Immigration

Despite Trump Endorsement, GOP Immigration Bill Rejected in Landslide House Vote

More than 100 Republicans voted against the GOP's "compromise" bill.

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Abaca Press/Douliery Olivier/Abaca/Sipa USA/Newscom

The House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to reject a Republican immigration bill backed by President Donald Trump.

The bill needed 218 votes to pass. Just 121 representatives voted yes, while 301 voted no, including 112 Republicans. No Democrats supported the bill.

The legislation was widely seen as a compromise bill, as it included elements meant to appease both conservative and moderate Republicans. In addition to allotting $25 billion for construction of Trump's proposed wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, the bill would have limited both legal and illegal immigration. It also would have provided a path to citizenship for beneficiaries of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and ensured that undocumented families caught trying to cross into the U.S. aren't separated.

Although the bill had the official support of the White House, Trump sent mixed signals about whether he really thought it was worth passing. Last week, the president said Republicans were "wasting their time" on the legislation. But in a Wednesday-morning tweet, he backed the bill.

Despite Trump's endorsement, it came as no surprise that the bill failed to make it through the House. The legislation was not expected to garner any support from Democrats, meaning that moderate Republicans and conservatives would have had to come together to ensure its passage. And even if it had passed the House, the bill likely would have died in the Senate.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R–Wis.) said Tuesday that if the legislation failed to pass, Republicans would attempt to propose a new bill focused on family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. But with lawmakers set to return home Thursday for the July recess, a timetable for that legislation is unclear.

It was the second time in recent days that a Republican immigration bill didn't make it through the House. Last week, legislation sponsored by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R–Va.) was shot down in a vote of 193 to 231. That bill was seen as much more conservative than the one lawmakers rejected on Wednesday.

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  1. The bill needed 218 votes to pass. Just 121 representatives voted yes, while 301 voted no, including 112 Republicans. No Democrats supported the bill.

    No offense, but of course no Democrats supported the bill. They didn’t support immigration reform when they had a supermajority, why the fuck would they start caring now?

    Oh, wait, that’s right. They said they care but really that’s just a shiv to jab Republicans with. Obviously, they probably learned this from Republicans during the Obama years. They’re so busy spitting in each others eyes, maybe they won’t get anything done.

    Sounds good to me.

    1. Sadly, it seems that a reasonable, fair, and humane compromise that would be supported by a majority of Americans and also solves the problem will never pass congress.

      The democrats simply have too much of a vested interest in keeping the status quo of an open border, because their goal is to “fundamentally transform” America into a socialist, feudalist, one-party state of the type that predominates everywhere south of the border.

      And no constitution-loving patriotic American in his right mind would ever agree to yet another sucker deal like the one Reagan agreed to where we give citizenship to millions of Marixists and still keep the border wide open so that another 10 million can walk in, and then we’re North Mexico with no hope of keeping a fiscally solvent republic.


      1. And no constitution-loving patriotic American in his right mind would ever agree to yet another sucker deal like the one Reagan agreed to…

        I would not be so sure of that. Amnesty is always the solution, they just need to hold their breath until they get their way. Functionally, it’s the only thing they can do since the solution to the immigration problem involves overwhelmingly popular domestic programs that Democrats are fully aware they can’t cut spending to.

        Democratic priorities are in opposition to one another, but that tends to happen when you use a bunch of balkanized minorities to weld together some semblance of a party.

        1. ” Functionally, it’s the only thing they can do since the solution to the immigration problem involves overwhelmingly popular domestic programs that Democrats are fully aware they can’t cut spending to.”

          The lack of border enforcement involves overwhelmingly popular domestic problems?

          The solution to the immigration problem is to get serious about stopping illegal immigration, including tracking down and expelling the illegal immigrants who already made it here, so that nobody thinks that if they can make it to home base they score.

          Right now, illegal immigrants rationally think, “All I have to do is sneak in, and wait for the next amnesty. Or at least have a kid in America, so that they’ll be reluctant to expel me.” The only thing that will actually solve the illegal immigration problem is convincing them that isn’t so.

          The real reason Congress can’t solve this is that a majority in Congress want continued illegal immigration. They just don’t dare come out an say so.

      2. because their goal is to “fundamentally transform” America into a socialist, feudalist, one-party state of the type that predominates everywhere south of the border.

        Yes we know, because they ‘hate America’ right?

        Team Blue thinks Team Red hates America.
        Team Red thinks Team Blue hates America.

        Perhaps reasonable people should realize that both teams are full of shit.

  2. They only had a supermajority for a few months.

    Many of the issues were not as pressing due to the situation in Central America.

    Bipartisan legislation passed the Senate twice. Republicans never moved it in the house.

    1. Exactly. We should sympathize with Democrats for being consistent liars.

    2. They had a supermajority long enough to rush through a vast unread regulation pile on the American healthcare system, but not enough to keep Obama’s (and their own!) pledges to definitely get immigration fixed.

      Whoops, guess the intentions of Democrats means more than the results of their actions when they could pass whatever they wanted without a single Republican. Even then, I suspect Republicans like Susan Collins would happily help out Democrats today if they wanted to take a whack at it. Republicans under Obama would occasionally put forth good bills they knew had zero chance, even while they usually didn’t bother either. Why would they then, and why would Democrats now?

      Honestly, I think we both know that Democrats don’t have any plan. Their base has mutually exclusive goals, and illegal immigrants don’t vote (or at least not often, right?)

      1. Only in California. And Chicago. Oh and New York.

    3. “Bipartisan legislation passed the Senate twice.”

      The Globalist Uniparty legislation.

  3. How can our country endure when the Republicans can’t even pass a bill that has the President’s all-caps Twitter endorsement?

    1. We’ll endure much better if no one votes for an amnesty bill.

  4. Is this the same GOP that couldn’t get Obamacare repealed after 8 years of swearing they wanted nothing more than the chance to get Obamacare alone in a dark alley and rips its throat out with their bare hands?

    1. It is, and notably they still don’t have the votes to repeal Obamacare. No Democrats plan on jumping ship, of course, since they think the ACA didn’t go far enough. I suspect many of them thought they were signing on to legislation that would directly nationalize hospitals and were disappointed to learn that it merely made healthcare vastly more expensive.

      1. Democrats are waiting for the vote and celebration for universal health care. I hope it is called Obamacare, to acknowledge the former president’s contribution to the progress and to enable that name to roll off all American tongues for the next century.

        1. How is your anime watching going, you best among us?

  5. Well, not terribly surprising. Democrats won’t give Trump a win under any circumstance. And Republicans can’t agree among themselves on what to do. But politically both tribes benefit from the status quo. Which is why we are where we are at.

    1. Is the status quo that bad? There is no room for resolution and compromises just seem to piss people off even more.

      We have been doing the same thing for decades with some variation in degree of enforcement. The economy is doing fine. Unemployment could not be any lower. If this stupid trade war does not get out of hand I think that Americans can navigate through for the foreseeable future.

      Faced with a problem that cannot be solved the only option is to manage it. The Israelis call it “mowing the lawn”.

      This is an emotional issue for a lot of people. It gets worse when we call it a “crisis”. Perhaps if things calm down some meaningful changes can occur.

      1. The status quo is pretty bad for those negatively affected by it.

        1. Nobody has clean hands in this.

          Something Trump knows well. If the negotiation breaks down sometimes you need to walk away and leave it open.

          Personally I am very pro immigration. The government has not fixed it. I see it as more an individual problem than a government one. In some ways similar to gay marriage for example. Advocacy and activism had a place but in the end most people changed their minds on the subject. A lot might not be “for” it but just kinda shrugged and said “OK mazel tov, whatever. I dont care”.

      2. Sure. Blue collar workers not getting a raise in thirty years, and in many industries actually experiencing wage cuts, isn’t a problem at all. Why, most of them probably even voted for Trump, so fuck them, right?

        1. Let them eat their Trump hats.

          1. And that attitude is why Trump is president.

            1. Trump[‘s presidency is explained by vestigial bigotry, structural amplification of yahoo voices, and dysfunction in our shambling backwaters.

              1. If only more of them would watch anime like you!

        2. Wages in general have barely kept up with inflation or have been behind.

          That is true for myself as well. Some of that has been tech driven which makes me able to produce more. So I can produce faster, better, and more product but I just get paid less per product and end up with the same or less in income.

          Even someone without much background in economics like myself can understand why that is normal and expected.

          We can also all understand that wages are just a number. What matters more is what those pieces of paper buy.

          Immigration has nothing to do with that. I compete and cooperate with other people. It matters not to me where they are located or where they are from.

          1. Sure. The law of supply and demand works for everything on the planet except wages. Why, there’s no way that importing millions of unskilled adults could in any way effect the wages of unskilled and young Americans. Come on, think clearly. Now if you just don’t give a shit about poor and or young Americans because you like cheap lawn mowing and babysitting, say so. Be a man and own it. But to suggest that the massive importation of cheap labor doesn’t drive down the cost of labor is bullshit.

            1. I’ll believe DenverJ is a fan of ‘be a man and own it’ when he acknowledges his bigotry.

          2. That’s true for me as well. Heck, I had a better standard of living in my late 20’s than I do now in my 50’s, though my nominal wage is considerably higher. Inflation ate all of that and then some.

            I like a good steak. You know how often I eat steak? Maybe once a year on my birthday. Most days it’s chicken that costs what steak used to, with some pork once in a while.

            And they tell me inflation has been low for a decade or more. Does anyone really believe that? They just started rigging the numbers to keep COLA from kicking in.

  6. Trump’s idea of immigration reform:
    – spend at least $25 billion on his little wall (with “TRUMP” emblazoned on it every mile in tall gold letters)
    – round up all DACA residents, load ’em into cattle cars, and ship them to Mexico
    – send undocumented immigrant child to labor camps, er … summer camps
    – restrict all legal immigration to “desirables”, such as people emigrating from Scandinavia.

    1. And from Slovenia. Very important.

    2. Who’s the new idiot?

    3. “round up all DACA residents, load ’em into cattle cars, and ship them to Mexico”

      If only.

      No, it was an amnesty and reward for breaking immigration law.

  7. GoodLatteII? What kind of American name is that for a bill?

    1. Doubleplus good!

  8. “It also would have provided a path to citizenship for beneficiaries of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals”

    They always had the same path to citizenship that every other foreign national has. Their parents breaking US immigration law should not entitle them to cut in line in front of all other foreign nationals obeying US immigration law.

    Breaking our immigration law should not be *rewarded* with special benefits. If anything, it should have special *punishments*, such as a lifetime ban on applying for or receiving US citizenship.

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