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A Voice From the Grave

While the earliest recording of a human voice dates to 1860, researchers at the University of London recently announced the recreation of a voice that is much older.

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While the earliest recording of a human voice dates to 1860, researchers at the University of London recently announced the recreation of a voice that is much older. Using a CT scanner and a 3D printer, they made physical models of the mouth and throat of a 3,000-year-old mummified Egyptian named Nesyamun. By pairing those models with an electronic larynx, the team has thus far been able to eek a single "eh" out of the long-dead priest.

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  1. To which former Secretary of State Clinton and failed presidential candidate shrieked, “what difference, at this point, does it make?!?”

    1. ROTFLMAO

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  2. Interesting. I wonder if they tested this methodology on someone we have a voice recording for first? Preferably someone who donated their body to science so they can be mummified beforehand to make sure they account for changes in shape the process will cause.

  3. Canada’s history is much deeper than I thought.

    1. beauty.

    2. That thing looks like a giant blunt. I bet Mike Riggs was tempted to smoke it.

  4. Nesyamun is now trending favorably in the Democratic primaries.

    1. he can beat. trump.

      1. He’s younger than Biden and Sanders.

  5. It’s just air escaping the lungs. Put 4,000 volts through his ass and you can re-create how ancient Egyptians were responsible for inventing the Jitterbug 2,900 years earlier than historians previously believed.

  6. Brought back from the dead, and the only comment he has is “eh”?

    1. After being dead for 3000 years, my initial comment would probably be similar.

  7. His next comment: “You refused to heed the curse pronounced against anyone who violated my tomb – now you’ve unleashed a pestilence upon the world.”

    1. Followed by, “JUST KIDDING! Had you for a second, didn’t I?”

      1. “Yeah, that virus wasn’t me, it was the guy in the tomb next to me. You shouldn’t have opened…his sar-cough-agus!”

  8. and now i am researching about Nesyamun death.

  9. Eh? I didn’t know they entombed Canadians.

  10. I’m failing to see the goal of this research. You have an ancient man, and you recreated his vocal chords. Now what? This can’t provide us with any knowledge or history. It’s his throat, not his brain. If you did it for the recently deceased, it might give us understanding on how to repair vocal chords of the sick or injured.

    All I’m left with is the question. Why?

  11. Are you sure they didn’t “eke” it out of him?

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