Political Correctness

'Unbridled and Performative Student Activism Is a Disease of Affluence': Camille Paglia Edition

Some students at the University of the Arts want the firebrand feminist fired. Where did they get the idea they should be picking faculty?

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Camille Paglia, the controversial literary and social critic who identifies both as queer and trans, is drawing fire yet again. Students at her own institution, the University of the Arts (UArts) in Philadelphia, are calling for her to be fired. An online petition, currently with over 1,300 signatures, reads in part:

Camille Paglia should be removed from UArts faculty and replaced by a queer person of color. If, due to tenure, it is absolutely illegal to remove her, then the University must at least offer alternate sections of the classes she teaches, instead taught by professors who respect transgender students and survivors of sexual assault.

Another demand in the petition is that, if she can't be canned, the university will stop selling Paglia's books on campus and permanently disallow her from speaking on campus outside of her own classes. Although it's mostly non-faculty speakers who get deplatformed, Paglia is merely the latest target being attacked by students from her own institution. Students at Sarah Lawrence, for instance, are calling for political scientist Samuel Abrams to be fired for writing an op-ed in The New York Times calling for ideological diversity among administrators.

Paglia's critics claim that, despite her own alternative sexual identity, she is so hostile and bigoted towards trans people that her mere presence on campus constitutes an insult or threat. There's no question that she has been dismissive of some claims made by trans people and, even more so, dismissive of students who claim that being subjected to speech with which they disagree is a form of trauma. But Paglia has been teaching at UArts for over 30 years, so what caused this particular outrage? As The Atlantic's Conor Friedersdorf summarizes:

This month's protests began when it was announced that Paglia would give a lecture titled "Ambiguous Images:  Sexual Duality and Sexual Multiplicity in Western Art."… Two student activists…brought this lecture to the student body's attention through social media and raised their concerns to Title IX and other University administration about the school giving Camille a platform. This led to the University reaching out to ​Deja Lynn Alvarez, a local transgender activist, to facilitate a talk-back after Camille's lecture. Students were informed the day before the lecture that Camille had no plans to stay for the talk-back.

One of the people behind the anti-Paglia protest is Joseph McAndrews, a self-described "trans-masculine, non-binary Writing for Film and Television junior at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia." Writing at Queerty, McAndrews says they asked administrators, including the UArts' president, that "the event be moved off campus where it would not feel unsafe for LGBTQ students." After getting no response, McAndrews organized a sit-in during the lecture, which was disrupted by a fire alarm (they say "the alarm was never part of our plan, and no one knows who did it").

The day after the lecture (and protest, which included a "talk-back" session in which students vented their concerns to five faculty, none of whom was Paglia), University of the Arts President David Yager sent out an email that supported free speech and academic freedom. It reads in part:

I firmly believe that limiting the range of voices in society erodes our democracy. Universities, moreover, are at the heart of the revolutionary notion of free expression: promoting the free exchange of ideas is part of the core reason for their existence….

I believe this resolve holds even greater importance at an art school. Artists over the centuries have suffered censorship, and even persecution, for the expression of their beliefs through their work. My answer is simple: not now, not at UArts.

The University of the Arts is committed to the exercise of free speech and academic freedom, to addressing difficult or controversial issues and ideas through civil discussion, with respect for those who hold opinions different from our own.

"Students around the country are being called fascist simply because they have to fight to be heard," McAndrews laments while also putting forth what might be called a "consumer's rights" argument regarding their complaint:

I pay way too much tuition (around $34k after aid and that's not including room and board) to attend this university to just sit idly by and allow injustices such as this go unnoticed.

That's an interesting twist to an otherwise standard-issue story of enraged students making extreme demands on a university (fire this professor! eliminate inauthentic ethnic food from the cafeteria! censor this movie!). College, after all, is in a very basic sense, an economic exchange between students and institutions. In other parts of our lives, we negotiate the buyer-seller exchange all the time by complaining when we're unhappy, learning to live with goods or services with which we're dissatisfied, or choosing to take our business elsewhere (this is somewhat akin to the ideas of voice, loyalty, and exit as articulated by Albert O. Hirschman). Aren't students simply exercising their "voice" by demanding change?

Not when it comes to faculty and academic requirements, says Tom Nichols, who teaches at the U.S. Naval War College and is the author of The Death of Expertise. Such demands from students are "inimical to the entire premise of tenure and academic freedom," he writes in The Atlantic. "This is the kind of demand that sounds like it could have come out of China during the Cultural Revolution—if Maoists had been as obsessed with race and sexuality as they were with class." There is, he continues, something fundamentally wrong with

…students demanding a say in the hiring and firing of faculty whose views they merely happen not to like. This is a dangerous development—a triple threat to free speech, to the education of future citizens, and to the value of a college education.

Nichols argues—persuasively, to my mind—that the economic exchange between students and the college they attend is a particular sort of bargain. He notes that students really have little or no expertise in any of the subjects in which they're being instructed and hence are in a particularly bad position from which to evaluate which faculty should be promoted or fired. He runs through examples of students lobbying for less work (this happened recently at Brown, where students "demanded less schoolwork so that they could devote more effort to their 'social-justice responsibilities'"). "To some extent," writes Nichols, "unbridled and performative student activism is a disease of affluence," since students who are working or pulling long hours to complete coursework have less time for extracurricular activities of all sorts. He also argues:

Students must be reminded that they petitioned the institution for entry, and not the other way around; they asked the university to allow them to enter into a contract in which the professors are obligated to educate them and they are obligated to fulfill the requirements that will allow those professors to recommend them to the university for graduation.

This doesn't mean that students can't voice dissatisfaction with any aspect of the school they attend or that they are restricted either to exercising exit (transfer elsewhere) or loyalty (shut up already). But Nichols is surely right that giving control over faculty hiring and firing decisions would yield a university that is not only profoundly dumber than it is now but also less intellectually adventurous and free. It's not hard to see that institutions that did give students broad powers to dictate faculty would see their reputations diminished, which in turn would mean fewer students applying for admission in the first place.

If there is going to be pushback against the type of demand University of the Arts students are making, faculty really need to step up. Nichols mentions in passing that this trend toward student power started in the late 1960s and that "some of the grievances of campus protesters—from racism and sexism to the possibility of being sent to die in Southeast Asia—made sense." Since then, faculty have mostly abdicated their role in actually governing the university, happy to outsource that task to a proliferating number of administrators and student-life professionals so they can get on with research and teaching. In this, he sounds more than a little like Camille Paglia, who zeroed in on this same issue in a 2016 interview with Reason, saying, "It's a nightmare, an outrage, and none of the faculty have fought back [against student-directed political correctness on campus]….They pretend to be leftists, they're pygmys; they are passive worms, not to fight back against the bureaucrats."

That's the sort of attitude, of course, that keeps getting Paglia in trouble. And one of the reasons why she has been such an influential public intellectual for decades.

Watch that 2016 interview now:

I also interviewed Paglia in 2015. Read and watch that here.

Virginia Postrel interviewed Paglia back in 1995. Read it here.

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  1. It is easier to protest than it is to learn something. These people are just trained monkeys who are at some point going to turn on their handlers.

    Just another reason I am never going back to my old school

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sq8OU-7JDFA

    1. Not only should students not be picking faculty, but criminal elements in the student body who subject distinguished faculty to anything in the nature of unwanted criticism, hoaxes or mockery should promptly be arrested and jailed. I point this out because, in addition to the usual prurient behavior in our classrooms here at NYU, we have had to deal with unacceptable “parody” that we had to immediately refer to the police. See, in this regard, the documentation of our nation’s leading criminal “satire” case at:

      https://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

    2. You did not think the girl could be so cruel?

    3. Boy, I hate to point this out (not really), but students picking faculty is pretty much how organized education got its start. A person who wanted to learn a subject would hire a tutor. If the tutor charged more than one student could afford, a bunch of students would get together to hire the teacher. If the teacher didn’t perform well, he didn’t get paid, or got paid less.

      Teachers responded by insisting on standard rates of pay and a guarantee that they not be fired for non-performance. The university was invented by the Catholic Church as a go-between, a kind of union organizer for teachers. In exchange for vetting the teachers beforehand and verifying the teachers were actually faithful so that students weren’t being ripped off by bad teachers, the Church would also guarantee the instructors a position and pay, so that they wouldn’t get short-changed by the students. This is the origin of the title “professor” – one who professes the Catholic Faith, and is therefore trustworthy to teach the primary university subjects of theology and philosophy.

      So, yeah, secular universities still perform that role. They’re just middle-men. And yes, the students have every right to question whether the professors are actually any good, i.e., whether the university is actually holding up its end of the bargain.

      Now, transgenders, homosexuals, etc. are nutcases, psychologically unstable and certainly exhibiting poor judgement in large areas of their lives, but so was Howard Hughes after his head injury in a plane crash, so…

      It’s hilarious how “libertarians” so readily abandon their economic values when they see other aspects of their value system threatened.

      1. “The university was invented by the Catholic Church as a go-between,”

        That’s just plain ahistorical. Yes, many early European universities developed from prior institutions – mostly monastic or other religious forms of education, but to say that the Catholic church intentionally created the structure for such express purposes is silly and ignores all sorts of other forms and places of higher learning that pre-date them and/or occurred outside of Catholic influence. The structure and operational relationships of the modern university come from myriad sources. Pinning it all on one agency defies credibility.

        1. I didn’t say that was the ONLY reason the Catholic Church invented the university. But it certainly was part of what happened.

          Historically, students have ALWAYS been able to fire their teachers. The fact that the particular students under discussion are insane doesn’t change the historical fact.

          It is also a fact that any actual libertarian would celebrate the free market in action (students attempting to get what they perceive as value for what everyone perceives as money). So, no matter how much you dislike the history, there’s no getting away from the fact that Nick’s take on this is not at all libertarian, nor are any of the comments disparaging the students for thinking they had a right to employ who they wanted.

          The student quoted in the story may be crazy in other aspects of his life, but he IS the one paying tens of thousands of dollars. If he wants to waste it by hiring only PC professors, that’s his lookout, and his right.

          The snowflakes are the ones who claim to be libertarian, but then attack this student for exercising his right. Is the student an idiot? Obviously, yes. But does he have a right to try to get Paglia fired? Also, obviously, yes.

          1. I guess you missed the point about students “petitioning” for admission to a university, the granting of which is far from assured, depending on the school. This takes the university setting far out of the realm of a traditional commercial transaction. Universities select students based on multiple criteria, and with the submission of an application is the implication that the prospective student agrees that the conditions existing at the university are acceptable to them. If the student submitted with their application a cover letter stating that they intended to attempt to wield undue influence in the overall policies and administration of the university and were accepted anyway, your comparison would be apt. Instead, what you describe would be akin to altering the terms of a contract after the parties had already mutually agreed to the terms thereof, a decidedly “unlibertarian” proposition, to say the least.

          2. But the church didn’t invent the university, merely gave it a particular form.

            Beyond that this is not remotely students ‘firing’ their chosen educators. If the students want to hire someone else they are free to do so. But what they initially purchased was a specific sort of package deal. You could try to characterize this as a re-negotiation of the terms, but even that is wrong. This is students thinking that paying tuition means they have purchased a stake in the institution. They have not.

            You insisting that your position is the true libertarian position is getting as tiresome as it is invalid.

            1. Just to reiterate, what part of these students seeking to “permanently disallow her from speaking on campus outside of her own classes” do you find to be a libertarian “right to employ who they wanted?”

              Because it is nothing of the sort.

              1. The students are paying customers. If that’s what they want, and they can manage to get it, then what is NOT libertarian about that?

                The university has two choices: fire the customers or fire Paglia. If enough customers don’t like Paglia, then the university goes out of business because the customers stop streaming in.

                The customers drive the business. They are letting the business know that tastes in the product have changed. How is that NOT libertarianism in action?

                1. The students aren’t satisfied with being free to not take her classes. They want to prevent other students from taking her classes. That’s step of totalitarianism.

  2. “”Where did they get the idea they should be picking faculty?””

    I going with their parents. Not directly but by fostering the notion that they are special and constantly letting them have their way.

    1. That and our entire popular culture that makes a fetish out of protesting and trying to “make a difference”.

      1. Who’s more productive for society? Kids and vigilantes filling potholes or crying temper tantrum throwing adult-children.

    2. I going with their parents.

      Only in a tiny number of cases. Student activists are coached by faculty and administrative activists. Student activism is best understood as internships in the academia-media-NGO economic complex.

      1. A lot of university administrators in the student affairs divisions have their degrees in grievance studies, so have been fully imbued with the SJW mindset.

    3. I wonder how many of these students have heard their parents threaten to have a teacher fired because they did not give little Billy or Suzie the A that they so obviously earned and deserved. Probably not the majority, but certainly a number well north of zero.

    4. They are not merely picking their faculty, they are actively seeking to suppress any other faculty from reaching any other students.

      Grossly authoritarian, certainly not libertarian.

  3. Where did they get the idea they should be picking faculty?

    They got fired that barista whose multiple microaggressions made them feel unsafe ordering cappuccinos, so why can’t they do the same to the monster literally trying to make their education challenging?

    1. Those hate studies degrees won’t pay for themselves.

  4. Anyone remember the skit from the old SNL [when it was funny] between Garrett Morris and John Belushi, “You old niggy, I new niggy?”

    Everyone wants to be the “new niggy.”

      1. What do you think of John Lennon?

        Myself, I have always preferred Paul.

        1. I like Dick Cavett better than either of them. Most thoughtful talk show ever [not that the bar is very high on that].

          1. Agreed. Too bad he’s such a flaming commie though.

  5. http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2019/5/6/winthrop-dhall-sit-in/

    The untrained monkeys are Harvard are protesting a law professor who had the termity to represent Harvey Weinstein.

    1. People who are obviously bad people don’t deserve representation. We should just let the justice system run rough-shod all over them. Because we already know they are bad. That’s how law would work if it was truly fair.

      1. That’s how law would work if the current crop of assholes had their way.

      2. Meh, I remember when the USA made a point of giving a trial to someone accused of being involved in 9/11 shortly after the attack. It is easier to respect the fundamental rights of someone with scary friends.

    2. Fortunately, it’s the undergrads protesting this. If there were/are any law students protesting, they should be summarily dismissed for having a total lack of understanding of how our adversarial legal system works.

      1. A leftist law student / attorney / judge is a leftist first. And leftism is incompatible with — is a rejection of — law & order / clear rules that apply equally to all / objective standards / level playing field. For leftists, it’s “empathy” for favored persons / groups, denial of any and all “rights” or “due process” to disfavored ones. They call this “social justice” (as opposed to plain old justice).

  6. I look at that picture and can’t help but think that wow old lesbians really do look like old lesbians.

    1. So do a lot of the younger ones.

      1. I don’t know. Most of the hot women I meet tell me they are lesbians.

        1. If you’re a guy, that’s only because they don’t want to sleep with you.

  7. >>>brought this lecture to the student body’s attention through social media

    herd mentality + steroidal means of communication = entitlement generation

  8. The answer to your question is the administration that caves into all of their retarded demands and, in fact, lets them pick faculty all of the time.

    You assume the administrators DISAGREE with the students. That is a silly assumption.

    “Students at Sarah Lawrence, for instance, are calling for political scientist Samuel Abrams to be fired for writing an op-ed in The New York Times calling for ideological diversity among administrators.”

    An example — why would STUDENTS give two shits about the makeup of ADMINISTRATION? Because administrators are their buddies now.

    “One of the people behind the anti-Paglia protest is Joseph McAndrews, a self-described “trans-masculine, non-binary Writing for Film and Television junior at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.””

    I bet his output is truly impressive and well-worth reading.

    “students demanding a say in the hiring and firing of faculty whose views they merely happen not to like.”

    Nichols is a fucking moron. And that he thinks this is NEW is hilarious.

    1. Nichols is one of Joe and Mika’s favorite guests.

    2. I think this is largely correct. Universities need to stop taking these ridiculous demands seriously. Not every dumbfuck with a petition signed by other dumbfucks deserves an audience with University leadership.

      By all means, let them petition and protest. But don’t take them seriously, if this is the substance.

      Instead, leadership grants them a platform, and validates their concerns. They hire a few new “administrators” to listen to these assholes—and these administrators come from the same group of clowns doing the protesting. RInse. Repeat.

      One of the best lessons I’ve ever learned is that I don’t matter, in the grand scheme. Not to the world. Not even to my employer—sure, I add enough value to earn my salary—but they can replace me without losing sleep.

      The self-importance of these assholes bothers me more than the ridiculous tripe they are spouting. No one cares what they think—yet they are encouraged by the pushovers that run these universities.

      1. Never ‘Bend the Knee’ to these toxic killjoys, because if you do, their demands will never end. They are never satisfied.

        But since U Arts refuses to bend, I expect this kerfluffle to die out pretty quickly.

    3. His self-given Game of Thrones type title he gives himself also shows he’s a pretentious dick too.

    4. It is an incestuous relationship. Administrators grant license to students in order to exert control over faculty in a manner that they otherwise could not express. That much of this coincides with the growth of administrative staff at such institutions is hardly coincidental.

      It’s almost analogous to cancer in a biologic sense.

      Universities have grown obese by gorging themselves on a fire hose of government subsidized ‘free’ student loan money. Creating all sorts of silly and otherwise worthless programs to occupy students, resulting in myriad worthless degrees. They sustained much of this by expanding their administrative ranks and absorbing a significant amount of these otherwise useless people. Now those people are doing actual harm to the very institutions that created and sustain them.

      It’s a feedback mechanism gone awry that now threatens the host.

    5. Yeah. They lost me at Tom Nichols. His book should be the Dearth of Expertise – an Autobiography.

  9. “But Nichols is surely right that giving control over faculty hiring and firing decisions would yield a university that is not only profoundly dumber than it is now but also less intellectually adventurous and free.”

    Has he and Reason not noticed colleges for the last few decades?

  10. leaving this much room for right wing non-feminists to defend a left wing feminist is exactly the type of psychotic shit that proves time and again why the left is a total joke filled with spoiled children. I’d say get your shit together but while you’re arguing about genders the right is continuing to fill courts and ensure your Utopian fantasies remain just that.

    1. The left used to be spoiled children. Now they are straight up psychotic lunatics.

      1. No, when I was in a psych ward several days ago, the millenial patients were willing to push back against the goverment healthcare providers there. Only the old mentally ill people were left-wing enough to support that system.

  11. Camille, if you lose your job at UA, can you come write for Reason?

    1. I just want a video of her knocking heads together like Moe.

  12. Students were informed the day before the lecture that Camille had no plans to stay for the show trial talk-back.

  13. Being a college administrator can be extremely lucrative nowadays. Hence, the customer loan-proceeds conduit student is always right.

    1. Damn tags!!!

  14. “One of the people behind the anti-Paglia protest is Joseph McAndrews, a self-described “trans-masculine, non-binary Writing for Film and Television junior at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.””

    Sorry, why should anyone care what a self-selected worthless piece of shit thinks about his professors?

  15. Yeah? Who’s demanding that they value logic and science? You?

  16. I think the state should stop funding these institutions or guaranteeing student loans. Once that happens, students are perfectly within their rights to demand that they be taught what they are paying for.

    As long as old white men like myself are paying for the education of these jerks, I’m going to push for making them listen to what I want them to listen to and what I am paying for.

  17. “Students around the country are being called fascist simply because they have to fight to be heard,” McAndrews laments ”

    No, they’re being called fascist because they’re trying to shut down any speech from anybody who differs ideologically from them by even the tiniest degree.

    In addition to being a fascist, McAndrews also appears to be a whiny imbecile.

    1. Excuse me….that’s a trans-masculine, non-binary whiny imbecile to you!

  18. “Students around the country are being called fascist simply because they have to fight to be heard,” McAndrews laments while also putting forth what might be called a “consumer’s rights” argument regarding their complaint:

    “Fight to be heard”? Seems the main problem is that you never actually shut up when you don’t get what you want.

  19. This is the appropriate age to engage in obnoxiously sincere and overreacting activism about stuff happening in your immediate surroundings. It’s part of the college experience. We managed to organize and bitch about the stupidest trivial shit in my day, all while the Iraq War was getting off the ground.

    I felt like we pretty uniformly were in favor of a liberal attitude toward free speech. This stuff is new. Back then, if liberal/gay activists had a rulebook, one rule would be “Develop a thick skin. Being a whiny bitch and advertising your hysterical sensitivity is no way to win a competition.”

    1. “We managed to organize and bitch about the stupidest trivial shit in my day,”

      The point of your current comment is well taken, but otherwise it still must be “your day”

    2. Now, on the other hand, the competition is just to advertise you’re the whiniest, most hysterically sensitive bitch around.

  20. To some extent,” writes Nichols, “unbridled and performative student activism is a disease of affluence,”

    While true I think the focus should be slightly different. These idiots prefer activism as a career because Chemistry is hard. Nothing in the world is easier than calling others x-ist or y-phobic.

    1. The hard part is figuring out how to get paid for it, though.

      So they apply to “work” in post-secondary education.

      1. The hard part is figuring out how to get paid for it, though.

        That’s why a key demand of any protest is “hire more grievance professors like I want to be”. Same for “make grievance studies classes required”. This is why our latest “financial reform” bill included authorizing a Center of Gender and Racial Equity for the financial services industry.

    2. Hey, I’m x-ist and y-phobic. All of my Cartesian graphs look like number lines.

      1. + Ω

  21. The entire lecture that is the subject of this piece was posted on YouTube, including the moment when it was interrupted. I watched the talk from the beginning and was surprised, given Paglia’s reputation, at how thin and lacking in substance it seemed to be. Her discussion also seemed to not bring anything new to the table and it’s been decades since I took a classics (or any other humanities) course. If I were a student there I would have been completely bored. Her lecture was interrupted at a very specific moment, when Paglia was describing a Greek statue with two sets of genitalia as being an “oddity,” a “fusion of two different individuals,” etc. The protesters stood up and interrupted in order to assert that trans people have always existed—that seems factual to me. Surely that fact would have been a better starting point than her tired patter involving the male/female dichotomy? (A “fact” that admittedly formed the backbone of my own education.)
    I think what this incident is really about is the issue of tenure. While it may be intended to protect the freedom of opinion of academics, it also serves to keep people in powerful positions whose ideas are never really challenged because they have a job guarantee, something libertarians should be strongly against. Even when I was at university it was a sad reality, in the humanities anyway, that the tenured profs were often the most boring and old-fashioned, dragging the same set of lecture notes behind them year after year. Sessionals, on the other hand, always had the most interesting ideas.

    1. That is the reason for this controversy? That you referred to a statue with two sets of genitals as potentially being a combination of two people? That is why she is a supposed threat to the entire alphabet community?

      I guess we’re supposed to believe that her decades long criticism of feminist orthodoxy and opposition to political correctness has absolutely nothing to do with the demand that she be removed.

    2. ” it also serves to keep people in powerful positions whose ideas are never really challenged because they have a job guarantee, something libertarians should be strongly against. “

      Wrong. Most broadly it’s called the right of contract. More specifically it hi how institutions known as universities establish much of their value.

      Your power dialectic is not a concern of liberty, it is the language of Marxism.

  22. What can I say about these Socially Retarded Justice Warriors that hasn’t been said before?

    That they’re retarded, uptight, bitter control freaks who never get laid, who never party, and who lay claim to victim hood at every opportunity, and think that America is the most racist, sexist, and all around worst country that ever existed?

  23. “even more so, dismissive of students who claim that being subjected to speech with which they disagree is a form of trauma.”
    Then the left wing politicians are serial killers with everything they say. I have been traumatized daily for the last 15 years.

    1. I have been traumatized daily for the last 15 years.

      Some trauma victims are more equal than others.

  24. “(this happened recently at Brown, where students “demanded less schoolwork so that they could devote more effort to their ‘social-justice responsibilities'”)“

    My boss hates millennials and refuses to hire them. After this, I’m on his side.

    Gen Z is our hope. Millennials are nothing more than a disease and should be exterminated.

    1. Gen Z will be exterminated by peanut allergy.

    2. I’m with you – the kids I’ve met think the next generation (Millennials) are wussies. And most of the kids I know can’t wait to drive a car.

    3. Tell your boss to hire kids who went to state colleges in Red states.
      It’s no guarantee of quality, but it is a good starting point.

  25. Camille can go fuck itself (xeself, whatever).

  26. Has anyone tried to figure out what fraction of the student body are activists like these, what fraction are inactive but sympathetic, and which fraction wish they would all shut up but are too afraid or apathetic to say anything publicly? I’ll bet the last group is actually a silent, but vast majority.

    1. “I’ll bet the last group is actually a silent, but vast majority.”

      I bet they still want to be liked. Bret Easton Ellis, author of American Psycho, says our age of Internet has turned us all into actors. Not that we perform on the stage as much as we’ve taken on the profession’s dire need to be liked and well regarded by others.

  27. trans-masculine, non-binary

    Jack Burton: Oh, my god, no. Please! What is that? Don’t tell me!

  28. >who respect transgender students and survivors of sexual assault.
    fucking dropped right there. Who the hell are these people to demand respect from anyone? Furthermore, under what pretense do they demand such respect? What have they ever done to earn it? What aspect of being mentally ill or having not successfully killed a rapist automagically counts as having earned respect? Fuck those people sideways.

    1. “automagically.”

      I’m swiping that word, thanks.

  29. “‘Students around the country are being called fascist simply because they have a right to be heard,’ McAndrews laments.”

    When did the right to free speech morph into the right to be heard? The latter implies that others are obligated to listen. McAndrews’s argument is authoritative; one of his goals appears to be the suppression of opposing thought – this sounds kind of fascist.

    1. “When did the right to free speech morph into the right to be heard?”

      Right about the same time the freedom of religion morphed into the “freedom of worship.”

      Word games from the left who took Orwell as a how-to manual, not a warning.

    2. Fascist and irony-impaired.

  30. Weeell, this wrinkled up old broad helped create this monster… So I can’t say I feel too bad about it trying to eat her now. I am getting kind of stoked to see the left attacking their own so hard all of a sudden. It may help make the saner left leaners break from the madness when they otherwise wouldn’t.

    1. Weeell, this wrinkled up old broad helped create this monster…

      I don’t think that this is true.

      Paglia’s been railing against the excesses of the left for a long time–while saying that she’s part of it.

      Paglia, like so many, still hold tight to the notion that there’s some ‘good’ left out there. A left that isn’t wholly committed to the pursuit of total power. A left that HAS some belief in the right wing goals they lied about to gain the vast hordes of useful idiots they liquidate whenever they think they’re getting close to ‘total power’.

      For all her brilliance, she doesn’t seem to grasp that all the liberties that make up ‘liberal’ are the antithesis of all leftism and are firmly grounded in the individualism that is the first step rightward on the political compass.

      And yet she makes the argument for it over and over again.

  31. Affluence Leads To Satiation

    Excerpt from the novel, Retribution Fever:

    Having basked in the comfortable context of satiation after World War II, the average American Euro-Caucasian had done next to nothing to oppose the radicals of The Left. Many even supported them. Years later with the election of Obama to President, the Marxist revolutionaries successfully set the nation aflame without firing a shot!

    Meanwhile, amid increasing turmoil Americans had continued living on borrowed time and money in their state of diminishing satiation. The context continued to elicit among the indoctrinated uneducated the arrogance of ignorance. It elicited among the indoctrinating elitists the ignorance of arrogance.

  32. “permanently disallow her from speaking on campus outside of her own classes. “</i.

    This, from "students" of "higher learning." The University should re-examine the admission process for everyone involved, and rescind most of them.

    They all need remedial Jr. HS civics lessons.

    1. And I need remedial HTML lessons.

  33. If Paglia can’t hold her own job against the demands of a bunch of loud undergrads, then she deserves to be fired.

    It’s hilarious that someone who spent her whole life railing against normal behaviour is now trying to hide behind tenure in order to keep her job. What a laughing stock her “supporters” are for defending that kind of nonsense.

  34. Fucking crybaby retards, as usual over privileged brats shitting in their diapers and sucking on their thumbs. Their like hissy fit children that think if you shout, yell and cry enough at the adults like they did their parents, they’ll get their spoiled way.

  35. Where did they get the idea they should be picking faculty?

    The Cultural Revolution that academians have admired ever since they were PhD students avoiding the Vietnam War.

    1. What’s wrong with students choosing their teachers? What’s wrong with holding faculty accountable for the quality of their thought or teaching? Paglia is a pretty low-wattage thinker. What’s wrong with demanding someone more capable?

      1. What’s wrong with students choosing their teachers?

        Nothing.

        What’s wrong with holding faculty accountable for the quality of their thought or teaching?

        Everything.

        Paglia is a pretty low-wattage thinker.

        Don’t buy her educational services, then.

        What’s wrong with demanding someone more capable?

        They’re attempting to change the terms of various contracts unilaterally by mob action.

        If they all bought a 5 GBit net connection from an ISP at some price, and then attempted to force the ISP to upgrade their connection to 10 GBit at the same price they’re already paying by picketing the ISP and not letting workers in, they would be arrested and charged with a slew of felonies & misdemeanors.

        Pacta sunt servanda; they can’t produce a contract which gives them veto power over who their teachers are: when they contracted with the university for educational services, then they bought the educational services of those professors the university employs.

        1. I went to university and I didn’t sign any contract with them. I’m not sure what you’re on about. Students make demands. Isn’t that what free speech is? Are they not free to demand better teachers?

          1. I went to university and I didn’t sign any contract with them.

            So the university you went to donated its educational services to you: it was a gift from the university.

            Students make demands.

            About the gift they receive?

            1. “it was a gift from the university.”

              What’s more, nobody tried to prevent me from criticizing the university, its faculty or its policies. Students are a demanding lot. And they don’t sign contracts with universities. Even if they did it’s hard to imagine these contracts preventing students from voicing their opinions on university matters.

      2. And you of course, are a genius on the Reason comments section,
        Paglia turned her Yale PhD dissertation under the tutelage of Harold Bloom into a massive tome (which I highly doubt you’ve read) on the history of centuries of art and literature. She’s published books of essays of insights into higher education, poetry, film, and art. She’s one of the most popular professors at UA and a highly accessible, intelligent public speaker. And you’ve accomplished what, exactly, through the depth of your thinking, you one-dimensional twit?

        1. “Paglia turned her Yale PhD dissertation under the tutelage of Harold Bloom into a massive tome ”

          That was long ago and doesn’t make her a good teacher. Have you read the recent interviews with her published here? Were you impressed by them? As you say, I am a genius here at the comment section, noted for my bullshit detection capabilities, I believe. Paglia set them off with her expounding on matters I have a better grasp of. I’ve read Foucault and Deleuze, the French philosophers, for example. Paglia hasn’t yet chooses to mis-characterize their work. This is not the hallmark of a revered scholar.

          1. I’m sure you’re more well-read on Foucault than Paglia. LOL

            1. But it’s Paglia’s reading that’s at issue here, especially when she gives her opinion on matters she knows little about. Like Foucault and Deleuze, for example. An art historian with an interest in sexuality not knowing Foucault is nothing to boast about.

  36. […] Some students at the University of the Arts want the firebrand feminist fired. Where did they get th… […]

  37. “I wear the chain I forged in life,” replied the Ghost. “I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it. Is its pattern strange to you?”

    The academics fostered and encouraged this bullshit. Now they start crying when it gets turned against them.

  38. […] count as harassment under Hughes’ proposal? Go ask the perpetually aggrieved students at University of the Arts or Seton Hall and get back to me. Facebook acted quickly to take down the livestream of the […]

  39. […] count as harassment under Hughes’ proposal? Go ask the perpetually aggrieved students at University of the Arts or Seton Hall and get back to me. Facebook acted quickly to take down the livestream of the […]

  40. “Where did they get the idea they should be picking faculty?”

    From their administration and faculty collaborators.

  41. […] Paglia’s take-no-prisoners style. In an online petition, organized by Joseph McAndrews, a self-described “trans-masculine, non-binary Writing for Film and Television junior at the University of the […]

  42. Amazing article! Reminds me of another one from .com/. Very informative, thanks for sharing!

  43. […] goods and services or for ideas—are supposed to work. In the parlance of political economist Albert O. Hirschman, CrossFit is not simply exercising its right of “exit” by leaving Facebook but also its […]

  44. […] for goods and services or for ideas—are supposed to work. In the parlance of political economist Albert O. Hirschman, CrossFit is not simply exercising its right of “exit” by leaving Facebook but also its […]

  45. […] for goods and services or for ideas—are supposed to work. In the parlance of political economist Albert O. Hirschman, CrossFit is not simply exercising its right of “exit” by leaving Facebook but also its right […]

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