colleges

Making Community College 'Free' Will Harm Serious Students

A well-intentioned plan is one of the worst ideas in the governor's new budget given the real-world effect it will have on California students.

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It took nearly a dozen years after graduating from college to pay off the student debt I accumulated to get my degree—and that was in the days when tuition to a private university was around $5,000 a year including room and board. I've been through the college-shopping process with three daughters and have looked at asking prices of nearly $50,000 a year at some universities, so I understand the importance of affordability. It's depressing thinking of kids getting their start in life with college loans the size of mortgages.

Given that reality, it's also easy to understand Gov. Gavin Newsom's budget proposal that would provide California residents with a "free" second year of community college along with the provision of additional Cal Grant funding for parents who are struggling to put their children through college. This is well intentioned, but is one of the worst ideas in the governor's new budget given the real-world effect it will have on California students.

The idea of a free college education goes back to California's earliest days. As recently as 1960, the Master Plan for Higher Education reaffirmed "the long established principle that state colleges and the University of California shall be free to all residents of the state." Shortly after that, the state university systems began charging tuition—and prices have soared as demand has outstripped supply and the legislature cut back on subsidies. As a matter of policy, it's a good idea for people to pay for the things they use. If you want an education, you need to pay for it.

Even with a tuition-based system, the University of California and California State University systems are overburdened given that they offer a better deal than most private alternatives. There's been progress, but it can still take six years to get a degree at a Cal State campus. Many students who cannot get the classes they need at "impacted" campuses.

In all aspects of life, the price mechanism is the best way to assure the right balance of supply and demand. If, say, the government mandated that car dealers slash the price of new cars by 50 percent, buyers theoretically would be able to get a cheaper car—but they'd take a number and wait a long time to actually get one.

Fortunately, California has an incredible system of 115 community colleges. Students who want a good education without saddling themselves with debt can get those first two years of courses inexpensively before finishing their degree at a college or university. In 2017, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law that provided free tuition to community colleges for state residents who were attending college on a full-time basis and first-time students. They only had to pay some ancillary fees. Newsom's plan would do the same for that second year. Advocates point to a "skills gap"—the need for Californians to get a better education to fill the needs of the work place.

Community college already is dirt cheap, at $46 a credit. Making it free will only assure that people who aren't particularly serious about getting an education will take up space in sought-after classes, thus making it tougher for others to get into their preferred classes. This sounds harsh, but people unwilling to invest $1,100 a year in their own education perhaps ought to find something else to do. There is nothing like spending one's own money to force people to take the coursework seriously.

There are many ways to come up with that relatively small amount and the state already waives fees for the poorest students. And adding additional student aid through Cal Grants will help some people pay for four-year universities, but one of the reasons that college tuition has soared well beyond inflation – and beyond the prices of most consumer goods—is that the aid itself is inflationary.

Back to the car analogy. The average transaction price for a new vehicle has topped $36,000. If the government decided that cars are so important that it was going to provide a $10,000 subsidy for their purchase, you could guess what would happen. Prices would climb given that buyers would have a lot more money to use as a down payment.

The same principle is at work at universities. Tuition has soared and so have debt levels. Easy government loan money has kept universities from making tough spending choices. Unfortunately, it's hard to break out of that spiral. Universities cost a lot and students who want to attend need to find a way to pay. More debt becomes an easy short-term answer.

The community college system remains the blow-off valve—a way to enable Californians to get a quality education without amassing debt or further burdening the state university systems. It sounds counterintuitive, but making those colleges "free" will only make it tougher on the people that this proposal is supposed to help.

This column was first published by the Orange County Register.

Steven Greenhut is Western region director for the R Street Institute. He was a Register editorial writer from 1998-2009. Write to him at sgreenhut@rstreet.org.

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  1. It will also reduce quality because no one will have the right to demand it. It will just be a glorified high school. And the teachers will stop every 20 minutes to check in with the class to find out if she triggered anyone’s anxiety/compulsion disorders. And slow down if anyone seems upset or distracted. Nothing will get done. The should be spending the money on high school to reduce class sizes from 40 to 25. That way the students would actually be prepared to learn something.

    1. When I was in the Navy, my ship went to Japan, and some nisei chief started a Japanese language class for the trip over. Good intentions and all, but every time someone new started attending, back to page 1. I don’t think we ever got out of the first chapter.

      What schools really need is to be completely privatized. If the statists insist on government financing, well, use vouchers. But privatize very last school so parents and kids can actually find the school they want, or get some subsidy for teaching at home.

  2. Making it free will only assure that people who aren’t particularly serious about getting an education will take up space in sought-after classes, thus making it tougher for others to get into their preferred classes.
    There will also be more demand for the remedial classes that drain resources from the college level courses.

    1. I would say, in any normal situation, that such a result would cause people to question “Why are remedial classes required after 12 years of expensive schooling from highly-qualified teachers?”, but the public school teachers have been getting away with it for decades and it’s become accepted. Students exiting high school uneducated is their own fault, or their parents’ fault, or the fault of the legislature to provide some unspecified but presumably vast amount of funding.

      From the observable precedents, the most absolutely assured result of this policy will be: more administrators.

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  4. After my freshman sabbatical I used online enrollment to earn government-mandates semester hours in history and government. Even full time tuition was less than $1000 a year. The Dilbert suggestion that online classes be offered free or cheap would eliminate the excuses that lead youngsters into a life of helpless parasitism and voting for looter candidates. That excuse-elimination might turn out to be less of an inconvenience than Greenhut’s idea that the world owes everyone the same raw deal he had to cope with.

  5. In Europe college is free or highly subsidized. However, you have to test into them. If you are not a serious student , you can’t get in. Students are “tracked” from a relatively young age.

    In the US, no one wants to engage in ever telling someone they totally suck as a student. So we end up sending people to college that have no business being there. There is nothing wrong with not going to college and finding a trade that a person would be good at.

    1. Yup. That is one of the best things about the system in some European countries, especially Germany. IIRC it is at something like 14 that they more or less “have a talk” with you, and you either go on the academic track, or you go the trade track. You obviously still get plenty more normal education of the 3 Rs on the trade track, but they don’t waste your time trying to teach you completely irrelevant advanced math you suck at anyway etc.

      We very much need to bring this sort of thing to the USA. Skilled trade jobs are not able to be filled in the US today, and many of them pay BETTER than many low end white collar type jobs.

      1. We used to when I went to school. Woodshop, metalshop, drafting classes, all that taught you how to measure, cut and build things. Do high schools even still have these classes?

        1. They ended when the shop teacher severed the only finger he had left.

        2. My school wanted more males students to do home economics. So they offered a class to guys called bachelor living. Same class.

        3. I went to two high schools in the early 2000s. The first in a good sized suburban town still had all the traditional shop classes. Metal, wood, auto, etc. Then we moved to a smaller town. That school had eliminated all their shop classes because they had to decide between a beefed up computer lab/computer classes or shop, and they chose computer stuff. Which is fine and well, but I was pissed I didn’t get to do shop classes at that school. I don’t know if bigger schools still have that stuff nowadays or not.

      2. Yep. Totally agree.

        Skilled trades are valuable and working with your hands is very rewarding on a psychic level. I am an engineer, which is a good job and has its own internal rewards for me, but I love working with my hands. I would be completely satisfied being a blacksmith, for example. Watching a skilled person working with their hands is a beautiful thing.

      3. I wish there were more tradesmen around. Getting any work done on the house is a fucking nightmare. Everything works on Island Time without the tropical paradise. It takes literally months to get a job started.

      4. The reason that works in Germany is because they tailor their entire trade profile to protect the Mittelstand. Those are the companies that hire the ‘trade track’ students – usually starting with apprenticeships combined with school. Those companies think longer term so are willing to make the investment into training their workforce to meet their specific needs. They can think longer-term because they are able to focus on narrow narrow niches and are able to get the financing that allows that to continue (they don’t need to think ‘IPO’ nor do they need the equity/option component to pay employees) and the country maintains the trade surplus that allows for surplus production in that niche to be exported. Those sorts of things also allow those companies to spread out geographically (rather than concentrate in order to gain some network effect on the hiring side) which also gives them a local advantage in working with the local school to combine apprenticeships/schooling.

        Can it happen in the US? Yeah – but it really would mean upending EVERYTHING about the way the US economy developed in the industrial era. We chose the ‘mass production’ and scale route – and that choice now drives the way we even think about the issue now.

        1. Oh, good, JFree makes a fool of himself, but one more time!

          JFree|1.25.19 @ 1:50PM|#
          The reason that works in Germany is because they tailor their entire trade profile to protect the Mittelstand. Those are the companies that hire the ‘trade track’ students – usually starting with apprenticeships combined with school. Those companies think longer term so are willing to make the investment into training their workforce to meet their specific needs.”
          Bullshit. They are protected from M/W issues and they are subsidized for taking on apprentices:
          “This study evaluates the Apprenticeship Bonus, a subsidy to employers for hiring additional apprentices introduced by the German Federal Parliament in July 2008. Between 2008 and 2010, almost 48,000 apprenticeships were subsidised”.
          https://whatworksgrowth.org/resources/how-to
          -evaluate-apprenticeships-apprenticeship-
          bonus-in-germany-statistical/

          1. “They can think longer-term because they are able to focus on narrow narrow niches and are able to get the financing that allows that to continue (they don’t need to think ‘IPO’ nor do they need the equity/option component to pay employees) and the country maintains the trade surplus that allows for surplus production in that niche to be exported. Those sorts of things also allow those companies to spread out geographically (rather than concentrate in order to gain some network effect on the hiring side) which also gives them a local advantage in working with the local school to combine apprenticeships/schooling.”
            A pile of unsupported claims, as expected from JFree. Do you have one cite to support that bullshit? I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest it’s lefty crap minus an support at all.

            “Can it happen in the US? Yeah – but it really would mean upending EVERYTHING about the way the US economy developed in the industrial era. We chose the ‘mass production’ and scale route – and that choice now drives the way we even think about the issue now.”
            Yep, lefty ignoramuses like JFree are more than willing to overturn the US model in the hopes some EURO-centric replacement might somehow be better.
            That’s because JFree is a lefty ignoramus!
            Peddle your bullshit to imbeciles like yourself; no one else buys your lies.

            1. No surprise you’re completely incapable of actually reading for comprehension.

    2. But wait!! What if the testing results in an imperfectly proportional racial mix?? Or lower numbers of lgbtq+1 in certain fields?? Or not enough women test into certain subjects??

      WHAT THEN, ALT-RIGHTIES??? HOW WILL YOU DEAL WITH THAT CRISIS???*

      *-j/k, of COURSE we’ll have to weight the test results to get the mix necessary to break the evil tyranny of so-called ‘meritocracy’. Or patriarchy. Or ‘late capitalism’. Or whatever.

      1. Because there’s nothing worse than having all those competent white and Asian males doing jobs properly that some chick or ethnic minority could be doing a worse job at!

    3. In the US, no one wants to engage in ever telling someone they totally suck as a student.

      You can and should do that in real college. You absolutely cannot do that in a community college, although you should. A real college weeds out shit students in some of the freshman classes. In community college, there’s no weeding out. The purpose of the college is to never give up on anyone, no matter how fucking hopeless they are. It creates some really frustrating situations.

      1. The purpose of the college is to never give up on taking anyone’s money

        FTFY

      2. One of the big problems with universities is that they largely HAVE given up on weeding out the morons… Because EVERYBODY deserves a chance to get a useless, expensive degree from a uni!

        Not to mention all the affirmative action people they let in… I don’t think I would ever be okay with having a female doctor, or a non white/Asian/Jewish doctor… Because all those other groups get let in when they aren’t up to snuff just to fill diversity quotas… And I really don’t feel like putting my life in the hands of a diversity hire. But that is the fucked up world we’re living in today 🙁

    4. “In the US, no one wants to engage in ever telling someone they totally suck as a student.”

      I went to college after high school because- well, that’s what you did. I was a good student but had no motivation for being there and one day, one of my professors pulled me aside and told me I needed to figure out if I really wanted to be in college or not. I decided not, and quit. Went out and got a job based on experience from shop class in high school. Today, I’m debt-free, own my own home and have a decent chunk put aside for retirement. Bottom line- no, you don’t need a college degree.

    5. “In Europe college is free or highly subsidized.”

      This is NOT a good thing. Forcing people who do not go to college to pay for your slot in college is greedy and evil.

      1. ^+1. Subsidizing anything leads to more of it than the market demands.

    6. This assumes that all people are created equal. They are not. Research has demonstrated that many kids struggle with BIOLOGICAL blockers to education, such as dyslexia or innumeracy, as well as ADHD, fibromyalgia with the associated “fibro fog”, and other barriers to education. These students may be very hard working but still have lower grades. It does not mean they do not deserve a chance — and all biological barriers to education do not have diagnoses (medicine is not always caught up with life), but kids still struggle with them all the same. Your policy would have the result of having the government provide opportunity based on SUPERIOR GENETICS, which is the worst kind of dystopian future. Kids like this need more chances, not fewer.

  6. Instead of making college free, why not give everyone a $5 million saving account, a nice house, and a car.

    That way instead of going to school, which is way dull, we can get to the good stuff right away about the rewards of an education.

    This message will be approved by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez when she gets back from shopping

    1. AOC weighed in on the issue. She says the Super Premium Life package including everything you mentioned and HealthCare, is only available to official elite Party members.

    2. But then Lizzie “Hold Ma Beer” Warren will wealth tax that 5 million at 70%.

      1. What Elizabeth Warren has proposed is an actual wealth tax – just like that noted communist country that is like kryptonite to the world’s ultrawealthy (Switzerland).

        There are a lot of really dumb things about her SPECIFIC proposal (like the notion that 200 basis points – or 300 basis points for billionaires – is remotely workable).

        But because libertarians are completely stuck on stupid and seem incapable of actually dealing with the real world, the sort of wealth tax that Switzerland DOES have (50 basis points – which can also then enable a top income tax rate of 12% and a SMALLER govt than the US has had since the New Deal) is not going to be proposed as an alternative.

        So we’re going to get the dumb thing implemented instead. And once again, libertarians will render themselves irrelevant

        1. Haven’t yet read it, but given JFree’s idiocy, I’m sure to have a good time calling that fucking ignoramus JFree on his bullshit:

          JFree|1.25.19 @ 4:12PM|#
          “What Elizabeth Warren has proposed is an actual wealth tax – just like that noted communist country that is like kryptonite to the world’s ultrawealthy (Switzerland).”
          Argument from authority, as is typical of those who have no argument. Stuff it up your ass, JFree.

          “There are a lot of really dumb things about her SPECIFIC proposal (like the notion that 200 basis points – or 300 basis points for billionaires – is remotely workable).
          But because libertarians are completely stuck on stupid and seem incapable of actually dealing with the real world, the sort of wealth tax that Switzerland DOES have (50 basis points – which can also then enable a top income tax rate of 12% and a SMALLER govt than the US has had since the New Deal) is not going to be proposed as an alternative.”
          Was there a point there, or were you just hoping to give yourself an ‘out’ after you made an ass of yourself?

          “So we’re going to get the dumb thing implemented instead. And once again, libertarians will render themselves irrelevant.”
          Ans lefty ignoramuses will again proclaim ‘success’ at reducing the prosperity of humanity in general. Are you proud of yourself, in proving you’re such a fucking lefty ignoramus?
          Turns out as expected after reading it…

        2. There’s probably a healthy skepticism that should be leveled towards any type of wealth tax (in fact, it is probably the best argument against the LVT), as “wealth” isn’t well defined until it is converted into cash, and that leaves open endless manipulations to avoid the tax altogether.

          There is also the pernicious affects of having to expose wealth to risk (not a happy place for retirees) or have it whittled down to nothing over time with an overzealous tax, accounting problems, bubbles, etc. Seems like a lot of overhead just to collect revenue.

          But yeah, as most libertarians fail in every conceivable way to promote specific policies that solve anything useful, we will probably get an ugly amalgamation of the worst from Europe implemented in the most WTF way possible.

          Goodtimes.

          1. You’re right about the skepticism. My guess is most wealth tax ideas have been put forward for exactly the reasons Warren is putting hers forward – to punish wealth and steal money to fund ‘better ideas’. That’s just bound to fail and backfire policy-wise. It won’t raise revenue and it will destroy wealth – and there is nothing to even negotiate.

            The Swiss are far more boring and businesslike:

            So you say the purpose of government is to protect property? See we don’t really see it that way since that just means you want everyone else to protect your claim to what is yours and to do so without compensation. So – let’s start negotiating. What is that protection worth to you?

            May be a problem if that conversation is initiated by Three-Fingered Guido swinging a bat (or Fauxcohantas swinging a purse). But Adam Smith was also right – Civil government, so far as it is instituted for the security of property, is in reality instituted for the defense of the rich against the poor, or of those who have some property against those who have none at all.

  7. It’s really very debatable question, I agree that education system needs some reform. But free education is not an answer too. Students really have to spend a lot of their money on appartment, books, writing https://paperleaf.ca/write-my-paper/ and the money you waste on university won’t be covered by your potential salary.

    1. What’s not debatable is the need for remedial grammar lessons for spambots.

  8. The reason that a college degree is so important right now is that many businesses are asking for one as a matter of course, even on jobs that don’t actually require anywhere near that level of learning. It’s likely that it’s “required” as a way of weeding out those who aren’t able or willing to put in the hours associated with full-time employment. That’s not a good reason.
    Also, there used to be a wide variety of jobs, including those in skilled trades where apprenticeship took care of the vocation-specific knowledge and experience. A lot of those formerly on-the-job-training positions don’t seem to work that way anymore.
    The solution isn’t to require an Associates Degree. It’s to reform the vocation structure and expectations to allow qualified people to get positions.
    You’re correct in thinking that a “free” community college degree will cause problems. For years I’ve been recommending to students who are legitimately seeking a college degree that going two years to a community college where the transcript will transfer to a four-year institution is an inexpensive way to get started. If it were “free,” there would be a lot more people attending with no real intention to succeed. That doesn’t create a good environment for those who do. You’d have to have a lot of drive to wade through all the dead weight. In addition, it would probably lead to grade inflation and thus to degradation of the value of the degree with fewer four-year institutions accepting all the credits.

    1. Education is required instead of competency tests because the tests run the risk of disparate impact lawsuits.

      1. I actually read up on the laws about competency tests awhile back because I am a business owner… It’s ridiculous all the weird ins and outs. You can theoretically use them still, but there are a lot of caveats. Any testing you do you must prove has DIRECT impact on doing the job… So like if writing correspondence wasn’t part of the job description, you couldn’t give somebody a test that tested their reading/writing abilities. Stupid stuff like that.

    2. It’s likely that it’s “required” as a way of weeding out those who aren’t able or willing to put in the hours associated with full-time employment.

      Michael Spence won a Nobel Prize for explaining why credentialism happens. Signalling

    3. Employers are lazy. They want to screen resumes with bots, not read resumes manually for people who don’t have a B.S. for a job that doesn’t really require one.

  9. I think you give these sponsors or supporters too much credit. It is not a well-intentioned plan. It is an attempt to buy votes with taxpayer dollars.

  10. Cue community college tuition rising to $20K a year! And standards falling! And dropout rates increasing! It’ll be winning across the board!

  11. We need to stop talking about “free anything”. Nothing is free. Someone has to pay for everything. Colleges have staff, operating expenses and other bills that have to be paid. Free school removes the incentive to work because if you fail it costs you nothing. The most successful students are thise with a stake in the game. As a society we also need to stop pretending every child can go to and succeed in college.

    1. You seem very insightful. I therefore would welcome your opinion concerning a few related points. How much should a third-grader be charged for tuition? For a medical, dental, or vision examination? Should third-grade textbooks be sold to students at laid-in cost, or with an overhead surcharge?

      Thank you.

      1. 1. An amount agreed upon between their parents and their school.
        2. An amount agreed upon between their parents and their physician.
        3. At a cost the market permits, with multiple sources available from which to purchase said books, and to sell them back when the books are no longer needed.

        Keep on clingin’, gecko.

      2. The Rev is dumb enough to focus questions of payment on the kids and not the parents who pay.

      3. Art,

        I like how you assume parents won’t buy those things for the third grader. For you, they won’t. You will force everyone else to pay and make the parents accept whatever you buy, no matter how unwanted and no matter how shitty.

      4. Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland|1.25.19 @ 12:38PM|#
        “You seem very insightful. I therefore would welcome your opinion concerning a few related points.
        Thank you.”

        You got answers, half-educated asshole. Care to respond to them?

  12. Well-intentioned? Which stupid government idea didn’t start as well-intentioned? Get that stupid phrase out of your article!

    Honestly, don’t you think that people on the right think the wall is well-intentioned? You never see that in articles.

    Quit trying to soften the language to prove you really care. It doesn’t matter if you say “well-intentioned”, once the left finds out your against it, they’re going to hate you anyway.

    1. I agree; it isn’t “well-intentioned.” Well intentioned would require the proposers to be paying for the students out of their own pockets, not ours.

  13. what is being purchased at a community college as it is?

    1. Job interviews. Working? That is not the same thing.

  14. There is nothing well intentioned about this. It is also amusing to see people completely missing the point and arguing that it will not be successful.

    It will be entirely successful, and this should be obvious to anyone who realizes what the goal of the program really is – to create more people – both teachers and students – dependent on government.

    It is ever more tiresome to see so many writers at an ostensibly ‘libertarian’ magazine accepting the premises of statist politicians at face value. One Suderman is more than enough.

  15. Stop saying things are well intentioned. There is no evidence of that. Has the left ever applied that standard to Libertarians?

    Well intentioned my ass.

  16. Free? Of course. Why not? What could go wrong?
    MY right is your responsibility. Stop whining, go to work, get some money and pay your dam taxes so I can get some free stuff. Now, if not sooner.

    1. Right on! We need more college educated boobs making more money to pay high taxes to fund my Social Security and its COLAs and the medicare and part D I recieve. The government is starting to tax ME too heavily on these free programs. I need more freebies. otherwise, I’m just going to ask for my Social Security in Lump Sum. . . After all the government claims I earned it – it’s mine! I want to be a trust fund retiree.

  17. Free college will increase the number of people with useless degrees. And the job market for useless people appears to be shrinking. Several media companies recently laid off a bunch of employees, including Chloe Angyal at the Huffington Post who tweeted:

    “If you’re in the market for an opinion editor with a huge and diverse rolodex, or a columnist with 10 years of writing about gender politics (and a literal PhD in romantic comedies) under her belt, talk to me.”

    Now what’s she supposed to do? Start a blog?

    1. There must be a Starbucks or Micky Ds near her.

      1. Everybody knows no self respecting gender studies expert would work at McDonalds! Barista is a FAR more important, rewarding, and classy job.

    2. If that’s really a twitter post from her… Jesus. What a useless cunt. Why can’t we just start lining these people up against walls or giving them helicopter rides? I’m so sick and tired of even having to listen to these damn people run their mouths.

  18. If a high school diploma actually meant something, most people wouldn’t need a college degree. The government that can’t manage to educate kids with 13 years of free school to work with, has no reason to think that another 2 will do the trick.

    1. There’s a program starting near me where high school juniors and seniors will take classes at community college. In the end they get their high school diploma and an associates degree. So, um, ok, why not just do that for everyone and call a high school diploma an “associates degree”?

      1. No doubt the teachers unions will demand a cut of the action and all be deemed adjunct faculty of the local community colleges

      2. I did a limited amount of that in HS. They called it Running Start or whatever. The bonus was that CC credits counted for MORE than HS credits as far as required graduating credits. So I basically knocked out twice as much HS credit in the same amount of time, it was pretty sweet!

  19. Colleges education is already free to mostly free. Almost all the info from a college level class can be found online, on places like you tube, regular books, e-books, or audio books. What’s not free and over price is accreditation which will run up to 300 + per credit even if you teach yourself. And if you doubt this just do a search on teach yourself programing and watch what happens. Hell do it on just about any subject. Their are now very few things that really requires a college any more. Such as getting a medical degree. Even doing genetic engineering can be self taught now.

    1. >>>Their are now very few things that really requires a college any more.

      English? (sorry couldn’t help myself)

  20. Community college already is dirt cheap, at $46 a credit. Making it free will only assure that people who aren’t particularly serious about getting an education will take up space in sought-after classes, thus making it tougher for others to get into their preferred classes.

    ^^THIS^^

    I started at a community college, and even with tuition, you get students who don’t take it seriously. I started straight out of high school, with many others. Most were gone within a few weeks.

  21. If someone thinks they are not worth investing in themselves, they are probably right.

  22. Why not just add two years of community college on to high school, or even four years, so everyone graduates with a bachelors. That seems to be the direction we are heading in.

    1. Dr. Lexus: Don’t worry scro’! There are plenty of ‘tards out there living really kick ass lives. My first wife was ‘tarded. She’s a pilot now.

  23. “Making Community College ‘Free’ Will Harm Serious Students”

    It’s sweet how you think that might matter to those advocating pumping money into their power base.

    1. “A well-intentioned plan”

      Is he 12?

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  26. Community college already is dirt cheap, at $46 a credit.

    Fuuuck, I wish this were true for any of the community colleges even remotely close to me.

  27. Meeting long lost family in Sweden 10 years ago a sly Swede cornered me and ask why not have free tuition for everyone in the US. It would benefit society as a whole to have an educated population as our founding fathers insisted was required to maintain the republic. A compelling argument, perhaps. I did suggest that if a person never worked for anything it would little valued. Whereas, busting your ass to get your desired education could prevent false starts, eliminate idiot courses.
    If true, There are fully 10% of our population not bright enough to do any, ANY job in the army. Great to have them taking up classroom space anywhere. These folks may be better served by having apprenticeship or vocational training.

  28. I don’t think that a free college society will hurt someone, we all value students, because they are our future, during college you will have problems with writing tasks, you can find solutions by clicking on the link, there is a lot of useful information.

  29. Getting a college place is very hard. How justified is this price? Can the Goverment provide children with free education? If students so hard to entry to college, does that mean that they cannot use services like Pro-papers ?

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