Guns

Colorado Teen Banned From School for Going Shooting With His Mother

Posting “Finna be lit” on Snapchat shouldn’t have gotten Nathan Myers thrown out of school.

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To Justine Myers and her 16-year-old son, Nathan, their casual Tuesday afternoon of shooting guns out in the woods of northern Colorado was just a fun-filled mother-son outing. To local law enforcement and school administration, this event was considered a threat.

On August 27, Justine picked up Nathan from Loveland High School to drive outside of town for an afternoon of shooting practice. Nathan posted a video to Snapchat, documenting the five pistols and a rifle he was preparing to shoot. (The rifle, an AR-15, cannot be made out in the video, because it was stored in a case.) Evans also typed out the message, "Finna be lit." (For anybody under 30, this roughly translates to "About to have a fun time.")

Upon reentering cellphone range, the two discovered several missed calls, voicemails, and text messages. One of the callers, Justine's ex-husband, had been approached by police about the video. According to the police, a message was received through "Safe2Tell," a Colorado-based reporting platform that allows individuals to submit anonymous tips to alert law enforcement of potential threats or risks. Once received, the reporting mechanism automatically triggers an immediate review by local law enforcement to assess the validity of the threat. 

Loveland Police reviewed the video, interviewed the parents, and quickly determined that Nathan was not a threat. 

"We thought it was done," Justine tells Reason

The following morning, Justine received a voicemail from the Thompson Valley School District, stating that, until further notice, her son was not allowed to return to school. Justine contacted the school to try to make the same case that she did to the police, but the school proved to be more difficult. Both mother and son attempted to request the homework that Nathan was missing in his absence, but to no avail.

When school officials returned the phone calls, they informed Justine that she needed to attend a "threat assessment hearing" on August 29 where she would defend her son in front of a seven-person panel, comprised of school administration, counselors, teachers, and law enforcement.

Before the hearing, the Myers' story went viral after Rally for our Rights, a Colorado-based pro-gun rights group, broke the news. As a result, school officials backpedaled. The assessment hearing, which traditionally last about an hour, was over in five minutes, according to Justine. The panel seemed to be in a hurry to clear Nathan's name. 

"They were really trying hard to get us out of there quickly," says Justine. 

During the hearing, the school's principal, Peggy Johnson, alluded "to the story that was already out there," suggesting that school officials were well aware of the public backlash they were facing online before the hearing started. 

Upon completion of the hearing, Nathan was allowed to return to school, which he did. According to Justine, her son endured significant taunting upon his return, with students calling him a "school shooter." The mockery was bad enough that Nathan begged his parents to be homeschooled. 

This incident sheds light on how local authorities respond to tips of potential threats or risks, especially through anonymous platforms like Safe2Tell. "It is definitely a flawed system," says Justine. 

"Why we're upset is this should have been squashed on Tuesday night," says Justine. "It should have never gotten to this point." 

School officials claimed that they did not receive the official clearance from police, which occurred on the evening of August 27, until the following day, August 28—18 hours after the fact. (Thompson Valley School District did not respond to requests for comment.) If true, law enforcement failed to communicate the existence of a potential threat to the town square that was already abuzz with gossip. If false, the school fumbled the communication handoff, suggesting some institutional blindspots that need to be addressed—especially if an actual threat were to occur.

Neither should make parents and students feel safe.

Founded in 2004, Safe2Tell was created in response to the Columbine High School shooting in April 1999, in order to "provide an anonymous venue for parents, students, teachers, school administrators, and law enforcement to share information," according to its website. Safe2Tell sought to break "the code of silence" that leaves possible risks and threats unreported, as well remove the stigma that surrounds being a "snitch."

According to the Colorado attorney general's office, which oversees the program, use of Safe2Tell has steadily increased each year. During the 2018–2019 fiscal year, Safe2Tell recorded 19,861 "actionable" tips — 4,400 more than the previous year. The calls are organized into categories to determine the issue addressed. The most frequently addressed issues include suicide (3,668), drugs (2,164), and bullying (1,871). 

Despite the high volume of calls concerning suicide, Safe2Tell is not the ideal resource for those struggling with self-harm or depression. Colorado's Department of Human Services also operates Colorado Crisis Services, a hotline that focuses primarily on mental health issues. The crisis line—which received 173,547 calls, texts, or chats last year—operates separately from Safe2Tell. Confusion among students, not only regarding which service they should use, but also the existence of either in the first place, is common, according to mental health professionals.  

This confusion has resulted in incongruous responses to sensitive issues. Safe2Tell has been criticized for its inability to appropriately address the complicated situations occurring on the other end of the phone line. Sarah Davidon, research director for Mental Health Colorado, shared an anecdote with The Colorado Sun about a troubled student, who called Safe2Tell in need of mental health assistance. "She needed a crisis line," said Davidon. Instead of deploying a mental health specialist to assist the troubled student, police were dispatched to her home. 

Bringing law enforcement into the picture also increases the risk of "swatting," or intentionally filing false reports with law enforcement as a means of harassing people. Of the total number of tips received last year, Safe2Tell estimates that 2.4 percent, or roughly 470 incidents, were intentionally false reports. (Sadly, Safe2Tell has earned the pejorative nickname "Safe2Swat" among Colorado students.)

In this age of ever-present fears of school shootings, efforts to prevent such tragedies run the risk of undermining the civil liberties of the falsely accused or, worse, dropping the ball when responding to an actual threat.

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  1. Maybe it’s time to start sending in anonymous tips about school administrators?

    1. And “counselors”.

    2. They will just be replaced by equally Lefty shitheals.

      The only real solutions for most people are to ignore it or sue the living shit out of them.

      I would choose the later.

      1. Tar and feathers seems most appropriate.

      2. Lawsuits indeed. I would also use the discovery process to punish the administrators in the case. With things like lengthy interrogatories that take dozens of hours to complete. Since they probably can’t be sued individually.

        1. I’m not sure I believe that Trump is really interested in that.

    3. Why send them? Just openly accuse people of things and, when questioned as to the source, say it’s an anonymous source. It’s how journalism is done these days.

    4. More to the point, victims of such officious nonsense should get lawyers and sue the offenders for their back teeth.

  2. “Founded in 2004, Safe2Tell was created in response to the Columbine High School shooting in April 1999”

    *snort* that’s impressively wickedly fast for a school district. If only they were similarly fast in responding to actual threats and in clearing fake threats.

    The only solution is to swamp Safe2Tell. Hundreds of calls every day, no photoshop or other fake evidence, just stupid calls that “I heard the principal say he was mad enough to strangle Mrs. SoAndSo”.

    1. DoS is the way to deal with all government busy bodying.

      Stuff their inbox with more cases than they can handle. The problem with the Right is that disagreeing with government programs, they avoid them, instead of swamping them.

      The Right should be filing every snowflake complaint they can to swamp the system, instead of letting the Left us those systems to target and abuse the Right.

      Theoden: I will not risk open war.
      Aragorn: Open war is upon you whether you would risk it or not.

      #OneSetOfRules

      1. The more the Left tries to go after people and their livelihoods, the more people on the Right come to this very conclusion.

        It’s been slow, though, but there’s even a danger of “preference cascades”, where the Left pushes the Right to the point that they realize they aren’t alone, and rise up all at once and squash this nonsense….

  3. My nephew, who my parents have custody of (his mother is abusive as is his step father, my brother died 8 years ago from cancer) went through something similar. The principal and detective conducting the investigation even admitted they doubted he was a real threat but still banned him from school. Is small town Idaho everyone was aware, especially as they pulled him out of school. To make matters worse they interviewed him, a minor, without my parents being present and never read him his rights. They also refused to allow them to contact a lawyer and told my parents that as it was a confidential matter that they could be liable criminally if they talked about it publicly. I advised my parents to get a lawyer anyhow and fuck them if they tried to prosecute my parents for going to the press. My mother is a don’t rock the boat type person and decided discretion was the better part of valor. They’re lucky is wasn’t me. I would have sued them for violating my nephew’s right to due process, questioning a minor without legal guardianship, denying me a lawyer and threatening my 1A rights. They get away with this shit because people don’t fight back.

    1. I don’t know about other states but in Texas minors don’t have rights. Police are not required to read them their rights, allow counsel or even contact the parents. I believe they are not charge with crimes either. It’s all civil in some way, if I remember correctly.

      1. I question the premise of minors not having rights in Texas. In fact the Texas State Bar directly contradicts this and states that minors must be allowed the right to counsel in accordance to USSC precedent and that minors are allowed the same rights to due process as adults according to the USSC. In fact a quick Google search found multiple sites that support this interpretation.

        1. Perhaps that’s because the state bar would benefit from that interpretation but, no, juvenile crimes are not handled in criminal courts but in civil courts.

          “In the state of Texas, a child can be charged with a felony or misdemeanor, just like an adult. A juvenile offender can also be charged for crimes based on his age such as truancy. However, juvenile crimes, unlike adult criminal cases, are handled in civil proceedings.”

          In the Juvenile Justice Handbook, the right to be with a child that is being detained is a parental right (not the right for the child) and taking a child into custody is not considered an arrest so the rights that are given to people who have been arrested are not in force. State law may codify those “rights” such as juveniles are given a version of the Miranda rights before giving a confession but it’s the law at that point and not a right.

          1. That doesn’t take away their due process. They are still protected, by the 5A, the 4th to some degree (on school grounds is a gray area), the 6th etc. Those protections are still afforded in both civil and criminal matters. As for it being a parental right or a child’s right in the matter of questioning, the supreme Court has made it clear that either a guardian or a child advocate must be present whenever the police are questioning a minor. If there isn’t a representative for the child, any information is considered I’ll gotten and not admissable in courts. And the right to representation also applies in civil matters. So, even in Texas the child has certain rights and certain legal protections.

            1. In fact I am reading the Texas DoJ handbook right now on juvenile Justice system. On page 8 it states they must be mirandized and on page 7 says a parent and or attorney must be present or a court appointed advocate in place of a parent. Also all confessions must be down in the presence of a child magistrate and law enforcement, including prosecuting attornies cannot be present during the confession.

              1. They also differentiate between criminal cases (felonies and misdemeanors) and non fineable offenses. The only reference I can find to minors not being criminally charged are for children under 10 years of age. Under 18 the prosecuting attorney must petition for criminal charges to be filed.

                1. The handbook refers to the right to an attorney, the right to receive Miranda warnings (though they call them something else for minors but the protections are the same) at least three times each. Also, it emphasizes the right for the child to request a parent be present etc.

                  1. This all goes back to me telling my son he doesn’t say anything until I am there. Also informing the school administrators that they are in fact in violation of Miranda because they are in fact agents of the state that will record my son’s statements and use them against him in official proceedings.

      2. Minors have rights in Texas. Police cannot question minors without a parent or guardian present.

  4. Sue for Defamation of character.

    These people are accusing him of a crime and he was exercising his 2nd Amendment rights with his mother.

  5. According to the police, a message was received through “Safe2Tell,” a Colorado-based reporting platform that allows individuals to submit anonymous tips to alert law enforcement of potential threats or risks.

    Wonder who the snitch was. Loveland HS was the site of a fairly large “March For Our Lives” rally last year, and has been a suburban whiteopia for several decades.

    1. According to Justine, her son endured significant taunting upon his return, with students calling him a “school shooter.”

      If this had become a self-fulfilling prophecy, think any of these shitheads would have gone through a moment of self-awareness?

      1. That would require the ability to think for one’s self.

        1. Accidentally flagged your comment, sorry about that.

  6. As a result, school officials backpedaled.

    It sure sounds that way. The rule book is paramount until their bubble gets pierced and they find out the entire world doesn’t think like they do.

  7. When school officials returned the phone calls, they informed Justine that she needed to attend a “threat assessment hearing” on August 29 where she would defend her son in front of a seven-person panel, comprised of school administration, counselors, teachers, and law enforcement.

    One surmises Justine’s lawyers informed those school officials that they needed to attend a “threat assessment hearing” where they would defend their actions.

  8. “Finna be lit.” (For anybody under 30, this roughly translates to “About to have a fun time.”)

    I was going to try to untangle this mess. Instead I just came to the conclusion that Millennials suck.

    1. They may suck, but only with ongoing affirmative and continuous consent.

      1. And more of the, could swallow. While maintaining eye contact.

    2. If you want it unpacked, here’s my attempt.

      “Finna” is the result of slang drift, words growing more and more garbled over time. “Finna” comes from “fixin’ ta,” which comes from “Fixing to,” which essentially, “preparing to.” “Fixing” in the sense of preparing to is an old slang that used to be more widespread but now mostly lingers in the South. So by “finna” he means, “I’m about to.”

      “be lit,” is also a bit of slang spread. Originally “getting lit,” was just a reference to getting high. It started to be used in much more general terms, often as an exaggeration for how much fun would be had. “We’re gonna be lit!” means we’re going to have a good time, regardless whether or not it involves pot. I suspect this phrase especially diluted in places where marijuana is legal, and there’s other phrases for “getting high” springing up.

      1. Getting lit applied to getting drunk originally.

        1. At least whenever I heard it used.

        2. Getting lit applied to getting drunk originally.

          I took it to mean generally high or buzzed without regard to cause pharmaceutical or other. I know I learned it wrt alcohol first, but heard it used in reference to cocaine (or the combination of alcohol and cocaine) before I ever heard it used to describe marijuana.

          1. Richard Pryor definitely got lit while dong cocaine.

        3. Weird. I always heard it about MJ, and assumed it was short for “light up,” as in, “smoke some weed.” But maybe that’s just a localization thing.

    3. Someone who is 16 is about 10-20 years too young to be a millennial.

      1. Kudos for out curmudgeoning the curmudgeons.

      2. Someone who is 16 would be under 30 and wouldn’t need their own words translated.

        I’m over 40 and I didn’t need the “translation” to get the gist of it and the “translation”, even ignoring the confusion of over/under, is worse than useless.

      3. Also, the phrase “roughly translates to”, to me, strongly implies some more formal foreign language that could be less roughly translated. ‘Is slang for’ or ‘suggesting’ are both more succinct and more accurate.

      4. It’s 2019. a 16 year old would have been born in 2002-2003. Howe is that too young to be a millennial?

  9. Justine contacted the school to try to make the same case that she did to the police, but the school proved to be more difficult.

    They know they don’t have qualified immunity in a law suit and so they act accordingly. Problem is, they’ll probably be sued over this and lose.

    1. The reporting people and the school district deserve to lose a lawsuit and lose a bunch a money.

      It is none of the school’s business what students do outside of school.

      People who accuse other people of crimes without it being true a civilly liable for Defamation.

  10. “Nathan posted a video to Snapchat”

    As I advised my daughters when they were young, “if you don’t want to get grief, don’t give anyone reason to give you grief.”

    Sometimes you get grief because that is how life can be, but posting guns on any form a social media [sure, it’s your right to do so] is just going to give some asshole an opportunity to signal their fucking virtue in your direction. And in this case, they fucked you up without even having to reveal who they are by miss-using a system that could not ignore them.

    1. yeah, the “threat” wasn’t going shooting with his mom. the “threat” was posting the video.

      1. along with some incomprehensible Latin phrase. Who knows? “Finna be lit” might mean the same thing as “Molon Labe”, a known white supremacist saying…

        1. What a load of crap. Molon Labe means “Come and take them”. It is what the Spartans told the Persians at the battle of Thermopylae. Where in the hell did you dream up it is a “white supremacist saying” ? Stop swallowing everything you hear on MSNBC or read in the Daily Beast.

          1. Was it meant as sarcasm?

        2. Well, the Greeks were fairly racist. Every non-Greek was a barbarian.

    2. If one is prepared, it may be an opportunity make some money with a lawsuit.

  11. Upon completion of the hearing, Nathan was allowed to return to school, which he did. According to Justine, her son endured significant taunting upon his return, with students calling him a “school shooter.” The mockery was bad enough that Nathan begged his parents to be homeschooled.

    It’ll be ok. Obviously it won’t be a self-fulfilling prophesy or anything like that.

    1. He should calmly walk up to anyone calling him a school shooter, stare them in the eyes, and smile.

      But he’s apparently a massive snowflake himself. Snowflakes and guns are a bad combo.

  12. Safe2Tell sought to break “the code of silence” that leaves possible risks and threats unreported, as well remove the stigma that surrounds being a “snitch.”

    And to provide cover to gun haters, of course.

  13. Shooting a firearm got this kid kicked out of school.
    God help him if he would recite the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution or plan a straight pride parade.
    He would probably be crucified in the school’s lunchroom.

    1. I think we’re at least ten years away from crucifixions in public schools.

      1. Before or after jetpacks?

    2. Why not recite the Declaration of Independence while shooting at a range? Then the constitution. After a straight pride parade.

  14. One of the callers, Justine’s ex-husband, had been approached by police about the video. According to the police, a message was received through “Safe2Tell,” a Colorado-based reporting platform that allows individuals to submit anonymous tips to alert law enforcement of potential threats or risks.

    Well that system is clearly working as intended. See anything, say something.

  15. “We thought it was done,” Justine tells Reason.

    Steaks are done, Justine. Your son, however, was finished.

  16. When school officials returned the phone calls, they informed Justine that she needed to attend a “threat assessment hearing” on August 29 where she would defend her son in front of a seven-person panel, comprised of school administration, counselors, teachers, and law enforcement.

    People need to start suing the living tar out of these institutions. Gawker-style.

    1. “When school officials returned the phone calls, they informed Justine that she needed to attend a “threat assessment hearing” on August 29 where she would defend her son in front of a seven-person panel, comprised of school administration, counselors, teachers, and law enforcement.”

      I would bring an attorney. And it would probably go something like this:

      Superintendent Chalmers: Sir, you’re not permitted legal counsel for this proceeding.

      Me: that’s ok, he’s not for that. He’s hear to observe. For later.

      Superintendent Chalmers: What do you mean by later?

      Me: For the massive lawsuit I intend to bring against the school district, the police department, and each one of you individually. Oh, and show of hands. Who here has owns a house that is free and clear or has a significant equity position?

      The panel looks around nervously. A few almost raise their hands but do not.

      Me: That’s ok. We can sort that out during the discovery process. Which will likely take up every spare second of your life for the next year. Maybe longer. Now let’s get started!

      Yeah, I think I could get into it. Sounds like fun.

  17. “the code of silence” that leaves possible risks and threats unreported, as well remove the stigma that surrounds being a “snitch.”

    We kindly ask you look the other way on the stigma of being falsely accused of something heinous.

    1. The calls are organized into categories to determine the issue addressed. The most frequently addressed issues include suicide (3,668), drugs (2,164), and bullying (1,871).

      She should repeatedly call Safe2Tell and report the bullying of her son. One call per incident.

      1. They like to hear about bullying so they can harass the people being bullied as potential shooters.

        Seriously, they do that.

    2. And the stigma on lawful gun owners they’re trying to create.

  18. According to Justine, her son endured significant taunting upon his return, with students calling him a “school shooter.”

    So sue each and every student that says that, and the students parents, and the school administration, and the school district. Any half competent lawyer can get a settlement for harassment, conspiracy to violate rights, and maybe more.
    Also report them as bullies to the school, and insist the procedures be followed.
    Spend the next year of your life in constant battle. It will help all the other real citizens to see the socialists can be opposed.

    1. +1000

      This is really the only good solution to this situation. I guarantee anyone who is ever sued never wants it to happen again.

      Civil lawsuits can be a great equalizer against tyranny of the masses.

    2. or report them all for bullying on the tattletale line?

  19. All our mass communications systems seem to be designed to scare the hell out of us. We’re afraid of gun owners, immigrants, billionaires, blacks, Hispanics, Republicans or Democrats, libertarians, socialists, vaccines, progressives, the Chinese, the climate, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, etc. The list is endless, but somehow still growing.

    1. V For Vendetta “Why they need us”
      https://youtu.be/sQ8l07a4d_0

  20. People keep acting like this is a bug, when its a goddamn feature. Every time the slippery slope causes someone to slide their ass to the bottom, a new slope is created. Welcome to the Matrix.

  21. 16 years old. I have always thought that was the perfect age to teach your children about guns and gun safety. It takes the mystery out of it. Until then all they know is from games and TV which can make them think they are just some cool toy.

    Just think in a couple years that kid could be a soldier shooting the real military stuff. In some places he would be conscripted or drafted.

    When I was in Israel you would see 18 year olds walking around in their uniforms with military rifles all over the place and nobody gave it a second thought. The young soldiers, men and women, have to keep their rifle even when they are off duty. They are allowed to lock them up at home.

    The attitude is different. People know what they are and see them as a tool for practical purpose of defense. I think Switzerland is sort of like that. Here people flip out.

    1. We started shooting at five years of age. Got our hunting licenses at 12. Many states now allow 8, 9, 10 year olds to take hunter safety and purchase special mentored hunting licenses. I started teaching my kids about guns as soon as they were old enough to walk. The rule in our house was/is never point a gun, including toy guns, at anyone and always be aware of trigger discipline and barrel discipline.

      1. That is also cultural. If you are raised in a more rural environment then it is just part of growing up.

        For a city environment it is a different thing. Either way I appreciate and think we agree that at at some point whenever that is, you should show and teach basic firearms to your children.

        Swimming is also important, that is a must.

        1. My wife, who is from Spain, thought private ownership of guns was very odd.

          Then I take her to my childhood home in western PA and she goes target shooting with my brothers. She observes how they handle the rifles and pistols and how carefully they instruct my daughter regarding safety. By the end of the day, she’s popping off rounds with a niece’s .32 pistol.

  22. If everyone just takes their kids out of the schools, the problem will be solved.

    1. I heard a whooshing noise when I read it.

      Gimmie some help here CE.

  23. Colorado Teen Banned From School for Going Shooting With His Mother

    War On Women

  24. why the hell would a 16 yo kid even touch a gun
    نیوراک

    1. You can legally hunt at 12 in most places, some even younger. Shooting is also a good sport, it helps with concentration and eye hand coordination. I started shooting at 5 with my grandfather and hunting at 12 with my dad. I have never in my life, shot, threatened or thought if I get a gun it will improve a dispute. Their are a lot more responsible gun owners/users than criminal idiots.

    2. I started shooting when I was about 10

    3. IT: “why the hell would a 16 yo kid even touch a gun..”

      I began target shooting with my dad’s .22 rifle when I was thirteen or so. Why not?

      By the time I was sixteen I was driving a 3/4-ton pickup truck, which is a lot more complicated that shooting a rifle. So, again, why not?

    4. Guns are very cool. I started shooting when I was 12. Still do all the time.

    5. I started shooting at 5 with supervision. Most kids in my area did.

  25. I wish that that happened more often. It’s a shame it was so hard on the boy. But if somebody had reported Devon or Alec when they went out shooting maybe STEM would have ended differently. But instead, even though everybody knew it was only a matter of time and it was probably going to be those two, nothing happened. And instead we lost Kendrick. It’s sad that this happened to this boy. But if it means stopping incidents, then it’s a necessary evil.

    1. Except now his classmates are harassing him by calling him a terrorist and a mass shooter. Think that shit won’t come back to bite them in the ass?

      1. Those kids sound like pillow biting soyboys.

    2. Also, the red flag laws in Colorado would not have stopped the STEM shooting.

    3. Honestly, I hope you get harassed to the point that you cannot function at work or at home, you deserve it.

  26. Article says the boy was taunted relentlessly by classmates. Gee what happened to zero tolerance for bullying? Seems school officials only care about bullying when the person is not someone they dislike

    1. Schools rate down to torment the bullied as potential future shooters.

  27. Kid makes vague Snapchat about guns and you all jump on his dick to defend his right to do so. He should be getting bullied for being mentally retarded as well.

    1. New parody account?

      1. No, probably a progtard.

  28. Express only what’s bland and acceptable to extreme leftists, at least in any openly accessible forum.

  29. Lesson 1: DON’T put anything on “social media”.
    Fact: The majority of your fellow citizens – as illustrated by this and many other Reason stories – are complete morons. I mean, who filed the initial complaint? A moron. Who is running that (and many other) public school? A group of morons.
    Common sense is a commodity more rare than gold. Don’t expect it from your neighbors.

  30. “During the 2018–2019 fiscal year, Safe2Tell recorded 19,861 “actionable” tips — 4,400 more than the previous year.”

    What I want to know is out of 19,861 tips, how many involved school shootings?

  31. Did anyone find it odd that the students of this high school taunted a classmate as a “school shooter” who was known to be a practiced shooter?So much for survival instincts.

  32. The law must do so in such cases and hold those responsible to account

  33. So, the people who think this kid is a threat allow his classmates to bully him.

    Bullying is one of the causes of attacks by students.

    What’s wrong with this picture?

  34. The irony here is thick. The headline says the student was “banned” from school and got “kicked out.” It turns out that means that he was asked to explain what his snap meant, and after 5 minutes the school said in effect, “Thanks. head to class.”
    Meanwhile the Reason comments mob demands that school officials be harassed and harangued, that schools be closed, officials be fired, and sue ’em all to boot. All because of a 5 minute chat.
    YOU are cancel culture!
    YOU are the snowflakes!

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