College Admissions

Time to Put the College Admissions System on a Rocket and Shoot It Into the Sun

Cheating scandal should have taxpayers asking whether it's right to subsidize the campus party lifestyles of celebrity scions who fake water polo careers.

|

OJ
Olivia Jade / Screenshot via Youtube

"I don't know how much of school I'm gonna attend," Olivia Jade, a YouTube star and daughter of Full House actress Lori Loughlin, told her fans just before she moved to the University of Southern California (USC) to begin freshman year. "But I'm gonna go in and talk to my deans and everyone, and hope that I can try and balance it all. But I do want the experience of like game days, partying….I don't really care about school, as you guys all know."

With that attitude, one might have hoped Jade could not earn admission to USC. But her parents paid half a million dollars to a man named William Singer, and Singer bribed all the necessary officials so that Jade's dream of going to college for the partying could come true.

Now Loughlin is one of 50 people facing federal fraud charges for participating in Singer's schemes to trick various colleges and universities into admitting wealthy but underqualified applicants. The perpetrators—which include another actress, Desperate Housewives' Felicity Huffman—gave Singer millions of dollars to guarantee their kids would be admitted to first-choice schools like Yale, Stanford, University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of Texas at Austin.

Singer's scheme was stunningly deceitful. His two main strategies were bribing test-taking officials so that they would give his clients more time to take the SAT or ACT—or even supply the correct answers directly—and bribing athletic officials to falsely claim the client was a high-value recruit for a certain sport. This often involved sending fake photos of the kids engaged in athletic activities—pole-vaulting, swimming, etc.—for sports they didn't play. Jade, for instance, gained admission after submitting a photo implying she was a talented coxswain on the crew team. She was not. But a $50,000 payment to a USC senior athletic director was all it took to facilitate the lie.

Indeed, athletic administrative bloat appears to be a significant contributing factor to the success of this scam. Many of the bribe-takers were coaches, and it's fairly worrying they have so much sway over the admissions process. One downside of forcing universities to hire a bunch of administrators—something federal guidance has encouraged for decades—is that there are more potential targets for Singer's schemes.

Unfortunately, colleges and universities routinely prioritize factors other than academic ability when making admissions decisions. Athletic considerations matter far too much, as do legacy connections. And of course, donating a new wing to the university's hospital or library is a good way to make sure your kid gets a second look. Singer took things much further, but it's a difference of degrees. As Frank Bruni wrote in The New York Times, "It may be legal to pledge $2.5 million to Harvard just as your son is applying—which is what Jared Kushner's father did for him—and illegal to bribe a coach to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars,but how much of a difference is there, really? Both elevate money over accomplishment. Both are ways of cutting in line."

The best remedy to this problem might be to admit that college is, to some degree, a scam. Note that these parents were evidently unconcerned that their kids—who were often coached to fake learning disabilities so they could get more time on the ACT and SAT—might struggle with their course loads. It's because college is a joke, and it's easy enough for an academically disinclined grifter—an Olivia Jade, if you will—to get by studying nonsense subjects. They're paying for the experience and the diploma, not the actual education.

This is a point that Bryan Caplan raises in his excellent book The Case Against Education. Caplan argues that most of the value of a college education is signaling rather than skills. Students don't learn very much that will be useful to them in the job world, and even if they do, they quickly forget it. But a diploma signals to employers that the diploma-holder is competent in some abstract way—they jumped through a bunch of impressive-looking hoops, and are thus more worthy of a job than people who didn't. The implication of Caplan's research is that public funding of higher education is therefore a waste: It doesn't actually benefit society to subsidize a signaling mechanism if there's little relevant skill-gaining along the way. It just punishes everybody who, for whatever reason, doesn't have access to the right hoops.

If we are going to continue to publicly fund higher education, taxpayers might rightly ask whether institutions that receive federal dollars should be permitted to privilege the wealthy, the donor class, the athletes (both faux and actual), and certain racial groups (resulting in abject discrimination against Asians) over applicants who might actually be interested in checking a book out of the library. But if higher education is really just about celebrity scions pretending to play water polo in order to gain admittance to an exclusive partying club, maybe it's long past time to hit the defund button.

NEXT: Don't Be Fooled by Polls Showing GOP Interest in Challenging Trump

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Fun fact: I have spilled more seed on my chest over Lori Loughlin than any other woman.

          1. Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail.

            +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+……… http://WWW.PAYSHD.COM

        1. Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail.

          +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+…………….. http://www.Just4Work.com

        2. I earned $9000 last month by working online just for 7 to 8 hours on my laptop and this was so easy that i myself could not believe before working on this site. GBd If You too want to earn such a big money then come?2019 news
          Try it, you won’t regret it!?..

          SEE HERE http://xurl.es/Justwork

          1. Do you need a college degree?

          2. Be careful…that’s $108,000/year and AOC wants 70% of it. That leaves you with $32,000…oops, before state and local taxes. Better to get a $15/hour job at Mickydees.

      1. on Saturday I got a gorgeous Ariel Atom after earning $6292 this ? four weeks past, after lot of struggels Google, Yahoo, Facebook proffessionals have been revealed the way and cope with gape for increase home income in suffcient free time.You can make $9o an hour working from home easily??. VIST THIS SITE RIGHT HERE
        >>=====>>>> http://www.Theprocoin.com

    1. She’s not that great.

      1. She grew up into a pretty good MILF. She works for me. I think her daughter is kind of homely though.

        1. I guess if you like that 50 year old look.

          1. I imagine she is pretty disapointing with her makeup off. She has probably had a lot of bad work done. But for the over 50 weight class she isn’t bad.

            1. She did nothing wrong and this entire incident has been blown way out of proportion. She should be praised for helping us do what needs to be done to bring money into our institutions of higher education, including through the admissions process, so often encumbered as it is by outdated rules and technicalities that no serious faculty administrator takes seriously.

              Here at NYU, we are proud not only to rank higher than every other university in terms of academic excellence, but to offer the highest tuition in the country to anyone who can afford to pay it, and we stand by our wrongly impugned colleagues at Yale and UCLA. How could they have known about the petty regulations being invoked against Loughlin and other parents?

              Nobody here even reads the faculty code anymore, for there is simply no time to waste on such nonsense. Furthermore, we have left nearly all of our competitors behind with our cutting-edge defense of scholarly reputation and our principled opposition to the so-called “free speech” baloney we keep hearing about on various Internet forums. See the documentation of our nation’s leading criminal “satire” case at:

              https://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

        2. I think her daughter is kind of homely though.

          Eh. If she ever grows into an actual woman I’m sure she’d be a catch. College separates the recedevist overgrown highschoolers from the people who are actually realizing their passage to adulthood and a place in the world.

      2. She’s among the more natural beauts if you ask me. Same with McDowell.

        Better than the skanks that pass off as ‘beautiful’ like Jolie, Lawrence or Roberts and so on.

        1. I do not care for Mcdowell. At all.

          1. Get out.

            Turn in your Straight Man card and GTFO!

    2. Google is now paying $17000 to $22000 per month for working online from home. I have joined this job 2 months ago and i have earned $20544 in my first month from this job. I can say my life is changed-completely for the better! Check it out whaat i do…..

      click here ======?? http://www.Theprocoin.com

    3. Google is now paying $17000 to $22000 per month for working online from home. I have joined this job 2 months ago and i have earned $20544 in my first month from this job. I can say my life is changed-completely for the better! Check it out whaat i do…..

      click here ======?? http://www.Theprocoin.com

    4. I once spilled seed on my chest at the garden center of a Home Depot. I was reaching for a large bag of lawn grass seed on a high shelf (there were no more on the lower part) and of course the bag had a large hole in it.

      1. That’s quite the strange euphemism but I’ll accept it.

      2. Damn large holes.

      3. Translation: couldn’t find a picture of a hot girl, so went with a picture of Rosie O’Donnell.

    5. Perhaps you shouldn’t be doing that to yourself while hanging like a bat…

    6. Google is now paying $17000 to $22000 per month for working online from home. I have joined this job 2 months ago and i have earned $20544 in my first month from this job. I can say my life is changed-completely for the better! Check it out whaat i do…..

      click here ======?? http://www.payshd.com

    7. Your chest, huh?

      1. The ceiling!

    8. You have incredibly bad taste!

    9. You have incredibly bad taste!

    10. You have incredibly bad taste!

    11. Crusty, her daughter isn’t bad either. Could maybe get a mother/daughter threesome thing going.

    12. How the hell do you masturbate?

    13. I earned $9000 last month by working online just for 7 to 8 hours on my laptop and this was so easy that i myself could not believe before working on this site. GBd If You too want to earn such a big money then come?2019 news
      Try it, you won’t regret it!?..

      SEE HERE http://www.Aprocoin.com

    14. Nice,

  2. If you defund college, (which I am all in favor of) you’ll need to repeal Griggs v. Duke Power which was codified into the 1991 Civil Rights Act.

    Of course neither of those things is ever going to happen, but it’s nice to dream.

    1. Why is it that you R types always link reducing govt with bringing back Jim Crow?

      1. Jim Crow? Really? Any argument against affirmative action must be an argument for segregation is what you are saying? Rather shallow thinking there.

        1. You’re not gonna drown at JFree’s end of the gene-pool.

          1. Probably not if your conscious.

        2. I’m not the one who’s linking a call to eliminate state funding for higher ed with a call to restore workplace segregation.

          1. Again a shallow argument. Being against disparate impact does not make one in favor of workplace segregation. I know nuanced arguments escape you.

            1. It’s not a ‘shallow argument’. Your strawman phrasing is COMPLETELY FUCKING IRRELEVANT to the comment to which I posted – to wit If you defund college, (which I am all in favor of) you’ll need to repeal Griggs v. Duke Power

              I really don’t give a shit about how you want to phrase Griggs v Duke (you call it disparate impact, I call it Jim Crow)– repealing that is completely irrelevant to defunding colleges. Tying them together is a typical paleoMisesBS R tactic – tie one thing that is transparently libertarian (defund colleges) to something else that is not at all relevant to the original and which raises a separate set of questions about one’s motives as well – in order to divert attention in hopes of starting some BS argument full of heat and zero light. No surprise it also helps serve to render libertarian ideas as foolish as the person making that sort of argument.

              1. The entire case was decided on disparate impact. Straw man really? You entire argument is nothing but a straw man and demonization. The case was decided based upon the concept of disparate impact and it was the case that set the precedent for disparate impact. You are cherry picking and refusing to grant legitimacy to anything but your definition and your take. That is the definition of a shallow argument and a straw man argument. Sorry, live with it.

                1. JFree may not be using the same “code” book as y’all, but if you get over the fucking infantile word games, he’s right on the money (for once). There is absolutely no fucking connection between the two things in question, and moreover Griggs v. Duke Power was sensibly decided in the context of an America without an absolute right to free association. If free association had political clout, my judgment would differ, but as it stands it’s self-discrediting to talk about “repealing” it (precedent is not “repealed”, btw).

                  1. If free association had political clout, my judgment would differ, but as it stands it’s self-discrediting to talk about “repealing” it

                    I don’t get this: because a tenet of political philosophy isn’t popular currently, a reference to it is ‘self-discrediting’? IMO that gives too much credit (of sovereignty) to the mob.

                  2. There is no connection? Really? How the fuck do you decide that, when it was the very case that set precedent on disparate impact. It was stated as such in the judgement. It isn’t fucking word games. Infantile or otherwise. It may have been the correct outcome but for the wrong reasons. And I wasn’t the one who said repeal. Reading comprehension difficult for you?

    2. I’d favor defunding ALL public education. All of it.

      If parents don’t care enough about their kids to educate them – why should I?

      The best way to devalue something is to give it away for free… to force it on people who neither want it nor deserve it.

      We’re headed for “Idiocracy” as it is… mainly because we keep mixing the morons in with the smart folks – then dumbing everything down for the morons.

      1. “I’d favor defunding ALL public education. All of it.” What an absolutely stupid and ridiculous idea. The US is already dragging up the rear of academic performance relative to many other nations which provide a free public education. In fact it was free education which made this country great.

        Obviously you do not know where the smart people are in our society who are keep us on the cutting edge of technology and research, administering business, and coordinating matters of public needs. They have by and large come out of the public education system and the best ones have foreign backgrounds, especially Asian.

        Middle class US parents have devalued the importance of education, many favoring sports and social activities for their kids. You BambiB are typical of those who don’t care anymore about the quality of education in our country. You need to take a tour of Scandinavian countries, Eastern European countries, and Asian countries and observe the cultures which are getting public education right.

        1. Keep living on the pipe dream — Does the names Steve Jobs and Michael Dell ring a bell???

          Both educational ‘regime’ drop outs as well as full slew of others. Isn’t it this same party crying on about education performance that cries on about being valueless in society after “graduation”? Do you really believe “public education” was what launched the industrial revolution? There is no boundaries to such bigoted arrogance.

  3. “Both elevate money over accomplishment. Both are ways of cutting in line.”

    You can’t privately fund education (or anything really) and not consider it bribery by that logic.

    1. Are the colleges pressing charges? If not, why is the government involved and what crime was committed? Is this worse than a $ million donation, or alumnus Daddy?

      If the colleges don’t cry fraud, stay the f out of this!

  4. I love the fact that Stanford has a sailing team. Probably a dressage program too. (Remember Ann Romney?)

    1. You really are a vile little man aren’t you.

    2. I was on the sailing team at my state school; we raced 14 foot dinghies on the cheap and drank a lot of cheap beer. But if you want to see heavy-hitting opulence, look no further than:

      https://www.usna.edu/Sailing/vost/index.php

      “Traditionally, midshipmen also race to Bermuda each summer as part of the Professional Development Training Program”

      They also go to local events in Annapolis and push around anyone sailing less than about $2MM worth of yacht.

      1. Future naval officers learning to sail?

        CRAZY!

        1. They’re going to need it when AOC bans all fossil fuels and nuclear energy.

          1. those darn sails get in the way of aircraft landing but thats okay

            1. Seamenship is important to ship officer’s understanding of ship movements. Teamwork too.

              But yeah, endless jokes.

              1. Solar powered fighter jets? Because all wars will be fought during the daytime in the future (and probably need to go into winter quarters to for land troops). So basically progress means regression.

                1. +1 Beavis

                2. Uh, they’re called “submarines”.

              2. Need a lot of seamen on the poop deck after all. Maybe the occasional Swallow.

      2. What was cheap beer back then? I have had a weird wish to find Haffenreffer Malt liquor somewhere again; the prime choice for brake work back when I was so young and stupid I felt beer was what you HAD to drink to work on a car. Maybe it was disk brakes that changed that – maybe not…

  5. Unfortunately, colleges and universities routinely prioritize factors other than academic ability when making admissions decisions. Athletic considerations matter far too much, as do legacy connections. And of course, donating a new wing to the university’s hospital or library is a good way to make sure your kid gets a second look.

    Why is any of this unfortunate?

    1. That is a really good question. If letting an idiot son or daughter or two into your school gets you millions of dollars in return, why wouldn’t you do it?

      1. If you know that revenue stream is going to consume no academic resources, if anything they should be seen as subsidizing another kid’s education. Let in another scholarship kid (that’s good PR) and leave a seat open in class for HIM, and you all come out even (or ahead when room, board, books, and bullshit fees are factored in).

      1. Why isn’t it “fair”? And who gives a shit if it isn’t?

        1. Why isn’t it “fair”? And who gives a shit if it isn’t?

          Because the administrators and state officials sold it as a fair contest. Not saying it is, but the people claiming it shouldn’t be didn’t dream up this idea that dirt poor people should just get into Harvard for no reason.

          1. “Because the administrators and state officials sold it as a fair contest”

            Did they? I’d like to examine that assertion.

            1. Did they? I’d like to examine that assertion.

              Well, for the two main tests offered by the College Entrance Examination Board I suggest you look over the annual Fairness Report for one and the Test Security and Fairness policies for the other.

              I freely admit that they likely don’t make claims of fairness outside the examination purview, that doesn’t change the fact that they’re arguably knowingly profiting off of the idea of ‘fairness’ in a fundamentally unfair process.

              1. “I freely admit that they likely don’t make claims of fairness outside the examination purview, that doesn’t change the fact that they’re arguably knowingly profiting off of the idea of ‘fairness’ in a fundamentally unfair process.”

                That’s a bit different than “the administrators and state officials sold it as a fair contest” isn’t it? I don’t think anyone thinks it is fair nor do they have any reason to. I don’t recall a time when anyone ever did.

                1. That’s a bit different than “the administrators and state officials sold it as a fair contest” isn’t it?

                  Normally, the sort of thing a jury would decide unless you had a law like the 14A effectively preventing it.

                2. “That’s a bit different than ‘the administrators and state officials sold it as a fair contest’ isn’t it? I don’t think anyone thinks it is fair nor do they have any reason to. I don’t recall a time when anyone ever did.”

                  I sure do.

                  Here’s an example: http://strib.mn/2XTwmzC

                  (Apparently the system is SO meritocratic that completion of a degree eclipses what people choose to do with their lives after graduation.)

                  I’m pretty sure that I could find college administrators and legislators implying the same in transcripts of legislative budget debates, and failing that I can certainly find it in Op-Ed pieces.

        2. Because why do they have rich parents and I don’t?

          1. Because their parents have all of their chomosones and yours didn’t. Sometimes nature isn’t fair.

        3. If public money is spent on it, then it should be equal access to the public based on merit not wealth.

          1. Goodbye college football and basketball.

            Not that that is a bad thing.

      2. Life’s not fair. Maybe college is the first time a lot of people learn taht.

        There’s an argument to be made that the honest students who get in to the top schools benefit from the bribery, too, provided that the bribery stays parasitic and doesn’t take over the whole school.

        The travesty is that some smarter people aren’t offered spots, so they end up going to slightly less competitive schools where the bribery is slightly less beneficial. It’s a vicious process where you need both some brains and some money. As it turns out, Team Full House lacked the requisite brain power to carry out the bribery effectively!

        1. Isn’t the libertarian position that the market should set the price on education? You want to pay $500k for entrance to USC, doesn’t that help the budget in admitting those with better test scores on the cheap? Doesn’t admitting spoiled brats increase diversity? USC is a private-public hybrid, one would think they’d just take the money and run (rather than needing convoluted bribery schemes).

          The rumored penalty (up to 20 years in prison) sounds excessive. It’s being discussed as a zero sum game, but in truth no one probably lost out on an educational opportunity. Schools always find room for one more.

          1. The problem here is that they did not bribe the school, they bribed an employee of the school to commit fraud. And sent the bribe through the US Postal Service, and tried to claim it as a charitable contribution.

            1. And the school employee is a state employee, I think.

            2. If the employee committed fraud, then a crime. If the employee merely propagandized for the kid, then tough shit. That’s politics at college.

        2. “Life’s not fair. Maybe college is the first time a lot of people learn taht.”

          From the various “grievance” and “victims” organizations, I’m afraid they *aren’t* learning that. It will come as a surprise later.

          1. Let’s not forget the majority of the massive rise in anti-semitic harassment is happening on the campuses of liberal arts colleges. Largely due to all the divest israel/pro Palestine student groups popping up on these campuses stalking and harassing members of those campuses Jewish groups.

            All this really does is reinforce the notion liberals are truly the pieces of shit we think they are

    2. The real burning question is…

      Doesn’t this story disprove rev hihntard’s notion that people on the right are the ones lacking college education?

      Here hihnny, hihnny, hihnny (makes chook noises with mouth) here hihnny, hihnny, hihnny

      1. Or mostly that the people on the right are taking business, engineering, or some other useful field. Incidentally, these are fields where the students have to study, so they lack time for extensive social agitation.

        1. +10

          That and some were not raised to waste their parents money.

    3. Because the taxpayers fund these institutions purportedly for the purpose of “education”, not faux credentials, which *undermine* the supposed purpose.

  6. Make government involvement in education and tuition illegal at all levels of government. Only direct financial assistance (cash/voucher) at the state and local levels for those who qualify should be allowed. And let the market do its thing. #ConstitutionalAmendment

  7. If we are going to continue to publicly fund higher education, taxpayers might rightly ask whether institutions that receive federal dollars should be permitted to privilege the wealthy, the donor class, the athletes (both faux and actual), and certain racial groups

    If Drumpf’s son-in-law really did have his father buy him a spot at Harvard, that suggests there is indeed something wrong with the admissions process. However, we absolutely cannot eliminate race-conscious admissions. Affirmative action is necessary both to achieve a critical mass of black and brown students ? which enhances the learning environment for everyone ? and to compensate for the obvious white supremacist bias of standardized testing.

    1. And we all know what happens when you reach critical mass.

      1. Something about spilling seed?

    2. Wow, I totally love the self-deprecating “it must be wrong because Trump did it” caricature of your TDS. Unfortunately, it doesn’t stop you from genuflecting at the now-defunct pseudo-benefits of affirmative action. Almost there. B+ for effort.

  8. I keep looking for where in the constitution the federal government is empowered to spend money on education and I can’t find it. Just get rid of all government involvement and this is no longer a ‘scandal’.

    It’s also not really much of a scandal as we all know you can get your kid into any college with a big enough ‘donation’. The outrage here is that these amounts were much less, ALMOST within reach of the typical middle class person. If I give 20 Mil to fund a new “Science Center” no one blinks an eye that somehow my below average kid got accepted. Make it $100K and now suddenly it’s a scandal.

    1. Just get rid of all government involvement and this is no longer a ‘scandal’.

      It would still be fraud and still be a crime. So yes, there would still be a scandal.

      1. Fraud against whom?

        1. The universities to start with. As I understand it, this wasn’t a case of universities letting people in in exchange for donations. This was actual bribery of individuals employed by the universities and testing companies. The schools can have whatever admission policies they want. But this is a bit beyond that.

          1. Bingo.

            Bureaucrats engage in fraud when they use the power entrusted to them by institutions contrary to the terms on which that power was granted.

          2. If the Universities press charges, then yes this should be tried as a crime. If the U’s do not, then no crime. No victim, no crime.

    2. That the $100K went personally to the men’s tennis coach sort of prompts “scandal.” I guess buying $100K of furniture for the dean of admissions isn’t overt enough. Just as long as it isn’t a cloth bag with a screen printed dollar sign.

      1. Just as long as it isn’t a cloth bag with a screen printed dollar sign.

        The man’s a fucking dean at an ivy league school, not some hobo! Stacked bills in a leather briefcase or GTFO.

        1. Cloth bags with dollar signs was good enough for the Monopoly guy!

    3. General welfare clause. I’m not saying it’s right, but that’s where just about all Congressional spending is permitted.

      1. And the feds don’t actually regulate education. They just hand out a lot of money with a lot of strings attached. If you don’t want their money, you don’t have to play by their rules.

        1. Long live Hillsdale College.

    4. Paying the school to let junior in is not a crime. Paying an employee to commit fraud so junior will get in is (or may be) a crime.

  9. Robby, what evil thing did the moon do that you want to inflict college admissions on it?

    You want to ‘fix’ college, eliminate all tuition loans, require either having a paying full time job for three consecutive years, or starting and running a business that is profitable for three consecutive years.
    That way the student understands the real world, and has a few bucks to pay for tuition.
    Back that up with a law that companies cannot require “a degree” as a qualification for application. If they can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a specific degree provides specific job knowledge, they can require that one degree for that one job, but no generic “degree required”.

    1. You could solve 90% of what you are talking about by eliminating the disparate impact test and allow employers to give IQ or general skills tests again. The only reason employers started requiring degrees for every job is because the disparate impact test deprived them of any other means to judge an applicants intelligence.

      1. Too late:

        The woke corporation: how campus madness entered the workplace
        Government is often vulnerable to forms of political madness. But what’s new is the behavior of corporates. The infection often enters the system via their HR departments, whose staff now parrot the theoretical gobbledegook that originated in trendy university departments ? gender studies, queer studies, whiteness studies etc. They have convinced themselves it is their moral duty to eliminate ‘white privilege’. And so off they go, zealously spreading the gospel of wokeness. The accountancy firm KPMG used to content itself with giving money to charities working with disadvantaged children, but not any more. It is currently advertising for an ‘Inclusion, Diversity and Social Equality Manager’. That’s right, ‘social equality’ ? an odd priority for a company that advises firms on how to minimize their tax burden.

        1. And those corporations are big enough to be able to waste a lot of money on that nonsense and still survive. So, so much for the market solving the problem. Moreover, even if it did and the corporations died, we would likely be in worse shape as the economy went with them. You can’t have a good economy when your population contains a high percentage of Progressive woke morons who destroy any organization they infect.

          1. They would rather rule in Hell than serve in Heaven.

            1. They would rather complain that Heaven is in fact Hell, and that it would be different if only the right people were in charge.

          2. The first giant discrimination lawsuit someone wins will be the end of that shit.

        2. The wokeness Gospel empowers apparatchiks to suck money from institutions.

      2. This is just BS. Disparate impact is not illegal. Legally, it is merely evidence of POTENTIAL discrimination – which is exactly what it actually is. The problem is that the ‘business necessity’ defense to that disparate impact ends up with a legal/bureaucratic hurdle which forces businesses into making decisions that satisfy bureaucrats/courts rather than making decisions that are merely legitimately/reasonably business-related.

        Getting rid of the disparate impact test merely means that one form of signalling will replace a different form of signalling — and you are insisting that the new form of signalling should be ‘subsidized’ by the court system (via its acts of denying standing for anyone to challenge that while also protecting the limited liability of those who do that) where the existing form of signalling shouldn’t be ‘subsidized’ (via too much emphasis on ‘higher education’).

        The best sentence in this article is It doesn’t actually benefit society to subsidize a signaling mechanism if there’s little relevant skill-gaining along the way. It just punishes everybody who, for whatever reason, doesn’t have access to the right hoops..

        1. “It doesn’t actually benefit society to subsidize a signaling mechanism ”

          But it does benefit those who control the signaling mechanism.

  10. Jade, for instance, gained admission after submitting a photo implying she was a talented coxswain on the crew team. She was not.

    But she is free to try out for the role of coxswain on my team.

    1. No radical individualist would be part of a team. Purest collectivism, regardless of whether it’s voluntary or not.

      1. I’ll make an exception in her case.

          1. She is 18. I heard it on talk radio.

    2. Jade saw “cox” and figured she’s had so much experience with them, she could fake it if anyone asked.

      1. Seriously, the girl is not that pretty and is obviously pretty stupid.

        What are you gonna do, gag her and put a bag over her head?

        1. Kennedy was on last night saying that Olivia Jade Laughlin was the latest O.J. to embarrass U.S.C.

          1. At least the first OJ was an actual athlete.

            1. It’s funny being old enough to remember when OJ was a superstar.

              About the same time Bruce Jenner was winning a gold medal.

              1. It’s funny… as a white kid growing up in LA at the time, it never occurred to me that OJ was black. Just another God of Football. Same color as Johnny Unitas and Jack Snow.

  11. The left is trying to say there is no meritocracy, so confiscate wealth. They are ignoring that there is no meritocracy, so no leftist can point to the right piece of paper from the right institution as a claim to power.

    Between this, and quotas, the middle class of flyover land is being squeezed out of the signal that admits one to “our betters”.

    1. The apparatchik ruling class is increasingly hereditary, all the way through the Deep State.

  12. There’s a division between academics and athletics. Shouldn’t athletics be part of the academics – a sound mind in a sound body?

    1. Tell Hawking that.

      1. Ouch, well, that’s where reasonable accommodation comes in, isn’t it?

      2. He was a coxswain at Oxford.

        1. So no, he wasn’t actually pulling the oar. Does that still make him a jock?

          1. So no, he wasn’t actually pulling the oar. Does that still make him a jock?

            Jesus Fucking Christ people! He didn’t come out of his Mom’s vagina in a wheelchair. Also, it turns out Lou Gehrig might’ve also played some baseball at some point even if his theories on black hole physics were absolute shit.

            1. Actually Gehrig has a pretty good take on string theory for his time.

  13. I’m disappointed that the right wing (e.g. Reason and Fox News) are both buying into the college application scam hysteria. The problem is not ‘fraud’ but the fact that it is not a free market. Parents should be able to pay to get their kids accepted. This is the perfect solution, because then a few rich kids would basically fund the education for hundreds of others. Then everyone would be happy, except the socialists who want government to control everything, and have mapped out exactly who they need to stab in the back to gain control of the state machinery.

    1. Schools could do that. They don’t because allowing too many idiot sons in the school devalues their brand. In a sense, it is the schools who committed the fraud here by pretending they admit on merit when in fact admit on bribes.

      1. +100

        Alumni should start suing these ‘elite’ colleges for devaluing their education status.

        As you say, students who got in on merit, were told one thing about how their overpriced educations would be seen by the working world. Turns out these colleges are letting in lying dipshit kids.

      2. Wrong because they can simply set limits on the number of ‘idiot sons’ they accept. Now you’ll probably say that then people will resort to underhanded bribes like in this case. Well you’d be wrong. Why? Human nature. Think about it.

        The real reason they don’t do this is because of wealth-shaming. However again, the people doing this are actually the wealthy socialist do-gooders whose motivation isn’t compassion or equality, but power. #capitalistpride #richlivesmatter

        1. Wrong. Schools are loath to admit that they admit people based on their parents money. It damages their brand, the value of their degrees and hurts them in recruiting top students which in turn hurts their ranking.

          You have no idea how this works.

          1. If they sold 100 slots for $200k each, they would make $20 million/year. They would pay for tons of scholarships and would easily justify itself. Stop wealth shaming. Stop being a socialist. Maybe comment on vox or slate.

            1. But eventually its like when government tries squeezing subsidized housing into new urban developments. Eventually people realize “why am i paying 1200$ a month for this apartment when the guy across the hall is only paying half that and gets free utilities?” And they find somewhere new to live.

              Eventually the rich people look for something more and more prestigious and these schools become to appear 2nd rate

          2. A significant percentage of applicants realize that admission to these top-tier schools may or may not lead to a better education, but that is most assuredly increases their chance of making connections and improving prospects in a non-academic matter. Hence, it may be true for those seeking such connections that the more wealthy privileged undeserving students allowed to matriculate, the better. And yes, she is welcome to matriculate at my institution for higher learning anytime she pleases.

        2. Why? Human nature. Think about it.

          lol, I love how you lecture about human nature right after you assume that the school will only engage in a moderate amount of bribery that will be reasonable to everyone. Because institutions that engage in bribery are known for their restraint and everyone else will be super understanding about it.

          1. Hamilton charges $500/ticket but no one is questioning their ‘restraint’. People pay the money. It’s called ‘free market’. What the hell happened to Reason? I’ve gone through the looking glass.

            1. I question the stupidity of a $500 ticket to Hamilton, so I don’t buy them.

            2. But your college scenario isn’t like Hamilton. In Hamilton, every single ticket is 500$. What your saying about the colleges is charge a select few ultra rich kids 500$ and then let everyone else in to the show for less money. That devalues the brand to the ones who paid more.

      3. The Administration is of course complicit in the fraud against the purported policies of the institution, and so complicit in the fraud against the federal government for the funds they receive.

    2. So what is the point of money if you can’t buy things for your kids. Like a college-ish education or at least that they had two years at USC or some other sort of prestigious tertiary education outlet?

      1. The real question is why they paid $500,000 for a girl who doesn’t want to go to class. She could actually just start going to college football games and parties without submitting a fraudulent school application. She’d get the college experience without the expense of going to college.

        Clearly her parents wanted her to get an education, but the girl herself has to want it.

        1. Did her parents want her to get an education or did they want the prestige of a daughter with a degree (who cares in what) from USC? Bloomberg has a great editorial on grade inflation and pass everyone mentality and how this has contributed to this crisis. Quillette has another great opinion piece on how the growth in administration and “Social Justice” pushed by aforesaid administers (most of which took education administration from education schools) and how that has cheapened degrees.

          1. Cheapened the value of a degree, because God knows tuition hasn’t gone down.

    3. Robby is not known for being on the right of anything (wing or otherwise).

    4. Wealth buys access. That is already what occurs. Harvard is famous for that. And other schools too. But when it becomes too obvious the finger pointing begins, and the shocked, “oh my how horrible….”
      I laughed when this story came out. Laughed because these fools got caught. Not anything new under the sun though…

  14. You’re supposed to fund, say, a new library. That’s how you buy your kid’s way in.

    1. That’s the right way to do it, if you’re gonna do it at all.

    2. Rodney Dangerfield funded an entire business school to get into college.

      1. His extracurricular work as Rapping Rodney left much to be desired though.

    3. But payoffs to coaches and test takers is cheaper than a library.

  15. In the left’s mind, the whole purpose of college is supposed to be to integration, and there’s no way they’ll let rich people subvert that and get away with it. The only people who are supposed to get preferential treatment are minorities and the non-white poor.

    P.S. Elizabeth Warren’s people are probably on the phone to all the important news outlets furiously begging them to stop covering this story. The last issue she wants for 2020 is a story about white people running an end around racial preferences.

    1. LOL. Good point about Lizzie.

    2. She is in the unique situation of not only being in the I-can-buy-people-off rich camp, while also having taken advantage of affirmative action to gain admission while being a “privileged” white. How do the pure SJW’s back her with a straight face? She couldn’t want this story to go away faster!

      1. She’s a woman, so…

    3. “In the left’s mind, the whole purpose of college is supposed to be to integration, and there’s no way they’ll let rich people subvert that and get away with it. ”

      The purpose of college is to gate keep unbelievers out of institutional power and make the ruling class hereditary.

      How can you mention Warren’s fraud in the comment and still talk like the Left gives a damn about the principles they purport to hold?

      “Diversity” is a way to filter whites, and thereby tilt admissions toward demographics that support the ruling apparatchiks.

      Follow the power. All the Left’s “principles” are rhetoric to achieve power.

  16. Some employers dont even check references, so why would college admissions be expected to check when one of their own was conspiring to commit fraud?

    1. More generally, the apparatchik class is best understood as a host of maggots feeding on the flesh of institutions.

      Not only do they have no incentive to police each other, they have every incentive *not* to police each other as they gorge. They have a shared interest in a lack of accountability.

      Pournelle’s Iron Law of Bureaucracy:
      In any bureaucracy, the people devoted to the benefit of the bureaucracy itself always get in control and those dedicated to the goals the bureaucracy is supposed to accomplish have less and less influence, and sometimes are eliminated entirely.

  17. “Unfortunately, colleges and universities routinely prioritize factors other than academic ability when making admissions decisions.”

    Also staffing decisions, right Fuaxcohantus?

  18. Like, what’s the point of going to college if not to get high and laid?

    1. You’re living in the 90s, man. College is one place where any guy should not get laid.

      1. Without video evidence

      2. I’d have to ask permission to touch her bosoms?

        1. Dude, you have to ask permission to even talk to women now.

          That pussy is so far up on a pedestal that women think they are winning some war of the sexes, that only they are fighting.

          Men are just trying to get laid.

          1. Asking permission for sex is sexual assault.

  19. But but but once the Great New Deal becomes law, about 20 mins > the Cortex girl becomes POTUS, all college and that might include university, will be free. And fair. So let’s get behind the Deal and stop this travesty. Besides we need and I mean need cute babes with hot MILF mothers to hit on.

  20. I’ll have to read “The Case Against Education”. The 50% of us who pay federal income taxes are all looking forward to student loan forgiveness for the 50% who do not pay feds. Come on… a Masters in Puppetry is the path to income equality, upward mobility and unlimited wealth.

  21. I think this is effing hilarious. As far as larger significance goes, I don’t think it means anything other than that rich people wildly overestimate the value of going to a big-name school.

    (And I totally agree that government should not be subsidizing college attendance, but this scandal seems to be unrelated to that important issue.)

    1. I agree. If this scandal shows anything, it’s how the value of a college education has been degraded significantly over the decades.

      1. I think we’ve also seen what a college degree is change. It’s less a means of training academics and researchers in techniques specific to those fields and more of semi-required continuation of standard education.

          1. Yup. College undergrads are now entering the workforce with barely a level of knowledge that high schoolers used to have access to.

            1. But the problem is certainly not lack of access. In addition to what you can download for free (including at a library computer if you really have no internet), you can buy textbooks by Enrico Fermi or Erwin Schrodinger for under $20 on Amazon. You can get Discourses on Livy, The Spirit of Laws and Wealth of Nations for free on Project Gutenberg, and if you’re dyslexic, you can get free audio versions of much of the PG library.

    2. ” I don’t think it means anything other than that rich people wildly overestimate the value of going to a big-name school.”

      Not really. Success in the apparatchik class is by credentialing, connections, and signaling that you’re part of the parasitic class.

  22. how is this a thing? elitists gotta elite

    1. All other federal crime has been eradicated, so the Feds had to take down Bill Macy’s wife.

  23. Where’s Clingin’ Kirkland in all of this? Nothing about our betters and their elite schools?

  24. All this bribery and chicanery, and not one person had to put out?

    1. As far as we know.

    2. Aunt Becky will certainly be offering some favors to prosecutors.

  25. submitting a photo implying she was a talented coxswain on the crew team

    Just what defines a “talented” coxswain, and what would constitute photographic evidence of that talent?

  26. Seriously. This site claiming to be libertarian needs to end.

    What crime are these people charged with, especially at the Federal Level. Essentially, because this case was brought by the US Government, the charges are use of interstate mail and telecommunications and use of the banking system to transmit funds for the purpose of committing a crime

    Notice that no federal crime in terms of fraud is being brought. The only federal level crime is use of the mails/phones/banking system.

    Here is what should have happened. The US AG’s should have notified the state AG’s and let the states charge these people with actual crimes of defrauding the state through bribery of officials of the colleges and such. Federalism at work. The only real crimes committed were at a state level.

    1. Sorry

      Typed to fast. end of first para should have read for the purpose of committing a state level crime, not a federal crime.

  27. Seems that targeting the parents is missing the real power brokers here. And every single rich/famous/powerful person ever has had to play this game, lest their progeny be humiliated into attending an ugggh….public school.

  28. Employers aren’t allowed to discriminate on the basis of SAT scores because disparate impact. College does this for them.

  29. The author’s question about the value of university degrees probably depends on what you are looking at. Land grant universities have added value, especially in agriculture and engineering. Today we produce far more food on far less land then we we’re even 25 years ago. At the end of World War 2 about 50% of the population worked directly on the farm/ranch. Today it is less than 1%. Some of this was mechanization (a good portion), some was private industry (but even that is usually paired with public institution) but a lot of it was because of education and research being done at the Land Grant Universities.

    1. Agreed. Also, the U.S. places too little value on trade schools. My Swiss brother-in-law got the vocational equivalent of an electrical engineering degree. Here trade school is scoffed at as inferior to a B.A/B.S but he was hired into a nearly six figure job with the power company operating a hydroelectric dam. I’m sure that the real engineers still look down on the trade school guys, but the market doesn’t.

      1. Actually, most of us engineers view technicians and skilled trades as different than, not less than.

        1. Couldn’t agree more!

        2. I suppose I could have put that differently.

      2. I 100% agree that Trade Schools should make a return. It’s a negative elitism that getting a College Degree is considered essential to being a good person almost in our society.

        1. That and the whole “must have a college degree” lie has made Lefty academia rich.

          1. Not all of academia is lefty. STEM and Business schools in particular. I’d say that most of my information tech professors and peers trended libertarian or even conservative.

            1. We all know how academia is NOT Lefty leaning Eric.

              Yeah, endless examples to show how much of a lying troll that you are.

              1. Based upon your silly retort, I’m guessing that the only thing you know about “academia” LC is what you’ve read about on right-wing websites?

                1. While I make no guess as to whether LC1789 has a college degree, it’s a certainty that he’s uneducated.

                  1. So your that kind of troll, insults rather than actually countering an argument and self implying greater knowledge or intelligence then those your criticizing. This really doesn’t demonstrate true intelligence but I’m sure it makes you feel good about yourself. In my experience those who are most smug tend to not actually have any reason to be smug.b

      3. “My Swiss brother-in-law got the vocational equivalent of an electrical engineering degree.”

        I have an Austrian relative who did the same thing. He worked at Siemens and lived very well, although I don’t know how much they paid him because it’s considered untactful there to ask.

      4. Engineers with bachelors and masters degrees get much higher starting salaries than technicians from trade schools in the U.S. However, the technicians do get overtime. +1 there should be more and better trade schools in the U.S. Employers have to lead in that charge.

  30. “His two main strategies were bribing test-taking officials so that they would give his clients more time to take the SAT or ACT”

    Actually, that is NOT what they did. What they did is FAR more widespread: They got a doctor to give them a letter that stated they met the standards for “learning disabled”/”learning impaired” which requires extra time or other “accommodations for disability” be given at every level. These kids have probably been getting extra time since kindergarten using that scam.

    1. And now they’re stupid. Great job parents!

      1. This could be the most brilliant insight regarding the whole affair. +10000

      2. “And now they’re stupid.”

        Or just scared for their lives… The parents had to be pretty crazy to do this, since it made their kids uninsurable until the ACA passed. It still prevents them from emigrating to some countries and makes them a pariah on the dating scene.

        Some parents do this because special ed. frees them from having to help with their kids’ homework. They go to school and say ‘My kid can’t handle this!’ and the school makes an accommodation to eliminate homework. Parents’ problem solved, kid’s long-term problem amplified 1000x.

        1. Every parent believes that they live in Lake Wobegon and that their children are above average.

    2. ‘ What they did is FAR more widespread: They got a doctor to give them a letter that stated they met the standards for “learning disabled”/”learning impaired” which requires extra time or other “accommodations for disability” be given at every level ‘

      Yep. Getting ahead is just a matter of the willingness to play the game.

      If you’re one of those old fashioned types who consider this “cheating”, and so refrain from playing, you should and will be relegated to a Red State backwater. The apparatchik class wants to keep you away from their fraud.

      Fauxcahontas played. If the Left actually meant any of their piffle about the moral imperative “affirmative action”, they would have run her out of town on a rail.

      Instead, she’s a darling and contender. She’s in on the con. So they know she’s one of theirs. And she got away with it. So she’s good at it. She’s got what it takes!

      Much like Hillary, *successful* public corruption is an asset, not a liability.

  31. “public funding of higher education is therefore a waste: It doesn’t actually benefit society to subsidize a signaling mechanism if there’s little relevant skill-gaining along the way. It just punishes everybody who, for whatever reason, doesn’t have access to the right hoops.”

    Yes

  32. I came here to say two things. One, that I am trying so very hard to care about this event but it’s a struggle. Two, this specific post’s comments thread turned out to be exactly what I was expecting.

  33. “As Frank Bruni wrote in The New York Times, “It may be legal to pledge $2.5 million to Harvard just as your son is applying?which is what Jared Kushner’s father did for him”

    Like no one before Kushner got his kid into Harvard by way of a timely contribution.

    1. Fellow actuary!

  34. “Jade, for instance, gained admission after submitting a photo implying she was a talented coxswain on the crew team.”

    Yeh, totes believable. Have you seen rowers?

    1. Rowers? I thought she was swaining cox.

      1. My bad. I got confused. Happens a lot.

        Still.

        Does she look line one?

  35. I’m troubled by this new trend where people don’t see such stories as bad.

    Up here, we have people excusing politicians attempting to go above the rule of law ‘to save jobs’ in pressuring a justice minister to do something that favours the government. In this case, I’m reading about ‘what’s the big deal? It’s just bribery’.

    I fear we’ve lost the plot. Our moral and intellectual compass is spinning wrong.

    If you can’t see the problem with these stories, you’re broken.

  36. I’m not sure I get the reasoning. He’s saying we should de-fund all public colleges and universities. Because that will guarantee that rich kids are not advantaged over poor kids? Many college degrees (science, engineering, medicine, nursing, business to some degree, law, even English if it’s taught properly) are actually useful as preparation for employment and not just “signaling”. If we want encourage any kind of “meritocracy”, then public colleges that are within financial reach of poor and middle class kids are useful. Employers are not going to stop requiring college degrees if you defund public colleges and universities. They’ll just have more reason to not hire people that can’t afford private schools.

    Eliminating the kind of bare-faced cheating exposed here is good for both private and public colleges.

    1. “Many college degrees (science, engineering, medicine, nursing, business to some degree, law, even English if it’s taught properly) are actually useful as preparation for employment and not just “signaling”.”

      Caplan’s argument in his book is that even STEM programs often require students to take a lot of expensive ‘filler’ for the benefit of the institution rather than for students or society. That doesn’t help college affordability.

      I’ve also seen secretarial positions with Americorps that required applicants to be college graduates or active students.

  37. “It may be legal to pledge $2.5 million to Harvard just as your son is applying?which is what Jared Kushner’s father did for him?and illegal to bribe a coach to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars,but how much of a difference is there, really? Both elevate money over accomplishment. Both are ways of cutting in line.”

    The former is at least in the open, the pledge is announced publicly and paid knowing that universities tend to be able to find a spot for the kid of a big donor, which is not usually taking a spot away from someone else, they’re extra spots made up just for that purpose–and the scam is known to all. The kid’s degree, if he gets one, will be tainted always as a result.

    The later is done in secret, and negatively impacts other students, because a “real” spot was bribed away.

    What’s the difference between lobbying politicians and bribing them?

    1. So many liberals implicated, Bruni had to find some way to get Trump. He likes his job at NYT, for God’s sake.

  38. I disagree with Caplan. In college, I learned a lot of skills (researching, problem-solving, writing, etc.) that I use to this day. My current career didn’t exist when I was in college. That said, I was a science major with a liberal arts minor, and did have a very comprehensive education.

  39. just before I looked at the paycheck four $6755, I accept that my friend could realey making money in there spare time online.. there friend brother haz done this less than 22 months and resently cleard the morgage on their appartment and purchased a great new Acura. I went here,

  40. just before I looked at the paycheck four $6755, I accept that my friend could realey making money in there spare time online.. there friend brother haz done this less than 22 months and resently cleard the morgage on their appartment and purchased a great new Acura. I went here,

  41. It’s good for people to scrutinize education at the college level.

    But never forget the rot starts in K and goes to 12.

    I write a lot about problems in K-12 and na?vely urged colleges to protect themselves by helping public schools do better. Like I said, na?ve. American public schools have been in planned decline for 75 years. The colleges pretended not to notice. They looked the other way as our school system methodically created 50 million functional illiterates, for starters.

    Everybody seems to be in on this game. Unions, foundations, government agencies, and even the great universities.

    The only solution is that every citizen learns more about how the schools were debased and then fights back.

    1. Not to sound like I’m supportive of the educational system status quo but, in my life experience, homelife was the most influential element of childhood learning.

      There are too many parents and non-parents who aren’t guiding their children to education and educational opportunities.

      Even the elites as in this case. They just bribe them into a “good” school.

  42. Wow, she looks like more like Lori Laughlin’s crack whore mother than her daughter. Damn.

    1. Swaining all those cox does that to a girl.

  43. These people are not doing their kids any favors.

    The opposite. This is only harming them.

    1. Don’t handicap your children by making their lives easy.
      Robert A. Heinlein

      1. Aye.

        For me there was a point as a young man. Did not know what to do next.

        I found Harry Browne who wrote the short letter, Gift for my daughter.

        Something clicked.

        Nobody owes you anything. Not love, friendship, income, nothing. Once you know that life becomes better.

        I am older now. That was the best advice I ever had.

        Another poet wrote “the love you take is equal to the love you make”

        Out.

  44. “Indeed, athletic administrative bloat appears to be a significant contributing factor to the success of this scam. Many of the bribe-takers were coaches, and it’s fairly worrying they have so much sway over the admissions process. One downside of forcing universities to hire a bunch of administrators?something federal guidance has encouraged for decades?is that there are more potential targets for Singer’s schemes.”

    Pournelle’s Iron Law of Bureaucracy:
    In any bureaucracy, the people devoted to the benefit of the bureaucracy itself always get in control and those dedicated to the goals the bureaucracy is supposed to accomplish have less and less influence, and sometimes are eliminated entirely.

  45. I’ve always wondered what would happen if the Big 4 accounting firms in accounting simply dropped their requirement for a 4 year degree, and simply required someone pass the CPA or some other certification program that they agreed was sufficient. If I was E&Y, I’d rather hire an 18 kid out of HS, pay him $15/hr for a two year internship where he/she went through an internal training program. After 2 years they could sit for the certification program and if they passed, they’d be hired as associates at full salary. You could weed out the slackers cheaply, and once hired as full associates they actually know the job and can take off and make them money. In the meantime, the kids actually make a small amount of money in their internship and don’t go $100K in debt. The only thing they miss out on is getting drunk and laid for 4 years, but you can get drunk and laid for a lot less than $100K

    1. Don’t forget it was the Big 8 not all that long ago. The drop to four severly damaged the public trust in accounting firms.

      Yes but, without that degree, they’d be stuck at associate level for a lifetime and likely never able to move outside of the audit world.

      The standard demand for application for any finance position above clerk – private, government, public firms – these days where I live is “MBA, CPA”. And, there are plenty of those where I live and more coming online every day.

      The latest crop of CPA candiates that our audit firm brings in in the last six or seven years is scary. Absolutely clueless!

      What’s more interesting to me as someone who worked in these areas for more than 40 years is how few hiring managers and HR people even know what a CPA is. They make all kinds of assumptions about it way beyond the license to render an opinion of the accounting of the agency.

  46. Same thing with engineering or computer science. If Microsoft and Oracle announced they no longer cared if someone had a BS in computer science, but just had to pass a coding test. Or if IBM, Intel and TI all indicated they didn’t need a BS in Engr. but just wanted evidence that they passed a certification test. The kids get internships out of HS and actually learn the trade, the companies get cheap labor and can weed out the crappy ones more cheaply, and the entire house of cards that is today’s higher education comes crashing down.

    It would just take someone challenging the assumption that a college education is needed.

    1. The truth is, it is entirely doable. There is ZERO reason that a tradesmen type career track wouldn’t work fine with things like accounting or programming.

      What it would really take was a company big enough to “change the game” to do it if it were ever to take off. That said, even a smaller company could potentially do well in the market by doing things along these lines, at least if they’re saving on labor costs.

      I know the whole “boot camp” model for different types of computer related stuff is taking off. That’s a good thing, as it is more along these lines. Somebody doesn’t really NEED to be able to dig really deep for a lot of entry level jobs anyway, as long as they can do a certain type of coding competently they’re good to go.

  47. Start working at home with Google! It’s by-far the best job I’ve had. Last Wednesday I got a brand new BMW since getting a check for $6474 this – 4 weeks past. I began this 8-months ago and immediately was bringing home at least $77 per hour. I work through this link, go to tech tab for work detail.

    +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+…………….. http://www.Just4Work.com

  48. This will always be viable until the presence of fake students hurts the school’s brand.

  49. YES! Federal student loans should be eradicated. Also Bryan Caplan is a hero.

  50. Why couldn’t Olivia Jade get in the old fashioned way: putting out for the admissions director?

    Or have mom do it; that worked for Forrest Gump.

  51. “The best remedy to this problem might be to admit that college is, to some degree, a scam.”

    HEY LOOK! More EFFECTS of socialized education in this country.

  52. I earned $9000 last month by working online just for 7 to 8 hours on my laptop and this was so easy that i myself could not believe before working on this site. GBd If You too want to earn such a big money then come?2019 news
    Try it, you won’t regret it!?..

    SEE HERE http://www.Theprocoin.com

  53. I do dislike the ignorant “we don’t need college” vibe that comes out of the far right at times like this. Reason definitely should not promote it. Sure, some degrees are impractical and a waste of time. But it is dangerously ignorant to think we can effectively train millions of Americans in mathematics, science, and engineering without a college framework. We have the best schools in the world! People come from all over the world, especially Asia, to study our technical majors. It is just the lazy Americans who fill up the know nothing degrees and then talk about how all they did was party. I studied engineering and worked my ass off! And yes I used what I learned in college later, and it would have been difficult, but not impossible, to acquire those skills on my own.

    1. Ya, very much this.

      Everyone certainly doesn’t need college and the slacker high school student who will probably be useless wherever they go will likely also be useless and party in college, get a liberal arts degree or communications, and waste everyone’s money and time. Hopefully get laid a good bit? That kid would be better served in a focused trade they have interest in, which they can save a ton of student debt and also make a good living. And they wouldn’t develop this idea that your 20’s are only for partying and fucking, you go to a trade you work to learn what you are doing.

      Conversely, some things still require or at least benefit from the college framework. Could you follow an engineer around for a few years and learn his trade? Maybe, depending on the type of engineer, and only if you are bright and self motivated enough to study the fundamental concepts on your own and you pick things up quickly. But many would fail this way. Far more efficient to have them learn the physics/math fundamentals in a college setting before they are ready.

  54. There is much in what Soave says, but he goes too far. Education in STEM subjects attracts students who want to learn something — if they don’t, they don’t stay around long. And students who are interested in Graduate or professional schools tend to study hard, because otherwise they are not going to make it there. And our graduate schools — at least in the STEM subjects and the “hard” humanities (e.g. not women’s studies) as well as law schools and medical schools regularly turn out student who learn to be good doctors and lawyers. Soave’s persuasive allegation that for many students, education is mere credentialing does not apply to curricula where the student is expected to know something.

  55. on Saturday I got a gorgeous Ariel Atom after earning $6292 this ? four weeks past, after lot of struggels Google, Yahoo, Facebook proffessionals have been revealed the way and cope with gape for increase home income in suffcient free time.You can make $9o an hour working from home easily??. VIST THIS SITE RIGHT HERE
    >>=====>>>> http://xurl.es/onlywork

  56. Dammit Robby, this was the best time for alt-text. AND YOU LET US DOWN.

  57. AOC is the epitome of what’s wrong with college admissions.

    She got in as a member of an “underrepresented” tribe.

    She graduated unable to conjure up a meaningful sentence in English.

    Must I say more?

  58. I earned $9000 last month by working online just for 7 to 8 hours on my laptop and this was so easy that i myself could not believe before working on this site. GBd If You too want to earn such a big money then come?2019 news
    Try it, you won’t regret it!?..

    SEE HERE http://www.Aprocoin.com

  59. You should be confident in yourself, and define the path you must take. I’m also on the way there
    run 3

  60. Earning in the modern life is not as difficult as it is thought to be. God has made man for comfort then why we are so stressed. We are giving you the solution of your problems. Come and join us here on just go to home TECH tab at this site and start a fair income bussiness

    HERE? ? http://Www.Theprocoin.com

  61. https: // www . theonion . com / 50 – charged – in – college – admissions – bribing – scandal – 1833271346 -> “That’s not right. Those kids took debt away from someone who really deserves it.” =P

  62. Jeez, if I had teenagers thinking about college, I’d pay them not to go. What a waste and the expense is not worth it. You can learn liberalism/Marxism from a cheapie web site for free.

  63. Yeah, you can’t have a good economy when your population contains a high percentage of Progressive woke morons who destroy any organization they infect.

  64. “His two main strategies were bribing test-taking officials so that they would give his clients more time to take the SAT or ACT”

    What’s funny is all he had to do is get some quack to certify the kid as “learning-impaired” whether true or not, and extra time is guaranteed. Happens literally every day. Heck, he could also increased their allowances with SSI “crazy money”.

  65. I had a hard time getting into College and now I’m trying to get good grades because I don’t want to disappoint my parents. Yes, I use some tricks, like many students nowadays. When I have difficulties with academic tasks I go to the site https://papersmart.net to get research paper writing assistance from professionals.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.