your comfort is a substantial concern. The culture war has had consequences.

      If this dose of reality bothers you, I suggest you petition the Volokh Conspiracy Board of Censors to have me banned.

      1. “They may provide solace as better Americans are stomping your bigoted right-wing aspirations into submission.”

        Kirkland, you wouldn’t recognize bigotry if it fell on you.

        And the pissed-off majority can (and eventually will) stomp back. Yeats put it best, the middle shall cease to hold.

        1. Yeats put it best, the middle shall cease to hold.

          Not, in fact, how Yeats put it.

        2. The clingers are no longer the majority in America. Our vestigial bigots, disaffected right-wingers, and stale religious fundamentalists are dying off and being relegated to increasingly small, desolate sections of America.

          The liberal-libertarian mainstream is the majority.

          1. Wrong, Kirkland.

            We are a Center-Right country.

            1. You don’t act like you think this.

              Constantly talking about your side resorting to political violence is the tactic of the ideologically frustrated.
              It is not the position of someone who believes their ideology is in the majority.

              1. No more than South African Blacks living under Apartheid.

                1. Noted republic South Africa.

  17. ” Umm, the University is named after a slaveholder. ”

    Ummm . . . what are your thoughts on slaveholders, Prof. Blackman, and what are your thoughts concerning celebrating slaveholders?

    1. Keep it up Kirkland and you’ll wind up with people celebrating slavery.

      Ever read Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address?

      1. “Keep it up Kirkland and you’ll wind up with people celebrating slavery.”

        Not for at least four years. The Republicans didn’t present a platform this year.

  18. If a university really wanted to be anti-racist, it would stop asking about race on admissions forms, and reviewing applications by applicant number rather than name, and would not allow photos to accompany applications.

  19. Just as an fyi (so that y’all can get a taste of the inevitable growth factor of this ed-diversity segment, Mark Perry at his Carpe Diem blog has been following the diversity staff expansion at Univ. of Mich. for some years now. His latest post, dated 28 Aug 2020, notes:
    “When accounting for staff salaries plus benefits, the university’s 93 diversity-dedicated administrators reaped in $11 million total annually”
    https://www.aei.org/carpe-diem/markets-in-everything-the-booming-industry-of-social-justice/

  20. “I worry about my my alma matter, Scalia Law School. Declaring independence is looking better by the day.”

    Secession — or attempted secession — by people objecting to the liberal mainstream’s treatment of racial issues has a record in the United States. Also instructive are the results of successive waves of old-timey intolerance and ignorance, often precipitated by immigration, skin color, religion, ethnicity, or perceived economic pressures.

    Spoiler: The side with the bigots doesn’t win in America. Not over time. Ask the Irish, the Jews, the Asians, the Catholics, the gays, the women, the Italians, the agnostics, the eastern Europeans, the Muslims, the Hispanics, the atheists, the other Asians, the other Hispanics.

    Our current batch of bigots seems nothing special to me.

    1. Who here are the current batch of bigots? Who, exactly? I don’t see anyone here hating on groups of people as you do.

      I don’t see anyone here expressing an antipathy to a group of color as you do toward persons of “pallor”, (if indeed not a soul here at this libertarian website happens to be darker hued), who don’t hue to your vision of totalitarian technocracy. What in hell are you to do about those people of color elsewhere who love individual liberty and conscience? Are you going to call them bigots and try to re-educate them into voting “their interests” or will you simply threaten to force your, um, progress down their throats, as you do here every other vile post?

      How is invoking the utter ruination of whom you pathologically deem “enemies” a matter of reason, justice, and social equanimity you claim to seek? Why do you call yourself and like-minded believers the “betters” of anyone here whose ideas don’t comport with yours? And, why is mouth rape one of your favorite rhetorical images of violation and submission?

  21. “Implicit bias” is anti-science bullshit, no different than phrenology.

    And people that support “implicit bias” in training, testing, or anywhere else should be treated no differently than the ones that were obsessed with skull molesting.

    1. Some of our vestigial bigots will go down kicking and screaming . . . but they will go down.

      1. And you are the worst of the vestigial bigots.

  22. I suppose the thing to do is pin down the precise meaning of “anti-racism.” If it means opposing actual, no-kidding racism, it would be a good thing, right?

    Allow me to voice the suspicion, however, that it’s an Orwellian term like “Ministry of Love.” Who could be against Love? Who could be against anti-racism?

    1. Anti-racism IS racism.

  23. Please note: As a group, liberty lovers aren’t bigots, just as socialist Progs aren’t pedophiles. The implicit conflation here by some is simple slander in service to an agenda of punitive control. The issue here for many is whether the colorblind exercise of individual outlooks, opportunities, and conscience will go forward in government and various institutions or be snuffed by the perennially enraged hate-mongers and control freaks.

    There are many people of color in this country and others of any color, gender, and orientation who have experienced discrimination of various kinds who also don’t like being told what to think or how to behave by commissars. The new prude punishing Puritans may act as if they’re re-engineering society for the collective good, but they’re intent upon suffocating the human spirit and individual expression.

    Under the new regime, nobody will be able to breathe easily or be heard while uttering an original and unapproved thought.

  24. “The Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, one of the nation’s few schools dedicated to social justice and peace, and one of the very best.”
    Translated: “We’re one of the 2 schools and we’re in the top 5!”

    1. It seems that boasting of your superiority is the way to *aggravate* conflict, not heal it.

      /sarc

      1. “But, Your Honor, he said his peacemakers were better and my peacemakers weren’t worth shit. With provocation like that, of course I slapped him!”

  25. Yes, David Bernstein must really be suffering, working at a notoriously lefty university like GMU.

  26. I guess now that the Soviet Union has fallen, someone has to take their place.

  27. I see too seperste issues.

    The first is that the university is choosing to prioritize certain other considerations over “academic excellence.” That is, under current law, its right. Just as a university doesn’t have to pick the student with the highest test scores, it doesnmt have ro pick the professor who publishes the most articles or in the journals with the highest impact factors.

    The loyalty pledge and similar issues are a different matter. I suspect they would be fairly easily struck down.

    At bottom, under current law, government is entitled to teach a viewpoint. And that means that it gets to select faculty who support that viewpoint.

    Academic freedom as characterized in Sweeney v. New Hampshire is at bottom a right of schools to determine who may teach, what may be taught, etc. It is not a right of individual faculty members to teach whatever they want.

    This means that people on the losing end of changes in intellectual fashions can get shafted. It’s just the way it is.

  28. Does anyone know which public college or university during the 1950s “required faculty members to include anti-communism statements on their syllabi”? I haven’t been able to find Jon Adler’s analogy through Google.

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