Culture War

Let's Have Fewer Public Statues

Those smitten by John Wayne, Robert E. Lee, or even Joseph Stalin should commission statues on their own property. The rest of us have more important issues to debate.

|

If you think America's statue battles are at a fever pitch, then consider the battles that Europeans have waged over statues following the demise of the totalitarian Soviet regime.

During the 1956 Hungarian Uprising, a group of students destroyed Budapest's monument to Joseph Stalin. Soviet forces quashed the revolution, but eventually the post-communist government erected a statue to Imre Nagy, who was a hero of the uprising. That wasn't the end of the story. In 2017, Hungary's president replaced the statue with one more in line with his pro-Russian sympathies.

Controversies over symbols never end. Sadly, the United States now finds itself in the midst of a statue-toppling, flag-revising frenzy. Because history is, as they say, written by the winners, the latest scuffles center on whose version of history will prevail. I'm not impressed by any marble likeness and have no interest in culture wars, but many Americans seem intent on fighting over these chiseled shrines.

In San Francisco, a large group of protesters recently destroyed the statues of Ulysses S. Grant, Junipero Serra, and Francis Scott Key that had previously sat uneventfully in Golden Gate Park. In Portland, Oregon, protesters toppled a statue of George Washington and painted it with the words "genocidal colonist."

This is the latest handiwork from America's newest iconoclasts, many of whom view the American experiment as rotten to its core. If they focused their attention instead on, say, opposing the nation's drug war or other current injustices, the world might become a better place. But that takes hard work and is less fun than destroying things.

There are many reasons to chip away at Grant's legacy, given his role in the Indian wars and his administration's myriad corruption scandals, but he led the armies that smashed the slave-defending Confederacy. Grant declared martial law to destroy the Ku Klux Klan. That makes his statue an odd target for activists who are dedicated to ridding the nation of racism. Well, at least more people are paying attention to history.

Key owned slaves, and was mocked by abolitionists for hypocrisy after he wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner." Isn't it more interesting to wrestle with that inconsistency than banish the national anthem's lyricist from the public square? Washington was the flawed founder of an imperfect nation—one that has done more to promote freedom and equality than any other nation.

Serra, canonized by Pope Francis in 2015, created California's mission system. The attacks on his image have less to do with his personal behavior and more to do with what that system represented. "Father Serra represents the invasion of California and the taking of native lands," a UC Riverside professor told the Riverside Press-Enterprise. The statue was a touchstone for that debate, which will be less likely to take place after we sanitize our parks and historical sites.

The Confederate statue issue is more understandable. Governments should remove these relics from public places. Southerners mostly installed them during the Jim Crow era and in the midst of the Civil Rights movement to make a retrograde political point. It took 130 years, but Mississippi officials finally seem poised to remove a slave-holding movement's emblem from the flag of a state where 38 percent of its residents' ancestors were slaves.

There's a marked difference, however, between removing the statue of a Confederate general and demolishing the images of key historical figures simply because of troubling things they've done or because their century-old attitudes don't conform to our current sensibilities.

Every noteworthy human being has done something controversial or awful. One prominent left-wing activist has even called for the removal of statues of Jesus because their Eurocentric depiction is a form of "white supremacy." That would apparently leave no one worthy of such acclaim, which actually might be a welcome development.

People have an unfathomable need to venerate statues and fly flags, so it probably won't be long before the broken marble corpses of Grant, Serra, and Washington will be replaced with gleaming new ones honoring other tainted humans—and their legacies will be questioned (or demolished) decades from now. The debate is getting tiresome.

Two professors recently called for renaming Orange County's "John Wayne" airport because of offensive comments the actor made. Supervisors named the airport after him in 1979 because he epitomized a certain traditional-values Republicanism that seems almost quaint in the modern OC. I agree with just calling it Orange County Airport, simply to make it easier for travelers to know where they're heading, but couldn't care less about the fate of Wayne's terminal statue.

Frankly, I prefer fewer statues, flags, and debates about overpriced public artwork. How many people even looked closely at these edifices before the recent controversy? Those smitten by John Wayne, Robert E. Lee, or even Joseph Stalin should commission statues on their own property. The rest of us have more important issues to debate.

This column was first published in the Orange County Register.

Advertisement

NEXT: Arizona Gyms Reject Governor Doug Ducey's Shutdown Order

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Controversies over symbols never end.

    “Perception is reality.”

    1. I getting Paid upto $18953 in the week, working on-line at home. I’m full time Student. I shocked when my sister’s told me about her check that was $97k. It’s very easy to do. everybody will get this job.Go to home media tab for additional details.

      Heres what I’ve been doing………….Money90

  2. I’ve never cared for public statues. I also don’t like ships, airports, etc. named after presidents. Presidents are narcissistic partisans and tax payer money shouldn’t pay for anything that immortalizes them.

    1. I quit working at shoprite to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $45 to 85 per/h. Without a doubt, this is the easiest and most financially rewarding job I’ve ever had.ESd I actually started 6 months ago and this has totally changed my life.

      For more details………………Home Profit System

  3. Why is it that all the bridges on the highways have some county supervisor’s name attached to them? Aggrandizement seems to be a trait of all people in politics.

    1. Tear down the bridges!

    2. LOL. The community college near me is putting up a new building and it’s named after the county executive and his wife. I guess when you get the final say as to whether a building is approved to be built, you get to put your name on it.

  4. This is the latest handiwork from America’s newest iconoclasts, many of whom view the American experiment as rotten to its core. If they focused their attention instead on, say, opposing the nation’s drug war or other current injustices, the world might become a better place. But that takes hard work and is less fun than destroying things.

    So you’re not taking these people seriously when they say they want to destroy America, you figure they’re just out tearing shit up for fun. I’m sure a lot of them are just getting in on the fun of tearing shit up, but there’s a hard core behind that and they’re dead serious.

    It’s easy enough to say well they’re just tearing shit up that doesn’t matter much, but when people have become inured to the shit that doesn’t matter much being torn up and these people move on to the shit that does matter, don’t say you weren’t warned. This isn’t some sort of temper tantrum being thrown by spoiled brat two-year olds, this is a revolution being fomented by people who know exactly what they’re doing. It needs to be put down and put down hard, none of this bullshitting around with the “well, they do have a point”, because the point ain’t the point.

    They’re not tearing down statues because the statues are “problematic”, that’s just the excuse they’re using to throw you off the point. The point is to tear shit down and they don’t care what or who, it all needs to come down. They intend to destroy society and remake it in their own image and we know where this shit leads.

    Falling into the trap of arguing with them over who is and who is not worthy to stand is playing their game. It’s like arguing with a child over their bedtime and whether or not the time spent brushing their teeth and getting ready for bed should count against their staying-up time. They’re not really arguing for a later bedtime, they’re seeing how far they can push you and yet when you snap and tell them enough is enough, they get to act all offended like you’re the one being unreasonable.

    You’d better wake up and smell the coffee, this ain’t about eliminating statues, it’s about eliminating you.

    1. “The point is to tear shit down and they don’t care what or who, it all needs to come down.”

      Or course they care who. They aren’t going after the statue of Lenin in Seattle, nor will they.

    2. “…this ain’t about eliminating statues, it’s about eliminating you.”
      Well, at least until the Democrats win the election. And they don’t want elimination, but enslavement.

    3. This is a mob throwing a temper tantrum. Only a delusional talk-radio junky would believe it’s an organized revolution. And even if it was, it won’t succeed. At best it will result in some police reform, and that isn’t a bad thing.

      1. Only a delusional talk-radio junky

        Never go full Buttplug.

        1. He is more of a full Jeff type of guy.

          1. He’s a shitty combo of Lying Jeffy and Squirrel.

      2. At best it will result in some police reform, and that isn’t a bad thing.

        And in the most likely case …?

        1. Some stupid new laws to appease the rabble, then back to normal.

          1. At least (best?) it won’t be “The New Normal”.

            1. Stupid laws related to the virus are a different matter.

              1. Lol I love watching you realize you’re a moron in real time

      3. Keep the blinders on.

        10 years ago “this is only happening on campuses.”

        5 years ago “this is only happening online.”

        Now it is happening in corporate offices, the streets, etc.

        Keep ignoring it.

        1. Dude was talking about a revolution. You call this a revolution?

          1. It’s a short bus version, but you’re delusional if you think it’s little more than a temper tantrum by a few malcontents–which is exactly his point.

            Shit like this now has backing by the mainstream media, local and national politicians, and global corporations. So yes, it is a new cultural revolution, and one supported this time by the nation’s elites.

            1. Cultural revolution? I can buy that. Organized political revolution? Nope. No dice.

              1. You’re deliberately being obtuse, as evidenced by the fact that you’re trying to frame it as some sort of “organized” guerrilla effort. I’ll just repeat what I said above:

                “Shit like this now has backing by the mainstream media, local and national politicians, and global corporations.”

                The Cultural Revolution in China had the support of the elites, too. You really think that was “just a temper tantrum” to all the people whose lives were destroyed by it, or the destruction of social stability that took place wasn’t that big of a deal?

                1. China’s cultural revolution was top down. It was political and backed with bullets. What we are seeing now is neither.

                  1. Bullshit. People are losing their livelihoods for going against the current media narrative. This movement has political and financial support vertically all the way to the upper echelons of one of the country’s two largest political parties, nearly all the large mass media outlets, including social networks, and global corporations that are nominally beholden to shareholders rather than politicians.

                    Anyone arguing that this is just a few malcontents is being willfully delusional.

                    1. So you’re saying this is top-down, as in originating in government, and backed by soldiers with rifles? If so then I’m not the delusional one. Those comparing this to what happened in China are delusional.

                    2. So you’re saying this is top-down, as in originating in government, and backed by soldiers with rifles? If so then I’m not the delusional one.

                      No, but you are making a deliberately pedantic argument to keep your delusions in place.

                    3. Oh really?

                      It’s merely pedantic to point out the difference between people doing stuff with and without government rifles in their backs?

                    4. You seem to be going out of your way arguing something he’s clearly not saying. Shocking.

                    5. He is comparing what is happening here and now to China’s Cultural Revolution. So that is exactly what he is saying. Maybe he didn’t think it through, I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt.

                    6. So two things should only be compared if they’re exactly the same. Smart.

                    7. You seem to be going out of your way arguing something he’s clearly not saying.

                      evergreen

                  2. China’s cultural revolution was top down. It was political and backed with bullets. What we are seeing now is neither.

                    NO.

                    China’s Cultural Revolution was political and backed by bullets.

                    China’s cultural revolution was the work of commie mobs beating people in the streets.

                    They did what we see now BEFORE they started announcing their gigantic evils as happy plans.

                  3. But you just stupidly asked if it was a revolution you fucking inbred.

                    No you fucking retard it was not. It took root in the schools and then gained traction with elites.

                    God damn dude read a fucking book instead of just bragging that you have one.

                2. I’ll add on to here that these kind of antics 50 years ago led to the increasing militarization of the police force, and every time a flare-up takes place, the militarization increases, not declines.

                  If you’re okay with that, then by all means keep dismissing this as just a “temper tantrum.” But history has shown us that radical leftism produces social upheaval by design. Society either knuckles under to these demands, or it decides when enough is enough and suppresses the movement, typically in a violent manner. Not nipping these movements in the bud tends to cause more problems then they solve.

                  1. It will fizzle when people go back to work.

                    1. It will fizzle when they finally do *something* that makes society at large go, “Ok, enough is enough, fuck these people” and start actively suppressing these people.

                    2. They are not going back to work, you are delusional.

      4. It’s spelled “junkie”.

    4. “The point is to tear shit down and they don’t care what or who, it all needs to come down. They intend to destroy society and remake it in their own image and we know where this shit leads.”

      Case in point: University of Texas Constitutional Law Professor wants to rewrite the US Constitution, replacing gendered and racial language. https://thehill.com/opinion/white-house/505071-time-to-update-the-language-of-the-constitution

      Think he plans on stopping there?

    5. Exactly so.

  5. Don’t be an idiot Steven, as your article noted, this won’t stop at statues, next it will be the names of buildings, then streets, then once those are cleansed the Woke will continue to find new objections to anything that’s unpleasing to their eye. How long before they go after License plates they don’t like? And probably vandalize cars with them on them. This is a campaign of terror to silence any voices that disagree with them. As soon as it jumped from the Confederate Statues to other notable historical figures, it’s clear to me that it won’t stop. Oh it might cool down for a while, but every time there’s an excuse to riot, they’ll be back out there suppressing other people’s ideas. This is mob tyranny.

    1. That’s what I was trying to say – it’s not about tearing down “problematic” statues, it’s just tearing shit up. Falling into the trap, as Ken does below, of arguing over which statues are worth saving and which should go misses the point – exactly as it’s intended to do. While we’re arguing over which statues are more problematic than others, they’re moving on because they never really gave a shit in the first place over whether or not the statue was problematic. They could have just called it “racist” and been done with it because every goddamn thing these days is racist and I’m done with that crap. Fuck you and your “racism” bullshit.

      1. I don’t have issues with naming things after people because it costs nothing (certainly some will argue about who deserves this or not, imagine the Democrats’ reaction to a Trump statue or naming an airport after him – LOL), but I do have problems with government spending taxpayer money for the purpose of promoting government and government employees or politicians.

        While we’re at it, let’s end the National Endowment For the Arts, as I see no difference, except that certain politically connected artists get nice government commissions, sometimes to make these statues that get torn down.

        1. I don’t have issues with naming things after people because it costs nothing
          Naming something new after someone is minimal. Renaming something can have significant costs. Renaming a street requires new signs, businesses on the street have to update anything with a printed address, etc. Renaming a transit station requires updating signs across the system.

    2. The governor of Colorado just created a board to review the names of mountains and other geographic features.

      1. Goodbye Rockies, hello Apollo Creeds.

  6. I remember John Wayne’s last years. He was something of the crusty uncle at the Thanksgiving dinner. You had to take everything he said in the context of a man who was anode by a changing world. Well the world changes and its time to take down his statue and rename the airport. It is not punitive it is just time. I like many of his movie, generally the funny ones more than the serious ones, but I know his period of fame is over. My children will not remember him.

    1. My children will not remember him.

      And your children’s children’s children will not remember “America’s newest iconoclasts”.

      “I met a traveller from an antique land,
      Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
      Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
      Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
      And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
      Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
      Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
      The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
      And on the pedestal, these words appear:
      My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
      Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
      Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
      Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
      The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

      1. They will not know this either. I do its by Shelley.

        1. So you, who blithely admit to knowing a poet from 200 years ago with do everything in your power to prevent your children from ever learning about a man who died less than 50 years ago?

          1. “blithely”

            ICWYDT
            Nice

          2. To my knowledge Shelley has neither a statue or an airport named after him. I learned about Shelley and this poem in my Public School High School English class. I am also guessing that far more people know about John Wayne and the book authored by Shelley’s wife.

        2. That’s from a book. Who reads books nowadays? Not college students. They don’t even need to take exams, if they’re woke or non-unpigmented.

    2. Why don’t you start with something easy, like unnaming the Little Rock Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport.

  7. I am making $150 every hour by working on the web at home. A month ago I have gotten $19723 from this activity. This activity is exceptionally astounding and its normal income for me is superior to anything my past office work. Read More.

  8. This is not a great way to handle the debate regarding our national heritage going forward. Whether we require people to build monuments on their own property won’t do anything about the fact that monuments that are near and dear to people’s hearts were built on public property some of them more than a hundred years ago.

    Much of the initial funds for design and construction of the Washington Monument were raised privately. The monument was partially built with slave labor. Meanwhile, George Washington was a slaveholder.

    Do you or don’t you favor dismantling the Washington Monument?

    I toured Monticello before the genetic tests came back tying him to the descendants of Sally Hemings. They told us how forward thinking Jefferson was because he bothered to educate some of his slaves. We didn’t know that those slaves were his own children. What about the Jefferson Memorial?

    Do you or don’t you favor dismantling the Jefferson Memorial?

    The answers to those questions have nothing to do with whether memorials should be built on private property in the future.

    Make a choice and take a stand. If you think we should dismantle our national heritage in deference to the social justice warriors, then have the guts to say so.

    1. Well said. And realize that wrt “dismantle our national heritage in deference to the social justice warriors”, what goes around comes around.

    2. What debate? Everybody’s on the same side. BLM says all the statues have got to go and the NYT, WaPo, CNN, Twitter, Facebook, Google, Coca-Cola, the NFL and Burger King all fall in line. Ever notice the “peaceful protestors” bullshit and how many targets there are for pointing out the “peaceful protestors” bullshit? In case you haven’t noticed here, we’re in a distinct minority and thank god Reason hasn’t attracted enough attention or isn’t dependent enough on Google AdSense to get that shit shut down. Yet. But notice the commentariat here is a lot more forceful with their denunciations of the Woke Marxist bullshit than any of the writers here – think that’s just a coincidence? Or you think maybe the writers have families to feed and know which side their bread is buttered on?

      1. “What debate? Everybody’s on the same side.”

        The majority of the American people would be angry if you dismantled the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial.

        Progressives see themselves on TV and think that means they’re popular. Don’t believe the hype. If you went by that standard, the night before President Trump was elected, everyone thought he was a serial sexual assaulter.

        Warren Buffet said that the stockmarket is like having a manic-depressive business partner. The trick is to take advantage of his moods. You want to sell him shares in your business when he thinks things are better than they are, and you want to buy shares from him when he thinks things are worse than they are. What most people do, on the other hand, is fall under their business partner’s influence. He’s crazy!

        If you think the everybody is on the side of the social justice warriors in this country, then you are falling under their influence.

        Don’t believe the hype.

        1. But where are you allowed to speak up? The “silent majority” are silent for a reason, they just want to be left alone to live their lives in peace, they don’t want any trouble. But that’s always an uneven contest, between people who want to be left alone and people that don’t want to leave you alone. How do you compromise with somebody who wants to bug the shit out of you when you don’t want to be bugged? I’m willing to leave you alone if you leave me alone, but what happens when you don’t want to leave me alone? I have no desire to mess with you, but if you want to push the point, I’ll mess with you bad enough to make you regret the day you ever thought messing with me was a good idea. The bear only takes so much poking before, god willing, the bear will have been poked enough.

        2. The old adage the squeaky wheel gets the oil is an old adage for a reason. It has survived the test of time. You already see politicians, even conservative ones, being pulled to the left. You see a whole new generation of kids raised in a bubbled environment of pared down single view news and social media amplifying the emotions of the left. This isnt something that is going away.

          1. The squeaky wheel is also the first one to be replaced.

        3. Ken is right. The hippies and yippies thought they would radically change the world in the 60’s. Turns out it wasn’t so much.

          1. They Yippies turned into Yuppies.

          2. I disagree, Don’t look at me!. Here’s three things that have changed since, say 1968, that are in part due to their agitation.

            1) Homosexuality is not only no longer illegal, it’s embraced, and probably encouraged.

            2) The Draft is practically no more, and no one plans on bringing it back.

            3) Women have gained sufficient autonomy to insist upon, be heard, and actually get, legal abortion on demand.

            All of those would have been crazy talk, if not outright seditious in 1968, yet are our current cultural reality. Imagine what else will change fifty years from now.

            1. More to the point we’re talking about, you want to start listing things that haven’t changed?

              Millennials flee the cities and move to the lily-white suburbs when they have kids, just like their white flight parents and grandparents did. And that trend predates COVID-19 by a long shot.

              The social justice warrior types are even more fascist and less tolerant of dissent than the hippy progressive types were in 1979, when Jello Biafra wrote California Uber Alles

              1. “when Jello Biafra wrote California Uber Alles”

                People tend to forget that there was a time when the music was for someone else–

                ‘I am Governor Jerry Brown,
                My aura smiles and never frowns
                Soon I will be president

                Zen fascists will control you
                100% natural
                You will jog for the Master Race
                And always wear the happy face….’

                Mellow out or You. Will. Pay.

                1. “Now it’s nineteen eighty-four
                  Knock, knock on your front door
                  It’s the suede-denim secret police
                  They’ve come for your uncool niece!

                  Come quietly to the camp
                  You’d look nice as a drawstring lamp
                  Don’t you worry, it’s only a shower
                  For your clothes here’s a pretty flower

                  —-California Uber Alles by Dead Kennedys

                  Yes, the left has gone bat-shit insane, but this has all happened before.

  9. There are a lot of great and admirable figures in history. We don’t admire them for what they did wrong, they and we are all human. We don’t build statues of them because they owned slaves or because they murdered, in some cases, millions of people.
    We build statues because they had the courage to do something great, even if it wasn’t necessarily something we agree with. But at least they tried. Oftent ime they had to make extremely difficult choices in the face of great peril. That greatness, is what we need to be reminded of. Those that dare to try are what moves us forward. We’re not just here to eat, shit, breed and die.

    It’d be a damn shame to tear down the statues of the long dead because all a small person can do is look backwards and scream at a defenseless ghost, often a strawman they built in their own little minds, in their own little lives, pickled by their own cowardice.

    We remember people for the great things they’ve done, right or wrong, there’re lessons to be learned.

    1. St. Peter denied Christ three times. It’s true! St. Paul actually persecuted Christians in his time. When I go through the Bible, I only see one perfect person in a cast of thousands. What would be left in the Vatican museum if they threw out everything with a sinner on it?

      What does it say when the Catholic church is more tolerant of people’s flaws than social justice warriors?

      The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King had flaws, an apparent aversion to homosexuality and gay leaders in the civil rights movement among them. Is MLK still in the pantheon or isn’t he?

      1. “What does it say when the Catholic church is more tolerant of people’s flaws than social justice warriors?”

        . . . because nothing screams “tolerance’ like the heretic’s fork; burning at the stake; drawing and quartering; water torture; boiling in oil; the Judas cradle; immurement; the rack; the pear of anguish; the wheel; the scold’s bridle; and Catholic torture dungeons in general.

        Disaffected, superstitious clingers are among my favorite culture war casualties.

        1. I was talking about the Catholic church today–and I was asking people to compare them to the progressives and the social justice warriors of today.

          If you have to go back to the inquisitions and the Reformation for examples of the Catholic church being less tolerant than the social justice warriors of today, then I guess we have your answer.

          1. The casualty count of the Catholic church is a hell of a lot smaller than Hicklib’s fellow travelers over the last 100 years.

        2. Arthur L. Hicklib unwittingly proves Ken’s point.

      2. I have “flaws” you mfer. Martin Luther was a monster.

        “Accordingly, it must and dare not be considered a trifling matter but a most serious one to seek counsel against this and to save our souls from the Jews, that is, from the devil and from eternal death. My advice, as I said earlier, is:

        First, that their synagogues be burned down, and that all who are able toss in sulphur and pitch; it would be good if someone could also throw in some hellfire. That would demonstrate to God our serious resolve and be evidence to all the world that it was in ignorance that we tolerated such houses, in which the Jews have reviled God, our dear Creator and Father, and his Son most shamefully up till now but that we have now given them their due reward.”

        Martin Luther, The Jews and Their Lies

        1. My bad. Wrong Luther.

          1. Which Luther were you quoting?

            Was it this one?

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_(diplomat)

            There’s no doubt that Martin Luther had serious problems with antisemitism–even if you did quote the wrong Luther.

            Lutherans today can be counted among some of the most liberal people on the planet, and when they call themselves Lutherans, antisemitism has nothing to do with what they’re talking about.

            The point stands, however, that expecting Lutherans to purge their church of any semblance of Martin Luther because of his horrible mistakes is absurd. The principles he gave their church, especially the sola scriptura, the idea that the ultimate authority on questions of theology isn’t clergy like Martin Luther but the scripture itself, is the reason why they don’t venerate people like Luther, who, as his antisemitism shows, are entirely fallible.

            The same can be said about The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King. He was also entirely fallible. The things he was good about, he was absolutely fantastic, and those are the things that people are celebrating when they reverence Dr. King–not his aversion to LGBT.

            I might even go so far as to say that these two revolutionaries may have been revolutionary specifically because they were able to see the flaws in themselves and be honest about them. You don’t argue for peaceful protest in the face of oppression rather than violence, like MLK did without, understanding the urge for violence within yourself and your own movement. At some point, Martin Luther must have realized that he wasn’t sufficiently good enough to be in charge of doctrine either–and used to flagellate himself.

            People talk about Thomas Jefferson as if he were a hypocrite. On the one hand, he could write about freedom so elegantly, like no one else could, but on the other hand, he was a slave holder. Must be hypocrisy in there, somewhere, right?

            Maybe not. Maybe staring at slavery every day of his life gave him an unusual sense of what freedom was all about. I’ve read excellent arguments, one by Orlando Patterson, about how the whole concept of freedom in the western world germinated in the ancient world as a concept that was the opposite of slavery. It might we one thing if we were celebrating Thomas Jefferson because of his slave holding. The ideals he stood for are about freedom, and his championing of the cause of freedom probably contributed mightily to Americans and their unwillingness to accept slavery. If it weren’t for Thomas Jefferson, there might not be as many Caucasian-Americans who are concerned about social justice as they are today.

    2. We build statues

      We?

  10. https://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/18313

    Best statue in the USA.

    Ignatius J Reilly

    1. I’m not going to click that link. It’s probably a statue of a pedophile groping children.

  11. The Confederate statue issue is more understandable. Governments should remove these relics from public places. Southerners mostly installed them during the Jim Crow era and in the midst of the Civil Rights movement to make a retrograde political point.

    Everyone says this yet no one can produce a even a single contemporary citation to support it. The memorials and monuments were erected around the semi-centennial and centennial of the war.

    1. It’s a much weaker argument than “Confederates were traitors who took up arms against the USA.”

      But I am a white Georgian so the statues don’t bother me in the least.

      1. Of course, Washington was a traitor who took up arms against England, yet there is a statue of Washington in Trafalgar Square in London.

        1. The colonies had no political remedy against a monarchy.

          The states had signed the US Constitution.

          1. Where does the constitution prohibit secession?

          2. You just inadvertently said the Confederacy was right.

            Nice job dumbass.

    2. “Dude, you’re harshing my buzz!”

    3. “Southerners mostly installed them during the Jim Crow era and in the midst of the Civil Rights movement to make a retrograde political point.”

      This is like the assumption that every single soldier who fought for the South did so because they wanted to support slavery. I can’t get five people in the office to agree on where to go to lunch, but a million individual Southerners all joined the Confederate army for the exact same reason?

      Some people joined the U.S. military over the last 20 years because they wanted to fight in Afghanistan. Some of them did it because they wanted money for college. Some of them did it because being in the military is prestigious in their family and their culture. Some of them just wanted to get out of Lost Holler, West Virginia and see the world. All of them did it for more than one reason.

      . . . but a million individual Southerners all joined the Confederate army for the exact same reason?

      Anytime you see someone project a single motive onto a group of individuals, you’re seeing someone make a bad assumption and you’re probably seeing a logical fallacy in action. When the group in question is particularly disliked by the person making the assumption, don’t take their word for it.

      To plenty of Southerners, the Confederate flag means to them what the Lone Star flag means to Texans or a shamrock means to the Irish. Whether it should be on state flags or whether monuments to Confederate heroes should stay in place is another question entirely–a question that doesn’t need to rely on logical fallacies or smearing 125 million people across 15 states for an answer. If you think their historical heritage should be dismantled because it’s offensive, have the guts to say so.

      No need to smear your opponents unless you have nothing legitimately persuasive to say.

    1. “Sinfest”, eh?

  12. Greenhut perpetrated the lie that all these old statues were paid for with taxpayer money and ignores that in many cases were erected on private property that was gifted to or taken over by government.

  13. Fundamentally, the furor about statues reveals the divergence of moral priorities. Are we a nation that at least tries to respect a variety of opinion, with a recognition that to do so means tolerating offensive behavior? Or are we a nation dedicated to a strict ideology, or at best, pandering to the idea that people have a right to an offense-free world?

    1. Yeah, there’s diversity and there’s “diversity”.

  14. “If they focused their attention instead on, say, opposing the nation’s drug war or other current injustices, the world might become a better place.”

    Bigotry is a current injustice, although I would not expect a disaffected clinger to apprehend that point.

    1. Bigotry is the natural response to plain observation.

    2. They could just read your opinions.

    3. Bigotry is a current injustice, although I would not expect a disaffected clinger to apprehend that point.

      You’re talking about yourself, but I wouldn’t expect a leftist NPC to comprehend that point.

  15. OMG… Thanks for sharing this info…

  16. As noted in the comments above, the tearing down of monuments has absolutely nothing to do with history. The mob is comprised of imbeciles that paid no attention in history class.

  17. “Father Serra represents the invasion of California and the taking of native lands,” a UC Riverside professor told this newspaper.

    Of course, the guy making this argument is a snow-white shitlib who grew up in the Midwest.

    White liberals really need a mass Jonestown moment to Make America Great Again.

  18. Isn’t Elvis rumored to have been a racist?

    Obviously, racists shouldn’t be allowed into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame–regardless of the importance of their contribution to the music.

    Even if Elvis wasn’t a racist, there must be some other racists in there somewhere. Some of the Rolling Stones’ lyrics are clearly racist. Why are they still in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

    1. Ban misogynists and there’s almost no rock ‘n roll.

      1. “French girls they want Cartier
        Italian girls want cars
        American girls want everything in the world
        You can possibly imagine

        English girls they’re so prissy
        I can’t stand them on the telephone
        Sometimes I take the receiver off the hook
        I don’t want them to ever call at all

        White girls they’re pretty funny
        Sometimes they drive me mad
        Black girls just wanna get fucked all night
        I just don’t have that much jam

        Chinese girls are so gentle
        They’re really such a tease
        You never know quite what they’re cooking
        Inside those silky sleeves”

        —-The Rolling Stones

        https://genius.com/The-rolling-stones-some-girls-lyrics

        Why doesn’t the left kick the Rolling Stones out of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame right now?!

  19. Fvck You and your heckler’s veto. Every great civilization builds monuments, barbarians tear them down

    1. ^^^^THIS^^^^

    2. Agree 100%.

    3. Did Imperial Rome build monuments to Spartacus?

      The statues of Confederate traitors should go, at least on public lands.

      1. You should go too

  20. Statues stay up.
    No more capitulation to leftists.

  21. Maybe these tankies need to start tearing down the statues in their brains.

    http://hiaw.org/defcon6/works/1862/letters/62_07_30a.html

    The Jewish n—– Lassalle who, I’m glad to say, is leaving at the end of this week, has happily lost another 5,000 talers in an ill-judged speculation. The chap would sooner throw money down the drain than lend it to a ‘friend’, even though his interest and capital were guaranteed.

    It is now quite plain to me — as the shape of his head and the way his hair grows also testify — that he is descended from the negroes who accompanied Moses’ flight from Egypt (unless his mother or paternal grandmother interbred with a n—– ). Now, this blend of Jewishness and Germanness, on the one hand, and basic negroid stock, on the other, must inevitably give rise to a peculiar product. The fellow’s importunity is also n—– -like.

  22. “I agree with just calling it Orange County Airport, simply to make it easier for travelers to know where they’re heading,”

    It will just have to be renamed again after Trump wins

  23. Sounds like capitulation to the angry mob. Doing it won’t make them happier, it will embolden them to attack other things. Maybe they will get to something you care about eventually.

    An no you don’t get to just install statues on private property and expect the mob to go away. They don’t respect private property or your rights.

    1. When rioting left-wing mobs want something, libertarians are right there offering to help them get it because individual freedom or the NAP or some such.

    2. That’s exactly what it is. Statues aren’t being torn down over some libertarian grievance over how they’re funded or where they are located. It is an attempt to discredit and obliviate historical figures, so the Left can install whatever version of history they want.

  24. Do we need fewer statues?
    That important decision should be made by those wonderful and enlightened bureaucrats in the Bureau Of Significant Statues.
    You can locate this vital bureaucracy left of the Thought Police Headquarters and right of the Ministry of Silly Walks.

  25. It would not be bad at all to accept some wisdom of the anti-immigration ethno-state called Wakanda. The basic wisdom consists of knowledge that migrants brought their problems with them. No hatred was left behind. No wrong was forgiven or even forgotten.HERE?Click For Full Details.

  26. I’m just glad I won’t live to see the day when thousands of angry young Muslim-Americans demand the 9/11 Memorial be obliterated because it led to the war in Iraq.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.