Police Solved the Case of the 5-Year-Old with Meth Poisoning, and No, It Wasn't the Halloween Candy

"We are extremely confident that he did not ingest any candy from Trick or Treat that was tainted."

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Candy
Paul Moore / Dreamstime

Braylen Carwell, the 5-year-old boy from Galion, Ohio, who tested positive for meth after trick-or-treating, was not given drug-laced candy by a stranger, as some originally suspected.

Police have arrested Cambray Carwell, the boy's 24-year-old father, and charged him with possession of meth and evidence tampering.

"While we cannot definitively say how the little boy ingested methamphetamine, we are extremely confident that he did not ingest any candy from Trick or Treat that was tainted," said Galion Police Chief Brian Saterfield in a statement.

Earlier reporting about the story made note of the fact that Braylen's parents admitted to being recovering drug addicts. "I'm not covering up the truth," Braylen's mother, Julia Pence, told WBNS.

The case was sad and suspicious from the start. The boy had barely eaten any of his candy, only chomping on some toy vampire teeth, when he started shaking and lost control of his limbs.

His parents, fearing he was having some kind of seizure, rushed him to the hospital. At that point, according to mom, "the left side of his face was just droopy, and then he fell and then he couldn't move his left arm. And he didn't know where he was, he didn't know what he was doing."

Doctors performed a drug test and found meth in Braylen's system. His parents suggested the poisoning was the result of a Halloween prank, but the cops executed a search warrant on the home and discovered drug paraphernalia, pot, and methamphetamine. Dad also had meth in his system.

Thankfully, Braylen is doing fine. "The boy is home, has been attending school and has not shown any lingering effects from the drug," wrote the police in their report.

That is great news. It also means the public doesn't need to worry about tainted Halloween candy. Just like all the other alleged incidents of trick-or-treating-gone-wrong, this poisoning had nothing to do with the holiday. It's still perfectly safe for kids to dress up, go out, and grab some sweets.

Moral of the story: don't meth with Halloween.

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  1. What? No! No! Now I’ve seen everything; whoever saw this one coming?

    1. Mr. Magoo could have seen this one coming.

  2. But it COULD have been from halloween candy!
    We need to outlaw halloween and replace it with a government sponsored and monitored event that glorifies greed and commercialism and cultural appropriation.
    For the children.

    1. We need to outlaw halloween and replace it with a government sponsored and monitored event that glorifies greed and commercialism and cultural appropriation.

      I thought they already did that.

      1. Yeah, it’s called Thanksgiving.

        1. You misspelled Christmas.

          1. Christmas has a long history across many Western nations.
            Thanksgiving was a crony gift to the Turkey and Cranberry industries.

        2. Heh. But I’m thinking of actual Halloween, where towns have decreed that they get to decide when and where trick-or-treating takes place, and even on what day in some cases.

          1. You forgot time of day. Some communities have mandated that trick-or-treating take place during daylight hours.

  3. Well, hopefully they charge the father, and the boy can at least be saved from having a two parent household growing up.

    1. Obviously taking the kid away from his methhead parents is not really going to help him. But fuck them. Their five year old child got into their drugs! He got dosed and had an acute medical emergency and had to go to the hospital! Then they started acting like a bunch of trash lowlifes with the evidence tampering business. Their kid is still their kid but that’s about all I can say on their behalf.

      1. Then they started acting like a bunch of trash lowlifes with the evidence tampering business.

        I doubt that’s when they started.

    2. Leaving the whole drugs debate aside, what do you think should happen when a child gets poisoned because of the actions of a parent?

      1. No idea, I’m just pointing that the grimmest consequence of this event, and the war on drugs et large, is another broken home. It’s a grim story, where a drugged kid turned out to be drugged by a family member rather than a stranger. It’s like if a molested kid turned out to be molested by his mom rather than a stranger, we still have a kid getting molested. We still have a family falling apart.

        I think the likely jail time for the father is not a happy outcome. And particularly if they kid had just gotten into his parents prescription meds, or had just eaten dish soap or something, the consequences would be far different then they will likely be.

        1. No idea, I’m just pointing that the grimmest consequence of this event, and the war on drugs et large, is another broken home.

          Just to be clear, 5-yr.-olds overdosing on meth is your idea of a functioning home? I’m no fan of the drug war but, c’mon, these people would be lying about their meth use even if it were legal. Would you feel better if the kid had shot himself with an unsecured weapon and they hauled Dad off for criminal negligence? How about if he was a cop?

          Hard case, bad law, don’t extrapolate.

          1. Yeah, I’m all for giving parents all the leeway in the world, but if you care more about your habbit than your kids, somebody’s gotta step in. Watch trainspotting a few times.

      2. Criminalizing late term abortions again, I see…

        /sarc

  4. >>>as some originally suspected.

    morons. “some”, the parents, and everyone who tried to ruin Halloween again.

    1. and everyone who tried to ruin Halloween again

      Especially in response to “child poisoned by meth; father says it must have come from Halloween candy and totally not his personal stash.”

      1. sourcing reports once standard.

  5. Trick or spiders-crawling-under-my-skin!

    1. “You’re just handing out half-dissolved sugar pills?”

      “No – those are my teeth – give me those back!”

  6. That is great news. It also means the public doesn’t need to worry about tainted Halloween candy.

    Until next year, when this incident will still be trotted out by alarmists and nannies to point out the dangers of trick-or-treating.

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